May-be Sentence Examples

may-be
  • I may be footing the bill, but you're working for Mom, not me.

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  • It seems you may be romantically involved with this man.

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  • They may be too busy running.

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  • I may be the person who's having the visions but I can't do it alone.

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  • I may be dead wrong, but I for one say, go for it.

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  • I truly believe he may be interested in doing the same to you.

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  • We may be slipping and sliding but we're still operational.

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  • She may be out of the loop for a short time.

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  • If I can slip them, I may be able to help.

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  • It's not a solution but it will help a lot more than doing nothing while this guy may be getting closer.

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  • It may be temporary.

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  • Betty-Boop or whatever your name is, if you tarry much longer I may be forced to introduce myself, though taking you, at least at this time, would cause a mild alteration to my carefully formulated plans.

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  • He may be a very bad man but we won't know until we have a friend of ours check the license plate.

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  • Was he really worth her attention on what may be the last day of her life?

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  • It may be awhile by earth standards.

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  • I'll let Han know you all may be in.

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  • You'll not face anyone willing to challenge you for him, ikir, I assure you, though there may be some left who might help him.

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  • Unshaven may be cool in Hollywood but in Ouray, you'd just look like a bum.

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  • She may be a first class bitch—but if there isn't a legal custody fight or the child isn't reported in danger or grossly neglected, it's none of our business.

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  • Much as I'd like to, I won't ask her if her mother's maiden name was Plotke, nor will I tell her daddy's bones may be taking a motor home trip up the west coast—or that his pinkie is in your jewel case.

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  • Look, there may be someone alive and hurt!

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  • Then he added, "It may be part of that parcel of land they're squabbling about over at the courthouse."

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  • She may be using you, but I have no doubt I'd rather be in your position right now than Mr. Fitzgerald's—the wrath of an angry woman is something to behold!

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  • This may be a different matter.

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  • He may be planning to kill himself.

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  • It may be the best arrangement.

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  • They may be after you all.

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  • I don't know, but it seems to me that his ability to perform may be something that makes him feel like himself.

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  • Your face may be blue and your hair pink, but I don't see you doing anything messy, like taking a shotgun to the head.

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  • That may be the only good thing that comes of returning you to the mortal world.

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  • The forest is full of demons out for Sasha.s head, and the Dark One may be sending more of its creatures.

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  • Several members, including Qatwal, may be willing to aid you in regaining your planet after you've reached a peace treaty.

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  • His chosen is the nishani, but your doubt may be well-placed.

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  • Shipton may be sleaze of the year, but until he does something illegal, there isn't anything the law can do.

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  • Sometimes I fear my mind may be going as I often pretend my circumstances are far different than they truly are.

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  • You may be a cop, but you're also an obnoxious slob who's soiling a clean carpet with your discarded body parts.

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  • You may be hurt and feeling helpless and desperate and God knows what and I'm sorry as hell but I have a life too, and I'll not have you ruin it!

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  • My guess is Donnie's muteness may be far more complicated.

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  • He may be right.

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  • Elisabeth sighed, "Samantha thinks you may be right about the whole protection thing."

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  • That may be your idea of an ideal relationship, but I had to get away from him if I was going to have a life of my own.

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  • We may be eating out of cans soon.

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  • You may be accustomed to scraping by in some third world country, but this is our country.

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  • This here case may be a lot more complicated than you think.

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  • The phone may be bugged!

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  • I don't know if she can help very much but she may be able to steer you in the right direction.

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  • The angel Jeffrey's halo may be rusty.

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  • You may be right about Byrne not showing up at his funeral next week.

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  • It looks as if the insurance company may be willing to advance some of the life insurance money—at least enough to tide us over for a while.

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  • Why should I confuse you with unproven suppo­sitions that may be totally irrelevant?

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  • Arthur may be missed, but I don't know by whom.

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  • I'm your husband — worthless as I may be.

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  • It may be true.

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  • Our new friend may be an ally to Sirian.

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  • And I'm ashamed I did not act before now, when it may be too late to counter Sirian.

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  • Even if I knew how, it may be too late to save them.

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  • It may be obtained in the spongy form by igniting iridium ammonium chloride, and this variety of the metal readily oxidizes when heated in air.

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  • Considerations of this latter kind will naturally present themselves in the two great departments of cosmology and psychology, or they may be delegated to an independent research under the name of religious philosophy.

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  • To these may be added the industrial museum, the cabinet of coins, the museum of natural history, the collection of majolica vases in the new palace, and the Wurttemberg museum of antiquities.

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  • Among other characteristics of these animals may be noticed the great length of the neck and limbs, the complete absence of lateral toes and the long and tufted tail.

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  • The native idea, which may be true, is that the shorter period occurs in the case of female and the longer in that of male calves.

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  • Although some of these elephants are believed not to have been larger than donkeys, the height of others may be estimated at from 4 to 5 ft., or practically the same as that of the dwarf Congo race.

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  • It may be added that fossil remains of the African elephant have been obtained from Spain, Sicily, Algeria and Egypt, in strata of the Pleistocene age.

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  • The mound may be of earth, or of stones with a covering of earth, or may be entirely composed of stones.

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  • One of these experiments may be described.

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  • His account of the notion of external existence, as derived, not from pure sensation, but from the experience of action on the one hand and resistance on the other, may be compared with the account of Bain and later psychologists.

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  • The third may be disregarded; but the first and second editions are almost distinct works.

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  • Vico may be said to base his considerations on the history of two nations.

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  • The affinity of the Pterobranchia to the Enteropneusta may be regarded as definitely established.

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  • Metallic cobalt may be obtained by reduction of the oxide or chloride in a current of hydrogen at a red heat, or by heating the oxalate, under a layer of powdered glass.

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  • The bromide, CoBr 2, resembles the chloride, and may be prepared by similar methods.

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  • It may be prepared by the addition of potassium nitrite to an acetic acid solution of cobalt chloride.

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  • This salt may be used for the separation of cobalt and nickel, since the latter metal does not form a similar double nitrite, but it is necessary that the alkaline earth metals should be absent, for in their presence nickel forms complex nitrites containing the alkaline earth metal and the alkali metal.

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  • Cobalt salts may be readily detected by the formation of the black sulphide, in alkaline solution, and by the blue colour they produce when fused with borax.

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  • Among modern buildings may be mentioned the Bakewell and High Peak Institute, and the town hall and museum.

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  • Although the action of zymase may be regarded as mechanical, the enzyme cannot be produced by any other than living protoplasm.

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  • The characteristic flavour and odour of wines and spirits is dependent on the proportion of higher alcohols, aldehydes and esters which may be produced.

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  • The pyrimidines may be obtained by condensing I.

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  • The 2.6-diketo-tetrahydropyrimidines or uracils may be considered as the ureides of /-aldehydo, and 0-ketonic acids.

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  • Cook suggests that he may be the god of the stream of Nemi.

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  • At the same time, if Matthew of Edessa may be trusted, he also carried his arms against the Armenians, and plundered in his avarice every Armenian of wealth and position.

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  • The chief town of the province, 's Hertogenbosch, may be cited as an interesting historical example.

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  • The motive of this and of the succeeding novels of what may be called her second period is free (not to be confounded with promiscuous) love.

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  • On account of the smallness of the particles, the forces acting throughout the volume of any individual particle are all of the same intensity and direction, and may be considered as a whole.

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  • Before applying the solution to a mathematical investigation of the present question, it may be well to consider the matter for a few moments from a more general point of view.

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  • Whatever may be the shape or size of the particles, there is no scattered light in a direction parallel to the primary electric displacements.

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  • The polarization in a distinctly oblique direction, however, is not perfect, a feature for which more than one reas9n may be put forward.

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  • This process is, however, less fully developed than in elephants, and as many as three teeth may be in place in each jaw at one time.

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  • During summer there may be eight or nine successive generations when conditions are favourable and food abundant.

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  • In place of its ancient fortifications Angouleme is encircled by boulevards known as the Remparts, from which fine views may be obtained in all directions.

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  • The cardinal grosbeak, or Virginian nightingale, Cardinalis virginianus, claims notice here, though doubts may be entertained as to the family to which it really belongs.

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  • It is thus difficult to form a judgment as to what has most claim to acceptance as the general law, and what may be regarded as local or exceptional.

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  • If the pressure alters as the water tank empties, a discontinuity occurs in the trace when the tank is refilled, and a fictitious element may be introduced into the diurnal variation.

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  • The large difference between the means obtained at Potsdam and Kremsmtinster, as compared to the comparative similarity between the results for Kew and Karasjok, suggests that the mean value of the potential gradient may be much more dependent on local conditions than on difference of latitude.

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  • If this be overlooked, a wrong impression may be derived as to the absolute amplitudes of the changes.

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  • Mache thinks that the ionization observed in the atmosphere may be wholly accounted for by the radioactive emanation.

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  • Dust particles interfere with conduction near the ground, so the relative conductivity in the upper layers may be much greater than that calculated.

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  • Thunder.-Trustworthy frequency statistics for an individual station are obtainable only from a long series of observations, while if means are taken from a large area places may be included which differ largely amongst themselves.

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  • Changes in the height or construction of buildings, and a greater readiness to make claims on insurance offices, may be contributory causes.

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  • It should, however, be borne in mind that the apparent differences between different species may be partly Table Xiv.

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  • During the first weeks of the queen's sorrow after the battle, Gavin, with one or two colleagues of the council, acted as personal adviser, and it may be taken for granted that he supported the pretensions of the young earl.

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  • This spawn may be obtained from old pastures, or decayed mushroom beds, and is purchased from nurserymen in the form of bricks charged with the mycelium, and technically known as mushroom spawn.

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  • When once obtained, it may be indefinitely preserved.

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  • The beds are formed of horse-droppings which have been slightly fermented and frequently turned, and may be made 2 or 3 ft.

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  • It has more than one advantage over the meadow mushroom in its extreme commonness, its profuse growth, the length of the season in which it may be gathered, the total absence of varietal forms, its adaptability for being dried and preserved for years, and its persistent delicious taste.

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  • To this character the fungus owes its generic name (Marasmius) as well as one of its most valuable qualities for the table, for examples may be gathered from June to November, and if carefully dried may be hung on strings for culinary purposes and preserved without deterioration for several years; indeed, many persons assert that the rich flavour of these fungi increases with years.

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  • A few species, however, like the common British forms Chelifer cancroides and Chiridium museorum, frequent human dwellings and are found in books, old chests, furniture, &c.; others like Ganypus littoralis and allied species may be found under stones or pieces of coral between tide-marks; while others, which are for the most part blind, live permanently in dark caves.

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  • It is possibly for the purpose of feeding on parasitic mites that book-scorpions lodge themselves beneath the wing-cases of large tropical beetles; and the same explanation, in default of a better, may be extended to their well-known and oft-recorded habit of seizing hold of the legs of horse-flies or other two-winged insects.

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  • The constitution may be amended by either of two methods.

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  • He may veto a bill, or in case of an appropriation bill, the separate items, but this veto may be overridden by a simple majority of the total membership of each house.

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  • The length of the legislative session is forty-five days, but it may be extended by a vote of two-thirds of the members elected to each house.

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  • The judicial power is vested in the Supreme Court of Appeals, the Circuit courts, such inferior courts as may be established, county courts, the powers and duties of which are, however, chiefly police and fiscal, and in justices of the peace.

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  • Children may be disinherited with or without cause.

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  • A homestead not exceeding $1000 in value may be set apart, provided that it is recorded before the debt against which it was claimed was contracted.

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  • No female or male under twelve may be employed in mines, and no child under twelve may be employed in a factory, and when school is in session none under fourteen.

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  • Some delegates favoured the immediate formation of a new state, but the more far-sighted members argued that as the ordinance had not yet been voted upon by the people, and Virginia was still in the Union, such action would be revolutionary, since the United States Constitution provides that no state may be divided without its consent.

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  • The effigy on it may be taken to be an authentic portrait.

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  • This again may be statecraft.

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  • Apotheosis can mean nothing to those who hold that a man may be reborn as a god, but still needs redemption, and that men on earth may win redemption, if they are brave enough.

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  • Amongst these may be mentioned Virgil, the epic poet Ponticus, Bassus (probably the iambic poet of the name), and at a later period Ovid.

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  • It may be assigned to 25 B.C. The dates of the publication of the rest are uncertain, but none of them was published before 24 B.C., and the, last not before 16 B.C. The unusual length of the second one (1402 lines) has led Lachmann and other critics to suppose that it originally consisted of two books, and they have placed the beginning of the third book at ii.

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  • Its material may be linen, wool, cotton or silk; but silk only is the rule for deacons.

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  • While at home Hastings is said to have attached himself to literary society; and it may be inferred from his own letters that he now made the personal acquaintance of Samuel Johnson and Lord Mansfield.

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  • For very refined work, however, the irregularities in the reproduction of the reseau may be studied by comparing the measures of the original reseau with the mean of corresponding measures of a number of photographed copies of it.

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  • Now, if CD is pressed by its weight or by a spring on the surface AB, the effect of wear will be to produce a symmetrical grinding away of both surfaces, which may be represented thus, fig.

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  • There may be seen the native dances and break-neck horse-racesthe riders bareback - through the main street of the village.

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  • Among the natural flora may be noted the wild olive, the lentisk (from which oil is extracted), the prickly pear, the myrtle, broom, cytisus, the juniper.

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  • Native capital is lacking, and taxation on unremunerative lands is, as elsewhere in Italy, too heavy in proportion to what they may be expected to produce, and not sufficiently elastic in case of a bad harvest.

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  • Of wild animals may be noted the moufflon (Ovis Ammon), the stag, and the wild boar, and among birds various species of the vulture and eagle in the mountains, and the pelican and flamingo (the latter coming in August in large flocks from Africa) in the lagoons.

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  • Among the exports may be noticed minerals, wines and spirits, tobacco, hides, live animals; and among the imports, groceries, cotton and cereals.

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  • Of Nuraghe Lugheras near Paulilatino, or the Nuraghe de S'Orcu near Domusnovas, the entrance may be protected by a regular system of courtyards and subsidiary nuraghi.

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  • Thus, there may be a platform round the nuraghe, generally with two, three or four bastions, each often containing a chamber; or the main nuraghe may have additional chambers added to it.

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  • Sometimes they occupy the approaches to tablelands, the narrowest points of gorges, or the fords of rivers; sometimes almost inaccessible mountain tops or important points on ridges; and it may be noticed that, where two important nuraghi are not visible from one another, a small one is interpolated, showing that there was a system of signalling from one to another.

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  • Generally there is, if possible, a water-supply in the vicinity; sometimes a nuraghe guards a spring, or there may be a well in the nuraghe itself.

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  • Whatever the obligations of the state towards the ecclesiastical society may be in pure theory, in practice they become more precise and stable when they assume the nature of a bilateral convention by which the state engages itself with regard to a third party.

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  • And reciprocally, whatever may be the absolute rights of the ecclesiastical society over the appointment of its dignitaries, the administration of its property, and the government of its adherents, the exercise of these rights is limited and restricted by the stable engagements and concessions of the concordatory pact, which bind the head of the church with regard to the nations.

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  • Selim determined on war with Persia, where the heresy was the prevalent religion, and in order that the Shiites in Turkey should give no trouble during the war, "measures were taken," as the Turkish historian states, which may be explained as the reader desires, and which proved fully efficacious.

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  • Four main processes may be distinguished.

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  • The first consists of cutting up the various fabrics and materials employed into shapes suitable for forming the leaves, petals, &c.; this may be done by scissors, but more often stamps are employed which will cut through a dozen or more thicknesses at one blow.

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  • Among them the Villa Litta and the Villa Ponte may be specially mentioned.

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  • Their form, however, is not sufficiently characteristic to warrant this identification, though it may be noted that the nearest approximation to phallic worship is found amongst the most typical of African peoples, viz.

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  • As a proof of the seriousness with which he regarded the literary vocation, it may be mentioned that he used to write out his poems in printed characters, believing that that process best enabled him to understand his own peculiarities and faults, and probably unconscious that Coleridge had recommended some such method of criticism when he said he thought "print settles it."

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  • In one direction the tabby shows a tendency to melanism which culminates in complete blackness, while in the other direction there is an equally marked tendency to albinism; grey cats, which may be regarded as tabbies whose stri p es have disappeared, forming the connecting link between the tabby and the white cat.

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  • From the same stock may be derived the Abyssinian breed, in which the ears are relatively large and occasionally tipped with long hairs (thus recalling the tufted ears of the jungle-cat).

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  • Science, he says, may be compared to a tree; metaphysics is the root, physics is the trunk, and the three chief branches are mechanics, medicine and Ouvres, viii.

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  • And innate ideas therefore are mere capacities or tendencies, - possibilities which apart from the will to think may be regarded as nothing at all.

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  • This year may be taken as the beginning of his literary activity and public life.

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  • The Summa is divided into three great parts, which shortly may be said to treat of God, Man and the God-Man.

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  • From here the caravans start for Persia, and at certain periods of the year long trains of camels may be seen, and Persian merchants conspicuous by their high black caps and long robes.

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  • The third player, who does any measuring that may be necessary to determine which bowl or bowls may be nearest the jack, holds almost as responsible a position as the captain, whose place, in fact, he takes whenever the skip is temporarily absent.

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  • Strutt has suggested that helium in hot springs may be derived from the disintegration of common rocks at great depths.

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  • If thorianite cannot be obtained, monazite, which is more abundant, may be utilized.

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  • The plants are grown in the stove till the flowering period, when they may be removed to the greenhouse.

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  • Some notion of the personal appearance of Alexander may be got from the literature and the surviving monuments.

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  • The Alexander legend was the theme of poetry in all European languages; six or seven German poets dealt with the subject, and it may be read in French, English, Spanish, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, Flemish and Bohemian.

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  • Among the most famous members of the house who ruled in Cyprus three may be mentioned.

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  • The only difference to be reckoned with may be in recent tendencies of solo vocalists to sing for effect, and so to extend the compass of the voice upwards.

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  • Any note may be a pitch note; for orchestras custom has settled upon a' in the treble clef, for organs and pianos in Great Britain c 2, and for modern brass instruments b flat'.

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  • About that time, or it may be a few years earlier, Sir George Smart established a fork for the Philharmonic Society, a' 433.2.

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  • Other countries have gradually followed, and, with few exceptions, the low pitch derived from the Diapason Normal may be said to prevail throughout the musical world.

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  • But for Leipzig a comparison with the Gewandhaus Band may be sought.

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  • It may be assumed that the social corruption in Jerusalem was such as is usually found in wealthy communities, made bolder in this case, perhaps, by the political unrest and the weakness of the royal government under Zedekiah.

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  • His high conception of God's transcendence, it may be supposed, led him to ignore intermediary agencies, which are common in the popular literature, and later, under the influence of this same conception of transcendence, are freely employed.

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  • The country to the west of this natural barrier may be divided geographically into three districts - northern, central and southern Albania.

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  • The population of Albania may be estimated at between 1,600,000 and 1,500,000, of whom 1,200,000 or, ioo,000 are Albanians.

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  • The tribal organization in northern Albania is an interesting survival of the earliest form of social combination; it may be compared in many respects with that which existed in the Scottish highlands in the time of the Stuart kings.

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  • To these seven groups, which are included under the general appellation of Malissori, or "highlanders," may be added the Malsia of Dibra, who extend to the west and north of that town, and form a large separate group; they are notorious for their fierce lawless character, and maintain themselves by plundering the Bulgarian peasants in their neighbourhood.

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  • In general the attitude of the Albanians in the north-eastern districts towards the Slavonic peasantry may be compared with that of the Kurds towards the Armenians.

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  • Notwithstanding certain points of resemblance in structure and phonetics, Albanian is entirely distinct from the neighbouring languages; in its relation to early Latin and Greek it may be regarded as a co-ordinate member of the Aryan stock.

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  • Among his successors may be mentioned Vincenzo Dorsa and Demetrio Camarda.

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  • The ruins of Pandosia, Ephyra, Elatea, Phoenike, Buthrotum, Akrolissos and other towns may be identified.

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  • The history of the relations of the Edomites and Israelites may be briefly summarized.

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  • It may be defined in several ways.

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  • In projective geometry it may be defined as the conic which intersects the line at infinity in two real points, or to which it is possible to draw two real tangents from the centre.

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  • Later traditions may be read in Carpzov's Introductio, pars 3, cap. xvi.

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  • The learned commentary of Marckius may be specially mentioned.

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  • For reasons of health it may be assumed that no system of heating is advisable which does not provide for a constant renewal of the air in the locality warmed.

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  • The object of all heating apparatus is the transference of heat from the fire to the various parts of the building it is intended to warm, and this transfer may be effected by radiation, by conduction or by convection.

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  • With another form of gas stove coke is used in place of the perforated asbestos; the fire is started with the gas, which, when the coke is well alight, may be dispensed with, and the fire kept up with coke in the usual way.

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  • Branches may be made from the main pipes by means of smaller pipes arranged in the same manner as the mains, the Bolter branch flow pipe being connected with the main flow pipe and returning into the main return.

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  • The rate of circulation in the ordinary low pressure hot-water system may be considerably accelerated by means of steam injections.

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  • Owing to the very rapid movement and the consequent increased rate of transmission of heat, the pipes and radiators may be reduced in size, in many circumstances a very desirable thing to achieve.

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  • If the weather is mild, a moderate heat may be obtained by using the apparatus as an ordinary hot water system, and shutting off the steam injectors.

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  • The smallness of the pipes renders it liable to damage by frost, but this accident may be prevented by always keeping in frosty weather a small fire in the furnace.

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  • If this course is inconvenient, some liquid of low freezing-point, such as glycerine, may be mixed with the water.

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  • Compared with heating by hot water, steam-heating requires less piping, which, further, may be of much smaller diameter to attain a similar result, because of the higher temperature of the heat yielding surface.

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  • With wrought iron pipes bends may be arranged, as shown in fig.

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  • One end of each pipe is plain, so that it may be cut to any desired length; pipes with shaped ends obviously must be obtained in the exact lengths required.

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  • They are now usually of special design, and may be divided into three classes - indirect radiators, direct radiators and direct ventilating radiators.

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  • In small houses all requirements may be satisfied with a boiler heated by the kitchen fire.

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  • The coiled pipe firebox of the high-pressure hot-water system previously described may be also classed with boilers.

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  • The size of the boiler may be increased or diminished by the addition or subtraction of one or more sections; these, being simple in design, are easily fitted together, and should a section become defective it is a simple matter to insert a new one in its place.

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  • The extent to which the employment of the local preacher is characteristic of Methodism may be seen from the fact that in the United Kingdom while there are only about 5000 Methodist ministers, there are more than 18,000 congregations; some 13,000 congregations, chiefly in the villages, are dependent on local preachers.

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  • As already stated, John Napier was born in 1550, the year in which the Reformation in Scotland may be said to have commenced.

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  • In one sense tt may be said to stand to theological literature in Scotland in something of the same position as that occupied by the Canon Mirificus with respect to the scientific literature, for it is the first published original work relating to theological interpretation, and is quite without a predecessor in its own field.

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  • Of course two sets of rods may be used, and by their means we may multiply every number less than 111,111,111 and so on.

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  • These rules were published in the Canonis Descriptio (1614), and Napier has there given a figure, and indicated.a method, by means of which they may be proved directly.

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  • They are, however, so simply deducible from the results he has.given that all the four analogies may be properly called by his name.

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  • Excursions may be made in all directions into the mountains, affording beautiful scenery and interesting views of the mining camps.

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  • It may be said broadly, therefore, that in .episcopacy the government is monarchical; in congregationalism, democratic; and in Presbyterianism, aristocratic or representative.

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  • Matters about which there is any doubt or difficulty, or division of opinion in the session, may be carried for settlement to the next higher court, the presbytery.

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  • Appeals and complaints may be taken from the presbytery to the synod.

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  • But it shall not be so among you."From the foregoing outline it will be seen that Presbyterianism may be said to consist in the government of the Church by representative assemblies composed of the two classe s of presbyters, ministers and elders, and so p ?'

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  • It may be convenient at this point to consider Calvin's ideal church polity, as set forth in his famous Christianae religionis institutio, the first edition of which was published in 1536.

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  • The work which the young Frenchman did for his countrymen was immense.3 The year 1555 may be taken as the date when French Protestantism began to be organized.

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  • The danger in this direction is that when Presbyterianism has been modified far enough to suit the English taste it may be found less acceptable to its more stalwart supporters from beyond the Tweed.

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  • On the south side of the façade is a large brick campanile, and the foundations of another may be seen on the north.

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  • The Correggio family never managed to keep possession of it for long, and in 1346 they sold it to the Visconti (who constructed a citadel, La Rocchetta, in 1356, of which some remains exist on the east bank of the river, while the later ate du Pont may be seen on the west bank), and from them it passed to the Sforza.

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  • The name Varuna may be Indo-European, identifiable, some believe, with the Greek ofpavos (Uranus), and ultimately referable to a root var, " to cover," Varuna thus meaning "the Encompasser."

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  • It may be compared in some degree to such European societies as the Carbonara, Young Italy, the Tugendbund, the Confreries of France, the Freemasons in Catholic countries, and the Vehmgericht.

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  • The existing system of taxation also presses heavily upon the provinces, as may be seen from the fact that the national, provincial and municipal exactions together amount to £7 per head of population, while the total value of the exports in 1898 was only L6 in round numbers.

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  • They are appointed by and may be removed by the president.

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  • Among birds of prey may be mentioned the eagle and various species of hawk, and among game-birds the partridge and pheasant.

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  • The number of Protestants may be estimated at about 600,000 and the Jews at about 70,000.

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  • Some of these may be specially mentioned.

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  • Of cattle besides the breeds named the Norman (beef and milk), the Limousin (beef), the Mont bfiard, the Bazadais, the Flamand, the Breton and tile larthenais breeds may be mentioned, societies and in many other ways.

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  • The department of Meurthe-et-Moselle (basins of Nancy and Longwy-Briey) furnished 84% of the total output during the quinquennial period 1901-1905, may be reckoned as one of the principal iron-producing regions of the world.

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  • Leather.Tanning and leather-dressing are widely spread industries, and the same may be said of the manufacture of boots and shoes, though these trades employ more hands in the department of Seine than elsewhere; in the manufacture of gloves Isre (Grenoble) and Aveyron (Millau) hold the first place amongst French departments.

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  • Bills may be proposed either by ministers (in the name of the president of the republic), or by private members, and may be initiated in either chamber, but money-bills must be submitted in the first place to the Chamber of Deputies.

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  • Any decision, even one of a cour dassises, may be brought before it in the last resort, and may be cassannulled.

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  • Police.Broadly, the police of France may be divided into two great branchesadministrative police (la police administrative) and judicial police (la police judic-iaire), the former having for its object the maintenance of order, and the latter charged with tracing out offenders, collecting the proofs, and delivering the presumed offenders to the tribunals charged by law with their trial and punishment.

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  • The organization of the Paris police, which is typical of that in other large towns, may be outlined briefly.

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  • Such re-engagements are for one to three years effective service but may be extended to fifteen.

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  • Primary Inslruction.All primary public instruction is free and compulsory for children of both sexes between the ages of six and thirteen, but if a child can gain a certificate of primary studies at the age of eleven or after, he may be excused the rest of the period demanded by law.

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  • The colonies are divisible into two classes, (I) those possessing considerable powers of local self-government, (2) those in which the local government is autocratic. To this second class may be added the protectorates (and some colonies) where the native form of government is maintained under the supervision of French officials.

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  • Fresh water, rising and falling with the tide, is found in certain large caverns in Lifu, and by sinking to the sea-level a supply may be obtained in any part of the island.

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  • The number of main craters may be about twenty-five, but there are very many small eruptive cones on the flanks of the old volcanoes.

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  • The presence of these giant reptiles on the group is the chief fact on which a former land connexion with the continent of America may be sustained.

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  • Actions may be transferred to it, and appeals made to it, from the county courts in all cases arising within the jurisdiction of the Cinque Ports as defined by that act.

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  • In 1901 Professor Furtwangler began a more systematic excavation of the site, and the new discoveries he then made, together with a fresh and complete study of the figures and fragments in Munich, have led to a rearrangement of the whole, which, if not certain in all details, may be regarded as approaching finality.

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  • Though this statement is probably to be rejected, it may be regarded as certain that Aegina was the first state of European Greece to coin money.

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  • Macan, suggest the period between Solon and Peisistratus, c. 570 B.C. It may be questioned, however, whether the whole episode is not mythical.

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  • Among many hospitals, the county hospital (5828), "open to the sick and lame poor of every country and nation," may be mentioned.

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  • They may be prepared by the dry distillation of the ammonium salts.

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  • Marsupials may be defined as viviparous (that is non-egglaying) mammals, in which the young are born in an imperfect condition, and almost immediately attached to the teats of the mammary glands; the latter being generally enclosed in a pouch, and the front edge of the pelvis being always furnished with epipubic or "marsupial" bones.

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  • It may be added that there are some marsupials, such as the wombat, koala, marsupial ant-eater and the dasyures, FIG.

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  • Taking opossums to have been the ancestors of the group, the author considers that the present writer may be right in his view that marsupials entered Australia from Asia by way of New Guinea.

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  • It is urged that the imperfect placenta of the bandicoots instead of being vestigial, may be an instance of parallelism, and that in marsupials generally the allantois failed to form a placental connexion.

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  • Existing marsupials may be divided into three main divisions or sub-orders, of which the first, or Polyprotodontia, is common to America and Australasia; the second, or Paucituberculata, is exclusively South American; while the third, or Diprotodonts, is as solely Australasian inclusive of a few in the eastern Austro-Malayan islands.

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  • Myrmecobius has a total of 52 or 54 teeth, which may be classed as i., c.

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  • In this wider sense the family may be characterized as follows.

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  • Here may be noticed three genera of large extinct marsupials from the Pleistocene of Australia whose affinities appear to ally them to the wombat-group on the one hand and to the phalangers on the other.

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  • The tail is long and in some cases prehensile; the first hind-toe may be either large, small or absent; the dentition usually includes three pairs of upper and one of lower incisors, and six or seven pairs of cheekteeth in each jaw; the stomach is either simple or sadculated, without a cardiac gland; and there are four teats.

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  • With the exception of the aberrant long-snouted phalanger, the members of the family Phalangeridae have the normal number of functional incisors, in addition to which there may be one or two rudimentary pairs in the lower jaw.

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  • The remaining members of the family may be included in the sub family Phalangerinae, characterized by the normal nature of the dentition (which shows redimentary lower canines) and tongue.

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  • The same deposits have yielded remains of small mammals whose dentition approximates more nearly to that of either polyprotodont marsupials or insectivores; and these may be conveniently noticed here without prejudice to their true affinities.

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  • It may be added that the division of these teeth into premolars and molars in figs.

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  • It may be added that a few traces of mammals have been obtained from the English Wealden, among which an incisor tooth foreshadows the rodent type.

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  • It may be obtained as a dark brown amorphous powder by placing a mixture of io parts of the roughly powdered oxide with 6 parts of metallic sodium in a red-hot crucible, and covering the mixture with a layer of well-dried common salt.

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  • Boron trioxide B203 is the only known oxide of boron; and may be prepared by heating amorphous boron in oxygen, or better, by strongly igniting boric acid.

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  • However intelligible may be the notion of a tribe reserved for priestly service, the fact that it does not apply to early biblical history is apparent from the heterogeneous details of the Levitical divisions.

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  • There are traces of what may be called a "five-day week," but also some traces of a period of seven days.

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  • It is quite consistent with the evidence to suppose that a seven-day week was in use in Babylonia, but each item may be explained differently, and a definite proof does not exist.

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  • As most of the records appealed to are from temple archives, it may be expected that the Sabbath days would show an increased number of records.

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  • Fairbairn, " Plato's arguments for immortality, isolated, modernized, may be feeble, even valueless, but allowed to stand where and as he himself puts them, they have an altogether different worth.

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  • The man who lives for fame, wealth, power, may be satisfied in this life; but he who lives for the ideals of truth, beauty, goodness, lives not for time but for eternity, for his ideals cannot be realized, and so his life fulfilled on this side of the grave.

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  • In favour of Ageladas it may be said that the influence of the many Dorian schools is certainly to be traced in some of his work.

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  • A similar conclusion may be drawn from the legend which peopled primitive Rhodes with a population of skilful workers in metal, the "Telchines."

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  • Among such settlements may be mentioned Phaselis in Lycia, perhaps also Soli in Cilicia, Salapia on the east Italian coast, Gela in Sicily, the Lipari islands, and Rhoda in north-east Spain.

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  • The same remark may be made of the rest of the sea-board; for, with the exception of Spencer Gulf, the Gulf of St Vincent and Port Phillip on the south, and Moreton Bay, Hervey Bay and Broad Sound on the east, the coast-line is singularly uniform.

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  • There are no other rivers of importance in South Australia, but the Torrens and the Gawler may be mentioned.

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  • From the sources of its various tributaries to the town of Bourke, the river may be described as draining a watershed.

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  • These run in wet seasons, but in every instance for a short distance only, and sooner or later they are lost in sand-hills, where their waters disappear and a line of stunted gum-trees (Eucalyptus rostrata) is all that is present to indicate that there may be even a soakage to mark the abandoned course.

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  • Kitson's work in Tasmania shows that there also the glacial beds may be correlated with the lower or Greta Coal Measures of New South Wales.

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  • From Cape Howe to Melbourne the fall may be taken at from 30 in.

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  • In a region so extensive very great varieties of climate are naturally to be expected, but it may be stated as a general law that the climate of Australia is milder than that of corresponding lands in the northern hemisphere.

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  • Cooma, with a mean summer temperature of 65.4°, and a mean winter temperature of 41.4°, may be taken as illustrative of the climate of the southern tableland, and Armidale of the northern.

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  • The town of Bourke, lying on the upper Darling, may be taken as an example of many of the interior districts, and illustrates peculiarly well the defects as well as the excellencies of the climate of the whole region.

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  • The country is naturally very healthful, as evidence of which may be mentioned that no great epidemic has ever visited the state.

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  • The birds of Australia in their number and variety of species may be deemed some compensation for its poverty of mammals; yet it will not stand comparison in this respect with regions of Africa and South America in the same latitudes.

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  • Of those peculiar to Australian waters may be mentioned the arripis, represented by what is called among the colonists a salmon trout.

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  • Two existing fishes may be mentioned as ranking in interest with the Myrmecobius (ant-eater) in the eyes of the naturalist.

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  • The assertion by the Queensland authorities that there are 50,000 aborigines in that state is a crude estimate, and may be far wide of the truth.

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  • The census of Western Australia included only those aborigines in the employment of the colonists; and as a large part of this, the greatest of the Australian states, is as yet unexplored, it may be presumed that the aborigines enumerated were very far short of the whole number of persons of that race in the state.

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  • Taking all things into consideration, the aboriginal population of the continent may be set down at something like 180,000.

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  • In the five years 1881-1888 the rate was 8 08 marriages (16.1 persons) per thousand of the population, declining to 6.51 in 1891-1895; in recent years there has been a considerable improvement, and the Australian marriage rate may be quoted as ranging between 6.75 and 7.25.

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  • This sum represents the interest payable on government loans placed outside Australia, mainly in England, and the income from British and other capital invested in the country; the former may be estimated at £7,300,000 and the latter £8,000,000 per annum.

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  • In his treatment of women the aboriginal may be ranked lower than even the Fuegians.

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  • Amongst the more important explorations may be ranked those of Tietkins in 1889, of Lindsay in 1891, of Wells in 1896, of Hiibbe in 1896, and of the Hon.

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  • It may be said that exploration on a large scale is now at an end; there remain only the spaces, nowhere very extensive, between the tracks of the old explorers yet to be examined, and these are chiefly in the Northern Territory and in Western Australia north of the tropic of Capricorn.

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  • Previous to the gold discoveries of 1851 they may be included, from 1839, in a general summary view.

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  • As regards the last mentioned it may be said that it was accomplished from within, there being no real external necessity for the union of the states.

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  • The allegations made con cerning the Chinese really amounted to a charge of undue 1 Australia, it may be noted, has woman's suffrage in all the states (Victoria, the last, adopting it in November 1908), and for the federal assembly.

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  • The powers and rights of existing colonies to remain intact, except as regards such powers as it may be necessary to hand over to the Federal government.

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  • Bills imposing taxation or appropriating revenue must not originate in the Senate, and neither taxation bills nor bills appropriating revenue for the annual service of the government may be amended in the Senate, but the Senate may return such bills to the House of Representatives with a request for their amendment.

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  • The Labour movement in Australia may be traced back to the early days when transportation was in vogue, and the free immigrant and the time-expired convict objected to the competition of the bond labourer.

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  • A special board may be formed at the request of any union of employers or of workmen, or on the initiative of the Labour department.

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  • Iron, coal and slate are the chief products, and copper and cobalt may be added.

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  • Public opinion, it may be declared, designated Ferdinand de Lesseps as the head of the enterprise.

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  • The various forms into which materialism may be classified correspond to the various causes which induce men to take up materialistic views.

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  • The pre-Socratics may be classed as naïve materialists in this sense; though, as at that early period the contrast between matter and spirit had not been' fully realized and matter was credited with properties that belong to life, it is usual to apply the term hylozoism to the earliest stage of Greek metaphysical theory.

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  • There are two theories that may be put forward.

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  • The governor has limited powers of appointment and pardon and a veto power which may be overridden by a majority vote in each house.

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  • In various places throughout the county may be seen the ruins of several ancient castles, Danish raths or encampments, and tumuli, in the last of which urns and stone coffins have sometimes been found.

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  • Many inscriptions and ancient fragments may be seen built into the houses; in front of the Madonna delle Grazie is a bull in red Egyptian granite, and in the Piazza Papiniano the fragments of two Egyptian obelisks erected in A.D.

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  • Robur, one of the most valued of the genus, and the most celebrated in history and myth, may be taken as a type of the oaks with sinuated leaves.

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  • Where artificial copsewood is the object, hazel, hornbeam and other bushes may be planted between the oaks; but, when large timber is required, the trees are best without undergrowth.

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  • The young trees require protection from storms and late frosts even more than in England; the red pine of the north-eastern states, Pinus resinosa, answers well as a nurse, but the pitch pine and other species may be employed.

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  • Cromwell's policy in this instance was not overturned at the Restoration, and the great Jewish immigration into England with all its important consequences may be held to date practically from these first concessions made by Cromwell.

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  • Beechey's nomenclature, it may be added that he called a large bay on the south of Peel Island Fitton Bay, and a bay on the south-west of Buckland Island Walker Bay.

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  • The foundations of our knowledge of the relief of the Atlantic basin may be said to have been laid by the work of H.M.S.

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  • These last may be of the nature of " reaction " currents; they are collectively known as the equatorial counter-current.

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  • The sub-surface circulation in the Atlantic may be regarded as consisting of two parts.

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  • It may be created by contract, by statute or by judgment.

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  • But in cases where a debt or instalment is in arrear and it is proved to the satisfaction of the court that the person making default either has or has had since the date of the order or judgment the means to pay the sum in respect of which he has made default and has refused or neglected to pay, he may be committed to prison at the discretion of the judge for a period of not more than forty-two days.

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  • His command of the art is such that his plays read like original works, and it may be at least said that some of his characters stand out so vividly from his canvas that they have ever since served as representatives of certain types of humanity, e.g.

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  • Mere Angelique Arnaud, who at this time put herself under his direction and wished to join the Order of the Visitation, attracted by its humility and sweetness, may be named as the most interesting of his innumerable penitents of this period.

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  • Anemometers may be divided into two classes, (1) those that measure the velocity, (2) those that measure the pressure of the wind, but inasmuch as there is a close connexion between the pressure and the velocity, a suitable anemometer of either class will give information about both these quantities.

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  • The other forms of velocity anemometer may be described as belonging to the windmill type.

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  • A violent gust strikes the plate, which is driven back and carried by its own momentum far past the position in which a steady wind of the same force would place it; by the time the motion has reached the pen it has been greatly exaggerated by the springiness of the connexion, and not only is the plate itself driven too far back, but also its position is wrongly recorded by the pen; the combined errors act the same way, and more than double the real maximum pressure may be indicated on the chart.

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  • Thus if the instrument depends on the pressure or suction effect alone, and this pressure or suction is measured against the air pressure in an ordinary room, in which the doors and windows are carefully closed and a newspaper is then burnt up the chimney, an effect may be produced equal to a wind of io m.

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  • When work is done against these forces no full equivalent of potential energy may be produced; this applies especially to frictional forces, for if the motion of the system be reversed the forces will be also reversed and will still oppose the motion.

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  • The ratio of the portion of the energy of a system which can under given conditions be converted into mechanical work to the whole amount of energy operated upon may be called the "availability" of the energy.

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  • By continuing this process every unit of mass which enters B will carry with it more energy than each unit which leaves B, and hence the temperature of the gas in B will be raised and that of the gas in A lowered, while no heat is lost and no energy expended; so that by the application of intelligence alone a portion of gas of uniform pressure and temperature may be sifted into two parts, in which both the temperature and the pressure are different, and from which, therefore, work can be obtained at the expense of heat.

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  • In 1875 Lord Rayleigh published an investigation on "the work which may be gained during the mixing of gases."

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  • When the pressure on one side of the diaphragm thus becomes greater than that on the other, work may be done at the expense of heat in pushing the diaphragm, and the operation carried on with continual gain of work until the gases are uniformly diffused.

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  • It is practically important to consider the rate at which energy may be transformed into useful work, or the horse-power of the agent.

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  • He immediately brought forward a scheme for improving the condi - tion of the poorer clergy by equalizing the incomes of the bishops, the reception of which at the time may be imagined, though it was substantially the same as that carried into effect by Lord Melbourne's government fifty years later.

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  • There is some reason to hope that the day of these misconceptions is passed; although there is also some reason to fear that on other grounds the present era may be known to posterity as an era of instrumentation comparable, in its gorgeous chaos of experiment and its lack of consistent ideas of harmony and form, only to the monodic period at the beginning of the 17th century, in which no one had ears for anything but experiments in harmonic colour.

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  • In every mature period of art it will be found that, however much the technical rules may be collected in one special category, every artistic category has a perfect interaction with all the others; and this is nowhere more perfectly shown than when the art is in its simplest possible form of maturity.

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  • Practically every law of harmony in 16th-century music may be equally well regarded as a law of vocal effect.

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  • The greater richness of tone of the modern pianoforte is a better compensation for any bareness that may be imputed to pure two-part or three-part writing than a filling out which deprives the listener of the power to follow the essential lines of the music. The same holds good, though in a lesser degree, of the resources of the harpsichord in respect of octavestrings.

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  • A subject so vast and so incapable of classification cannot be discussed here, but its aesthetic principles may be illustrated by the extreme case of the trumpets and horns, which in classical times had no scale except that of the natural harmonic series.

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  • It will be convenient to take one supreme composer as the artist who has dealt so consistently with the essentials of the new style that he may be conveniently regarded as its creator.

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  • The parasitic and free-living Nematodes are connected by transitional forms which are free at one stage of their existence and parasitic at another; they may be divided into two classes those that are parasitic in the larval state but free when adult, and those that are free in the larval state but parasitic when adult.

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  • Cranes may be divided into two main classes - revolving and non-revolving.

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  • Jib cranes can be subdivided into fixed cranes and portable cranes; in the former the central post or pivot is firmly fixed in a permanent position, while in the latter the whole crane is mounted on wheels, so that it may be transported from place to place.

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  • The net effective work of lifting that can be performed by a man turning a handle may be taken, for intermittent work, as being on an average about 5000 foot-lb per minute; this is equivalent to 1 ton lifted about 24 ft.

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  • Cranes fitted with rotating hydraulic engines may be considered as coming under the third category.

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  • Where electric or hydraulic cranes are worked from a central station the speed is greater, and may be roughly represented by V =5 +30o/T; e.g.

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  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.

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  • It contains all the essential elements of the hammer-headed crane, of which it may be considered to be the parent; in fact, the only essential difference is that the Titan is portable and the hammer-head crane fixed.

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  • In order that only one motor may be used, and also that the load may be lifted by a single part of rope, various devices have been invented.

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  • Mount Abu is at the south-western extremity of the range, and the north-eastern end may be said to terminate near Khetri in the Shaikhawati district of Jaipur, although a series of broken ridges is continued in the direction of Delhi.

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