Mary sentence examples

mary
  • Mary looked around and saw Samuel Miller asking his neighbor for a pencil, and Samuel was called.

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  • Princess Mary was still looking silently at her brother and her beautiful eyes were full of love and sadness.

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  • The traveller on the prairie is naturally a hunter, on the head waters of the Missouri and Columbia a trapper, and at the Falls of St. Mary a fisherman.

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  • Princess Mary was first surprised and then aghast at this question.

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  • Mary had never been the jealous type, but then, where love was concerned, people changed.

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  • Mary entered the kitchen and frowned.

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  • Mary shrugged and smiled wryly.

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  • Mary watched her intently.

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  • Mary added another plate to the stack.

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  • The conversation with Adrena was comforting, but Mary maintained her viewpoint.

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  • She is a relation of yours, Princess Mary Bolkonskaya.

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  • Mary threw her hands in the air.

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  • You haven't been in to see Mary for a while.

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  • The four Gothic churches of St Nicholas,' St Mary, with a lofty steeple, St James and The Holy Ghost, and the fine medieval town hall, dating in its oldest part from 1306 and restored in 1882, are among the more striking buildings.

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  • Defoe married, on New Year's Day, 1684, Mary Tuffley, who survived until December 1732.

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  • Carmen stopped washing the dish in her hand and stared at Mary in mute silence.

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  • We're living in the 21st century, Mary.

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  • The wedding took place some years later (1509), and several children were born, none of whom survived except the princess Mary.

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  • Mary's tone became dry again.

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  • Mary stood by, unusually quiet, but when Cade left she found her voice.

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  • So Cade had visited Mary last night.

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  • Hopefully Mary wouldn't be too angry with him.

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  • Cade was the man of her dreams, but was Mary the woman of his?

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  • I went to see Robert and Mr. Graves and Mrs. Graves and little Natalie, and Mr. Farris and Mr. Mayo and Mary and everyone.

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  • Yesterday I read to her the story of 'Macbeth,' as told by Charles and Mary Lamb.

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  • The subject was how Mary had been a vessel to carry the son of god.

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  • Mary gnawed on her lower lip and it was her turn to blush.

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  • He was no more expressive around Mary than anyone else, but he often asked her opinion on things.

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  • The life of old Prince Bolkonski, Prince Andrew, and Princess Mary had greatly changed since 1805.

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  • After that Princess Mary did not see her father for a whole week.

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  • A moment of silence preceded Mary's response.

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  • After a long pause, Mary's voice sounded concerned.

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  • Everything considered, it was easier to make the decision to take the job than to placate Mary.

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  • Dad's old truck had been sitting at Mary's since it broke down.

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  • Could there be truth to Mary's suspicions.

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  • Was it possible that he was equally interested in Mary?

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  • At Mary's startled look, she was afraid she had stepped over the line.

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  • It was none of her business and she certainly didn't want to hurt Mary's feelings.

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  • Why didn't he simply say he wanted to go see Mary?

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  • She had barely finished putting the things away when Mary knocked on the kitchen door.

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  • Mary quirked a brow.

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  • They talked for several hours and when Mary left, Cade was nowhere in sight.

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  • Had Mary accused him as well?

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  • The evening was young and she had ruined his chance to spend it with Mary.

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  • But if Mary and Cade met, there was no indication.

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  • Maybe she and Mary were merely his friends.

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  • Maybe that was why Mary seemed so concerned that she would become romantically involved with Cade.

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  • If he wanted to see Mary, why did he have to drag her along?

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  • If you want to visit Mary, why don't you go see her?

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  • Nor did she want him to see Mary.

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  • Hadn't Mary warned her?

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  • After Cade left the next morning she phoned Mary.

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  • Swallowing her pride, she dialed Mary's number.

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  • When Mary answered, Cynthia stammered around about the weather and every other subject she could think of.

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  • But Mary wasn't fooled.

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  • Mary was silent again for a few moments and when she spoke it was in a controlled voice.

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  • Mary's voice was compassionate.

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  • Mary was silent a long time and then she finally spoke.

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  • Had it been that long since she talked to Mary?

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  • Mary showed up one morning in time to witness that fact.

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  • Mary gaped at her.

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  • Mary shook her head.

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  • For crying out loud, Cindy, he'll be devastated, Mary interrupted.

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  • And so they both managed to get her things into Mary's truck.

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  • She couldn't stay with Mary forever.

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  • Mary was still out, so she sat down and read the pamphlet.

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  • The familiar scrawl belonged to Mary.

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  • You know, when Mary put in her untimely appearance.

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  • Then when Mary arrived, you ran off.

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  • I thought you were upset because Mary caught us together.

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  • I called Mary to see if you were there and she filled me in on the whole thing.

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  • I decided to talk to you this weekend, but I guess Mary found the form and took it upon herself to mail it to you.

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  • Betsy screamed, It's like if The Lord Jesus was standing here, writing a mother's day card to the Virgin Mary, you'd be sitting around on your asses discussing if it was really the month of May!

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  • "Mother Mary," he murmured.

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  • Mary needs an environment without stress.

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  • His eyes landed on a perfect Little Red Riding Hood, right down to the ankle socks and patent leather Mary Janes.

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  • "I'm Larry... of Mary and Larry," he said in a southern drawl.

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  • Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds had three girls, Joan, Mary and Alice – in that order and each born two years after the other, more or less.

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  • "So did Josh," Mary said without looking up from the magazine she was flipping through.

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  • "And he's slight of build," Mary added.

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  • "Neither is rich man," Mary supplied, her lips twisting into a wry smile.

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  • Mary's laugh was more a snort.

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  • "Back in the early 1900's," Mary said sarcastically.

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  • Lori came in and handed cake to Joan, Mary and Alice.

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  • Mary gave her a scorching look, but said nothing.

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  • Maybe Mary was right – and yet, that would mean her parents had been wrong.

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  • Mary, who had always been opposed to Josh marrying Lori, was the only one who spoke.

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  • Mary & Joe Foreman were friends of mine.

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  • The cruciform church of St Mary, with a central tower and short spire, is in great part Early English, with Perpendicular additions; but considerable traces of a Norman building were revealed during a modern restoration.

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  • St Mary's College was in fact formally founded in 1382, and the school had been going on since 1373 (A.

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  • The site was five acres, and the building is described in the letters patent " as a fitting and noble college mansion in honour of the most glorious Virgin Mary and St Bernard in Northgates Street outside the Northgate of Oxford."

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  • and his wife Mary.

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  • El-`Azariyeh is a poor village of about thirty families, with few marks of antiquity; there is no reason to believe that the houses of Mary and Martha and of Simon the Leper, or the sepulchre of Lazarus, still shown by the monks, have any claim to the names they bear.

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  • Under the influence of Archbishop Chicheley, who had himself founded two colleges in imitation of Wykeham, and Thomas Bekynton, king's secretary and privy seal, and other Wyke - hamists, Henry VI., on the 11th of October 1440, founded, in imitation of Winchester College, "a college in the parish church of Eton by Windsor not far from our birthplace," called the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton by Windsor, as "a sort of first-fruits of his taking the government on himself."

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  • The dedication to Mary Magdalen was no doubt derived from the hospital at Winchester of which the founder had been master.

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  • Having obtained a papal bull, he founded it by deed of the 12th of June 1458, converting the hospital into a college with a president and six fellows, to which college two days later Magdalen Hall surrendered itself and its possessions, its members being incorporated into "the New College of St Mary Magdalen."

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  • Even the Virgin Mary, though she is styled Mother of God and Queen of Heaven, receives only dulia or at most hyperdulia.

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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.

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  • The church of St Mary is mainly Perpendicular, and contains a Norman font and monuments of the 8th century.

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  • (London, 1900); Mary A.

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  • On the 18th of August 1477, by his marriage at Ghent to Mary, who had just inherited Burgundy and the Netherlands from her father Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, he effected a union of great importance in the history of the house of Habsburg.

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  • He inspired the production of The Dangers and Adventures of the Famous Hero and Knight Sir Teuerdank, an allegorical poem describing his adventures on his journey to marry Mary of Burgundy.

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  • It was the birthplace of Henry VIII., Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, and here Edward VI.

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  • from Inigo Jones's designs, and in that of Queen Anne from designs by Sir Christopher Wren; and behind these buildings are on the west those of King William and on the east those of Queen Mary, both from Wren's designs.

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  • In Mary's reign (1555) the licences were withdrawn, the queen or her advisers deeming the game an excuse for "unlawful assemblies, conventicles, seditions and conspiracies."

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  • In the earliest periods of Christian art this splendour was confined to the figures of the persons of the Godhead, but it was afterwards extended to the Virgin Mary and to several of the saints.

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  • His father, Georg Karl Benjamin Ritschl (1783-1858), became in 1810 pastor at the church of St Mary in Berlin, and from 1827 to 1854 was general superintendent and evangelical bishop of Pomerania.

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  • The church of St Mary and St Modwen is classic in style, of the 18th century, but embodies some remains of an ancient Gothic building.

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  • Its church of St Mary is mainly Decorated, and a few old houses remain.

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  • The church of St Mary and All Saints is a large and beautiful cruciform building principally of the Decorated period.

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  • 46) in which Joseph and Mary lived (Luke i.

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  • ' For none of these can anything be said, save that it is possible that the village spring (called "St Mary's Well") is the same as that used in the time of Christ.

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  • A picturesque avenue leads to the church of St Mary, principally Early English and Perpendicular, with remains of Norman work, having a lofty tower surmounted by a spire, and containing several fine monuments, tombs and brasses.

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  • He was specially devoted to the Virgin Mary, and wrote an Officium Beatae Virginis, in addition to many letters, sermons, and other writings.

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  • The church of St Mary and St German belonged to a Benedictine abbey founded under a grant from William the Conqueror in 1069 and raised to the dignity of a mitred abbey by Pope Alexander II.

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  • The pulpit of St Mary's was no longer closed to him, but the success of Balliol in the schools gave rise to jealousy in other colleges, and old prejudices did not suddenly give way; while a new movement in favour of " the endowment of research " ran counter to his immediate purposes.

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  • building and St Paul's Episcopal, the Second Presbyterian and St Mary's (Roman Catholic) churches.

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  • On the accession of Mary he was deprived of all his offices, but in the succeeding reign was prominently employed in public affairs.

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  • St Mary's Hall (1836) is devoted to the education of poor clergymen's daughters.

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  • In the 6th century the emperor Justinian erected a magnificent basilica at Jerusalem, in honour of the Virgin Mary, and attached to it two hospitals, one for the reception of pilgrims and one for the accommodation of the sick poor.

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  • On the mount of Olives are the Russian church, tower and hospice, near the chapel of the Ascension; the French Paternoster church; the Carmelite nunnery; and the Russian church of St Mary Magdalene, near Gethsemane.

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  • He constructed "Morton's Dyke" across the fens from Wisbech to Peterborough, repaired the episcopal palace at Hatfield and the school of canon law and St Mary's Church at Oxford.

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  • So far the mud-fish has been found only in the Mary and the Burnett rivers.

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  • The parish church of St Mary Magdalene was rebuilt, in 1726-1729, near the site of the old one dating from before the 12th century.

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  • and Mary.

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  • representing Flanders, Brabant, Hainault and Holland met at Ghent, where Mary was detained almost as a prisoner, and compelled her (February 10, 1477) to sign the " Great Privilege."

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  • On these conditions Mary obtained the hearty support of the states Against France, but her humiliations were not yet at an end; two of her privy councillors, accused of traitorous intercourse with the enemy, were, despite her entreaties, seized, tried and beheaded (April 3).

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  • The duchess Mary, died from the effects of a fall from her horse (March 1482), and Maximilian became regent (mambourg) for his son.

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  • After the death of Margaret, Charles appointed his sister Mary, the widowed queen of Hungary, to the regency, and for twenty years she retained her post, until the abdication Mary of in fact of Charles V.

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  • Mary was forced to impose taxation which met with violent resistance, especially in 1539 from the stiff-necked town of Ghent.

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  • At Nancy Charles was himself among the slain, leaving his only daughter Mary of Burgundy, then in her twentieth year, sole iheiress to his possessions.

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  • claimed the of reversion of the French fiefs, and seized Burgundy, Mary Burgundy Franche Comte and Artois.

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  • St Mary's in Builth, took its name from the ancient territorial division of Buallt in which it is situated, which was, according to Nennius, an independent principality in the beginning of the 9th century, and later a cantrev, corresponding to the modern hundred of Builth.

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  • The church of St Mary and St Nicholas is a cruciform building in red sandstone, of the Decorated and Perpendicular periods, with a central octagonal tower.

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  • nor Mary should ever have admitted him to the privy council.

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  • of Orange, having married Mary, daughter of Charles I.

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  • Of these Bridget was the wife successively of Ireton and Fleetwood, Elizabeth married John Claypole, Mary was wife of Thomas Belasyse, Lord Fauconberg; and Frances was the wife of Sir Robert Rich, and secondly of Sir John Russell.

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  • St Mary's church was opened in 1903, but occupies a site which bore a church in Saxon times, though the previous building dated only from 1786.

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  • The lines include the Chatham, the Royal Marine, the Brompton, the Hut, St Mary's and naval barracks; the garrison hospital, Melville hospital for sailors and marines, the arsenal, gymnasium, various military schools, convict prison, and finally the extensive dockyard system for which the town is famous.

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  • It was now that he began to frequent the ruined little chapel of St Mary of the Angels, known as the Portiuncula, where much of his time was passed in prayer.

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  • Mary Thy Mother stopped at the foot of the Cross, but poverty mounted it with Thee and clasped Thee in her embrace unto the end; and when Thou wast dying of thirst, as a watchful spouse she prepared for Thee the gall.

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  • He terminated the war with Holland in 1674, and from that time maintained a friendly correspondence with William; while in 1677, after two years of tedious negotiations, he overcame all obstacles, and in spite of James's opposition, and without the knowledge of Louis XIV., effected the marriage between William and Mary that was the germ of the Revolution and the Act of Settlement.

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  • He appears to have thought that William would not claim the crown,' and at first supported the theory that the throne having been vacated by James's flight the succession fell as of right to Mary; but as this met with little support, and was rejected both by William and by Mary herself, he voted against the regency and joined with 7 Add.

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  • In 1690, during William's absence in Ireland, he was appointed Mary's chief adviser.

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  • Anne's sister, Mary Boleyn, had been Henry VIII.'s mistress; this by canon law was a bar to his marriage with Anne - a bar which had been removed by papal dispensation in 1527, but now the papal power to dispense in such cases had been repudiated, and the original objection revived.

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  • by which the succession devolved upon Mary, and now he violated his oath by signing Edward's " device " of the crown to Lady Jane Grey.

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  • On the accession of Mary he was summoned to the council - most of whom had signed the same device - reprimanded for his conduct, and ordered to confine himself to his palace at Lambeth until the queen's pleasure was known.

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  • Renard thought he would be executed, but so true a Romanist as Mary could scarcely have an ecclesiastic put to death in consequence of a sentence by a secular court, and Cranmer was reserved for treatment as a heretic by the highest of clerical tribunals, which could not act until parliament had restored the papal jurisdiction.

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  • On the 21st of March he was taken to St Mary's church, and asked to repeat his recantation in the hearing of the people as he had promised.

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  • But they sat again for this purpose under Mary and Elizabeth and (save between 1640 and 1661) continued regular criminal sessions till towards the end of the 17th century as continuously and constantly as the king's courts (op. cit.).

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  • After the death of Mary of Burgundy, who had resided in the city, they forced her husband, the archduke Maximilian, to conclude the treaty of Arras (1482).

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  • This was the favourite shrine of Mary of Guise, who betook herself hither at momentous crises in her history.

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  • south-east, on the verge of Haddingtonshire, is Carberry Hill, where Mary surrendered to the lords of the Congregation in 1567, the spot being still known as Queen Mary's Mount.

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  • The government offices, art gallery and exchange, with St Mary's cathedral (Anglican), a building in a combination of native timbers, St Paul's and St Patrick's cathedral (Roman Catholic), are noteworthy buildings.

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  • The maiden name of the poet's mother was Mary Arden, and this name, that of an ancient county family, survives in the district north-west of Stratford, the Forest of Arden, though the true forest character is long lost.

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  • The treatises on physical geography by Mrs Mary Somerville and Sir John Herschel (the lattewritten for the eighth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica) showed the effect produced in Great Britain by the stimulus of Humboldt's work.

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  • All Northmen were not bent on rapine and plunder; mary were peaceful merchants.

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  • Just south of the city is Kemper Hall, a Protestant Episcopal school for girls, under the charge of the Sisters of St Mary, opened in 1870 as a memorial to Jackson Kemper (1789-1870), the first missionary bishop (1835-1859), and the first bishop of Wisconsin (1854-1870) of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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  • to find a place at once among the advisers of William and Mary, and he was excepted from the act of indemnity of 1690.

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  • JAMES HEPBURN BOTHWELL, 4TH Earl Of, duke of Orkney and Shetland (c. 1536-1578), husband of Mary, queen of Scots, son of Patrick, 3rd earl of Bothwell, and of Agnes, daughter of Henry, Lord Sinclair, was born about 1536.

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  • Though a Protestant, he supported the government of Mary of Guise, showed himself violently anti-English, and led a raid into England, subsequently in 1559 meeting the English commissioners and signing articles for peace on the border.

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  • He joined Mary at Paris in September, and in 156 1 was sent by her as a commissioner to summon the parliament; in February he arrived in Edinburgh and was chosen a privy councillor on the 6th of September.

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  • The same year, however, he was recalled by Mary to aid in the suppression of Murray's rebellion, successfully eluding the ships of Elizabeth sent to capture him.

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  • In Bothwell also, "the glorious, rash and hazardous young man," romantic, handsome, charming even in his guilt, Mary gained what she lacked in her husband, a lover.

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  • He now stood forth as her champion; Mary took refuge with him at Dunbar, presented him, among other estates, with the castle there and the chief lands of the earldom of March, and made him the most powerful noble in the south of Scotland.

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  • He himself superintended all the preparations, visiting Darnley with Mary on the night of the crime, Sunday, 9th of February 1567, attending the queen on her return to Holyrood for the ball, and riding back to Kirk o' Field to carry out the crime.

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  • On the 24th he seized Mary's willing person near Edinburgh, and carried her to his castle at Dunbar.

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  • Archbishop Hamilton, however, who now granted the decree, had himself obtained a papal dispensation for the marriage, 1 and in consequence it is extremely doubtful whether according to the Roman Catholic law Bothwell and Mary were ever husband and wife.

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  • In June Mary and Bothwell fled from Holyrood to Borthwick Castle, whence Bothwell, on the place being surrounded by Morton and his followers, escaped to Dunbar, Mary subsequently joining him.

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  • Bothwell invited any one of the nobles to single combat, but Mary forbade the acceptance of the challenge.

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  • Meanwhile, during the negotiations, the queen's troops had been deserting; a surrender became inevitable, and Bothwell returned to Dunbar, parting from Mary for ever.

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  • He corresponded frequently with Mary, but there being no hopes whatever of his restoration, and a new suitor being found in the duke of Norfolk, Mary demanded a divorce, on pleas which recall those of Henry VIII.

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  • After the downfall of Mary, Bothwell's good treatment came to an end, and on the 16th of June 1573 he was removed to the castle of Dragsholm or Adelersborg in Zealand.

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  • He left no lawful descendants; but his nephew, Francis Stewart Hepburn, who, through his father, John Stewart, prior of Coldingham, was a grandson of King James V., and was thus related to Mary, queen of Scots, and the regent Murray, was in 1581 created earl of Bothwell.

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  • He was anxious that Mary Stuart's death 1 Hist.

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  • Chalmers's Life of Mary, Queen of Scots (1818); Life of Bothwell, by F.

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  • of Mary, Queen of Scots, by J.

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  • See also MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS.

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  • He was not released until the accession of Mary, parliament restoring his dukedom on his petition for reversal of the attainder.

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  • The bride was Mary, sole heir in her issue of her father Henry, the last of the Fitzalan earls of Arundel.

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  • After promising fidelity and the abandonment of the Scots marriage scheme, Cecil took him corresponding with Mary and tampering with the Ridolfi plot.

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  • LADY DAY, originally the name for all the days in the church calendar marking any event in the Virgin Mary's life, but now restricted to the feast of the Annunciation, held on the 25th of March in each year.

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  • The latter industry declined before the reign of Queen Mary, but has since been revived.

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  • After the death of his mother in 1463, and of her principal supporter, James Kennedy, bishop of St Andrews, two years later, the person of the young king, and with it the chief authority in the kingdom, were seized by Sir Alexander Boyd and his brother Lord Boyd, while the latter's son, Thomas, was created earl of Arran and married to the king's sister, Mary.

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  • He married Mary Alsop (1769-1819) of New York in 1786 and removed to that city in 1788.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the waterworks, the water being obtained from Lake Saint Mary, one of a chain of small lakes lying S.

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  • In December 1774, as a militia captain he assisted in the capture of Fort William and Mary at New Castle, New Hampshire, one of the first overt acts of the American colonists against the property of the crown.

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  • Shortly after he settled at Laleham, he married Mary, youngest daughter of the Rev. John Penrose, rector of Fledborough, Nottinghamshire.

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  • His chief literary work was the often-translated Month of Mary (Vienna, 1843).

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  • See The Writings of Hugh Swinton Legare (2 vols., Charleston, S.C., 1846), edited by his sister, Mrs Mary Bullen, who contributed a biographical sketch; and two articles by B.

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  • Not far from the scene of this conflict stands Balquhain Castle, a seat of the Leslies, now a mere shell, which was occupied by Queen Mary in September 1562 before the fight at Corrichie between her forces, led by the earl of Moray, and those of the earl of Huntly.

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  • He met with such a favourable reception from the tsar that on his return to England a special envoy was sent to Moscow by Queen Mary, and he succeeded in obtaining for his countrymen the privilege of trading freely in Russian towns.

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  • By Mary Bohun Henry had four sons: his successor Henry V., Thomas, duke of Clarence, John, duke of Bedford, and Humphrey, duke of Gloucester; and two daughters, Blanche, who married Louis III., elector palatine of the Rhine, and Philippa, who married Eric XIII., king of Sweden.

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  • Among its four Evangelical churches, the cathedral and the church of St Mary are noteworthy.

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  • The principal buildings are the beautiful church of St Mary, dating from the 13th century, the theological seminary established in 1870, the gymnasium and the hospital.

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  • He abandoned his preferments on Mary's accession and made his way to Strassburg.

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  • President Harrison was twice married; in 1853 to Miss Caroline Lavinia Scott, by whom he had a son and a daughter, and in 1896 to Mrs Mary Scott Lord Dimmock, by whom he had a daughter.

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  • It is dedicated to Mary of Guise, and consists of the "Dreme" of Dame Scotia and her complaint against her three sons.

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  • Stair, Old Samoa (London, 1897); Mary S.

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  • In the following year he conducted the negotiations for the marriage of Mary of England and Philip II.

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  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.

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  • In 1514 she accompanied Mary Tudor to France on the marriage of the princess to Louis XII., remained there after the king's death, and became one of the women in waiting to Queen Claude, wife of Francis I.

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  • Unlike her sister Mary, who had fallen a victim to Henry's solicitations,' Anne had no intention of being the king's mistress; she meant to be his queen, and her conduct seems to have been governed entirely by motives of ambition.

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  • She, and not the king, probably was the author of the petty persecutions inflicted upon Catherine and upon the princess Mary, and her jealousy of the latter showed itself in spiteful malice.

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  • Mary was to be forced into the position of a humble attendant upon Anne's infant, and her ears were to be boxed if she proved recalcitrant.

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  • She was reported as saying that when the king gave opportunity by leaving England, she would put Mary to death even if she were burnt or flayed alive for it.

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  • He had stoutly opposed the marriage of Mary with Darnley, and when, after Restalrig, he was captured by the queen's troops, he narrowly escaped execution.

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  • Queen Mary held a council in it in 1562.

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  • stayed in the abbey for a short time in 1303 and Queen Mary spent two nights in it in 1562.

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  • The abbey church of St Mary the Virgin is a stately cruciform building with central tower, the nave and choir having aisles and clerestory.

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  • Mary's institute, a Roman Catholic commercial and business school.

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  • about 1040, containing among other relics of the cathedral an old altar supposed to be that of the idol Krodo which formerly stood on the Burgberg near Neustadt-Harzburg; the church of the former Benedictine monastery of St Mary, or Neuwerk, of the 12th century, in the Romanesque style, with wall-paintings of considerable merit; and the house of the bakers' gild now an hotel, the birthplace of Marshal Saxe.

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  • The other side is similar, with figures of St Leonard and St Mary Magdalene.

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  • It is the object of an ancient and famous pilgrimage due to the tradition that Mary, sister of the Virgin, and Mary, mother of James and John, together with their black servant Sara, Lazarus, Martha, Mary Magdalen and St Maximin fled thither to escape persecution in Judaea.

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  • St Mary over the river), receiving its present name after the suppression of the monasteries.

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  • Besides the priory of St Mary Overy, there was the hospital of St Thomas, founded in 1213 from the neighbouring priory of Bermondsey, and forming the origin of the great modern hospital of the same name in Lambeth (q.v.).

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  • He brought about the peace with France and marriage between Mary Tudor and Louis XII.

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  • He was the second son of Emmanuel Scrope Howe, 2nd Viscount Howe, who died governor of Barbadoes in March 1735, and of Mary Sophia Charlotte, a daughter of the baroness Kilmansegge, afterwards countess of Darlington, the mistress of George I.

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  • Lord Howe married, on the 10th of March 1758, Mary Hartop, the daughter of Colonel Chiverton Hartop of Welby in Leicestershire, and had issue two daughters.

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  • The tradition that he was descended from Dr Rowland Taylor, Cranmer's chaplain, who suffered martyrdom under Mary, is grounded on the untrustworthy evidence of a certain Lady Wray, said to have been a granddaughter of Jeremy Taylor.

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  • In the autumn of the same year he was appointed to preach in St Mary's on the anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot, and apparently used the occasion to clear himself of a suspicion, which, however, haunted him through life, of a secret leaning to the Romish communion.

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  • THE TEUTONIC ORDER, or Teutonic Knights of St Mary's Hospital at Jerusalem (Der deutsche Orden, Deutsche Ritter) was one of the three great military and religious orders which sprang from the Crusades.

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  • On the site of St Mary's (1837-1839), also Gothic, stood the small chapel raised by Christiana, sister of Robert Bruce, to the memory of her husband, Sir Christopher Seton, who had been executed on the spot by Edward I.

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  • James IV., James V., Mary and her son each visited it.

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  • It is further conjectured that she was a sister of Mary the mother of Jesus, in which case James and John would be cousins of Jesus.

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  • Rose mary Library was given to the city by Thomas Nelson Page in memory of his wife, who died in 1888.

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  • The approach of the " Monitor " and the Union gunboats up the James river caused a partial and temporary panic; President Davis appointed a day for prayer, and the families of some of the cabinet secretaries and many citizens fled the city precipitately; but confidence, restored by " Bacon's Rebellion," was auditor-general of the colony from 1687 until his death, and was a member of the committee which founded the College of William and Mary.

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  • " The minority of James V., 'the reign of Mary Stuart, the infancy of her son, and the civil wars of her grandson Charles I., were all periods of lasting waste.

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  • (On these points see Mary Taylor, Mrs Mill's grand-daughter, in Elliott's edition of the Letters.) closely reasoned and characteristic works, the Liberty, the Utilitarianism, the Thoughts on Parliamentary Reform, and the Subjection of Women, besides his posthumously published essays on Nature and on the Utility of Religion, were thought out and partly written in collaboration with his wife.

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  • In 1552 he was promoted to the rich deanery of Lincoln, and in July 1553 he supped with Northumberland at Cambridge, when the duke marched north on his hopeless campaign against Mary.

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  • But he found means to live in England throughout Mary's reign without further molestation.

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  • Parker's consecration was, however, only made legally valid by the plentitude of the royal supremacy; for the Edwardine Ordinal, which was used, had been repealed by Mary and not re-enacted by the parliament of 1559 Parker owes his fame to circumstances rather than to personal qualifications.

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  • MARY OF LORRAINE (1515-1560), generally known as Mary Of Guise, queen of James V.

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  • The duke died in June 1537, and Mary was sought in marriage by James V., whose wife Magdalene died in July, and by Henry VIII.

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  • Mary, who was made by adoption a daughter of France, received a papal dispensation for her marriage with James, which was celebrated by proxy in Paris (May 1538) and at St Andrews on her arrival in Scotland.

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  • April 1541), died within a few days of one another in April 1541, and her husband died in December 1542, within a week of the birth of his daughter and heiress, Mary, Queen of Scots.

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  • Cardinal David Beton, the head of the French and Catholic party and therefore Mary of Lorraine's friend and ally, produced a will of the late king in which the primacy in the regency was assigned to himself.

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  • Mary of Lorraine was approached by the English commissioner, Sir Ralph Sadler, to induce her to further her daughter's marriage contract with Edward VI.

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  • The marriage treaty between Mary, not then one year old, and Edward VI.

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  • was signed on the 1 st of July at Greenwich, and guaranteed that Mary should be placed in Henry's keeping when she was ten years old.

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  • After the queen's coronation in September Mary of Lorraine was made principal member of the council appointed to direct the affairs of the kingdom.

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  • The English invasions of 1547, undertaken with a view to enforcing the English marriage, gave Mary the desired pretext for a French alliance.

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  • Mary of Lorraine now gave her energies to the expulsion of the English and to the difficult task of keeping the peace between the Scots and their French auxiliaries.

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  • The hostility of Arran and his brother Archbishop Hamilton forced Mary into friendly relations with the lords who favoured the Protestant party.

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  • Mary of Lorraine broke the spirit of this agreement by garrisoning Perth with Scottish troops in the pay of France.

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  • Mary retreated to Edinburgh and thence to Dunbar, while Edinburgh opened its gates to the reformers, who issued a proclamation (Oct.

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  • Mary, with the assistance of a French contingent, began to fortify Leith.

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  • Mary entered Edinburgh and conducted a campaign in Fife.

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  • and Mary to take over Mary's regency on account of her failing health.

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  • When she knew that she was dying Mary sent for the lords of the Congregation, with whom she pleaded for the maintenance of the French alliance.

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  • Bain (Edinburgh, 2 vols., 1890-1899); Calendar of State Papers relating to Scotland and Mary Queen of Scots,1547-1603 (Edinburgh, 2 vols., 1898-1900), &c. There is a Life in Miss Strickland's Queens of Scotland (vols.

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  • Mary of Modena >>

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  • St Mary's church in the centre of the town possesses a massive tower of the 12th century.

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  • The church of St Mary contains a chapel dedicated to St Edward, commemorating that Edward who was murdered at Corfe Castle in this neighbourhood, whose body lay here before its removal to Shaftesbury.

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  • Mary, Peter and Ethelwold, and the site of the old castle may be traced.

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  • OTTERY ST MARY, a market town in the Honiton parliamentary division of Devonshire, England, 15 m.

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  • A recent valuable work is that of Mary B.

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  • This industrial centre is continued eastward in the urban district of East Ham (pop. 96,018), where the old village church of St Mary Magdalene retains Norman portions.

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  • One of the first military exploits of the War of Independence occurred at New Castle, where there was then a fort called William and Mary.

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  • Penrith and the adjoining township of St Mary's are chiefly remarkable for their connexion with the railway.

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  • Pop. (1901), of Penrith 3539, of St Mary's 1840.

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  • In 1J41 he became dean of Hereford, and in 1555 Queen Mary nominated him to the archbishopric of Dublin, and in the same year he was appointed lord chancellor of Ireland.

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  • Next year he was ordained to the curacy of St Mary's, Bryanston Square, and took priest's orders in 1868.

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  • part of the city is St Mary's park (30 acres).

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  • At Peekskill are the Peekskill military academy (1833, nonsectarian); St Mary's school, Mount St Gabriel (Protestant Episcopal), a school for girls established by the sisterhood of St Mary; the Field memorial library; St Joseph's home (Roman Catholic); the Peekskill hospital, and several sanatoria.

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  • This branch of the Capetians is also distinguished by its union with the Habsburgs, through the marriage of Mary, daughter of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, with Maximilian, afterwards the emperor Maximilian I.

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  • Baldwin and Amalric both married into the Comnenian house, while Manuel married Mary of Antioch, the daughter of Raymund.

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  • 2 John of Brienne had only ruled in right of his wife Mary.

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  • On the death of Conradin, Hugh of Cyprus had been recognized in the East as king of Jerusalem (1269); but his pretensions were opposed by Mary of Antioch, a granddaughter of Amalric II., who was prepared to bequeath her claims to Charles of Anjou, and was therefore naturally supported by him.

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  • In 1277 Mary of Antioch ceded to him her claims, and he was able to establish himself in Acre; in 1278 he took possession of the principality of Achaea.

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  • Mary of Antioch, who died 1277, leaving her claims to Charles of Anjou (king of Sicily).

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  • On the influence of her cult upon that of the Virgin Mary, see Rusch, Studien u.

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  • Mary Astell >>

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  • by Mary E.

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  • About the same time an attempt to organize a government at St Mary's was made by American sympathizers, and a petty civil war began between the Americans, who called themselves " Patriots," and the Indians, who were encouraged by the Spanish.

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  • The mortuary chapel attached to the Roman Catholic church of St Mary was built to receive the body of Napoleon III., who died at Camden Place in 1873; and that of his son was brought hither in 1879.

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  • On the 15th of August 1534, the Feast of the Assumption, they assembled in the crypt of the church of St Mary on Montmartre, and Faber, the only one who was a priest, said Mass.

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  • The church of St Mary is Perpendicular and has been enlarged in modern times.

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  • The elder, Eleanor, was given in 1374 to Thomas of Woodstock, seventh son of Edward III.; the younger, Mary, to Henry, earl of Derby, son of John of Gaunt and afterwards Henry IV., in 1380 or 1381.

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  • 690) from the ruins of Justinian's church of St Mary on Mount Sion, and the central avenue or nave built with them presents the appearance of a Christian church; it however runs north and south, the Mecca niche being at the south end; originally there were seven aisles on each side, now reduced to three.

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  • Workman, Persecution in the Early Church (London, 1906); Paul Allard, Ten Lectures on the Martyrs (London, 1907); John Foxe, The Book of Martyrs; Mary I.

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  • He left an illegitimate son, to whom was paid in 1524 one hundred and twenty livres for a copy of the Chronique intended for Charles V.'s sister Mary, queen of Hungary.

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  • and the West India Islands; another reached Jerusalem and preached against the superstition of the monks; Mary Fisher (fl.

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  • The interruption of preachers when celebrating divine service rendered the offender liable to three months' imprisonment under a statute of the first year of Mary, but Friends generally waited to speak till the service was over.'

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  • The Toleration Act was not the only law of William and Mary which benefited Quakers.

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  • In July 1656 two women Quakers, Mary Fisher and Ann Austin, arrived at Boston.

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  • St Mary's, the ancient parish church, has an elaborate 14th-century font and some monuments of interest.

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  • The cathedral church of St Mary dates from 1190-1225, but has been much altered in later times: it has a great square tower at the west end and two graceful octagonal towers at the east, and contains numerous memorials of the 17th century.

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  • It has a cathedral, near which lie buried Mary Menshikov, once betrothed to the tsar Peter II., and some of the Dolgorukis.

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  • The worship of Mary, largely developed during the reign of Pius IX., received further stimulus from Leo; nor did he do anything during his pontificate to correct the superstitions connected with popular beliefs concerning relics and indulgences.

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  • The African trade of England was long in the hands of exclusive companies; but by an act of the first year of William and Mary it became free and open to all subjects of the crown.

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  • He took a leading part in the negotiations connected with the king's marriages, first with Madeleine of France, and afterwards with Mary of Guise.

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  • On the death of James in December 1542 he attempted to assume office as one of the regents for the infant sovereign Mary, founding his pretensions on an alleged will of the late king; but his claims were disregarded, and the earl of Arran, head of the great house of Hamilton, and next heir to the throne, was declared regent by the estates.

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  • A son of John Bethune of Auchmuty and a nephew of Cardinal Beaton, James was a trusted adviser of the Scottish regent, Mary of Lorraine, widow of James V., and a determined foe of the reformers.

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  • In 1751 Wesley married Mary Vazeille, a widow, but the union was unfortunate and she finally left him.

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  • His full-length of Lady Mary Coke is remarkable for the skill and delicacy with which the white satin drapery is managed; while in the portrait of his brown-eyed wife, the eldest daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Evelick, in the Scottish National Gallery, we have a sweetness and tenderness which shows the painter at his highest.

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  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.

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  • During the 14th century there were constant quarrels between the citizens and the abbey of St Mary's about the suburb of Bootham, which the citizens claimed as within the jurisdiction of the city, and the abbey as a separate borough.

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  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.

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  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.

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  • The most notable churches are St Gotthard (14th century, remodelled in 1782) St Mary, attached to the Piarist college (1655-1658), the chapel of St Lawrence (13th century) and the church of the Holy Trinity belonging to the Franciscan friary (1655).

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  • Town and castle followed the vicissitudes of the dukedom of Norfolk, passing to the crown in 1405, and being alternately restored and forfeited by Henry V., Richard III., Henry VII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth and James I., and finally sold in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, who left it in 1636 to the master and fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

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  • The borough, which originally comprised only the parishes of St John's and St Mary's, was in 1875 and 1895 extended so as to include Roath and a large part of Llandaff, known as Canton, on the right of the Taff.

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  • The original church of St Mary's, at the mouth of the river, was swept away by a tidal wave in 1607: Wordsworth took this as a subject for a sonnet.

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • Amherst Academy (opened about 1814, chartered 1816), a co-educational school at which Mary Lyon, the founder of Mt.

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  • It lies on a gentle eminence in the flat fen country, and the fine Perpendicular tower and spire of the church of St Mary are a landmark from far.

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  • St Mary's church is principally Perpendicular, but has Norman and Decorated portions; the church of St Andrew is also Decorated and Perpendicular.

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  • In 1582 he withdrew to the continent, where he was active in the cause of Mary, queen of Scots.

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  • It was erected in 1836-1841 on the site of the convent of St Mary Magdalen and escaped the conflagration of 1842.

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  • In medieval times Droitwich was governed by two bailiffs and twelve jurats, the former being elected every year by the burgesses; Queen Mary granted the incorporation charter in 1554 under the name of the bailiffs and burgesses.

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  • Queen Mary granted three new fairs, and James I.

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  • Close by are the remains of St Mary's Priory, which comprise a large Perpendicular gatehouse, refectory, precinct wall, abbot's gate and still-house.

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  • The Perpendicular church of St Mary contains a number of interesting tombs and effigies dating from the 15th century onwards, and much excellent carved work.

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  • It has a fine Perpendicular church dedicated to St Mary, with a lofty, well-proportioned tower and many interesting monuments.

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  • To the north lies the populous suburb of St Mary Church.

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  • The old church at St Mary Church, north of Torquay, was rebuilt in Early Decorated style; and in 1871 a tower was erected as a memorial to Dr Phillpotts, bishop of Exeter, who with his wife is buried in the churchyard.

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  • At this castle Mary queen of Scots was detained in 1569 under the custody of the earls of Huntingdon and Shrewsbury.

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  • The author had at his disposal two distinct groups of legends about Mary.

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  • One of these groups is certainly of non-Jewish origin, as it conceives Mary as living in the temple somewhat after the manner of a vestal virgin or a priestess of Isis.

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  • 93) shows acquaintance with one of the chief doctrines of the book - the perpetual virginity of Mary.

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  • Finally, as Justin's statements as to the birth of Jesus in a cave and Mary's descent from David show in all probability his acquaintance with the book, it may with good grounds be assigned to the first decade of the 2nd century.

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  • This third work contained in the Coptic MS. referred to under Gospel of Mary gives cosmological disclosures and is presumably of Valentinian origin.

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  • Descent of Mary (F vva Maplas).

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  • Questions of Mary (Great and Little).

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  • The first consists of seven letters addressed by Ignatius to the Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Romans, Philadelphians, Smyrnaeans and to Polycarp. The second collection consists of the preceding extensively interpolated, and six others of Mary to Ignatius, of Ignatius to Mary, to the Tarsians, Antiochians, Philippians and Hero, a deacon of Antioch.

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  • It will be observed that the legality of the trial, in so far as the jurors were not properly qualified and the law of treason was shamefully strained, was denied in the act of William & Mary which annulled the attainder.

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  • In 1555 Bishop Farrar of St David's was publicly burned for heresy under Queen Mary at the Market Cross, which was ruthlessly destroyed in 1846 to provide a site for General Nott's statue.

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  • It contains several historic relics, the most interesting being a bed adorned with embroidery worked by Mary Queen of Scots during her imprisonment in Lochleven Castle.

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  • and Queen Mary.

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  • Other buildings in the Palace Yard include the apartments occupied by the regent, Mary of Guise, and her daughter Mary, queen of Scots, and the room in which James VI.

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  • and James V., including the apartments occupied by Queen Mary, the scene of the murder of Rizzio in 1566.

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  • The most imposing structure belonging to the Scottish Episcopal Church is St Mary's cathedral, built on ground and chiefly from funds left by the Misses Walker of Coates, and opened for worship in 1879.

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  • To the south of the metropolis are Colinton (pop. 5499), on the Water of Leith, with several mansions that once belonged to famous men, such as Dreghorn Castle and Bonally Tower; and Currie (pop. 2513), which was a Roman station and near which are Curriehill Castle (held by the rebels against Queen Mary), the ruins of Lennox Tower, and Riccarton, the seat of the GibsonCraigs, one of the best-known Midlothian families.

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  • At Dalmahoy Castle, near Ratho (pop. 1946), the seat of the earl of Morton, are preserved the only extant copy of the bible of the Scottish parliament and the original warrant for committing Queen Mary to Lochleven Castle in Kinross-shire.

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  • It was a favourite residence of Mary Stuart, and its associations with the hapless queen give it a romantic interest.

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  • Mary in the Field (the "Kirk of Field"), the scene of the murder of Darnley.

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  • New College buildings, designed in the Pointed style of the 16th century, and erected on the site of the palace of Mary of Guise, occupy a prominent position at the head of the Mound.

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  • In the 16th century the movements connected with John Knox and Mary, queen of Scots, made Edinburgh a castle of much activity.

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  • His wife, Mary Elizabeth Campbell, the eldest daughter of the first Baron Abinger by one of the Campbells of Kilmorey, Argyllshire, whom he had married in 1821, had in 1836 been created Baroness Stratheden in recognition of the withdrawal of his claim to the mastership of the rolls.

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  • They are held in the public square, the curious and historic Piazza del Campo (now Piazza di Vittorio Emanuele) in shape resembling an ancient theatre, on the 2nd of July and the 16th of August of each year; they date from the middle ages and were instituted in commemoration of victories and in honour of the Virgin Mary (the old title of Siena, as shown by seals and medals, having been "Sena vetus civitas Virginis").

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  • The noveschi, being "fat burghers" with powerful connexions, abilities and traditions, gained increased strength and influence in exile; and five years later, on 22nd July 1487, they returned triumphantly to Siena, dispersed the few adherents of the popolo who offered resistance, murdered the captain of the people, reorganized the state, and placed it under the protection of the Virgin Mary.

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  • The case first came under consideration when Cardinal Pole returned to England early in Mary's reign with legatine authority for reconciling the realm to the Holy See.

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  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Mary lies on the north-east side of Hyde Park; it is a splendid Gothic structure, the finest in Australia.

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  • At the age of sixteen he entered the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, but in 1776 he left college to take part in the War for Independence.

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  • 3d., it was dissolved, but revived under Mary I.

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  • The best original account of the rebellion of Wat Tyler is the "Anonimal Chronicle of St Mary's, York," printed by G.

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  • The church was called St Mary at the Bourne.

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  • Close by the park there stood, until the 19th century, a house believed to have belonged to the notorious Bishop Bonner, the persecutor of Protestants in the reign of Mary; his name is still attached to a street here.

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  • On this cliff also stands the parish church of St Mary and St Eanswith, a cruciform building of much interest, with central tower.

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  • Hence the great dispute about the application to the Virgin Mary of the epithet OEoTOKOS.

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  • However, the angel, on hearing of the resurrection, cast away fear and accepted death as well; and came down and was born of Mary, and named himself son of God according to the grace given him from God; and he fulfilled all the command, and was crucified and buried, rose again and was taken up into heaven.

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  • The church of St Mary of Charity, restored by Sir G.

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  • The first charter of incorporation was granted by Queen Mary in 1553, and instituted a common council consisting of a bailiff, 12 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses; a court of record, one justice of the peace, a Thursday market and two annual fairs.

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  • From the date of Queen Mary's charter until the Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885 the borough was represented by one member in parliament.

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  • had opposed this project, but in 1673 allowed him to marry the Catholic Mary of Modena as his second wife.

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  • It was in vain that he married his daughter Mary to the Protestant prince of Orange in 1677.

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  • By Anne Hyde James had eight children, of whom two only, Mary and Anne, both queens of England, survived their father.

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  • By Mary of Modena he had seven children, among them being James Francis Edward (the Old Pretender) and Louisa Maria Theresa, who died at St Germain in 1712.

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  • The church of St Mary exhibits Decorated and Perpendicular stone and flint work.

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  • The parish church of St Mary is Perpendicular, with a fine carved roof of the 17th century.

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  • LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD (1763-1798), Irish conspirator, fifth son of James, 1st duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond, was born at Carton House, near Dublin, on the 15th of October 1763.

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  • In 1322, freed from his first marriage, Charles married his cousin Mary of Luxemburg, daughter of the emperor Henry VII., and upon her death, two years later, Jeanne, daughter of Louis, count of Evreux.

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  • He was educated for a business career, but in his eighteenth year entered the Church, joining the Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Mary (also known as the Picpus Congregation), and taking Damien as his name in religion.

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  • On the death of Mary queen of Scots he was chosen to pronounce her eulogy.

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  • Queen Mary by statute (1 Mary, sess.

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  • Mary died on the 17th of November 1558.

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  • The church of St Mary the Virgin has Norman remains in the tower and chancel.

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  • St Saviour's in Southwark (q.v.), the cathedral church of the modern bishopric of Southwark, was the church of the priory of St Mary Overy, and is a large cruciform building mainly Early English in style.

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  • St Mary's; Paddington (1845).

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  • Such are that of the London Necropolis Company at Brookwood near Woking, Surrey, and that of the parishes of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, at Hanwell, Middlesex.

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  • This was the Abbey of St Mary Graces, East-Minster or New Abbey without the walls of London, beyond Tower Hill, which Edward III.

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  • The citizens, however, soon found out their mistake, and the lord mayor, aldermen and recorder proclaimed Queen Mary at Cheapside.

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  • In the next year he published his only completed, though certainly not his most valuable work, the Miscellanies, a collection of stories on ghosts and dreams. He died at Oxford in June 1697, and was buried in the church of St Mary Magdalene.

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  • Later examples are the two sisters, Martha and Mary (x.

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  • 1329) with Otto IV., Artois passed to the house of Burgundy, in whose possession it remained till the marriage of Mary, the daughter of Charles the Bold, to the archduke Maximilian brought it to the house of Austria.

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  • Mary, wife of William of Orange.

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  • The church of St Mary has some fine Norman portions.

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  • He was elected in September 1553 member of parliament for Looe in Cornwall in Queen Mary's first parliament, but in October 1553 a committee of the house reported that, having as prebendary of Westminster a seat in convocation, he could not sit in the House of.

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  • His father Zacharias was a priest "of the course of Abijah," and his mother Elizabeth, who was also of priestly descent, was related to Mary, the mother of Jesus, whose senior John was by six months.

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  • In 1565, like many other English exiles, he made his headquarters at Louvain, and after a visit to the Imperial Diet at Augsburg in 1566, in attendance upon Commendone, who had been largely instrumental in the reconciliation of England with Rome in Mary's reign, he threw himself into the literary controversy between Bishop Jewel (q.v.) and Harding.

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  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.

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  • He now aimed at establishing himself definitely by marrying his daughter Mary to Peter II.

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  • Under William and Mary he succeeded Tillotson as dean of Canterbury in 1689, and (after declining a choice of sees vacated by nonjurors who were his personal friends) followed Thomas Lamplugh as archbishop of York in 1691.

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  • Among the relics of its former importance are the cathedral, built in1420-1424(though originally founded in 1188), restored in 1893 and now housing the archaeological collection of the Altmark, the Gothic church of St Mary, founded in 1447, a "Roland column" of 1535, and two fortified gateways, dating from the 13th century.

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  • Its buildings and institutions include the old Gothic church of St Mary, the Powysland Museum, with local fossils and antiquities, and a library, vested (with its science and art school) in the corporation in 1887.

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  • Tamisier, Chedufau and Mary, belonging to the Egyptian army in Asir; another Frenchman, a.

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  • Another development of the legend is that in which, having rejected many offers of marriage, she was taken to heaven in vision and betrothed to Christ by the Virgin Mary.

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  • The church of St Mary the Virgin stands high, and is surmounted by a lofty spire; it shows good Decorated and Perpendicular work.

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  • The church of St Mary is of good Perpendicular work, with Early English tower and Decorated spire.

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  • of Boston, is served by the Boston & Albany railroad; it has the Walnut Hill preparatory school, the Leonard Morse hospital, and a public library, the Morse institute, which was given by Mary Ann Morse (1825-1862) and was built in 1873.

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  • His Queen Mary, the first of these chronicle-plays was published in 1875, and played by Sir Henry Irving at the Lyceum in 1876.

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  • The church of St Mary is fine Early English with Perpendicular clerestory.

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  • On Mary's accession Vermigli was permitted to return to Strassburg, where, after some opposition raised on the ground that he had abandoned Lutheran doctrine, he was reappointed professor of theology.

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  • Among the more prominent buildings are the court-house - the portion first erected being designed after the Parthenon - the Steele high school, St Mary's college, Notre Dame academy, the Memorial Building, the Arcade Building, Reibold Building, the Algonquin Hotel, the post office, the public library (containing about 75,000 volumes), the Young Men's Christian Association building and several churches.

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  • The rest of the edifice was in the baroque style; the high altar (containing the supposed letter of the Virgin Mary to the people of Messina), richly decorated with marbles, lapis lazuli, &c., was begun in 1628 and completed in 1726.

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  • (1650-1702), king of England and prince of Orange, was the only son of William II., prince of Orange, stadtholder of the Dutch republic, and Mary, daughter of Charles I.

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  • In November 1677 he married Mary, eldest daughter of James, duke of York, afterwards King James II., and undertook negotiations with England in the following year which forced Louis to make terms and sign the treaty of Nijmwegen in August 1678, which gave Franche Comte and other places in Spanish Flanders to France.

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  • After a great deal of discussion, William was at length proclaimed joint-sovereign of England in conjunction with his wife, Mary (Feb.

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  • McCormick (London, 1714); Queen Mary, Letters with Those of James II.

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  • After the hands of Elizabeth of England, Mary of Scotland and Renata of Lorraine had successively been sought for him, the council of state grew anxious about the succession, but he finally married his cousin, Sophia of Mecklenburg, on the 10th of July 1572.

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  • (afterwards 1st Viscount St John, a member of a younger branch of the family of the earls of Bolingbroke and barons St John of Bletso), and of Lady Mary Rich, daughter of the 2nd earl of Warwick, was baptized on the 10th of October 1678, and was educated at Eton.

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  • Replying to Mary of Modena, who had sent a message deprecating his ill-will, he wished his arm might rot off if he ever used pen or sword in their service again!

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  • The church of St Mary is Norman and Early English, and has a fine chancel screen dating from the later part of the 13th century.

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  • In the vicinity is St Mary's (Anglican) parish hall (1905-1907), the first portion of a large building planned to take the place of "Old" St Mary's Church, the "mother" church of the Rand, built in 1887.

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  • St Mary >>

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  • His first wife was Mary, daughter of William Staunton of Staunton; and his second was Jane, daughter of Sir John Newton.

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  • The ducal burial-vault is in the church of St Mary.

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  • In 1567 Mary made Bothwell keeper of the castle, and sought its shelter herself after the murder 'of Rizzio and again after her flight from Borthwick Castle.

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  • His mother, Mary, daughter of Henry Leroy Hunter, of Beech Hill, Reading, was of a family said to be of French extraction.

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  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

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  • who was born of the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary, 4.

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  • 36): " The Roman Church has made a common token with the African Churches, has recognized one God, creator of the universe, and Christ Jesus, of the Virgin Mary, Son of God the Creator, and the resurrection of the flesh."

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  • Who for our sakes, came down, and was born of Mary the Virgin.

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  • Who for our salvation descended from heaven, was conceived of the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered by suffering under Pontius Pilate, under Herod the King, crucified, buried, descended into hell, trod down the sting of death, rose again the third day, appeared to the apostles.

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  • And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of His Father before all worlds, [God of God,] Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made; Who for us men and for our salvation came down from heaven and was incarnate of the Holy Ghost and the Virgin Mary, and was made Man.

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  • It is possible that Leo's letter to Flavian gave the impulse to put it forward because it contained a parallel to words which Leo quoted from the Old Roman Creed, " born of the Holy Ghost and the Virgin Mary," " crucified and buried," which do not occur in the first Nicene Creed.

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  • He left the army in 1887, married Sibell Mary, daughter of the gth Earl of Scarbrough, widow of Earl Grosvenor, mother of the 2nd Duke of Westminster, and became private secretary to Mr. Balfour, at the time Irish Secretary, a position which he held till 1892.

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  • His arguments and exhortations may be gathered from many of his epistles and from his tract Adversus Helvidium, in which he defends the perpetual virginity of Mary against Helvidius, who maintained that she bore children to Joseph.

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  • At St Mary's church, almost wholly rebuilt c. 1870, are buried John Oldmixon, the historian (d.

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  • Included in Kingsbridge is the little town of Dodbrooke, which at the time of the Domesday Survey had a population of 42, and a flock of 108 sheep and 27 goats; and in 1257 was granted a Wednesday market and a fair at the Feast of St Mary Magdalene.

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  • Among the city's educational and charitable institutions are the Lady Jane Grey school (for girls), St Joseph's academy, St Mary's home for orphans, the Susquehanna Valley orphan asylum, and a state hospital for the insane.

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  • It is the seat of St Mary's, Academy (1872; R.C.) for young women, and the College of the Sacred Heart (1880; R.C.) for men.

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  • and Mary, who married into that of Montfort.

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  • Mary's College, Kan., studied art at the school of the San Francisco (Cal.) Art Association, and during 1890-3 attended the Academie Julien and the Rcole des Beaux Arts in Paris.

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  • Had the year then begun, as it now does, with the ist of January, it would have been the revolution of 1689, William and Mary being received as king and queen in February in the year 1689; but at that time the year was considered in England as beginning on the 25th of March.

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  • It contains a fine Gothic Protestant church (St Mary's) dating from the 13th century and has several educational establishments, notably a school of seamanship. Its industries comprise iron-founding, ship-building, brewing, and the manufacture of cigars, leather and tinned fish.

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  • He was a second cousin to the elder John Adams. His father, whose Christian name was also Samuel, was a wealthy and prominent citizen of Boston, who took an active part in the politics of the town, and was a member of the Caucus (or Caulker's) Club, with which the political term "caucus" is said to have originated; his mother was Mary Fifield.

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  • This is the name generally given to eight letters, and a sequence of irregular sonnets, all described as originally in French, and said to have been addressed by Mary, queen of Scots, to the earl of Bothwell, between January and April 1566-1567.

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  • If authentic throughout, they afford perfect proof of Mary's complicity in the murder of her husband, Henry, Lord Darnley.

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  • If Mary wrote all of this, or even wrote some compromising parts of it, she was certainly guilty.

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  • a forged interpolation, based on another document, not by Mary The whole affair has been obscured and almost inextricably entangled, as we shall see, by the behaviour of Mary's accusers.

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  • Of these Maitland of Lethington was consenting to Darnley's murder; the earl of Morton had, at least, guilty foreknowledge; the regent Moray (Mary's natural brother) had "looked through his fingers" at the crime, and for months remained on intimate terms with the criminals.

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  • We cannot, in short, believe Mary's accusers on their oaths.

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  • When they all went, in October-December 1568, to York and London to accuse their queen - and before that, in their proclamations - they contradicted themselves freely and frequently; they put in a list of dates which made Mary's authorship of Letter II.

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  • For example, when Moray, after Mary was in Elizabeth's power (May 16, 1568), wished Elizabeth to have the matter tried, he in May-June 1568 sent John Wood to England with Scots translations of the letters.

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  • Henderson (1889; second issue, 1890, being the more accurate); in The Mystery of Mary Stuart, by Andrew Lang (4th edition, 1904), and in Henderson's criticism of that book, in his Mary, Queen of Scots (1905) (Appendix A).

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  • A silver casket (originally Mary's property, but then in the possession of Bothwell) was placed in his hands on the 10th of June, and was inspected by several nobles and gentlemen on the 21st of June 1567.

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  • Mary was, on the 21st of June 1567, a prisoner in Loch Leven Castle.

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  • In December 1567 the Scottish parliament was informed that the letters were signed by Mary (they are unsigned), but the phrase is not used in the subsequent act of parliament.

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  • Mary's party in September 1568 declared that they were garbled, and that the handwriting was not hers.

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  • In the end of July 1567 the earl of Moray, Mary's brother, passing through London from France, told de Silva, as de Silva reported to his government, that there was proof of Mary's guilt in a letter of three double sheets of paper signed by her.

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  • According to Moray's version of the letter, Mary was to try to poison Darnley in a house on the way between Glasgow and Edinburgh where he and she were to stop. Clearly Lord Livingstone's house, Callendar, where they did rest on their journey, is intended.

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  • If this failed, Mary would put Darnley "in the house where the explosion was arranged for the night upon which one of the servants was to be married."

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  • Moray's version of the letter made Mary tell Bothwell to poison or put away his wife.

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