Maxillae sentence example

maxillae
  • Hinds believe that the paired piercers are the inner lobes of the maxillae, and the unpaired piercer the left mandible, the right mandible being absent.
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  • The maxillae are not piercing organs, and their function is to protect the mandibles and labrum and separate the hairs or feathers of the host.
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  • The head - carrying feelers, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae - is succeeded by the three thoracic segments, each bearing a pair of strong five-segmented legs, whose feet, like those of the adult, carry two claws.
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  • The root-feeding larvae of the cockchafer and allied members of the Scarabaeidae have a ridged area on the mandible, which is scraped by teeth on the maxillae, apparently forming a stridulating organ.
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  • The inner lobe (lacinia) of the first maxilla terminates in an articulated hook, while in the second maxillae (labium) both inner and outer lobes ("ligula" and "para-glossae") are much Gyrinus sulcatus reduced.
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  • The mandibles are strong, adapted for biting the vegetable substances on which these beetles feed, and the palps of the second maxillae have three segments.
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  • The ventraPscleriteof the head-skeleton (gula), well developed in most families of beetles, is absent among the Rhynchophora, while the palps of the maxillae are much reduced.
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  • The mandibles, which are frequently used for carrying various objects, are situated well to the outside of the maxillae, so that they can be opened and shut without interfering with the latter.
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  • The head of an insect carries usually four pairs of conspicuous appendages - feelers, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae, so that the presence of four primitive somites is immediately evident.
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  • The maxillae of the hinder pair become more or less fused together to form a " lower lip " or labium, and the segment of these appendages is, in some insects, only imperfectly united with the head-capsule.
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  • As previously mentioned, a pair of minute jaws - the maxillulae- are present in the lowest order of insects, between the mandibles and the first maxillae.
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  • Such maxillae are found in most biting insects.
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  • The second pair of maxillae are more or less completely fused together to form what is known as the labium or " lower lip."
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  • In front or above the mouth is bounded by the labrum, while the mandibles and first maxillae lie on either side of it.
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  • Ia, frons; b, clypeus (the pointed labrum beneath it); II, mandible; III, first maxilla; (a, base; b, sheath; c, piercer), III', inner view of sheath; IV, second maxillae forming rostrum (b, mentum; c, ligula).
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  • Organs of similar type on the maxillae and epipharynx appear to exercise the function of taste.
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  • Biting mandibles; minute but distinct - maxillulae; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; vestigial maxillulae; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely fused; maxilIulae often distinct.
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  • First maxillae also modified as piercers; maxillae of both pairs with distinct palps.
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  • Mandibles and first maxillae modified as piercers; second maxillae fused to form a jointed, grooved rostrum.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae completely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae very intimately fused.
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  • Mandibles present in pupa, vestigial in imago; maxillae suctorial without specialization; first maxillae with lacinia, galea and palp. Prothorax small.
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  • Mandibles absent in imago, very exceptionally present in pupa; first maxillae nearly always without laciniae and often without palps, or only with vestigial palps, their galeae elongated and grooved inwardly so as to form a sucking trunk.
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  • Mandibles rarely present, adapted for piercing; first maxillae with palps; second maxillae forming with hypopharynx a suctorial proboscis.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely or completely fused; often forming a suctorial proboscis.
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  • All these orders agree in the possession of biting mandibles, while their second maxillae have the inner and outer lobes usually distinct.
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  • The Hemiptera, with their piercing mandibles and first maxillae and with their second maxillae fused to form a jointed beak, stand far apart from them.
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  • The standing of the Trichoptera in a position almost ancestral to the Lepidoptera is one of the assured results of recent morphological study, the mobile mandibulate pupa and the imperfectly suctorial maxillae of the Trichoptera reappearing in the lowest families of the Lepidoptera.
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  • There seems no doubt that the suctorial mouth-organs of the Diptera have arisen quite independently from those of the Lepidoptera, for in the former order the sucker is formed from the second maxillae, in the latter from the first.
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  • Specialized as they are in form, development and habit, they retain mandibles for biting, and in their lower sub-order - the Symphyta - the maxillae are hardly more modified than those of the.Orthoptera.
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  • The mouth parts are well developed, consisting of an upper lip, powerful mandibles, maxillae with three-jointed palpi, and a deeply quadrifid labium or lower lip with three-jointed labial palpi.
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  • The proboscis of tsetse-flies is without the paired piercing stilets (mandibles and maxillae) possessed by other bloodsucking Diptera, such as the female horse-flies and mosquitoes.
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  • Sharp, however, the hypopharynx is present in all Hymenoptera as a distinct structure at the base of the " tongue," which must be regarded as representing the fused laciniae of the second maxillae.
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  • Eugereon is a remarkable Permian fossil, with jaws that are typically hemipterous except that the second maxillae are not fused and with cockroach-like wings.
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  • The second antennae, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae may also be claimed as of malacostracan type.
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  • This " leaf-footed " suborder has the appendages which follow the second maxillae variable in number, but all foliaceous and branchial.
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  • In these the furcal branches are linear or rudimentary, the shell is without rostral sinus, and, besides distinguishing characters of the second 2ntennae, they have always a branchial plate well developed on the first maxillae, which is inconstant in the other tribe.
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  • The variable first maxillae are seldom pediform, their function being concerned chiefly with nutrition, sensation and respiration.
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  • Muller, our leading authority, adopts the confusing plan of calling them second maxillae in the Cypridinidae (including Asteropidae), maxillipeds in the Halocypridae and Cyprididae, and first legs in the Bairdiidae, Cytheridae, Polycopidae and Cytherellidae, so that in his fine monograph he uses the term first leg in two quite different senses.
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  • Giesbrecht and Hansen have shown that the mouth-organs consist of mandibles, first and second maxillae and maxillipeds; and Claus himself relinquished his long-maintained hypothesis that the last two pairs were the separated exopods and endopods of a single pair of appendages.
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  • The tenth abdominal segment carries a pair of jointed cerci which are often elongate, and the feelers are always long, while the jaws are usually feeble and membranous, though the typical parts of a mandibulate mouth are present - mandibles, maxillae with inner and outer lobes and palps, and second maxillae (labium) whose lacinae are not fused to form a ligula.
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  • Structurally the Neuroptera are distinguished by elongate feelers, a large, free prothorax, a labium with the inner lobes of the second maxillae fused together to form a median ligula, membranous, net-veined wings without hairy covering, those of the two pairs being usually alike, the absence of abdominal cerci, and the presence of six or eight Malpighian tubes.
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  • They are abundantly distinct from the Neuroptera and Mecaptera, through the absence of mandibles in the imago, the maxillae - both pairs of which possess the typical inner and outer lobes and jointed palps - forming a suctorial apparatus.
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  • Of the corresponding pairs of appendages thirteen belong to the head and trunk, two pairs of antennae, one pair of mandibles, two pairs of maxillae, followed by three which may be all maxillipeds or may help to swell the number of trunk-legs to which the next five pairs belong.
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  • In the mandibles and maxillae some of the terminal joints of the stem are invariably wanting.
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  • In the Machilidae and Lepismidae (these two families are known as the Ectotrophi) the maxillae are like those of typical biting insects, and there is a median tail-bristle in addition to the paired cerci; while in the Campodeidae and Japygidae (which form the group Entotrophi) the jaws are apparently sunk in the head, through a deep inpushing at the mouth, and there is no median tail-bristle.
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  • Willem it appears that the viscid fluid which causes the adherence of the ventral tube is secreted by a pair of glands in the head whose ducts open into a superficial groove leading from the second maxillae backward to the tube on the first abdominal segment.
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  • The maxillulae and maxillae (or, as they are often termed, first and second maxillae) are nearly always flattened leaf-like appendages, having gnathobasic lobes or endites borne by the segments of the protopodite.
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  • The most important excretory or renal organs of the Crustacea are two pairs of glands lying at the base of the antennae and of the second maxillae respectively.
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  • It is not true that all the biting processes of the Arthropod limb are thus produced - for instance, the jaws of Peripatus are formed by the axis or corm itself, whilst the poisonjaws of Chilopods, as also their maxillae, appear to be formed rather by the apex or terminal region of the ramus of the limb; but the opposing jaws (= hemignaths) of Crustacea, Arachnida and Hexapoda are gnathobases, and not the axis or corm.
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  • The two somites following the mandibular or first post-oral or buccal somite carry appendages modified as maxillae.
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  • It is mainly formed by the maxillae, as the palatines are very narrow.
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  • Moreover, the upper jawbones (maxillae) and the nasal bones are also short in the sloth.
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  • He therefore regards it as the inner lobe (lacinia) of that maxilla, comparing it with the remarkable " pick " of the maxilla of a book-louse (see Copeognatha in article Neuroptera), The paired piercers, connected by muscles with the base of the maxillae, but attached directly to the head skeleton, into which they can be withdrawn, are regarded by Borner as true mandibles.
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  • Ileymons, the hypopharynx represents the sterna of all the jaw-bearing somites, but other students consider that it belongs to the mandibular and first maxillary segments, or entirely to the segment of the first maxillae.
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  • Biting mandibles; first maxillae elongate; second maxillae completely fused.
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  • Mandibles fused into a piercer; first maxillae developed as piercers; palps of both pairs of maxillae present; hypopharynx wanting.
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  • They differ from the Diptera, however, in the general presence of palps to both pairs of maxillae, and in the absence of a hypopharynx, so it is possible that their relationship to the Diptera is less close than has been supposed.
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  • Muller) has the second maxillae transformed into suckers, but in Dolops (Audouin, 1837) (fig.
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  • There is, however, good embryological evidence in some Hexapods of the existence of a seventh somite, the supra-lingual, occurring between the somite of the mandibles and the somite of the first maxillae (4).
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