Mayor Sentence Examples

mayor
  • I'm mayor now, until we get around to having an election.

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  • But if the parents wish him to be taught in a private school they must give notice to the mayor of the commune of their intention and the school chosen.

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  • Burton is governed by a mayor, 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • Each mayor, however, sought to supplant the others; the Pippins and Charles Martel succeeded, and their victory was at the same time the victory of Austrasia over Neustria and Burgundy.

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  • The mayor of the palace thus found himself at the head of the commendati, just as he was at the head of the functionaries.

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  • This here's the mayor's office.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • The other was the mayor, a man with a thin sallow face and narrow beard.

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  • Its members will be distinguished by a red ribbon worn across the shoulder, and the mayor of the city will wear a white belt as well.

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors, and has an area of 2751 acres.

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  • She thinks he was even the mayor for a term, way back before the war.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1890, and is governed by a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors.

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  • The French authorities, under whose eyes the massacre was perpetrated, did nothing to prevent or repress it, and the mayor of Marseilles even refused to admit the wounded Italian workmen to the municipal hospital.

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  • It is administered by an elective municipal council with a civil service administrator as mayor.

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  • The mayor is elected for two years and has the powers and authority in criminal cases of a justice of the peace.

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  • Other elective officers are the mayor, city treasurer, city sergeant, commonwealth attorney, city collector, city auditor, sheriff and high constable, elected for four years; and clerks of the various courts elected for eight years.

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  • At any rate, he spoke at Guildhall on Lord Mayor's Day in a worthy manner; admitting that the growth of the German navy was a main factor in British construction, and pointing out that no power was better able to bear the strain or less likely to fail than Great Britain.

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  • In 1835 a mob, composed in part of wealthy and high-standing citizens, attacked a city-building, and dragged Garrison through the streets until the mayor secured his safety by putting him in gaol.

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  • In 1649 he married Dorothy, daughter of Richard Mayor, or Major, of Hursley in Hampshire.

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  • In 1853, Johann Heinrich Dollfus (1800-1887), mayor of the town, founded the "artisans' town" (cite ouvriere) to the north-east of the old town, consisting of about 1 200 model dwellings with public bath-, washand bakehouses, and library.

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  • Tyler thereupon grew insolent, and in the altercation that ensued the rebel leader was killed by the mayor, Sir William Walworth, and John Standwick, one of the king's squires.

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  • In this reign also the abbot appointed the mayor, but from the reign of Edward I.

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  • The corporation was prescriptive, and a hallmote held in 1293 was attended by a mayor and twelve jurats.

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  • Banbury is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • It has its council of notables, forming a sort of oligarchy which, through the medium of a mayor and two subordinates, directs the interior affairs of the community - policing, recruiting, the assignment and collection of taxes, &c. - and has judicial power in less important suits and crimes.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, 4 aldermen and 1 2 councillors.

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  • Queenborough Castle was built about 1361 by Edward III., who named the town after Queen Philippa and made it a free borough, with a governing body of a mayor and two bailiffs.

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  • Charters were granted by subsequent sovereigns down to Charles I., who reincorporated the town under the title of the mayor, jurats, bailiffs and burgesses of Queenborough.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, 6 aldermen, and 18 councillors.

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  • By the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835 a mayor, aldermen and a council replaced the capital burgesses, the older governing body.

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  • At this junction stand the Royal Exchange, the Mansion House (the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London) and the Bank of England, from which this important point in the communications of London is commonly known as " Bank."

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  • In 1902 a Mansion House Conference was convened by the lord mayor and a deputation was appointed which in 1903 pressed the solution of the matter upon the government.

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  • The City Corporation exercises a control over the majority of the London markets, which dates from the close of the 14th century, when dealers were placed under the governance of the mayor and aldermen.

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  • This consists of a Lord Mayor, 26 aldermen and 206 common councilmen, forming the Court of Common Council, which is the principal administrative body.

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  • On April 11, 1582, the lords of the council wrote to the lord mayor to the effect that, as " her Majesty sometimes took delight in those pastimes, it had been thought not unfit, having regard to the season of the year and the clearance of the city from infection, to allow of certain companies of players in London, partly that they might thereby xvi.

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  • When theatres were established the lord mayor took care that they should not be built within the city.

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  • The lord mayor's shows, which had been discontinued for some years, were revived by order of the king in 1609.

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  • On the following lord mayor's day the king witnessed the show in Cheapside and attended the banquet at Guildhall.

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  • The first attempt at a census was in August 1631 when the lord mayor returned the number of mouths in the city of London and Liberties at 130,268, which is only about half the number given above.

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  • From this we learn that the government of the city was in the hands of a mayor and twelve dchevins (skivini); both these names being French, seem for a time to have excluded the Saxon aldermen.

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  • Twelve years later (1205-1206) we learn from another document, preserved in the same volume as the oath, that alii probi homines were associated with the mayor and dchevins to form a body of twenty-four (that is, twelve skivini and an equal number of councillors).

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  • No record has been found of the date when the aldermen became the official advisers of the mayor.

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  • As we do not find any further evidence than the oath of the Commune alluded to of the existence of "dchevins " in London, it is possible that aldermen were elected on the mayor's council under this title.

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  • The aldermen are not mentioned as the colleagues of the mayor until the very end of the 13th century, except in the case of Fitz-Ailwin's Assize of 1189, and this, of course, related specially to the duties of aldermen as heads of the wards of the city.

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  • In March1298-1299letters were sent from " the Mayor and Commune of the City of London " to the municipalities of Bruges, Caen and Cambray.

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  • Although the official form of "The Mayor and Commune " was continued until the end of the 13th century, and it was not until early in the 14th century that the form " Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council " came into existence, there is sufficient evidence to show that the aldermen and common council before that time were acting with the mayor as governors of the city.

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  • When the poll-tax of 1379 was imposed the mayor was assessed as an earl and the aldermen as barons.

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  • After the establishment of the Commune and the appointment of a mayor the sheriffs naturally lost much of their importance, and they became what they are styled in Liber Albus " the Eyes of the Mayor."

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  • In 1383 it was ordained and agreed " that no person shall from henceforth be mayor in the said city if he have not first been sheriff of the said city, to the end that he may be tried in governance and bounty before he attains such estate of the mayoralty."

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  • In 1376 an ordinance was made by the mayor and aldermen, with the assent of the whole commons, to the effect that the companies should select men with whom they were content, and none other should come to the elections of mayors and sheriffs; that the greater companies should not elect more than six, the lesser four and the least two.

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  • The elections in Common Hall were by the whole body of citizens until Edward I.'s reign, citizens were then specially summoned to Common Hall by the mayor.

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  • In Edward IV.'s reign the elections of mayor, sheriffs and other officers and members of parliament were transferred to liverymen.

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  • Various alterations were subsequently made and now the qualification of electors at the election of the corporate offices of lord mayor, sheriffs, chamberlain and minor offices in Common Hall is that of being a liveryman of a livery company and an enrolled freeman of London.

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  • The lord mayor of London has certain very remarkable privileges which have been religiously guarded and must be of great antiquity.

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  • They all prove the remarkable position mayor of Old London, and mark it off from all other cities of modern Europe.

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  • The mayor's position in the city, where he is second only to the king.

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  • The first mayor appointed by the governor was Peter Schuyler (1657-1724).

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  • In any case he does not seem to have remained in Paris, although in the riot of the 1st Prairial some of the insurgents proclaimed him mayor.

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  • Florence is the capital of a province of the same name, and the central government is represented by a prefect (prefetto), while local government is carried on by a mayor (sindaco) Under the Carolingian emperors Tuscany was a March or margraviate, and the marquises became so powerful as to be even a danger to the Empire.

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  • Arnold died in 1274; the last fact recorded of him is that, in this year, he joined in a successful appeal to the king against the illegal grants which had been made by the mayor, Walter Hervey.

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  • In1882-1886he was mayor of the city of Brooklyn, being twice elected on an independent ticket; and by his administration of his office he demonstrated that a rigid "merit" civil-service system was practicable - in September 1884 the first municipal civil-service rules in the United Service were adopted in Brooklyn.

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  • He was prominent among those who brought about the chartering of Greater New York in 1897, and in this year was an unsuccessful candidate, on an independent ticket, for mayor of New York City; in 1900, on a fusion ticket, he was elected mayor and served in 1901-1903.

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  • It was constituted a free borough under the title of the mayor, aldermen and burgesses of Hadleigh.

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  • The town is governed by a municipality (created in 1893) with a mayor and councillors, the large majority being elective.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1882, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, .6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • Questions affecting the interests of the whole Fu come before the Fu-kwai, or prefectural assembly, made up of representatives from both Ku and Gun, and a prefectural council, of which „the governor is president; while matters concerning the city alone are discussed by a Shi-kwai, or municipal assembly, and administered by a municipal council, of which the Shicho or mayor is president.

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  • In at least one case he removed a mayor who had called for state troops.

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  • The former granted some additional exemptions whilst the latter incorporated the town under the title of mayor and burgesses of Marlborough.

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  • The corporation was finally reconstructed in 1835 under the title of a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

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  • In 1609 a charter of incorporation provided for a mayor, recorder, six capital burgesses and seventeen assistants and courts of record and pie powder.

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  • Under the reformed charter granted in 1885 the corporation consists of a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councillors.

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  • He was mayor of his commune, and a member of the council of the Haute-Garonne under the Empire.

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  • He was mayor of Toulouse in 1814-15 and deputy for the Haute-Garonne in the "Chambre Introuvable" of 1815.

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  • See also bibliography in Hubner and Mayor's Lat.

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  • It was governed by a mayor and twelve aldermen, but by 1864 their privileges had become merely nominal, and the corporation was dissolved in 1885 under the Municipal Corporations Act.

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  • In conformity with the passing of the Municipal Corporations Act of 1840 the constitution of the corporation was made to consist of ten aldermen and thirty councillors, under the style and title of " The Mayor, Aldermen, and Burgesses of the Borough of Belfast."

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  • In 1892 Queen Victoria conferred upon the mayor of the city the title of lord mayor, and upon the corporation the name and description of The Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of the city of Belfast."

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  • It centralizes power in a council of five (mayor and four councilmen), nominated at a non-partisan primary and voted for on a non-partisan ticket by the electors of the entire city, ward divisions having been abolished.

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  • The mayor is superintendent of the department of public affairs, and each of the other administrative departments (accounts and finances, public safety, streets and public improvements, and parks and public property) is under the charge of one of the councilmen.

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  • His uncle or great-uncle was Sir Richard Deane, lord mayor of London, 1628-1629.1629.

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  • Thus a mayor is spoken of as "his worship the mayor," or "the worshipful the mayor."

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  • He was mayor of the Loth arrondissement of Paris under the Consulate, and died at Paris on the 27th of October 1800, of small-pox, contracted during a visit to a workshop for the blind which he had founded.

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  • He became king of Neustria in 715, on which occasion he changed his name from Daniel to Chilperic. At first he was a tool in the hands of Ragenfrid, the mayor of the palace.

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  • In all these cities and towns a mayor, council and various officers are elected, and also a police judge in cities of the first class where there is no superior court.

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  • By a law of 1907 cities with a population of 25,000 or more may adopt a commission form of government, with a mayor and four councilmen elected at large on a non-partisan ticket.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • In 1802 Clinton became a member of the United States Senate, but resigned in the following year to become mayor of New York city, an office he held from 1803 to 1807, from 1808 to 1810, and from 1811 to 1815.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, sheriff, senior and junior bailiffs, 13 aldermen, and 39 councillors.

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  • In 1909 there was a recall election at which a mayor was removed and another chosen in his place.

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  • All laws relative to " towns " are applied to " cities " in so far as they are not inconsistent with general or special laws relative to the latter, and the powers of the selectmen are vested in the mayor and aldermen.

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  • The political and commercial centre of the city is the Plaza Mayor, or Plaza de la Constituc16n, on which face the cathedral, national palace, and municipal palace.

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  • The principal business streets runs westward from the Plaza Mayor toward the Alameda, and is known as the Calle de los Plateros (Silversmiths' Street) for two squares, Calle de San Francisco for three squares, and Avenida Juarez along the south side of the Alameda to its junction with the Paseo.

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  • The national palace, also on the Plaza Mayor, has a frontage of 675 ft.

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  • In former times Mexico was overrun with mendicants (pordioseros), vagrants and criminals (rateros), and the " Portales de las Flores " on the east of the Plaza Mayor was a favourite " hunting-ground " for them because of its proximity to the cathedral; but modern conditions have largely reduced this evil.

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  • Under the latter a mayor, recorder, six common councillors, a coroner, six freemen and a common clerk were to constitute the corporation.

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  • In 1784 the vicar of Tintagel, as mayor and only qualified elector, enjoyed the probably unique privilege of returning two members to the House of Commons.

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  • He was associated in practice there with his brother until 1848, and early in 1849 removed to California, settling soon afterward at Marysville, of which place, in 1850, he became the first alcalde or mayor.

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  • From 1890 he was a member of the West Ham town council, being elected mayor in 1917.

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  • In the autumn of 1881 he was nominated by the Democrats for mayor of Buffalo.

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  • As mayor he attracted wide attention by his independence and business-like methods, and under his direction the various departments of the city government were thoroughly reorganized.

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  • In early manhood he left the Democratic party, became a Republican, and as such was elected mayor of Utica in 1884.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1884, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • In cities the mayor is required to appoint a municipal civil service commission, with similar duties; not more than twothirds of the members may be of the same political party.

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  • The town is, governed by a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

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  • The borough is governed by a mayor, six aldermen, and eighteen councillors.

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  • A city of the second class must elect a mayor and twelve councilmen, and its mayor must appoint a police judge, an attorney, a street commissioner and a chief of police.

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  • A city of the third class must elect a mayor, seven councilmen, a treasurer, a health officer, a clerk and an attorney, and its mayor must apoint a marshal, a police justice and as many policemen as the council provides for.

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  • An incorporated town must elect a mayor, five councilmen and a treasurer, and its mayor must appoint a marshal and a clerk.

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  • The ceremonies were attended by the President and Vice-President of the United States, the Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court, and a large number of eminent public men of both parties, who followed the hearse in a solemn procession, preceded by the mayor and other civic authorities, down Broadway.

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  • In a city of the first class, a mayor, two aldermen from each ward, a police judge, and a treasurer who may be ex officio tax-collector are elected, and an attorney, a clerk, a chief of police, an assessor, a street commissioner, a jailer, a surveyor, and, where there is a paid fire department, a chief engineer with one or more assistants, may be appointed by the mayor with the consent of the council.

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  • He was taken from the Federal service in Washington to New York City by a reform mayor and put in charge of the police, because he had shown both physical and moral courage in fighting corruption of all sorts; and the New York police force at that time was thoroughly tainted with corruption, not in its rank and file, but among its superior officers, who used the power in their hands to extort money bribes chiefly from saloonkeepers, liquor-dealers, gamblers and prostitutes.

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  • There he received news of his election as mayor of Bordeaux with a peremptory royal endorsement enjoining residence, and after some time journeyed homewards.

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  • Wallsend was incorporated in 1901, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • Milwaukee is governed under a city charter of 1874, providing the form of city government most common in America, a mayor (elected biennially) and a single board of aldermen.

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  • There are the usual administrative boards whose members are appointed by the mayor, some of them with the approval of the board of aldermen, though the board of school directors is elected by direct popular vote.

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  • Walker's Point, the south side, was annexed as a third ward in 1845, and in 1846 the three wards were incorporated as the city of Milwaukee, of which Solomon Juneau was elected first mayor.

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  • The new corporation consists of a mayor, 26 aldermen and 78 councillors.

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  • The first effective steps toward a city park and boulevard system were taken in 1907, when a board of park commissioners, consisting of three members, was appointed by the mayor.

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The council chooses the city clerk, treasurer and tax receiver, and the mayor appoints the city attorney, police justices, the board of education, the trustees of the public library, and the excise and assessment commissioners, and, subject to the ratification of his choice by the council, the comptroller, auditor and the tax, police, health and fire commissioners.

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  • Associated with these views was a group of deputies from other parts of France, of whom the most notable were Condorcet, Fauchet, Lasource, Isnard, Kersaint, Henri Lariviere, and, above all, Jacques Pierre Brissot, Roland and Petion, elected mayor of Paris in succession to Bailly on the 16th of November 1791.

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  • In the general anarchy Charles succeeded in escaping, defeated the Neustrians at Ambleve, south of Liege, in 716, and at Vincy, near Cambrai, in 717, and forced them to come to terms. In Austrasia he wrested the power from Plectrude, and took the title of mayor of the palace, thus prejudicing the interests of his nephews.

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  • In 71 9 he defeated Ragenfrid, the Neustrian mayor of the palace, at Soissons, and forced him to retreat to Angers.

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  • After the alliance between Charles and Odo on the field of Poitiers, the mayor of the palace left Aquitaine to Odo's son Hunald, who paid homage to him.

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  • In 1387 the duke of Gloucester, uncle of Richard II., assembled in Hornsey Park the forces by the display of which he compelled the king to dismiss his minister de la Pole, earl of Suffolk; and in 1483 the park was the scene of the ceremonious reception of Edward V., under the charge of Richard, duke of Gloucester, by Edmund Shaw, lord mayor of London.

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  • Hornsey was incorporated in 1903 under a mayor, 10 aldermen and 30 councillors.

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  • Elected deputy from Paris to the states-general, he was chosen president of the Third Estate (May 5, 1789), led the famous proceedings in the Tennis Court (June 20), and acted as mayor of Paris (July 15, 1789, to November 16, 1791).

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  • The government of the university is entrusted mainly to a board of nine directors appointed by the mayor.

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  • Ramsgate was incorporated in 1884, and is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • In 1884 it was incorporated by royal charter, under the title of mayor, aldermen and councillors.

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  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1862, is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1871, is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • In the territoires du commandant the mixed commune is presided over by a military officer who fulfils the duties of mayor.

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  • Among numerous later charters one of 1268 confirmed the privilege granted to the burgesses by the bishop of choosing a mayor; another of 1416 re-established his election by the aldermen alone.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 1 0 aldermen and 30 councillors.

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  • In accordance with the general laws each city elects a mayor, a board of aldermen, and a common council in whom is vested the administration of its " fiscal, prudential and municipal affairs "; the mayor presides at the meetings of the board of aldermen, and has a veto on any measure of this body, and no measure can be passed over his veto except by an affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of all the aldermen; each ward elects three selectmen, a moderator and a clerk in whom is vested the charge of elections; the city marshal and assistant marshals are appointed by the mayor and aldermen, but the city clerk and city treasurer are elected by the aldermen and common council in joint session.

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  • He married in January 1562 Anne, daughter of George Barnes, Lord Mayor of London and widow of Alexander Ca rleill, whose son-in-law Christopher Hod desdon was closely associated with maritime and commercial enterprise.

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  • The corporation consists of a lord mayor (this dignity was conferred in 1907), 21 aldermen, and 63 councillors.

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  • The church of St Mary existed at a very early period, but the present building, chiefly of brick, was erected in 1535 by Robert Thorne, a merchant, and Sir George Monoux, lord mayor of London, and has undergone frequent alteration.

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  • The Dublin Port and Docks Board, which was created in 1898 and consists of the mayor and six members of the corporation, with other members representing the trading and shipping interests, undertook considerable works of improvement at the beginning of the 10th century.

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  • The corporation consists of a lord mayor, 20 aldermen and 60 councillors, representing 20 wards.

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  • The lord mayor is clerk of the markets and supervises weights and measures and deals with cases of adulteration.

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  • The city hall, used as municipal offices, has already been mentioned; the official residence of the lord mayor is the Mansion House, Dawson Street.

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  • In 1909 a new city charter was adopted under which the city government is vested in five commissioners (one of whom acts as mayor), each in charge of a city department.

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  • He made a reputation as a parliamentary debater, but lost favour with his constituents who were largely Republican, and only held his seat with the help of Livio Quartaroli, mayor of Forli, and Saffi; when they died his position became untenable and he was not reelected.

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  • The city is governed, under a charter of 1907, by a mayor and four commissioners, who together pass ordinances, appoint nearly all city officers, and generally are responsible for administering the government.

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  • These American corporations had the usual English system of borough government, consisting of a mayor, aldermen and councilmen, who carried out the simple administrative and judicial functions needed br the then small communities.

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  • As a rule, one finds (I) a mayor, elected directly by the voters within the city, who is the head of the administration; (2) adminis- trative officers or boards, some directly elected by the city voters, others nominated by the mayor or chosen by the council; (3) a council or assembly, consisting sometimes of two, but more frequently of one chamber, elected directly by the city voters; and (4) judges, usually elected by the city voters, but sometimes appointed by the state.

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  • The mayor is by far the most important official in the city government.

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  • In many cities he appoints some or all of the heads of the administrative departments, usually with the approval of the council, but in some important cities the mayor has an absolute power of appointment.

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  • The recent tendency has been, however, to decrease the powers of the council and to increase those of the mayor.

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  • In some cities the mayor has received an absolute power of appointment; the departments, especially the boards of health, have large ordinance-making powers; statutes passed by the state legislature determine (excepting the states where cities can make their own charters) the principal lines of municipal policy, and the real control over appropriations and taxes is occasionally found vested in a board of estimate, consisting of the mayor, comptroller (the chief financial officer), and a few other administrative officials.

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  • In 1902 the city of Galveston, in Texas, adopted a new form of municipal government by vesting all powers in a commission of five persons, elected by the citizens on a general ticket, one of whom is mayor and head of the commission, while each of the others has charge of a department of municipal administration.

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  • Some cities also provide in their charters that an official, including the mayor or a member of the council, may be displaced from office if, at a special election held on the demand of a prescribed number of the city voters, he does not receive the largest number of votes cast.

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  • The government is that of all cities of the second class in New York state, with an elective mayor and other important officers and a single-chambered city council.

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  • The government palace, which like the cathedral faces upon the plaza mayor, is generally considered one of the finest specimens of Spanish architecture in Mexico.

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  • The borough incorporated in 1877, is under a mayor, 7 aldermen and 21 councillors.

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  • In the vicinity of Bromley, Bickley is a similar residential township, Hayes Common is a favourite place of excursion, and at Holwood Hill near Keston are remains of a large encampment known as Caesar's Camp. Bromley was incorporated in 1903, and is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • In 1828 he was elected an alderman of Greeneville and in 1830-1834 was mayor.

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  • Of the three parks, Pearson Park was presented by a mayor of that name in 1860, and contains statues of Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort.

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  • The city is governed by a mayor, 16 aldermen and 48 councillors.

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  • In 1381 Edward III., while inspecting former charters, granted that the burgesses might hold the borough with fairs, markets and free customs at a fee-farm of £70, and that every year they might choose a mayor and four bailiffs.

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  • Under the charter of 1903, as amended in 1907, the municipal government consists of a city council, composed of the mayor, four aldermen, elected at large, and eight ward aldermen, all elected for a term of two years, as are the other elective officers; a city attorney, an assessor, a collector, a treasurer, an auditor and judge of the Corporation Court.

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  • Other officers are appointed by the mayor with the confirmation of the council.

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  • He was once more a member of the Connecticut Assembly in 1764-1766, was one of the governor's assistants in 1766-1785, a judge of the Connecticut superior court in 1766-1789, treasurer of Yale College in 1765-1776, a delegate to the Continental Congress in1774-1781and again in 1783-1784, a member of the Connecticut Committee of Safety in1777-1779and in 1782, mayor of New Haven in 1784-1793, a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787 and to the Connecticut Ratification Convention of the same year, and a member of the Federal House of Representatives in 1789-1791 and of the United States Senate in 1791-1793.

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  • Buffalo is governed under an amended city charter of 1896 by which the government is vested in a bicameral city council, and a mayor elected for a term of four years.

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  • The mayor appoints the heads of the principal executive departments (health, civil service, parks, police and fire).

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  • In 1832 Buffalo obtained a city charter, and Dr Ebenezer Johnson (1786-1849) was chosen the first mayor.

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  • Grover Cleveland lived in Buffalo from 1855 until 1884, when he was elected president, and was mayor of Buffalo in 1882, when he was elected governor of New York state.

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  • The city is governed by a mayor, four controllers, and twelve aldermen.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, 7 aldermen and 21 councillors.

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  • Hemel Hempstead is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • A mayor, aldermen and councillors received governing power by a charter of 1898.

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  • A horn with a baldric and the motto "Except the Lord keep the city the watchman waketh but in vain" forms the mayor's badge.

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  • From before the Conquest until the incorporation charter of 1604 Ripon was governed by a wakeman and 12 elders, or aldermen, but in 1604 the title of wakeman was changed to mayor, and 12 aldermen and 24 common councilmen were appointed.

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  • Tradition has dramatized their first meeting into the story given by Cresacre More' - that the two happened to sit opposite each other at the lord mayor's table, that they got into an argument during dinner, and that, in mutual astonishment at each other's wit and readiness, Erasmus exclaimed, " Aut tu es Morus, aut nullus," and the other replied, " Aut tu es Erasmus, aut diabolus !

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  • Nuneaton was incorporated in 1907, and the corporation consists of a mayor, six aldermen and twelve councillors.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, 7 aldermen and 42 councillors.

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  • The municipal corporation consists of a mayor, 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • In 1684 the charters were surrendered, and a new one obtained reserving to the crown power to remove the mayor and alderman, and this one was further modified by James II.

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  • In 1882 he was elected mayor of Kingwood, and the following year went to Chicago, where he was engaged in law practice until 1893.

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  • McClellan for mayor of New York City, who was elected, and two years later reelected.

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  • In 1909 he supported for mayor Judge Gaynor, who was elected.

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  • After graduating in law at the university of Catania, he began his public career in the field of local politics and in 1879 was chosen mayor of his native city.

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  • In 1627 he was elected alderman of Magdeburg, and in 1646 mayor of that city and a magistrate of Brandenburg.

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  • The apparent object of the measure was to deprive the people of Pittsburg temporarily of the privileges of self-government by empowering the governor to appoint a recorder (in 1903 the title of mayor was again assumed) to exercise (until 1903, when the municipal executive should be again chosen by the people) the functions of the mayor, thus removed by the governor under this statute; and this act applied to the other cities of the second class, Allegheny and Scranton, although they had not offended the party managers.

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  • The marriage was arranged by Cardinal Alberoni, with the concurrence of the Princess des Ursins, the Camerara Mayor.

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  • He was chairman of the commission which drafted the charter for Greater New York, and in 1897 was defeated as Republican candidate for mayor of the city.

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1487 by Sir Edmund Shaa or Shaw, lord mayor of London.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1835, and is under a mayor, 16 aldermen and 48 councillors.

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  • It was then granted that the burgesses might elect from among themselves a chief officer, who was first called a mayor in 1296.

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  • The right of the burgesses to his election was, however, lost, and the mayor was always nominated by the lord of the manor.

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  • This arrangement lasted until 1565, when the burgesses put in a claim to their right of election, and it was decided that out of four burgesses nominated by the lord of the manor the jury of the court leet should select the mayor.

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  • The administration of the city became famous after 1897 when Samuel Milton Jones (1846-1904), a manufacturer of oil machinery, was elected mayor by the Republican party; he was re-elected on a non-partisan ticket in 1899, 1901 and 1903, and introduced business methods into the city government.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen, and 36 councillors.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1867, and the corporation consists of a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors.

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  • As Dagobert was yet but a child, he was placed under the authority of the mayor of the palace, Pippin, and Arnulf, bishop of Metz.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, 12 aldermen and 36 councillors.

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  • The mayors of the palace belonging to the Carolingian family were able to keep the throne vacant for long periods of time, and finally, in 751 the mayor Pippin, with the consent of the pope Zacharias, sent King Childeric III.

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  • He had been elected mayor of the ninth arrondissement of Paris in the autumn of 1870, and in March was sent by the same district to the Commune, from which he resigned when he found no reconciliation was possible between the mayors and the Commune.

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  • The town is under a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councillors.

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

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  • The municipal government of the city, and also of South Brisbane, is in the hands of a mayor and ten aldermen; the suburbs are controlled by shire councils and divisional boards.

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  • Its date is disputed, but the town dependent on it seems to have grown up during the 13th century, being first mentioned in 1290, when an inquisition states that the mayor has pesage of wool and cheese.

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  • In 1380-1381 at an inquisition into the liberties of Corfe Castle, the jurors declared that from time immemorial the constable and his steward had held all pleas and amerciaments except those of the mayor's court of Pie Powder, but that the town had judgment by fire, water and combat.

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  • The tenants, or "barons," elected themselves a mayor and coroners, but the constable received the assize of ale.

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  • Elizabeth in 1577 gave exclusive admiralty jurisdiction within the island of Purbeck to Sir Christopher Hatton, and granted the mayor and "barons" of Corfe the rights they enjoyed by prescription and charter and that of not being placed on juries or assizes in matters beyond the island.

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  • It is governed by a mayor and corporation, which, though retained under the Local Government (Ireland) Act of 1898, has practically the status of an urban district council.

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  • He was intendant (mayor) of Charleston, S.C., from 1835 to 1837, and was president of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston railway from 1837 to 5839.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, to aldermen and 60 councillors.

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  • In Wurttemberg, Baden and Hesse-Nassau the system is a compromise between the two; both the town and rural communes have a mayor (Blirgermeister or Schuitheiss, as the case may be) and a Gemeinderat for administrative purposes, the citizens exercising control through a representative Gemeindeausschuss (communal committee).

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  • Pippin and his son Charles Martel, who was mayor of the palace from 717 to 741, renewed the struggle with the Germans and were soon successful in re-establishing the central power which the Merovingian kings had allowed to slip from their grasp. The ducal office was abolished in Thuringia, a series of wars reduced the Alamanni to strict dependence, and both countries were governed by Frankish officials.

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  • During this period the king's mandates were addressed to the bailiffs or to the mayor and bailiffs, and no charter of incorporation appears to have been granted until the reign of James II.

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  • Under the second charter of 1690 the common council consisted of a mayor and eight aldermen and these with a recorder elected the free burgesses.

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  • A mayor of Altrincham is mentioned by name in 1452, but the office probably existed long before this date; it has now for centuries been a purely nominal appointment, the chief duty consisting in the opening of the annual fairs.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1902, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 16 councillors.

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  • A force of 30,000 was to be raised, La Fayette and Bailly, the mayor of Paris, were to be assassinated, and Paris was to be starved into submission by cutting off supplies.

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  • The charter, as amended, provides for a mayor elected for two years and a common council of two members from each ward elected for two years.

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  • A charter of incorporation was granted in 1558 under which the common council was to consist of a mayor and 8 chief burgesses.

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  • In 1574 a charter of incorporation was granted, providing for a mayor and 11 burgesses, also for a market on Wednesdays and two fairs.

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  • West Looe continued to be administered under this charter until 1869, when the death of the mayor deprived the council of its only surviving member and elector.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 9 aldermen, and 27 councillors.

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  • Under the provisions of the charter of 1908 the people elect a mayor, city treasurer, city comptroller, and judges of the municipal court, each for a term of two years.

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  • A board of public works, board of park commissioners, board of fire and water commissioners, a board of civil service, a city counsellor, a city auditor, a city assessor, a purchasing agent, and subordinate officers, are appointed by the mayor, without confirmation by the common council.

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  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1896, is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The provinces are further divided into districts, each of which is under a mamur, who in his turn supervises and controls the omda, mayor or head-man, of each village in his district.

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  • Jarrow was incorporated in 1875, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The corporation was to consist of a mayor, 8 aldermen and 12 capital burgesses.

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  • On his return in March 1834 he was elected mayor of Toronto.

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  • During his year of office, the heroism with which he worked hand in hand with his old enemy, Bishop Strachan, in fighting an attack of cholera, did not prevent him from winning much unpopularity by his officiousness, and in 1835 he was not re-elected either as mayor or alderman.

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  • In the 13th century, as part of the barony of Halton, the manor passed to Henry, earl of Lincoln, who by a charter dated 1282 declared the town a free borough, with a gild merchant and numerous privileges, including power to elect a mayor, a catchpole and an aletaster.

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  • He also guaranteed a certain measure of independence to the nobles of Burgundy, giving them the option of having a special mayor of the palace, or of dispensing with that officer.

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  • Southend was incorporated a municipal borough in 1894, under a mayor, 6 aldermen, and 18 councillors; in 1910 these numbers were increased to 8 aldermen and 24 councillors.

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  • Berwick-upon-Tweed is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • Until the beginning of the 14th century Berwick was one of the four royal boroughs of Scotland, and although it possesses no charter granted before that time, an inquisition taken in Edward III.'s reign shows that it was governed by a mayor and bailiffs in the reign of Alexander III., who granted the town to the said mayor and the commonalty for an annual rent.

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  • The burgesses were given the right to elect annually their mayor, who with the commonalty should elect four bailiffs.

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  • Five years later, in 1307, the mayor and burgesses received another charter, granting them their town with all things that belonged to it in the time of Alexander III., for a fee-farm rent of 500 marks, which was granted back to them in 1313 to help towards enclosing their town with a wall.

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  • While the war with Scotland dragged on through the early years of the reign of Edward II., the fortification of Berwick was a matter of importance, and in 1317 the mayor and bailiffs undertook to defend it for the yearly sum of 6000 marks; but in the following year, "owing to their default," the Scots entered and occupied it in spite of a truce between the two kingdoms. After Edward III.

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  • In 1694 William and Mary made Walden a free borough, with a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 town councillors.

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  • Having adopted medicine as his profession, he settled in 1869 in Montmartre; and after the revolution of 1870 he had become sufficiently well known to be nominated mayor of the 18th arrondissement of Paris (Montmartre) - an unruly district over which it was a difficult task to preside.

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  • Blackburn received a charter of incorporation in 1851, and is governed by a mayor, 14 aldermen and 42 councillors.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1847, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 9 aldermen and 27 councillors.

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  • In 656, at the moment of his accession to power, Sigebert III., the king of Austrasia, had just died, and the Austrasian mayor of the palace, Grimoald, was attempting to usurp the authority.

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  • But in spite of a very firm policy Ebroin was unable to maintain this unity, and while Clotaire III., son of Clovis II., reigned in Neustria and Burgundy, he was obliged in 660 to give the Austrasians a special king, Childeric II., brother of Clotaire III., and a special mayor of the palace, Wulfoald.

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  • The borough returns one member to the house of representatives, and its local affairs are administered by a mayor and council.

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  • It is under a mayor, 7 aldermen and 22 councillors.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, six aldermen and eighteen councillors.

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  • The castle was successfully defended in 1216 against the French under the dauphin Louis by Hubert de Burgh, who was also the founder of the Maison Dieu established for the accommodation of pilgrims. The title of mayor as chief municipal officer first occurs about the middle of the 13th century, when the town was governed by a mayor and twelve jurats.

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  • In 1555 Dunheved, otherwise Launceston, received a charter of incorporation, the common council to consist of a mayor, 8 aldermen and a recorder.

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  • The executive officer is the Amin, a kind of mayor, elected from some influential family in which the dignity is often in practice hereditary.

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  • Mayor and Lightfoot, he established the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology, and plunged eagerly into theological and patristic study.

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  • In 18 J9 he joined the revolutionary committee which paved the way for Garibaldi's triumphs in the following year; then after spending a short time at Turin as attache to the Italian foreign office he was elected mayor of Palermo.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1891, and the corporation consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councilors.

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  • In this extremity the caliph bade Ibn Raiq, who had made himself master of Basra and Wasit, and had command of money and men, to come to his help. He created for him the office of Amir al-Omara, "Amir of the Amirs," which nearly corresponds to that of Mayor of the Palace among the Franks.'

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, 54 aldermen and 42 councillors.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, ten aldermen, and sixty councillors.

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  • She was examined for heresy in March 1545 by the lord mayor, and was committed to the Counter prison.

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  • The reactionary party, which, owing to the absence of Hertford and Lisle and to the presence of Gardiner, gained the upper hand in the council in the summer of 1546, were not satisfied with this repulse; they probably aimed at the leaders of the reforming party, such as Hertford and possibly Queen Catherine Parr, who were suspected of favouring Anne, and on the 18th of June 1546 Anne was again arraigned before a commission including the lord mayor, the duke of Norfolk, St John, Bonner and Heath.

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  • Adelaide is governed by a mayor and six aldermen elected by the whole body of the ratepayers, and is the only Australian city in which the mayor is so elected.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, 6 aldermen and 36 councillors.

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  • The town is governed by a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors, Area, 1 945 acres.

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  • A mayor was elected from the beginning of the reign of Richard II., while a town hall is mentioned in 1395.

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  • The corporation consists of a mayor, 3 aldermen and 9 councillors; and possesses a remarkable ancient mace, of 15thcentury workmanship. Area, 321 acres.

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  • The city was chartered in 1802, with a mayor appointed annually by the president of the United States and an elective council of two chambers.

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  • The mayor was elected by the council from 1812 to 1820, and by the people (biennially) from 1820 to 1871.

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  • In each city incorporated after its adoption, the Constitution requires the election in each of a mayor, a treasurer and a sergeant, each fora term of four years, and the election or appointment of a commissioner of the revenue for an equal term; that in cities having a population of 10,000 or more the council shall be composed of two branches; that the mayor shall have a veto on all acts of the council and on items of appropriation, ordinances or resolutions, which can be overridden only by an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members elected to each branch; and that no city shall incur a bonded indebtedness exceeding 18% of the assessed value of its real estate.

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  • In 1618 the borough received its first charter of incorporation from James I., instituting a governing body of a mayor, 12 chief burgesses, and 12 assistant burgesses, with a recorder, deputy-recorder, townclerk and two serjeants-at-mace; a court of record every fortnight on Tuesday; and fairs at Michaelmas and on the second Tuesday after Trinity Sunday, which were kept up until within the last fifty years.

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, 9 aldermen and 27 councillors.

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  • The town was enfranchised in 1832, and was incorporated in 1848 under the title of the mayor, aldermen and councillors of the borough of Wakefield.

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  • Municipal corporations with a population of 3000 and over are cities, and are governed through a mayor and board of aldermen; those with a population of between 1500 and 3000 are towns, and are governed through a mayor and trustees.

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  • He was mayor of Youghal in 1588-89, and is said to have first cultivated the potato here.

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  • There are no early charters extant, but in 1586 Elizabeth acknowledged the right of the mayor and burgesses to be a body corporate and to hold a court for pleas under forty shillings, two weekly markets and four annual fairs - which rights they claimed to have exercised from time immemorial.

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  • The buildings; of the monastery of Grey Friars, Newgate Street, were appropriated to it; liberal public subscription added to the king's grant endowed it richly; and the mayor, commonalty and citizens of London were nominated its governors in its charter of 1553.

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  • This was superseded by another in 1683 under which the governing body was to consist of a mayor and six aldermen.

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  • The parliamentary franchise was enjoyed by the mayor, aldermen and the holders of burgage tenements.

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  • The city, being incorporated, is governed by a mayor and a board of aldermen.

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  • The borough, incorporated in 1899 (county borough, 1907), is under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • The principal bays are Committee and Pelly in the southern portion, and Lord Mayor in the western.

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  • Privileged towns, receiving their privileges from the government (not necessarily on the basis of population), are under a mayor (borgmastare) and aldermen (radman), the aldermen being elected by the citizens, while the mayor is appointed by the government from the first three aldermen on the poll, is paid, and holds office for life.

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  • The town-courts in the privileged towns are called radstufvuratter, and consist of the mayor and at least two aldermen.

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  • His father, Prospero Balbo, who belonged to a noble Piedmontese family, held a high position in the Sardinian court, and at the time of Cesare's birth was mayor of the capital.

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  • The Improvement Commissioners constituted by this act included the mayor, bailiffs and four aldermen of Liverpool, under whose care the main streets were laid out on a regular plan, intersecting one another at right angles; and the first iron tramway in England was laid down.

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  • The borough is under a mayor, 14 aldermen and 42 councillors..

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  • Borough constabulary forces were established by the Municipal Corporation Act (1835), which entrusted their administration to the mayor and a watch committee, and this act was revised in 1882, when the general powers of this authority were defined.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century, outside of the city of London (where magisterial duties were, as now, performed by the lord mayor and aldermen), there were various public offices besides the Bow Street and Thames police offices where magistrates attended.

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  • The city of London has its own distinct police organization under a commissioner and assistant commissioner, and its functions extend over an area of 673 statute acres containing two courts of justice, those of the Guildhall and Mansion House, where the lord mayor and the aldermen are the magistrates.

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  • It included in 1910 a commissioner appointed by the mayor and exercising a wide range of authority; four deputy commissioners; a chief inspector, who has immediate charge of the force and through whom all orders are issued; he is assisted by 18 inspectors, who are in charge of different sections of the city, and who carry out the orders of the chief; 87 captains, each of whom is in direct charge of a precinct; 583 sergeants; and last of all, the ordinary policemen, or patrolmen, as they are often called from the character of their duties.

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  • On the 24th he sailed from the Hague, landing on the 26th at Dover, where he was met by Monk, whom he saluted as father, and by the mayor, from whom he accepted a " very rich bible," " the thing that he loved above all things in the world."

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  • This residence takes its name from the family of whom James Lynch Fitzstephen, mayor of Galway in 1493, was a member; whose severity as a magistrate is exemplified in the story that he executed his own son, and thus gave origin (according to one of several theories) to the familiar term of Lynch law.

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  • This is a curious collection of small cottages, where communal government by a locally elected mayor long prevailed, together with peculiar laws and customs, strictly exclusive inter-marriage, and a high moral and religious standard.

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  • The company, or rather, the wardens, the assistants and livery presented a petition to the lord mayor, which was answered by the discontented craftsmen.

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  • He was first elected a guardian in Bow in 1892, was elected to the Borough Council in 1901 and was mayor of Poplar in 1919-20.

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  • These two men Clotaire took as his counsellors; and when he decided in 623 to confer the kingdom of Austrasia upon his son Dagobert, they were appointed mentors to the Austrasian king, Pippin with the title of mayor of the palace.

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  • The civil authority (Magistrat) consists of a chief mayor (Oberbiergermeister), a mayor (Biirgermeister), and a city council (Stadtrat).

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  • His father, John Phillips (1770-1823), a man of wealth and influence, graduated at Harvard College in 1788, and became successively "town advocate and public prosecutor," and in 1822 first mayor of Boston, then recently made into a city.

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  • Queen Elizabeth granted a charter of incorporation in 1580 under which there were to be a mayor, recorder and eight councillors.

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  • It is governed by a lord mayor, 14 aldermen and 42 councillors.

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  • Cork showed favour to Perkin Warbeck in 1492, and its mayor was hanged in consequence.

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  • Any township with more than 5000 inhabitants may be incorporated as a town, with its government vested in a mayor and council.

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  • The borough council consists of a mayor, 5 aldermen, and 30 councillors.

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  • A mayor and twenty-four brethren who formed the council of the borough are mentioned in 1440, but the earliest charter of incorporation is that of Charles I.

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  • The government of the city is vested in a council consisting of the mayor and four controllers elected annually and eighteen aldermen (three from each of the six wards into which the city is divided).

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  • The council as a whole is the legislative body, while the board of control is the executive body, and as such is responsible for the supervision of all matters of finance, the appointment of officials, the carrying on of public works, and the general administration of the affairs of the city, except the departments of education and of police, the first being under the control of the board of education, elected annually by the citizens, and the latter under the board of police commissioners, consisting of the mayor, the county judge and the police magistrate.

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  • In 1834 the population of York numbered fully 10,000; and an act of the provincial legislature conferred on it a charter of incorporation, with a mayor, aldermen and councilmen.

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  • In 1882 he was elected mayor of Elmira, and in the same year was chosen lieutenant-governor of the state, having been defeated for nomination as governor by Grover Cleveland.

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  • The municipal boroughs (246 in England and Wales in 1832) were governed by mayor, aldermen, councillors and a close body of burgesses or freemen, a narrow oligarchy.

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  • The first business at that meeting is the election of the chairman, whose office corresponds to that of the mayor in a borough.

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  • At an election for the whole borough the returning officer is the mayor; at a ward election he is an alderman assigned for that purpose by the council.

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  • After the annual election on the 1st of November the first quarterly meeting of the council is held on the 9th, and at that meeting the mayor and aldermen are elected.

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  • The election of the mayor and aldermen is again the same as has already been described in connexion with the election of the chair- Officers .

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  • These include the remuneration of the mayor, recorder audit and officers of the borough, overseers' expenses, the expenses of the administration of justice in the borough, the payment of the borough coroner, police expenses and the like.

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  • The third auditor is appointed by the mayor and is called the mayor's auditor.

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  • He takes precedence over all justices in and for the borough, and is entitled to take the chair at all meetings at which he is present by virtue of his office of mayor.

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  • Over a mile south of Mold, on the right of the road to Nerquis, is the "Tower" (15th century, but perhaps restored in the 18th), where, in 1465 or 1 475, the royal chieftain, Rheinallt ab Gruffyd ad Bleddyn, hanged Robert Byrne, mayor of Chester, and subsequently burned alive some 200 Chester folk who tried to 'arrest him.

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  • The first mayor was Mr George Cato (c. 1810-1893), one of the earliest settlers in Natal.

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  • The Pittsburg charter of 1816 vested the more important powers of the city government in a common council of 15 members and a select council of 9 members, and until 1834 the mayor was appointed annually by these city councils from their own number.

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  • It provided that the executive be a " city recorder ";"; this provision was repealed in 1903, when the title of mayor again came into use.

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  • The mayor holds office for three years, has the powers and jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, appoints the heads of departments (public safety, public works, collector of delinquent taxes, assessors, city treasurer, law, charities and correction, and sinking fund commission), and may remove any of the officers he has appointed, by a written order, showing cause, to the select council.

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  • The legislative bodies are the select and common council, elected under the law of 1887; by a three-fifths vote it may pass resolutions or ordinances over the mayor's veto.

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  • Cities are divided into classes (see above) according to population, and are governed by a mayor and a council.

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  • The municipal borough is under a mayor, four aldermen and twelve councillors.

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  • He served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1796-1797, in the National House of Representatives in 1797-1801, as district-attorney for Massachusetts in 1801, as speaker of the state House of Representatives in 1803-1805, as a member of the state Senate from 1805 to 1811, and as president of that body in 1805-1806 and 1808-1811, as a member of the United States Senate from 1817 to 1822, and as mayor of Boston in 1829-1832.

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  • He was strongly opposed to the War of 1812, and was a leader in the movement culminating in the Hartford Convention, which he defended in a series of open letters published in 1824, and in his inaugural address as mayor of Boston.

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  • The municipal borough is under a lord mayor (the title was conferred in 1897 on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee), 16 aldermen and 48 councillors.

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  • An important charter of Edward V., as prince of Wales and lord of Haverford, enacted that the town should be incorporated under a mayor, two sheriffs and two bailiffs, duly chosen by the burgesses.

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