Marl sentence example

marl
  • Marine fossils are very abundant in the marl.
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  • On the island of Andros there is an extremely fine white marl almost resembling a chalky ooze.
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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.
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  • The Cambridgeshire coprolites are believed to be derived from deposits of Gault age; they are obtained by washing from a stratum about a foot thick, resting on the Gault, at the base of the Chalk Marl, and probably homotaxeous with the Chloritic Marl.
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  • The Chloritic Marl in the Wealden district furnishes much phosphatic material, which has been extensively worked at Froyle.
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  • Phosphatic nodules occur also in the Chloritic Marl of the Isle of Wight and Dorsetshire, and at Wroughton, near Swindon.
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  • The plain, sandy in its northern part, is in the south a deep bed of argillaceous marl, scattered over with great granite boulders and fragments of greenstone.
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  • Till 1765 it was only a village under the name of Causewayhead, but the discovery of marl in the lake brought it some prosperity, and it was purchased in 1792 by Sir William Douglas and called after him.
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  • The state contains deposits of iron, gypsum, marl, phosphate, lignite, ochre, glass-sand, tripoli, fuller's earth, limestones and sandstones; and there are small gas flows in the Yazoo Delta.
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  • On the Coastal Plain the soil is generally sandy, but in nearly all parts of this region more or less marl abounds; south of the Neuse river the soil is mostly a loose sand, north of it there is more loam on the uplands, and in the lowlands the soil is usually compact with clay, silt or peat; toward the western border of the region the sand becomes coarser and some gravel is mixed with it.
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  • Flanking the hills between Ashbourne and Quarndon are red beds of Bunter marl, sandstone and conglomerate; they also appear at Morley, east of the Derwent, and again round the small southern coalfield.
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  • Lime and marl are mentioned as common manures, and the former was sometimes spread on the surface to destroy heath.
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  • Fitzherbert, in deploring the gradual discontinuance of the practice of marling land, had alluded to the grievance familiar in modern times of tenants "who, if they should marl and make their holdings much better, fear lest they should be put out, or make a great fine or else pay more rent."
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  • Brick clay and limestone are abundant, and there are on the south coast a sand marl rich in phosphates and productive salt deposits.
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  • The prairies of south-western Louisiana have much yellow marl underlying them.
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  • S i milarly soils can be improved by applying to them marl, a substance consisting of a mixture of clay with variable proportions of lime.
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  • The amount and nature of the clay or marl to be added to the soil will depend largely upon the original composition of the latter, the lighter sands and gravel requiring more clay than those of firmer texture.
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  • The Oceanic series is generally overlaid directly, and unconformably, by coral limestones; but at Bissex Hill, at the base of the coral limestones, and resting unconformably upon the Oceanic series, there is a Globigerina marl.
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  • The process in this case is to ained take a thin plate of metal and beat it into another plate Grounds of similar metal, so that the two, though welded together, retain their separate forms. The mass, while still hot, is coated ~-ith hena-tsuchi (a kind of marl) and rolled in straw ash, in which state it is roasted over a charcoal fire raised to glowing heat with the bellows.
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  • The Maltese Islands consist largely of Tertiary Limestone, with somewhat variable beds of Crystalline Sandstone, Greensand and Marl or Blue Clay.
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  • Sand may be taken as the predominating deposit on the continental shelves, often with a large admixture of remains of calcareous organisms, for instance the deposits of marl made up of nullipores off the coasts of Brittany and near Belle Isle.
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  • In the Chalk of the south-east of England nodules of marcasite with a fibrous radiated structure are abundant, and in the Chalk Marl between Dover and Folkestone fine twinned groups of "spear pyrites" are common.
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  • The Cambridge Greensand, rich in phosphatic nodules, occurs at the base of the Chalk Marl.
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  • The piles of the third settlement do not reach down to the shell marl, but are fixed in the layers representing the first and second settlements.
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  • In the district of the Weald marl prevails, with a substratum of clay.
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  • The soil varies greatly according to the district, being in some cases a rich loam, in others a chalky marl, and elsewhere showing a coating of peat.
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  • It rests on a subsoil of clay and marl.
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  • The most distinctive feature of the Cretaceous of the Atlantic coastal plain is its large content of greensand marl (glauconite).
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  • Large quantities of seaweed as well as lime and marl are available for manure.
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  • It receives its name from its soil (weathered from the weak underlying limestone), which is black in colour, almost destitute of sand and loam, and rich in limestone and marl formations, especially adapted to the production of cotton; hence the region is also called the "Cotton Belt."
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  • When the subsoil is too compact to be pervious to water, effectual drainage must be resorted to; when it is very loose, so that it drains away the fertile ingredients of the soil as well as those which are artificially supplied, the compactness of the stratum should be increased by the addition of clay, marl or loam.
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  • In England extensive deposits of rock-salt are found near the base of the Keuper marl, especially in Cheshire.
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  • The commonest of such substances in England are chalk and clay, but where local conditions demand it, limestone, marl, shale, slag or any similar material may be used, provided that the correct proportions of lime, silica and alumina are maintained.
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  • Next in antiquity to hydraulic lime is Roman cement, prepared by heating an indurated marl occurring naturally in nodules.
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  • The southern district, which includes the white marl region of Beersheba, was in ancient times called the Negeb.
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  • The state also makes annual grants directly to owners who are willing to place their plantations under state supervision, for the sale of plants at half price to the poorer peasantry, for making protective or sheltering plantations, and for free transport of marl or loam.
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  • The mineral products of Eure include freestone, marl, lime and brick-clay.
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  • The glacial clay of the Silurian regions is generally rich in lime and is thus a marl of great fertility.
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  • Marl is found in the south part of the state; limestone most largely in the north part of the lower peninsula, and the east part of the upper peninsula; and the production of Portland cement increased rapidly from 77,000 barrels in 1898 to 3,572,668 in 1907.
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  • At the base of the Chalk is the Chalk Marl, above this is the Totternhoe Stone, which, on account of its great hardness, usually stands out as a well-marked feature.
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  • Geological research shows that the land surrounding the lake consists of gneiss, quartz and schistose rocks, covered, in the higher regions, with marl and red clay, and in the valleys with a rich black loam.
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  • Whether the city is named from Marlborough in Wiltshire, or, as seems more probable, because of early spellings "Marlberg" and "Marlbridge," from the presence of marl in the neighbourhood, is uncertain.
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  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.
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  • The mineral occurs in metalliferous veins in the lead mines of Strontian in Argyllshire, Pateley Bridge in Yorkshire, Braunsdorf near Freiberg in Saxony; abundantly in veins in calcareous marl near Minster and Hamm in Westphalia; and in limestone at Schoharie in New York.
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  • On the east side a peninsula, El-Lisan ("the tongue"), of white calcareous marl with beds of salt and gypsum, divides the sea into two unequal parts: this peninsula is about 50 ft.
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  • The origin of this bitumen is disputed: it was supposed to be derived from subaqueous strata of bituminous marl and rose to the surface when loosened by earthquakes.
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  • On leaving the Sea of Galilee the water is quite clear, but it soon assumes a tawny colour from the soft marl which it washes away from its banks and deposits in the Dead Sea.
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  • In some cases a brown marl is also present, coating the ferroan calcite or directly in contact with the bivalve shell.
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  • The fabric is a marl clay ware decorated with red ochre paint.
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  • The patchwork of scattered cornfields interspersed with the region's crumbling, gray marl ' badlands ' forms a splendid wildlife habitat.
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  • The skeletons of millions of aquatic animals, which lived and died in the lake, formed a layer of calcareous marl.
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  • Being regularly washed by wave action at every high tide, the softer marl is soon eroded away from the harder calcite fossils.
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  • The Hereford fabrics would have needed tempering since the gravel found in them is not found naturally mixed with Devonian marl.
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  • Samphire Hoe is a new piece of England created from 4.9 million cubic meters of chalk marl dug to create the Channel Tunnel.
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  • This rock is famous throughout Nottingham as a brick marl.
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  • The marl provides excellent conditions for the mayfly nymphs to make a stable burrow in which they dwell for approximately 2 years.
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  • Fitzherbert, in deploring the gradual discontinuance of the practice of marling land, had alluded to the grievance familiar in modern times of tenants " who, if they should marl and make their holdings much better, fear lest they should be put out, or make a great fine or else pay more rent."
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  • In the Coralline Limestone the following fossils have been noted :- Spondylus, Ostrea, Pecten, Cytherea, Arca, Terebratula, Orthis, Clavagella, Echinus, Cidaris, Nucleolites, Brissus, Spatangus; in the Marl the Nautilus zigzag; in the Yellow, Black and Greensand shells of Lenticulites complanatus, teeth and vertebrae of Squalidae and Cetacea; in the Sandstone Vaginula depressa, Crystallaria, Nodosaria, Brissus, Nucleolites, Pecten burdigallensis, Scalaria, Scutella subrotunda, Spatangus, Nautilus, Ostrea navicularis and Pecten cristatus (see Captain Spratt's work and papers by Lord Ducie and Dr Adams).
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  • They succeed well, however, in stiffer soils, such as clay and limestone marl, especially if given a little good soil at the outset, and soon make dense masses, spreading by suckers.
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