Market sentence example

market
  • The market is only two blocks away.
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  • I'll go to the market now.
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  • There is a large weekly market for grain, and annual horse and cattle fairs.
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  • The rich cinnamon-vanilla scent of the bath bubbles filled the air, reminding her of the candle she'd bought at the farmers market the day her life went to hell.
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  • Wasn't '29 when the market crashed?
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  • When you trade with someone in a free market, you are giving up something you have for something the other person has, which you value more.
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  • You would argue that no other widget on the market can beat the C2000, no nation can ever gain widget superiority if the government just buys the C2000—and so they do.
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  • I think you like going to the farmer's market in the morning.
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  • After leaving the ice park, Dean had gone on to Duckett's Market for groceries.
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  • In Richmond, Virginia, one Saturday morning, an old man went into the market to buy something.
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  • I one evening overtook one of my townsmen, who has accumulated what is called "a handsome property"--though I never got a fair view of it--on the Walden road, driving a pair of cattle to market, who inquired of me how I could bring my mind to give up so many of the comforts of life.
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  • It was the man he'd seen talking to Ginger Dawkins at the Farmer's Market on Sunday.
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  • She's gone to the market, she shouldn't be long.
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  • The market man wrapped a paper round it and put it in the basket.
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  • They are too pure to have a market value; they contain no muck.
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  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
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  • All the profound plans about cutting off and capturing Napoleon and his army were like the plan of a market gardener who, when driving out of his garden a cow that had trampled down the beds he had planted, should run to the gate and hit the cow on the head.
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  • It was only a couple of blocks to Duckett's Market, but he needed the Jeep to haul the groceries.
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  • Fred offered to go up to Duckett's Market for boxes and give up closet space to temporarily store the large pile.
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  • Before going home, she made a trip to the market and bought prepared food for the first time.
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  • Asheville is a market for live-stock, dairy products, lumber and fruits, and has various manufactories (in which a good water-power is utilized), including tanneries, cotton mills, brick and tile factories, and a wood-working and veneer plant.
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  • In the future, all people will be able to follow their passions without regard for market forces.
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  • They have something they love and want to do, but if market forces are not such that they can support themselves doing that, they have to do something else.
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  • Sarah, your stock dealings have outperformed the market every year since 1933, of course you're going to be investigated.
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  • After the Turks were driven from the city in 1878, it was in many respects modernized; but something of its former character is preserved in the ancient Turkish palace, mosque and fountain, the maze of winding alleys and picturesque houses in the older quarters, and, on market days, by the medley of peasant costumes - Bulgarian, Albanian and Rumanian, as well as Servian.
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  • These jobs can be market jobs that have the potential to make a person vastly richer, creating more and more wealth on the planet.
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  • (3) Sunday and Wednesday of each week are appointed as the chief market days and to that end a sufficient number of troops will be stationed along the highroads on Tuesdays and Saturdays at such distances from the town as to protect the carts.
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  • Gabe made his way through the narrow alleys and disjointed walkways that wound like a maze through the market.
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  • Alex had instructed Carmen to put the insurance benefit in a money market where it would draw interest until Lori had time to recover.
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  • The olive oil produced is mainly mixed with that from Genoa or Provence, and placed on the market under the name of the latter.
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  • For a short period the day was changed to Tuesday, but the market was given up before 1888.
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  • Market days are Monday and Wednesday.
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  • The market is still held on Wednesdays, and in 1792 the Michaelmas fair and another on May-day were in existence.
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  • Market gardening is carried on both near towns and villages, where products find ready sale, and along the great railways, on account of transport facilities.
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  • In Columbus there is a large market for imported horses.
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  • The machine which will gin the largest quantity in the shortest time is naturally preferred, unless such injury is, occasioned as materially to diminish the market value of the cotton.
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  • There were bazaars, shops, warehouses, market stalls, granaries--for the most part still stocked with goods-- and there were factories and workshops, palaces and wealthy houses filled with luxuries, hospitals, prisons, government offices, churches, and cathedrals.
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  • He probably had to pick up something at the market.
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  • An Ursuline convent, built in 1764, serves as hotel de ville and law court, and a church of the 14th century is used as a market.
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  • It is also a considerable market for horses, cattle and grain, and there is a little boat-building and salt and sail-cloth manufacture.
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  • Later charters were given by Henry II., by John in 1204 (who also granted an annual fair of three days' duration, 29th of October, at the feast of St Modwen, and a weekly market on Thursday), by Henry III.
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  • Forty years later it had a market at St Petersburg and the Baltic ports, and in 1796 there were nine brewing firms in the town.
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  • The Tuesday market has long been discontinued.
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  • There is also an important butter and cheese market.
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  • The trade of Market Bosworth is principally agricultural, and there are brickworks.
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  • William de Braose claimed to have a free market on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
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  • Great improvements, however, have been effected in the design of open fireplaces, and many ingenious contrivances of this nature are now in the market which combine efficiency of heating with economy of fuel.
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  • Denver is the central live-stock market of the Rocky Mountain states.
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  • Troy is the market for a fertile agricultural region, and the principal jobbing centre for a large district in north-eastern New York and eastern Massachusetts.
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  • A weekly market on Wednesdays was granted to John, earl of Richmond, in 1308 together with an eight days' fair beginning on the vigil of St Margaret's day, and in 1445 John de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, one of his successors as lord of the manor, received a further grant of the same market and also two yearly fairs, one on the feast of St Philip and St James and the other at Michaelmas.
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  • Oysters are reared chiefly at Marennes, which is the chief French market for them, and at Arcachon, Vannes, Olron, Auray, Cancale and Courseulles.
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  • Market gardening is an important industry.
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  • A circle of stones in the Iron Market of Linkoping marks the spot where Sigismund's adherents were beheaded in 1600.
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  • These fish frequent rocky shoals off the eastern coast and are caught in numbers outside Port Jackson for the Sydney market.
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  • Cobalt occurs in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia, and efforts have been made in the former state to treat the ore, the metal having a high commercial value; but the market is small, and no attempt has been made up to 1907 to produce it on any large scale.
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  • When the excitement consequent on the gold finds had subsided, there was a considerable reaction against the claims of Labour, and this was greatly helped by the congested state of the labour market; but the principle of an eight-hours day made progress, and was conceded in several trades.
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  • Driven from Strassburg by the authorities, after a short imprisonment in December 1531, he tried to make a living in 1532 as a soapboiler at Esslingen, removing in 1533 for a better market to Ulm, where (October 28, 1 534) he was admitted as a burgess.
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  • There is a weekly market on Saturday, held by prescription.
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  • The first important industry of the state was "rafting" lumber from Vermont through Lake Champlain and the Richelieu and St Lawrence rivers to Quebec. Burlington became a great lumber market for a trade moving in the direction of Boston after the Richelieu river was blocked to navigation and railway transportation began, and in 1882 Burlington was the third lumber centre in the United States.
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  • It retains an ancient town hall; there is a good market cross; and in the neighbourhood, along the Fal, are several early earthworks.
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  • It was provided that the hundred court of Powdershire should always be held there and two fairs at the feasts of St Peter in Cathedra and St Barnabas, both of which are still held, and a Tuesday market (now held on Friday) and that it should be a free borough rendering a yearly rent to the earl of Cornwall.
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  • Garrison, a fishing station on the wild Lough Melvin, and Pettigo, near to the lower Lough Erne, are market villages.
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  • That the recurrence of the market determined the length of the week seems clear from the Wajagga custom of naming the days after the markets they visit, as well as from the fact that on the Congo the word for week is the same as the word for market.
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  • Among agricultural tribes in Africa one day of the week, which varies from place to place, is often a rest-day, visiting the market being the only work allowed.
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  • 90 seq., refer to the week in connexion with the market.
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  • Akhmim has several mosques and two Coptic churches, maintains a weekly market, and manufactures cotton goods, notably the blue shirts and check shawls with silk fringes worn by the poorer classes of Egypt.
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  • A market to be held on Tuesday, and a fair on the 4th, 5th and 6th of May, were granted by Charles II.
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  • In 1738 fairs were held on the 4th of May and the 8th of September, and a market every Saturday.
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  • One of the earliest monuments records the purchase by a king of a large estate for his son, paying a fair market price and adding a handsome honorarium to the many owners in costly garments, plate, and precious articles of furniture.
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  • A common way of doing business was for a merchant to entrust goods or money to a travelling agent, who sought a market for his goods.
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  • It cannot justly be said that the companies made large profits while neglecting to develop the services adequately, but it is true that they were not able commercially to comply with many of the demands made upon them by the public. Until speculation took place in anticipation of government purchase, the market prices of the telegraph securities were mostly below par.
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  • Teignmouth is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but in 1276 what is now West Teignmouth appears as a mesne borough held by the dean and chapter of Exeter; what is now East Teignmouth continuing with the bishop, who was accused in that year of holding in his manor a market which should be held in the borough.
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  • The Saturday market, which was held up to the 19th century, is mentioned in 1220, and was confirmed by royal charter in 1253, together with a fair at Michaelmas.
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  • The business subsequently proved profitable, good dividends were paid, and the securities for the most part commanded a premium in the market.
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  • Sheep have likewise been raised in Piauhy, but there is no market for mutton and their wool is not utilized.
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  • Home products not only supply the Italian market in increasing degree, but find their way into foreign markets.
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  • As in the case of cotton, Italian woollen fabrics are conquering the home market in increasing degree.
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  • The jute industry is concentrated in a few large factories, which from 1887 onwards have more than supplied the home market, and have begun considerably to export.
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  • The last named has succeeded, by means of the large establishments at Milan in supplying not only the whole Italian market but an export trade.
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  • The large predominance of imports over exports after 1884 was a result of the falling off of the export trade in live stock, olive oil and wine, on account of the closing of the French market, while the importation of corn from Russia and the Balkan States increased considerably.
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  • But the laws have not been rigorously enforced of late years; and the ecclesiastical possessions seized by the state were thrown on the market simultaneously, and so realized very low prices, being often bought up by wealthy religious institutions.
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  • The demands for reimbursement at par represented a sum of only 187,588 and the market value of the stock was hardly affected; while the saving to the Treasury was to be 800,000 per annum for the first five years and about double the amount afterwards.
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  • The closing of the French market to Sicilian produce, the devastation wrought by the phylloxera and the decrease of the sulphur trade had combined to produce in Sicily a discontent of which Socialist agitators took advantage to organize the workmen of the towns and the peasants of the country into groups known as fasci.
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  • The three chief divisions are as follows: - (I) Chipping or High Barnet, a market town and urban district (Barnet), pop. (1901) 7876.
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  • The second epithet designates its position on a hill, but the first is given it from the market granted to the abbots of St Albans to be kept there, by Henry II.
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  • Turtles are abundant and supply the Calcutta market.
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  • In the market-place is the market cross, said to date from 958, and a beautiful Renaissance fountain, the Petersbrunnen, erected in 1595.
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  • Near the tolbooth stands the market cross, a stone column with a unicorn on the top supporting the burgh arms. At the west end of High Street is a statue of David Macbeth Moir ("Delta," 1798-1851), Musselburgh's most famous son.
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  • A beautiful house of the 16th century belonged to one Thomas Rogers, whose daughter was mother of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, U.S.A. Among public buildings are the town hall, originally dated 1633, rebuilt 1767, and altered 186 3; market house, corn exchange and three hospitals.
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  • But the open space where is now a memorial fountain was the Rother market, and Rother Street preserves its name.
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  • A market, formerly held on Thursdays by a grant of 1309, is now held on Fridays.
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  • The discovery and production of commodities require a knowledge of the distribution of geological formations for mineral products, of the natural distribution, life-conditions and cultivation or breeding of plants and animals and of the labour market.
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  • The former, standing on the south side of the market square, is a Gothic structure, erected in 1353-1370 on the ruins of Charlemagne's palace.
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  • There are many fine streets and squares and some handsome public monuments, notably among the last the fountain on the market square surmounted by a statue of Charlemagne, the bronze equestrian statue of the emperor William I.
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  • The abbot seems to have held a market from very early times, and charters for the holding of markets and fairs were granted by various sovereigns from Edward I.
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  • The town has a picturesque inn, adapted from a building dating partly from the 16th century, and market buildings dating from the 14th to the 16th centuries.
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  • The other fair has been discontinued, and the market day has been changed to Wednesday.
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  • It was probably in connexion with this market that the "kind gallows of Crieff" acquired their notoriety, for they were mostly used for the execution of Highland cattle-stealers.
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  • The redemption was not calculated on the value of the allotments of land, but was considered as a compensation for the loss of the compulsory labour of the serfs; so that throughout Russia, with the exception of a few provinces in the S.E., it was - and still remains, notwithstanding a very great increase in the value of land - much higher than the market value of the allotment.
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  • As a consequence this central Russian industry, even when supported by very high protective duties, is only able to produce for the home market and the markets of the adjacent territories in Asia which are under Russian political control.
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  • The smaller company exchanges its stock for stock of the larger system on an agreed basis, or sells it outright, and the bondholders of the absorbed line often have a similar opportunity to exchange their securities for obligations cf the parent company, which are on a stronger basis or have a broader market.
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  • Holden developed the use of liquid fuel on the Great Eastern railway to a point beyond the experimental stage, and used it instead of coal with the engines running the heavy express traffic of the line, its continued use depending merely upon the relative market price of coal and oil.
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  • It should be mentioned that the act provided that the Treasury might advance a portion of the money required for a line in cases where the council of any county, borough or district had agreed to do the same, and might also make a special advance in aid of a light railway which was certified by the Board of Agriculture to be beneficial to agriculture in any cultivated district, or by the Board of Trade to furnish a means of communication between a fishing-harbour and a market in a district where it would not be constructed without special assistance from the s' ate.
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  • The industries of the town include cotton spinning and weaving, silk spinning, the manufacture of tobacco, ropes, metal-ware, furniture, &c. The market gardens of the neighbourhood are famous, and there is a considerable shipping trade by the river and the Ludwigskanal.
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  • Before the 13th century the burgesses held a weekly market on Sunday and a yearly fair on St James's day, but in 1218 Henry III.
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  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.
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  • Wichita is a transportation centre for the rich agricultural region surrounding it, and is an important market for broom-corn.
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  • The public buildings include the town hall, a fine and commodious house on the site of the old tolbooth; the Falconer museum, containing among other exhibits several valuable fossils, and named after Dr Hugh Falconer (1808-1865), the distinguished palaeontologist and botanist, a native of the town; the mechanics' institute; the agricultural and market hall; Leanchoil hospital and Anderson's Institution for poor boys.
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  • The most petty limitations of Jewish commercial activity continued; thus at about this period the community of Prague, in a petition, " complain that they are not permitted to buy victuals in the market before a certain hour, vegetables not before 9 and cattle not before II o'clock; to buy fish is sometimes altogether prohibited; Jewish druggists are not permitted to buy victuals at the same time with Christians " (op. cit.).
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  • In 1320 a grant occurs of a Tuesday market, but no fair is mentioned.
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  • The Saturday market probably dates from the same century.
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  • In the same year the city still retained its position as the greatest ore market in the world and also led in many steel products.
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  • The city is situated in a rich agricultural region, and is a market for grain, neat cattle, horses and swine.
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  • A great market for corn and other produce is still held on Saturday by prescription.
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  • With Fisk in August 1869 he began to buy gold in a daring attempt to "corner" the market, his hope being that, with the advance in price of gold, wheat would advance to such a price that western farmers would sell, and there would be a consequent great movement of breadstuffs from West to East, which would result in increased freight business for the Erie road.
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  • At Crystal Springs tomatoes were first successfully grown for the market (1874-1876).
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  • The state owned, in 1909, 30,002 shares of stock in the North Carolina Railroad Company,' with a market value (1907) of $5,580,372 (the stock being quoted at 186), and an annual income of $210,014 and 12,666 shares of stock in the Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad Company, from which the annual income is $31,665.
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  • It is a market for live-stock, and for dairy and farm products, and has slaughtering and packing establishments, flour mills, creameries and cheese factories, canning and preserving factories, carriage works, a flax fibre mill and grain elevators.
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  • When we have mentioned vanilla, which consists of the fleshy pods of an orchid, we have mentioned about the only economic product that now comes into market.
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  • The Yarn Market, a picturesque octagonal building with deep sloping roof, in the main street, dates from c. 1600, and is a memorial of Dunster's former important manufacture of cloth.
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  • During the middle ages the Friday market and fair in Whit week, granted by the first charter, were centres for the sale of yarn and cloth called "Dunsters," made in the town.
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  • The market day is still Friday.
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  • Knaresborough is said by Leland to be "no great thing and meanely builded but the market there is quik."
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  • A market on Wednesday and a fortnightly fair on the same day from the Feast of St Mark to that of St Andrew are claimed under a charter of Charles II.
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  • Here also was the slave market.
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  • In Kano itself is a great market for livestock: camels, horses, oxen, asses and goats being on sale.
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  • No early grant of a market can be found, but in 1792 the market-day was Wednesday.
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  • Dumfries markets for cattle and sheep, held weekly, and for horses, held five times annually, have always ranked with the best, and there is also a weekly market for pork during the five months beginning with November.
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  • "It is a wyues occupation," he says, " to wynowe all maner of comes, to make malte, to washe and wrynge, to make heye, shere come, and, in time of nede, to helpe her husbande to fyll the mucke wayne or dounge carte, dryue the ploughe, to loode heye, come and suche other; and to go or ride to the market to sel butter, chese, mylke, egges, chekyns, capons, hennes, pygges, gese, and all maner of comes."
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  • Several weeks elapsed before the true character of the disease was known, and in this brief space it had already been carried by animals purchased in Smithfield market to all parts of the country.
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  • Wheat was so great a glut in the market that various methods were devised for feeding it to stock, a purpose for which it is not specially suited; in thus utilizing the grain, however, a smaller loss was often incurred than in sending it to market.
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  • The compulsory slaughter at the place of landing does not extend to animals shipped from Ireland into Great Britain, and this is a matter of the highest importance to Irish stock-breeders, who find their best market close at hand on the east of St George's Channel.
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  • The manor was indeed self-sufficient and independent in the sense that it could furnish everything required by the majority of the inhabitants, and that over the greater part of rural England production was not carried on with a view to a distant market.
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  • To buy in the cheapest market and sell in the dearest; to secure cheapness by lowering the expenses of production; to adopt the less expensive rather than the more expensive method of obtaining a given result - these and other maxims are as old as human society.
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  • Competition, in the Darwinian sense, is characteristic not only of modern industrial states, but of all living organisms; and in the narrower sense of the " higgling of the market " is found on the Stock Exchange, in the markets of old towns, in medieval fairs and Oriental bazaars.
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  • A fair and a market on Wednesday weregranted by Edward III.
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  • West Ham received the grant of a market and annual fair in 1253.
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  • Among other public buildings may be noted the Piece-Hall, erected in 1799 for the lodgment and sale of piece goods, now used as a market, a great quadrangular structure occupying more than two acres; the bonding warehouse, court-house, and mechanics' institute.
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  • The executions took place on market days on a hill outside the town, the gibbet somewhat resembling a guillotine.
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  • Later these fairs and markets were confirmed with the addition of an extra market on Thursday to Sir William Ayloffe, baronet, who had succeeded David Waterhouse as lord of the manor.
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  • The market rights were sold to the Markets Company in 1810 and purchased from them by the corporation in 1853.
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  • The most striking of these modern buildings are the new wing of the Hotel d'Italie, San Moise, and the very successful fish market at Rialto, designed by Laurenti and carried out by Rupolo, in which a happy return to early Venetian Gothic has been effected in conjunction with a skilful adaptation of one of the most famous of the old houses of Venice, the Stalon, or palace of the Quirini family.
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  • The result of the first three Crusades was that Venice acquired trading rights, a Venetian quarter, church, market, bakery, &c., in many of the Levant cities, e.g.
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  • The adjoining Quincy market may be mentioned because its construction (1826) was utilized to open six new streets, widen a seventh, and secure flats, docks and wharf rights - all without laying tax or debt upon the city.
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  • It is the largest wool and the largest fish market of the United States, being in each second in the world to London only.
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  • The principal Mahommedan public buildings, erected by subsequent governors and now in ruins, are the Katra and the Lal-bagh palace - the former built by Sultan Mahommed Shuja in 1645, in front of the chauk or market place.
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  • Large cargoes are annually imported in ice from Norway to the English market.
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  • Compensation was given to market gardeners for unexhausted improvements by the Market Gardeners' Compensation Act 1895 and by the Agricultural Holdings Act 1906 for improvements effected before the commencement of that act on a holding cultivated to the knowledge of the landlord as a market garden, if the landlord had not dissented in writing to the improvements.
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  • In 1755 he was appointed to a small congregation at Needham Market, in Suffolk, where he was not very successful.
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  • In 1777 a weekly market was granted on Wednesday and Saturday.
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  • Lumber and flour are Cairo's principal manufactured products, and the city is an important hardwood and cotton-wood market; the Singer Manufacturing Co.
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  • The approximate weights of some of the principal bales on the English market are as follows: United States.
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  • Experience shows that 1000 lb of seed are produced for every 50o lb of cotton brought to market.
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  • These facts indicate that we have here an agricultural product the market price of which is still far below its value as compared, on the basis of its chemical composition, either with other feeding stuffs or with other fertilizers.
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  • The improvements desired in cotton vary to some degree in different countries, according to the present character of the plants, climatic conditions, the chief pests, special market requirements, and other circumstances.
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  • Attention has been paid in the West Indies to seed selection, by the officers of the imperial Department of Agriculture, with the object of retaining for West Indian Sea Island cotton its place as the most valuable cotton on the British market.
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  • In addition to the small country ginneries, large modern ginneries have now been set up in all the leading Southern market towns.
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  • A Manchester cotton-importing company was recently formed for increasing deliveries direct to Manchester, and establishing a " spot " market there, an end to which the Manchester Cotton Association had directed its efforts for some time past.
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  • We shall not attempt to trace the changes as they appeared in every market of importance, but shall confine our attention to one only, and that perhaps the most important of all, namely, the market at Liverpool.
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  • This selection of one market for detailed examination does not rob our sketch of generality, as might at first be thought, since broadly the history of the development of one market is the history of the development of all, and on the whole the economic explanation of the evolution that has taken place may be universalized.
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  • Ship Canal, has drawn back into Manchester a part of the cotton market which was attracted from Manchester into Liverpool by the famous improvement in transport opened to the public three-quarters of a century ago.
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  • The centralization of the cotton market in Liverpool fixed firmly the system of buying through brokers, for the Liverpool importer, or his broker, was in no sense a professional adviser to the spinners, informally pledged to advance the latter's interests, as the old Manchester dealers had been.
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  • Originally cotton was imported by the Liverpool dealer as an agent for American firms or at his own risk, and then sold by private treaty, auction, or through brokers, to Cotton market methods.
    0
    0
  • Hence at first, in 1882, they were used only by a section of the market constituted of members who had voluntarily agreed to do business with one another upon these terms alone.
    0
    0
  • At the same time of " futures " were becoming an increasing necessity to Origin Liverpool importers, because through " futures " alone could they cotton hedge on their purchases of cotton, or buy when the Associa- market seemed favourable, and they were not prepared tion .
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  • The split in the market so caused was so damaging to both parties that a satisfactory arrangement was eventually agreed upon, and both institutions were absorbed in the Liverpool Cotton Association.
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  • Messrs Ewart and Rutson pioneered in 1805 by issuing a weekly account of the sales and imports of cotton, and three years later three such circulars were on the market, though Hope's alone was confined to cotton.
    0
    0
  • For the first associated circular of any importance, the market had to wait until 1832.
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  • The issue of this circular by subscribing firms, on the basis of particulars collected by brokers appointed at a weekly meeting, gave rise in 1841 to the Cotton Brokers' Association, to which the development of the market by the systematizing of procedure is largely due.
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  • The rest of the tale may be told in Mr Ellison's own words: " Down to 1864 the leading firms continued to issue weekly market reports, but in that year the association commenced the publication of an associated circular.
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  • The third, which is not distinct in principle from the two preceding, is that such limited speculation in cotton buying on the part of spinners worried with other matters would not be likely to steady the cotton market in any high degree.
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  • Now it is evident that brokers in turn require some means of passing on the risks that they are bearing, or some portion of them from one to another, or of sharing them with other market experts, as they find themselves overburdened, and as their judgment of the situation changes.
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  • American cotton, we may remind the reader, is graded into a number of classes, both on the Liverpool and New York Ex changes, and an attempt is made in each market to keep the grades as fixed as possible.
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  • But other things are not equal: the market would be more confusing and quotations would be complicated if " futures " were in use for all grades.
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  • Various grades of cotton are tenderable against " futures ": if this were not so " futures " would be in danger of defeating their object, because the price of the grade upon which they were founded would probably at times be thrown widely out of relation to the general level of prices in the cotton market.
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  • The detailed arrangements described above are those of the Liverpool market.
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  • Purchases for " speculation " remain in the market and therefore figure again in the sales.
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  • Now, supposing dealing to be confined to experts, what effects upon the course of prices would one expect from the specialism of the cotton market and improved facilities Effect specula= for dealing, on the assumption that dealers were governed wholly in their actions by the course of prices and never tried to manipulate them?
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  • This would be so if people acted independently and without guidance, but actually they are sometimes misled by published advice and movements in the market intended to deceive them, and, even when they are not, they watch each other's attitudes and tend to act as a crowd.
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  • In consequence of this tampering with the market no certainty can be felt about the effect even of expert dealing.
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  • What, then, we may profitably inquire next, has actually happened to price movements generally as the market has developed?
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  • Mr Hooker has shown with reference to the wheat market how close is the correlation between prices in different places,' and the same has been observed of the cotton market, though the Conceivably some indication of the working of " futures " might be gleaned from observation of the relations of near and distant " futures " to one another and of both to spot."
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  • The "spot" market might be judged generally as too high, in view of crops and the probable normal demand of the year, but it might not therefore drop immediately, owing partly to the pressure of demand that must be satisfied instantaneously.
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  • The city maintains a workhouse (1882), also two market houses, and owns and manages an electric-lighting plant.
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  • At the inception of the industry kerosene came into the market as a dark yellow or reddish-coloured liquid, and in the first instance, the removal of colour was attempted by treatment with soda lye and lime solution.
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  • In such condition ordinary soft soaps and certain kinds of hard soap are brought to the market.
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  • Suppose that a pure soap without resin is to be made - a product little seen in the market - the spent lye is run off, steam is again turned on, pure water or very weak lye run in, and the contents boiled up till the whole is thin, close and clear.
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  • By the market house is a statue of Sir Humphry Davy, who was born here in 1778.
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  • Nevertheless thirty years later it is described by Leland as the westernmost market town in Cornwall "with no socur for Botes or shippes but a forsed Pere or Key."
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    0
  • In 1332 a market on Wednesdays and a fair at the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula were granted to Alice de Lisle and in 1405 this market was ratified and three additional fairs added, viz.
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  • Of her numerous temples at Rome, the most ancient was appropriately in the forum olitorium (vegetable market), built during the first Punic war, and since that time twice burnt down and restored.
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  • In the large market place is the statue of the Prussian king Frederick William I., erected in 1824, and there is a war memorial on the Friedrich Wilhelm Platz.
    0
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  • The centre of commercial and civic life of the older group of communities, as of the greater city of the classical age, was the Agora or market.
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  • The New, or Roman, Agora to the north of the Acropolis, perhaps mainly an oil market, was constructed after the year 27 B.C. Its dimensions were practically determined by excavation in 1890-1891.
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  • Nursery and market gardening, largely under glass, brickmaking and saw-mills are the chief industries of Cheshunt.
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  • The only manufacturing industries of much importance are the preparation of sugar, coffee and tobacco for market, and the manufacture of cigars, cigarettes, straw hats, soap, matches, vermicelli, sash, doors, ice, distilled liquors and some machinery.
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  • Louis as the largest horse and mule market in the world was maintained, the volume of business in 1919 being $50,000,000.
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    0
  • It is an important horse and mule market, and handles much tobacco.
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  • 's Hertogenbosch is the market of the fertile Meiery district, and carries on a considerable trade, chiefly by water, with Dordrecht and Rotterdam, Nijmwegen, Amhem, Maastricht and Liege.
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  • The ancient market town of Hartlepool lies on a peninsula which forms the termination of a southeastward sweep of the coast and embraces the bay.
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  • West Hartlepool, a wholly modern town, has several handsome modern churches, municipal buildings, exchange, market hall, Athenaeum and public library.
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  • In 1216 John confirmed toRobertBruce the market on Wednesday granted to his father and the fair on the feast of St Lawrence; this fair was extended to fifteen days by the grant of 1230, while the charter of 1595 also granted a fair and market.
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    0
  • Banda cotton enjoys a high repute in the market.
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    0
  • Gold had fallen still further from the diffusion of the Persian treasure, and Alexander struck in both metals on the Attic standard, leaving their relation to adjust itself by the state of the market.
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  • Fox and his fellow-preachers spoke whenever opportunity offered, - sometimes in churches(declining, for the most part, to occupy the pulpit), sometimes in barns, sometimes at market crosses.
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    0
  • Among other buildings are the court house, the market hall, the assembly rooms (a handsome building adjoining the town-hall), and large barracks.
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    0
  • The abbot of Fecamp seems to have originally held a market.
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    0
  • In 1792 a market was held on Saturdays and a fair on the 14th of May, .but no market or fair now exists.
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    0
  • Athens was an important slave market, and the state profited by a tax on the sales; but the principal marts were those of Cyprus, Samos, Ephesus and especially Chios.
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    0
  • The pirates sold great numbers of slaves at Delos, where was the chief market for this kind of wares; and these sales went on as really, though more obscurely, after the successful expedition of Pompey.
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    0
  • Captives were brought thence to the slave market of Kuka in Bornu, where, after being bought by dealers, they were, to the number of about 10,000 annually, marched across the Sahara to Murzuk in Fezzan, from which place they were distributed to the northern and eastern Mediterranean coasts.
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  • It includes the market towns Of Broseley, Madeley and Much Wenlock.
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    0
  • The first grant of a market and fair is dated 1227, when the prior of Wenlock obtained licence to hold a fair on the vigil, day and morrow of the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and a market every Monday.
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    0
  • These mines divide with the Sicilian mines the control of the sulphur market of the world.
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    0
  • Only in very recent years have oysters, though plentiful, become of competitive importance in the national market; they are greatly favoured by state protective legislation.
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    0
  • Since that time select Japanese species, chosen for superior milling qualities, have been widely introduced, as the market prejudice in favour of head rice made the large percentage of broken rice a heavy handicap to the farmers.
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    0
  • The berries are of fine quality, and despite the competition of Brazil there is no (agricultural) reason why the home market at least should not be supplied from Cuban estates.
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  • It has woollen mills, cotton compresses, clothing, furniture, and spoke and stave factories and machine shops, and is a cotton market.
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  • In the earlier half of the 19th century Fayetteville was a great inland market for the western part of the state, for eastern Tennessee and for south-western Virginia.
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    0
  • Tobacco is grown all over the empire, the most important market for it being Smyrna.
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  • It was to be applied by redemption at the best price possible on the market, until that price stood at £T66.66, when, if the rate of interest served were 1%, it was to proceed by drawings; if the interest were anything more than 1%, and less than 3%, the limit of price for redemption was to be raised to U75; if the interest were between 3% and 4% inclusive, the limit was to be raised to par.
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  • The gross receipts from this export trade amounted in the year1908-1909to £T99,564, and the profits approximately to £T12,000, in spite of the contest between Liverpool and Spanish salt merchants on the Calcutta market, which led to a heavy cutting of prices.
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  • The capital sum per section was fixed, in round figures, at 54,000,000 francs (£2,160,000), subject to adjustment when the section was completed and its actual length definitely measured up. A minimum net price of 812% was fixed for the realization of these securities on the market.
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  • The 20-piastre mejidie currency, in spite of the further enormous depreciation of silver since 1880, has scarcely varied in the Constantinople market, but has always remained at a discount of about 3% (between 108 and 109 piastres to the pound) under government rate; this is doubtless due to the fact that the demand and supply of the coins in that market are very evenly balanced.
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  • The fractional mejidie coins (5, 2 and 1 piastres) are quoted at a separate rate in the market, usually at a premium over the 20-piastre piece.
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  • Germany also has invaded this market.
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  • In the account roll above mentioned reference is made to a fair and a market, but no early grant of either is to be found.
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  • In 1792 two annual fairs were held, one on Whit Monday, the other on the 10th of October; and a market was held every Saturday.
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  • The market day is still Saturday, but the fairs are discontinued.
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  • The Zahran district lies four days west of Besha on the crest of the main range: the principal place is Makhwa, a large town and market, from which grain is exported in considerable quantities to Mecca.
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  • Agen is the market for a rich agricultural region.
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  • There is a large brewery in the town, and extensive market gardens in the neighbourhood.
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  • A grant of a market was obtained in 1247, and this is still of importance as regards both cattle and corn.
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  • Cleveland is the largest ore market in the world, and its huge ore docks are among its most interesting features; the annual receipts and shipments of coal and iron ore are enormous.
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  • It is also the largest market for fresh-water fish in America, and handles large quantities of lumber and grain.
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  • The city is a market for the produce of the Willamette Valley.
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  • Its noteworthy public buildings are the custom-house and its storehouses which occupy the old quadrangular fortress built by the Spanish government between 1770 and 1775, and cover 15 acres, the prefecture, the military and naval offices and barracks, the post-office, three Catholic churches, a hospital, market, three clubs and some modern commercial houses.
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  • It is of modern growth, possessing a town hall, market hall, free library, technical school, pleasant park and recreation grounds, and an extensive system of electric tramways and light railways, connecting with Burnley and Colne.
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  • The largest of the public squares in Hamburg is the Hopfenmarkt, which contains the church of St Nicholas (Nikolaikirche) and is the principal market for vegetables and fruit.
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  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.
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  • Having regard to the present cost of producing " plantation " rubber, and to the probability that, apart from a possible increase in the price of labour, this cost is susceptible of further reduction, it may be concluded that rubber production will continue to be profitable even should a considerable fall in market value take place.
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  • " Para " rubber, which takes the first position in the market, is derived from species of Hevea, principally Hevea brasiliensis, of which there are enormous forests in the valleys of the Amazon and its tributaries, and also in Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela and Guiana.
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  • Partly for this reason and partly because pieces of wood and dirt are apt to be included with the scrap, the market value of Ceara rubber is usually less than that of Para.
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  • The flat rounded cakes of rubber made in this manner are known in the London market as " biscuits.
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  • Since the latex " creams " readily the rubber can be separated from the latex by centrifugalizing, and its quality and market value thus enhanced.
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  • About thirty days afterwards it is sent to market.
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    0
  • The tests of the physical properties of crude rubber usually applied to determine its value in the market are also very rough and cannot be relied upon.
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  • A weekly market was granted, two fairs yearly at Whitsuntide and Michaelmas, and many other privileges.
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    0
  • The market for leather and cloth is important, and Ulm is famous for its vegetables (especially asparagus), barley, beer, pipe-bowls and sweet cakes (Ulmer Zuckerbrot).
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    0
  • A market on Saturday existed at least as early as 1255, and in 1608 is described as well stocked with provisions.
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  • The market day has been transferred to Friday, but the May and October fairs are continued.
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  • A Saturday market and an annual fair were granted to the lord of the manor by Henry III.
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  • The fertility of the pasture-land in Romney Marsh to the south and east of Ashford caused the cattle trade to increase in the latter half of the 18th century, and led to the establishment of a stock market in 1784.
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  • In 1833 Pattinson invented his process by means of which practically all the silver is concentrated in 13% of the original lead to be cupelled, while the rest becomes market lead.
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    0
  • Of these the Pattinson process has become subordinate to the Parkes process, as it is more expensive and leaves more silver and impurities in the market lead.
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  • It holds its own, however, when base bullion contains bismuth in appreciable amounts, as in the Pattinson process bismuth follows the lead to be cupelled, while in the Parkes process it remains with the desilverized lead which goes to market, and lead of commerce should contain little bismuth.
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  • The effect of the two processes on the purity of the market lead is clearly shown by the two following analyses by Hampe, which represent lead from Lautenthal in the Harz Mountains, where the Parkes process replaced that of Pattinson, the ores and smelting process remaining practically the same: - It is absolutely necessary for the success of the Parkes process that the zinc and lead should contain only a small amount of impurity.
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  • The same is done with the kettle one-third filled with liquid lead, and so on until the first kettle contains market lead, the last cupelling lead.
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  • The intervening kettles contain leads with silver contents ranging from above market to below cupelling lead.
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  • From the reverberatory furnace or the kettle the refined lead is siphoned off into a storage (market) kettle after it has cooled somewhat, and from this it is siphoned off into moulds placed in a semicircle on the floor.
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  • The principal buildings are the old town-hall, the market house, the guildhall, the Royal Dorset Yacht Clubhouse, the theatre, the Royal Victoria Jubilee Hall, the Weymouth and Dorset eye infirmary, the Weymouth royal hospital and dispensary and the barracks.
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  • The market is of ancient origin, and was formerly held on Monday; in the survey the tolls are assessed at 45 shillings.
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    0
  • The earliest record of a grant of market rights is in 1219, when Roger la Zouch obtained a grant of a weekly market and a two days' fair at the feast of St Helen, in consideration of a fine of one palfrey.
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  • The local market price will form the basis of the indemnity for the live stock and implements to be expropriated.
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  • There are works for the manufacture of woollens and ropes, also tanneries, but it is as the central market of a large and fertile district that Carmarthen is most important.
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  • The weekly Saturday market is well attended, and affords interesting scenes of modern Welsh agricultural life.
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  • In 1555 Bishop Farrar of St David's was publicly burned for heresy under Queen Mary at the Market Cross, which was ruthlessly destroyed in 1846 to provide a site for General Nott's statue.
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  • Cattle, phosphate of lime and salt, manufactured from a lake in the interior, are the principal exports, the market for these being the neighbouring island of St Thomas.
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    0
  • Of the edible river fish, the best known is the pirarucd (Sudis gigas), a large fish of the Amazon which is salted and dried for market during the low-water season.
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    0
  • In the Amazon valley fish is a principal article of food, and large quantities of pirarucu (Sudis gigas) are caught during the season of low water and prepared for storage or market by drying in the sun.
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  • Manufactures.-Before the establishment of the republic very little attention had been given to manufacturing industries beyond what was necessary to prepare certain crude products for market.
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  • The town hall is the principal modern building, and the fountain erected in Market Square to the memory of the 6th duke of Atholl (d.1864) occupies the site of the old cross.
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  • The Waverley Market for vegetables and fruit presents a busy scene in the early morning, and is used for monster meetings and promenade and popular concerts.
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  • A market town since the 14th century, Korsor has ruins of an old fortified castle, on the south side of the channel, dating from the 14th and 17th centuries.
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  • The chief market for cattle is Johannesburg.
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  • This proved one of the most momentous steps taken in the history of South Africa, for the Indian population rapidly increased, the " free " Indians becoming market gardeners, farmers, hawkers, traders, and in time serious competitors with the whites.
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  • "We advocate," he said, "nothing but what is agreeable to the highest behests of Christianity - to buy in the cheapest market, and sell in the dearest."
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  • Bodin showed a more rational appreciation than many of his contemporaries of the causes of this revolution, and the relation of the variations in money to the market values of wares in general as well as to the wages of labour.
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  • Schweinfurt carries on an active trade in the grain, fruit and wine produced in its neighbourhood, and it is the seat of an important sheep and cattle market.
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    0
  • At the present time excellent reproductions of Rowland's speculum gratings are on the market (Thorp, Ives, Wallace), prepared, after a suggestion of Sir David Brewster, by coating the original with a varnish, e.g.
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  • The Geestlande comprise the suburban districts encircling the city on the north and west; the Marschlande includes various islands in the Elbe and the fertile tract of land lying between the northern and southern arms of the Elbe, and with its pastures and market gardens supplying Hamburg with large quantities of country produce.
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    0
  • All tin, except a small quantity produced by the shaft furnace process from exceptionally pure stream tin ore, requires refining by liquation and "boiling" before it is ready for the market.
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    0
  • In 1086 it was assessed as royal demesne, and a market was held here at this date.
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    0
  • It carries on a flourishing trade, especially in fruit, and is an important market for horses and cattle.
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    0
  • The first charter of incorporation was granted by Queen Mary in 1553, and instituted a common council consisting of a bailiff, 12 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses; a court of record, one justice of the peace, a Thursday market and two annual fairs.
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  • Several grades are produced in Venezuela, determined by geographical position, altitude and method of curing and preparing for market.
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    0
  • Its principal product is " papelon," or brown sugar, which is put on the market in the shape of small cylindrical and cubical masses of 14 to 31 lb weight.
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  • Potatoes, asparagus, and other vegetables are also grown for the London market.
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    0
  • Saturday was market day in 1792; a corn market is now held on Saturday, a cattle market on Thursday and Saturday.
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    0
  • A little east of Church Square this street opens on to Market Square, with commodious market buildings.
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    0
  • The young are about an inch in length by the end of spring, but are not fit for the market till the second year, and it has been stated that they do not reach maturity, as shown by the power of reproduction, till the end of their third year.
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    0
  • The fishery is also carried on along the coast of Norfolk and Suffolk, where great quantities of the fish are caught with hook and line, and conveyed to market alive in "well-boats" specially built for this traffic. Such boats have been in use since the beginning of the '8th century.
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  • The survival of names of obliterated physical features or characteristics is illustrated in Section I.; but additional instances are found in the Strand, which originally ran close to the sloping bank of the Thames, and in Smithfield, now the central meat market, but for long the " smooth field " where a cattle and hay market was held, and the scene of tournaments and games, and also of executions.
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    0
  • A market for horses and cattle existed here at least as early as the time of Henry II.
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    0
  • This market was in existence before 1411 when it came into the possession of the City.
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    0
  • Formerly a point of anchorage for small vessels, it was made a free market in 1699.
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    0
  • Of other markets, the Whitechapel Hay Market and Borough Market, Southwark, are under the control of trustees; and Woolwich Market is under the council of that borough.
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    0
  • It appears to have been used as a market early in the 17th century.
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    0
  • Tite also agreed with Dr Stukeley's suggestion that on the site of the Mansion House (formerly Stocks Market) stood the Roman forum, and he states that a line drawn from that spot as a centre would pass by the pavements found on the site of the Excise Office.
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    0
  • In 1737 the Fleet ditch between Holborn Bridge and Fleet Bridge was covered over, and Stocks Market was removed from the site of the Mansion House to the present Farringdon Street, and called Fleet market.
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    0
  • In coal mining the market demand varies in different seasons, and surface storage is sometimes necessary to permit regular work at the mines.
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  • Coal, fireclay and blue and red brick clay are dug in the neighbourhood; and there are also market gardens.
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  • Coal is found in the Thayetmyo, Upper Chindwin and Shwebo districts, and in the Shan States; it also occurs in Mergui, but the deposits which have been so far discovered have been either of inferior quality or too far from their market to be worked to advantage.
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  • Crown-glass has at the present day almost disappeared from the market, and it has been superseded by sheet-glass, the more modern processes described above being capable of producing much larger sheets of glass, free from the knob or " bullion " which may still be seen in old crown-glass windows.
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  • There is also an important camel and cattle market.
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    0
  • Market gardening, the rearing of cattle, for which the district is widely famed, and fishing, form the chief occupations of the rural population.
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    0
  • The slave market was closed about 1874.
    0
    0
  • The city carries on a considerable jobbing business for the farming region of which it is the centre and produce market.
    0
    0
  • Upon the removal in 1824 of the conference's academy at New Market, New Hampshire, to Wilbraham, Massachusetts, Fisk became one of its agents and trustees, and in 1826 its principal.
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    0
  • That which comes into the European market as jaggery or khaur is obtained from the sap of several palms, the wild date (Phoenix sylvestris), the palmyra (Borassus flabellifer), the coco-nut (Cocos nucifera), the gomuti (Arenga saccharifera) and others.
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    0
  • Jaggery production is entirely in native hands, and the greater part of the amount made is consumed locally; it only occasionally reaches the European market.
    0
    0
  • The curing or preparation of the crystals for the market by separating the molasses from them.
    0
    0
  • A further saving of juice was sometimes possible if the market prices of sugar were such as to compensate for the cost of evaporating an increased quantity of added water, but a limit was imposed by the fact that water might be used in excess.
    0
    0
  • Whether the improvement will be profitable or not to the planter or manufacturer depends on the market for the sugar, and on the conditions of foreign tariffs, which are not infrequently hostile.
    0
    0
  • The choice of the size of the crystals to be produced in a given pan depends upon the market for which they are intended.
    0
    0
  • The claying system involved the expense of large curing houses and the employment of many hands, and forty days at least were required for completing the operation and making the sugar fit for the market, whereas with centrifugals sugar cooked to-day can go to market to-morrow, and the labour employed is reduced to a minimum.
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    0
  • From the centrifugal the sugar is either turned out without washing as raw sugar, only fit for the refinery, or else it is well washed with a spray of water and air until white and dry, and it is then offered in the market as refined sugar, although it has never passed through animal charcoal (bone-black).
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    0
  • In selection work the grower must keep definitely in view the special market requirements for the kinds of tobacco he is producing.
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    0
  • The picked leaves are usually either prepared for market by simple exposure to the sun for a few days, or in addition are sprinkled with groundnut oil and sometimes other materials also, which result in an increase of strength.
    0
    0
  • The exports of manufactured tobacco, such as Manila cheroots, find their principal market in China, British India, Australasia and the United Kingdom, whilst of the leaf tobacco fully three-quarters goes to Spain.
    0
    0
  • In Ceylon tobacco is grown in the northern portion of the island; the produce is but little suited to the European market and is mainly exported to southern India and Cochin China.
    0
    0
  • Rhodesian-grown Turkish tobacco is already on the English market, as also various brands of tobacco from the Transvaal.
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    0
  • Airdrie was a market town in 1695, but owes its prosperity to the great coal and iron beds in its vicinity.
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    0
  • The great majority of the horses that come into the market as Arabs, are bred in the northern desert and in Mesopotamia, by the various sections of the Aneza and Shammar tribes, who emigrated from Nejd generations ago, taking with them the original Nejd stock.
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  • The fishing centre at Schonen was important as a market, though, like Novgorod, its trade was seasonal, but it did not acquire the position of a regularly organized counter, reserved alone, in the North, for Bergen.
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  • Jalap has been cultivated for many years in India, chiefly at Ootacamund, and grows there as easily as a yam, often producing clusters of tubers weighing over 9 lb; but these, as they differ in appearance from the commercial article, have not as yet obtained a place in the English market.
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  • As early as the close of the 17th century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates.
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  • The chief town of the Majerda basin is Beja (pop. 5000), the ancient Vaga, an important corn market.
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  • The trade of the district has grown to such an extent that Padua has become the central market for the whole of Venetia.
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  • Tallow candles as a substitute for whale-oil had been introduced, and the British market was closed by a duty of £r8 a ton on oil; a bounty offered by the Massachusetts legislature (£5 on white and £ 3 on yellow or brown spermaceti, and £2 on whale-oil per ton) was of slight assistance.
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  • The market house, dated 1670, is a picturesque building supported on columns, the upper portion serving as a town hall.
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  • The Prospect was acquired and laid out by Kyrle, who also planted the fine elm avenues near the church; his house stands opposite the market house, where he disbursed his charities; he erected the church spire, and is buried in the chancel, where his grave remained without a monument until Pope called attention to the omission.
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  • A market every Thursday was granted by Stephen and confirmed by Henry III.; Friday is now market day.
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  • There is evidence of the existence of a market here as early as the 13th century.
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  • James I., in his charter of incorporation, granted fairs on Monday and Tuesday in Whitsun week, and confirmed an ancient fair at Michaelmas and a market on Monday.
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  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.
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  • In 1905 the number of persons employed in the general fisheries industry was 2212; and the value of the catch was $ 1, 54 6, 6 5 8, the largest items being: lobsters, squeteague (weakfish), $86,478; scup, $138,030; and oysters (for market), $874,232.
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  • The barracks have been cleared away and a covered market made in the upper part of the Kissaria.
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  • In the Waverley Market at Edinburgh, which is said to hold 20,000 people, he could be heard without difficulty; and as late as 1895 he said to the present writer: " What difference does it make to me whether I speak to 400 or 4000 people ?
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  • Market gardening is extensively carried on in the neighbourhood and cider largely manufactured.
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  • The wine of the neighbourhood, which resembles port, is shipped in large quantities from Barcelona; and the district furnishes fine roses and strawberries for the Barcelona market.
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  • But if the Japanese sculptor adopted such standards in working for foreign patrons, his market would be reduced to very narrow dimensions.
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  • A considerable school of carvers soon began to work in the Matsumoto style, and hundreds of their pi-oductions have gone to Europe and America, finding no market in Japan.
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  • The productior was always scanty, and, owing to official prohibitions, the ware did not find its way into the general market.
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  • In spite of their artistic defects, these specimens were exported in considerable numbers by merchants in the foreign settlements, and their first cost being very low, they found a not unreniunerative market.
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  • Up to that time there had been little demand for enamels of large dimensions, but when the foreign market called for vases, censers, plaques and such things, no difficulty was found in supplying them.
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  • There is a market house of the 16th century.
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  • For the theory and elemental laws of electro-deposition see Electrolysis; and for the construction and use of electric generators see Dynamo and Battery: Electric. The importance of the subject may be gauged by the fact that all the aluminium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, calcium carbide, carborundum and artificial graphite, now placed on the market, is made by electrical processes, and that the use of such processes for the refining of copper and silver, and in the manufacture of phosphorus, potassium chlorate and bleach, already pressing very heavily on the older non-electrical systems, is every year extending.
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  • The market rights were held by the lord of the manor until 1819, when Earl Powis sold them to the corporation.
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  • In the 15th and 16th .centuries a weekly market was held at Oswestry for the sale of woollen goods manufactured in North Wales, but in the 17th century the drapers of Shrewsbury determined to get the trade into their own town, and although an Order in the Privy Council was passed to restrain it to Oswestry they agreed in 1621 to buy no more cloth there.
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  • Dijon has considerable trade in cereals and wool, and is the second market for the wines of Burgundy.
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  • Towards the end of the 14th century the town gained a considerable trade owing to the permission given by the provost to the pirates known as "Viktualienbruder" to make it their market, after they had been driven out of Gothland by the Teutonic Order.
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  • The town, which is very ancient, being mentioned in Domesday, obtained a grant for a market and fair in 1251, and received its charter of incorporation in 1887.
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  • Bishop Stapledon obtained a Saturday market, and two annual fairs lasting three days at the feasts of St Laurence (August io) and St Martin in winter (November II).
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  • In 1672 John Ford was granted a Tuesday market for the sale of wool and woollen goods made from English yarn, and in 1705 Andrew Quicke obtained two annual fairs, on the first Thursdays in March and June, for the sale of cattle, corn and merchandise.
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  • The chief open spaces are Market Square in the west and Government Square in the south of the town.
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  • The chief business streets, such as Commissioner Street, Market Street, President Street and Pritchard Street, run east and west.
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  • Chief Buildings, &c. - In the centre of Market Square are the market buildings, and at its east end the post and telegraph offices, a handsome block of buildings with a façade 200 ft.
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  • The offices of the Witwatersrand chamber of mines face the market buildings.
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  • The Wednesday market is held under the charter of Henry VII.
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  • There is also a Saturday cattle market.
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  • In 1204 John also granted a weekly market on Wednesday and Saturday.
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  • The Pipe Rolls (1194-1203) show that Robert de Cardinan, lord of Restormel, paid ten marks yearly for having a market at Lostwithiel.
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  • By Isolda, granddaughter of Robert de Cardinan, the town was given to Richard, king of the Romans, who in the third year of his reign granted to the burgesses a gild merchant sac and soc, toll, team and infangenethef, freedom from pontage, lastage, &c., throughout Cornwall, and exemption from the jurisdiction of the hundred and county courts, also a yearly fair and a weekly market.
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