Mark sentence examples

mark
  • His mark is inconsequential.

  • I saw the mark with my own eyes.

  • He made his mark; it draws us to you.

  • Like a dog pissing on a tree to mark his territory?

  • This is an important night, and I want to mark it as such.

  • Finding his mark, no doubt.

  • Pasteur's important researches mark an epoch in the technical aspect of fermentation.

  • I read from Mark Twain's lips one or two of his good stories.

  • I've got a black and blue mark on my ribs from his version of Saturday night fever.

  • She slammed the book shut and carried it to the shed, where she searched for something to mark a trail.

  • These years mark the zenith of Athenian greatness.

  • These different tasks, which philosophy had to fulfil, mark pretty accurately the aims of Lotze's writings, and the order in which they were published.

  • The 2nd and 3rd centuries, indeed, are the high-water mark of its prosperity: and it still possessed a mint in the 4th century A.D.

  • Dean's eyes questioned and Mrs. Byrne clarified, The Mark Hopkins Hotel, in San Francisco—it was our little joke.

  • Fine, but mark my words.

  • I passed that mark a few hundred thousand years ago.

  • The names of leading legislators, which we so often find recorded in the history of primitive peoples, are symbols and myths, merely serving to mark an historic period or epoch by some definite and personal denomination.

  • There's got to be a way to track and mark them.

  • Mark Twain has said that the two most interesting characters of the nineteenth century are Napoleon and Helen Keller.

  • Only after the public grew weary of this did printers go off in search of completely new books, called novels to mark their newness.

  • Its importance, however, is of comparatively modern growth and in the early history of Wurttemberg it was overshadowed by Cannstatt, the central situation of which on the Neckar seemed to mark it out as the natural capital of the country.

  • The views of Becher on the composition of substances mark little essential advance on those of the two preceding centuries, and the three elements or principles of salt, mercury and sulphur reappear as the vitrifiable, the mercurial and the combustible earths.

  • When all was ready, the sabers stuck in the snow to mark the barriers, and the pistols loaded, Nesvitski went up to Pierre.

  • If Alex was a big question mark right now, Jonathan was an exclamation point.

  • The grant finally came into the possession of Thomas, Lord Fairfax, and in 1746 a stone was erected at the source of the north branch of the Potomac to mark the western limit of the grant.

  • It's not the Top of the Mark, but I may not get another chance.

  • Mark my words, what you are doing will not remain unnoticed.

  • The beekeeper closes the hive, chalks a mark on it, and when he has time tears out its contents and burns it clean.

  • Fred consoled her in his best fashion in spite of having a snoot-full at the time—the mark of a real pro.

  • Today I signed my name Carmen Pullock and then had to mark through it and sign it with my new name.

  • If you don't mark 'em all with rocks we're going to miss a turn on the way out and end up god-knows-where in the middle of the earth someplace.

  • Alondra was still a big question mark, but her gut said no to that idea too.

  • If Darkyn didn't want you, he never would've let that mark form on you.

  • The mark of these technologies is that they are greeted with universal skepticism at first.

  • Sure. Mark and Joni.

  • Regardless, Clarissa's sugar coated barbs hit their mark all too often.

  • Keaton kicked at a stick and made a mark in the gravel with the toe of his shoe.

  • Few politicians have been the mark of such abuse as Shaftesbury.

  • We'll mark every corner, just as Martha did—not just stones but chalk, too.

  • When things were going badly, we'd say, 'Think of manhattans at the Mark.'

  • After being educated at Cracow, he made the grand tour with his brother Mark and returned to Poland in 1648.

  • His official duty is to mark the game on the scoring card when the leader announces the result.

  • As recently as the early twentieth century, relatively few careers existed in which young men of drive and ambition could distinguish themselves and leave a mark on the world.

  • But the plague, which had carried off two of his sons and a sister, had left its mark also on Pericles himself.

  • Now the "war stories" are about how Mark Zuckerberg was nineteen when he started Facebook, Bill Gates was nineteen when he started Microsoft, and Larry Page and Sergey Brin were in their early twenties when they started Google.

  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.

  • Today's events mark an epoch, the greatest epoch in our history, he concluded.

  • To have one's ear pulled by the Emperor was considered the greatest honor and mark of favor at the French court.

  • The Mark Hopkins hotel.

  • Being educated in the United States has long been a mark of distinction for the elites of other nations.

  • I love Mark Twain--who does not?

  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.

  • It was time for him to make his own mark on the world – settle down with some nice girl and raise a family like his father had.

  • Diff selection: mark the radio boxes of the versions to compare and hit enter or the button at the bottom.

  • It is clear from Chicheley's position in the list, with eleven fellows and eight scholars, or probationerfellows, below him, that this entry does not mark his first appearance in the college, which had been going on since 1375 at least, and was chartered in 1379.

  • Mr. Hutton introduced me to many of his literary friends, greatest of whom are Mr. William Dean Howells and Mark Twain.

  • A quick look revealed the speedometer was nearing the ninety mark - or did it merely look like it from her seat?

  • If his name scrawled across her shoulders didn't mark her as his, the collar did.

  • "To mark you as my blood monkey," he said.

  • The one week mark of Conner's new life coincided with Jackson's birthday.

  • She put her hair down to hide the mark, horrified by the idea of belonging to the devil.

  • Looking out, they could see into some of the houses near them, where there were open windows in abundance, and were able to mark the forms of the wooden Gargoyles moving about in their dwellings.

  • Uncertain how to explain things, she turned and swept her pink-dyed hair from her back to show him the mating mark.

  • He rubbed his eyes against the dimness and caught sight of a skid mark.

  • You should be used to it, or you wouldn't wear your dead master's mark.

  • Then they said I was your mate, because I bear your mark.

  • Do you think it will leave a mark?

  • Jackson deflected her foot inches away from its mark.

  • Little things keep pop­ping into mind—like Jeff won't be here for Randy's graduation, or he'll miss a neighbor's surprise party, or we'll never get to the Top of the Mark.

  • Maybe drink a manhattan at sunset on the Top of the Mark?

  • She wore the mark of Darian, the firstborn of the White God.

  • Sofi wore the White God's pendant, Bianca wore Dusty's mark, and Yully wore Jule's.

  • True to his word, Jonny left Xander's at the fifty-eight minute mark.

  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

  • about 1190), in his biography of Thomas Becket, gives a graphic sketch of the London of his day and, writing of the summer amusements of the young men, says that on holidays they were "exercised in Leaping, Shooting, Wrestling, Casting of Stones [in jactu lapidum], and Throwing of Javelins fitted with Loops for the Purpose, which they strive to fling before the Mark; they also use Bucklers, like fighting Men."

  • In Ulfilas' Gothic version of the Bible, the earliest extant literary monument of the Germanic languages, the Syrophoenician woman (Mark vii.

  • It has been usually supposed that John Napier was buried in St Giles's church, Edinburgh, which was certainly the burialplace of some of the family, but Mark Napier (Memoirs, p. 426) quotes Professor William Wallace, who, writing in 1832, gives strong reasons for believing that he was buried in the old church of St Cuthbert.

  • Of this singular contract, which is signed, "Robert Logane of Restalrige" and "Jhone Neper, Fear of Merchiston," and is dated July 1594, a facsimile is given in Mark Napier's Memoirs.

  • An account of the contents of these manuscripts was given by Mark Napier in the appendix to his Memoirs of John Napier, and the manuscripts themselves were edited in their entirety by him in 1839 under the title De Arte Logistica Joannis Naperi Merchistonii Baronis Libri qui supersunt.

  • The treatise occupies one hundred and sixty-two pages, and there is an introduction by Mark Napier of ninety-four pages.

  • The office, Mark Napier states, is repeatedly mentioned in the family charters as appertaining to the "pultre landis" near the village of Dene in the shire of Linlithgow.

  • With regard to the spelling of the name, Mark Napier states that among the family papers there exist a great many documents signed by John Napier.

  • As an orator Charles Lucas appears to have had little power, and he made no mark in the House of Commons.

  • Its site is now occupied by an open square, one stone remaining to mark the spot where Henry II.

  • On their right Scirocco outflanked the Venetians of Barbarigo, but the better build of the galleys of Saint Mark and the admirable discipline of their crews gave them the victory.

  • important reign is a very mportant period in the early history of Scotland, and may almost be said to mark an epoch in every department of public life.

  • In this form the seventh day's rest was one of the few outward ordinances by which the Israelite could still show his fidelity to Yahweh and mark his separation from the heathen.

  • Unless the Sabbath was already an institution peculiarly Jewish, it could not have served as a mark of distinction from heathenism.

  • 29; Mark x.

  • Linkoping early became a place of mark, and was already a bishop's see in 1082.

  • Few men of the period so profoundly impressed their mark on Jewish life.

  • Lord Palmerston offered him a baronetcy and a seat in the privy council, and the emperor of the French would gladly have conferred upon him some distinguished mark of his favour.

  • 7 Early Protestantism lived too much in the thought of justification to mark out the boundaries of creed with this scholastic precision.

  • s Mark xii.

  • In 1762 Prince Paul Esterhazy died and was succeeded by his brother Nicholas, surnamed the Magnificent, who increased Haydn's salary, showed him every mark of favour, and, on the death of Werner in 1766, appointed him Oberkapellmeister.

  • It is of course easy to see that Celsus had no apprehension of the spiritual needs even of his own day which it was the Christian purpose to satisfy, that he could not grasp anything of the new life enjoyed by the poor in spirit, and that he underrated the significance of the Church, regarding it simply as one of a number of warring sections (mostly Gnostic), and so seeing only a mark of weakness.

  • MARK TWAIN, the nom de plume of [[Samuel Langhorne Clemens]] (1835-1910), American author, who was born on the 30th of November 1835, at Florida, Missouri.

  • He went to the mines for a season, and there he began to write in the local newspapers, adopting the pen name of "Mark Twain," from a call used in taking soundings on the Mississippi steamboats.

  • This firm prospered for a while, and issued in 1889 Mark Twain's own comic romance, A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court, and in 1892 a less successful novel, The American Claimant.

  • Mark Twain was an outstanding figure for many years as a popular American personality in the world of letters.

  • After Mark Twain's death, his intimate friend, W.

  • GOSPEL OF ST JOHN, the fourth and latest of the Gospels, in the Bible, and, next to that of St Mark, the shortest.

  • John has a metaphysical prologue; Matthew and Luke have historical prologues; and Mark is without any prologue.

  • But the Synoptists, especially Mark, give the slow steps in even the apostles' realization of Jesus' Messianic character; only at Caesarea Philippi Simon alone, for the first time, clearly discerns it, Jesus declaring that His Father has revealed it to Him, and yet Simon is still scandalized at the thought of a suffering Messiah (Mark viii.

  • As to the Baptist, in all three Synoptists, he baptizes Jesus, and in Mark i.

  • The long scenes with Pilate culminate in the great sayings concerning His kingdom not being of this world and the object of this His coming being to bear witness to the truth, thus explaining how, though affirming kingship (Mark xv.

  • In John He does not declare Himself Messiah before the Jewish Sanhedrin (Mark xiv.

  • The scene on Calvary differs as follows: In the Synoptists the soldiers divide His garments among them, casting lots (Mark xv.

  • In the Synoptists, of His followers only women - the careful, seemingly exhaustive lists do not include His mother - remain, looking on " from afar " (Mark xv.

  • 15-21; Mark vi.

  • Both narratives are doubtless based upon actual occurrences - the cures narrated in Mark ii., iii., viii., x.

  • Water stands in this Gospel for what is still but symbol; thus the water-pots serve here the external Jewish ablutions - old bottles which the " new wine " of the Gospel is to burst (Mark ii.

  • Wine is the blood of the new covenant, and He will drink the fruit of the vine new in the Kingdom of God (Mark xiv.

  • 23-25); the vineyard where He Himself is the true Vine (Mark xii.

  • xxii.2); Jesus is the Bridegroom (Mark ii.

  • For especially in Mark, the passing through Jericho, the entry into Jerusalem, the Temple-cleansing and its immediate effect upon the hierarchs, their next day's interrogatory, " By what authority doest thou these things?

  • The materials for the allegory will have been certain Old Testament narratives, but especially the Synoptic accounts of Jesus' raisings of Jairus's daughter and of the widow's son (Mark v.; (Luke vii.).

  • In the Synoptists, the disciples' intolerance is rebuked (Mark ix.

  • 38-41); Jesus' opposition is everywhere restricted to the Pharisees and the worldly Sadducees; He ever longs for the conversion of Jerusalem; the great double commandment of love is proclaimed as already formulated in the Mosaic law (Mark xii.

  • East of the Cascade Mountains the Columbia and Spokane rivers mark the boundary between the Okanogan Highlands to the northward and the Columbia plateau to the southward; The Okanogan Highlands, an outlier of the Rocky Mountains extending westward from the Coeur d'Alene Mountains in Idaho, reach heights of 5000 to 6000 ft.

  • For the moment it was equally Japan's interest to mark time in Manchuria.

  • GOSPEL OF ST MARK, the second of the four canonical Gospels of the Christian Church.

  • The significance of all that we can learn as to the history of the composition of Mark's Gospel is clearly enhanced by this consideration.

  • (I) Early Account of a Writing b y Mark.

  • 140, Mark, who was the follower and interpreter of Peter, recorded after the latter's decease the words of Christ and the narratives of His deeds which he had heard the Apostle deliver, but he could not arrange the matter "in order," because he had not himself been a personal follower of Jesus.

  • There can be little doubt that the work to which Papias himself supposed this story to apply was the Gospel of Mark virtually as we know it.

  • It may be noted also that the same view of the origin of the Gospel of Mark appears to have been held by a contemporary of Papias, Justin Martyr.

  • In his Dialogue with Trypho (c. 106) he cites a fact about the name of Peter from "his Memoirs," and adds also another similar fact about the name given to the sons of Zebedee, just as they are stated in Mark iii.

  • He may well have been ready to call the work "Peter's," though he believed that Mark actually composed it, on the ground that the latter recorded what the Apostle said (cf.

  • But is our Gospel of Mark also to be identified with the writing by Mark spoken of by "the elder" whose account had been reported to Papias ?

  • In support of this view it is urged, though it is so much less often now than it used to be, that the description "not in order" does not fit our Gospel of Mark, the order in which is from an historical point of view as good as, if not better than, in the other Gospels.

  • This argument, then, for supposing that the original writing by Mark differed widely in form and contents from the Gospel which now bears his name appears to be without force.

  • There would, indeed, be an exception to the general correctness of the topography if we were compelled to suppose that "country of the Gerasenes" (which is the best reading according to existing MS. evidence at Mark v.

  • It has without good reason, as we have seen, been supposed to show that it cannot be the record by Mark referred to by Papias.

  • But Mark's own writing might exhibit this variety, according to what he had been told or could remember.

  • Further, it would be unreasonable to suppose that Mark, even if he relied chiefly on what he had heard Peter teach, would refrain from using any other sources of information which he possessed.

  • Some have supposed that the same Logian document in Greek which was used by the first and third evangelists was also used by Mark.

  • There does not, then, seem to be good reason for thinking that the work which proceeded from the hands of Mark differed widely in character and contents from the Gospel which now bears his name.

  • in Mark iv.

  • This evangelist has probably here followed the original form of Mark.

  • They are thrown together in a way unusual with Mark, who is accustomed to place each important saying in a setting of its own.

  • And it is not so likely that Mark should have mistaken it for a distinct incident as that an editor of his Gospel should have done so.

  • Some of the cases in which the first and third evangelist agree against Mark in a word or clause may be best accounted for by their both having reproduced the common source (an example may be seen under 4 below).

  • As we have found it necessary to distinguish between the original composition by Mark, to whom in the main the work appears to be due, and some enlargement and alteration which it subsequently underwent whereby it reached its present form, these stages must be borne in mind in considering dates that may be assigned in connexion with this Gospel.

  • According to Papias, Mark wrote after the death of Peter, i.e.

  • It would be natural for Mark to set himself to make his record soon after the Apostle's death; and in confirmation of the view that he did so it may be pointed out that in the form of the prophecy in ch.

  • Further, Mark's work may very probably have been used by Luke in its original form.

  • The chief revision of Mark would seem, then, to have taken place between the times of the composition of the first and third Gospels, which cannot be far removed from one another (see Matthew, Gospel Of St).

  • and Swete's St Mark in loc. and p. xcvi.

  • of his introduction.) (3) The Gospel History as represented in Mark.

  • A 14th-century MS. Book of Prayers in the Francis Douce collection in the Bodleian library at Oxford contains a drawing in which two persons are shown, but they bowl to no mark.

  • 1-14; Mark ii.

  • These run in wet seasons, but in every instance for a short distance only, and sooner or later they are lost in sand-hills, where their waters disappear and a line of stunted gum-trees (Eucalyptus rostrata) is all that is present to indicate that there may be even a soakage to mark the abandoned course.

  • North of Massachusetts the Connecticut river is wholly within New Hampshire - Vermont's eastern boundary is low-water mark on the W.

  • 18), and universally (Mark xvi.

  • A slave bore an identification mark, which could only be removed by a surgical operation and which later consisted of his owner's name tattoed or branded on the arm.

  • The loss of the surgeon's hand that caused loss of life or limb; or the brander's hand that obliterated a slave's identification mark, are very similar.

  • A brander, induced to remove a slave's identification mark, could swear to his ignorance and was free.

  • The steamer on reaching the given position lowers one, or perhaps two, mark buoys, mooring them by mushroom anchor, chain and rope.

  • The repair being thus completed, the various mark buoys are picked up, and the ship returns to her usual station.

  • Then, if a current is sent from the spring to the roller through the paper, a brown mark will be mace by the spring due to the liberation of iodine.

  • Grant that the distinctive mark of our Order may be never to possess anything as its own under the sun for the glory of Thy name, and to have no other patrimony than begging" (in the Legenda 3 Soc.).

  • It would follow, on the other hand, that what is called Oscan represented the language of the invading Sabines (more correctly Safines), whose racial affinities would seem to be of a distinctly more northern cast, and to mark them, like the Dorians or Achaeans in Greece, as an early wave of the invaders who more than once in later history havevitally influenced the fortunes of the tempting southern land into which they forced their way.

  • It was bold policy to confide Frederick to his greatest enemy and rival; but the pope honorably discharged his duty, until his ward outgrew the years of tutelage, and became a fair mark for ecclesiastical hostility.

  • The first entry of any moment made by the Venetians into strictly Italian affairs was in 1336, when the republics of Florence and St Mark allied themselves against Mastino della Scala, and the latter took possession of Treviso.

  • To be a prince was tantamount to being the mark of secret conspiracy and assassination.

  • If we did hit the exact mark, apparently we need no longer be immortal.

  • Definite theism, bearing the mark of Kant's thought throughout, is found in Hermann Lotze.

  • in oriente gestis (Bonn, 1879); Conrad, Mark Aurels Markomannenkrieg (1889); Th.

  • According to Lecointe, the young wall consists partly of cellulose and partly of a substance which is not cellulose, the latter existing in the form of slight depressions, which mark the position of the future pores.

  • Our regions will not be natural unless they mark out real discontinuities both of origin and affinity, and these we can only seek to explain by reference to past changes in the earths history.

  • 8; Mark vii.

  • Figures slim, muscular and bony, action impetuous but of arrested energy, tawny landscape, gritty with littering pebbles, mark the athletic hauteur of his style.

  • His engagement was for a salary of 75 lire (about X30) a month, a sum so large for that period as to mark conspicuously the high regard in which his art was held.

  • Six miles below this the ruins of Kai' at Dibse mark the site of the ancient Thapsacus (Tiphsah of 1 Kings iv.

  • from the Persian Gulf, separated from it by a couple of small spurs of the Syrian plateau, and may be said to mark the beginning of the lower Euphrates.

  • On the other hand, neither sex of the latter at any age puts off its striped garb - the mark, it may be pretty safely asserted, of an inferior stage of development.

  • The device of hereditary coat-armour, a growth of the 12th century, did much to define and mark out the noble class throughout Europe.

  • In its origin it was a mere personal mark of distinction, in the primary sense of this word.

  • Later arose the custom of granting arms as a mark of personal favour or gratitude.

  • But, when increased knowledge of Aristotle's texts (and of the commentaries) led to the victory of a supposed Aristotelianism over a supposed Platonism, Albertus Magnus, and his still more distinguished pupil Thomas Aquinas, mark certain doctrines as belonging to faith but not to reason.

  • Paul left no deep, permanent mark on Russian history.

  • It was at Keighley in Yorkshire - where also the first English periodical, the Yorkshire Spiritual Telegraph, was published in 1855 and onwards - that spiritualism as a religious movement first made any mark in England; but this movement, though it spread rather widely, cannot be said to have attained at any time very vigorous proportions.

  • 12070, bears every mark of authenticity.

  • The book of Deuteronomy, in conjunction with the reformation of Josiah's reign (which synchronizes with the rapid decline of Assyria and the reviving prestige of Yahweh), appeared to mark the triumph of the great prophetic movement.

  • long, with the skin of its neck loose, so as to render it dilatable at the will of the animal, as in the cobra of India, a species from which it differs only in the absence of the spectacle-like mark on the back of the neck.

  • In the Drum Tower incense-sticks, specially prepared by the astronomical board, are kept burning to mark the passage of time, in which important duty their accuracy is checked by a clepsydra.

  • back to the Mycenaean age (c. 1400-1100 B.C.) and seem to mark an Aegean colony: 2 but in historic times Citium is the chief centre of Phoenician influence in Cyprus.

  • in height, but lacking the upper storeys, and a Franciscan friary (1490); while a circular tower, and a square keep (occupied as barracks), mark strongholds, the one built by King John and the other by the Ormondes, and testify to the former importance of the town, which was doubtless accentuated by its physical position in a passway between the neighbouring mountain ranges.

  • On the 12th Sir Francis Weston, Henry Norris, William Brereton and Mark Smeaton were declared guilty of high treason, while Anne herself and Lord Rochford were condemned unanimously by an assembly of twenty-six peers on the 15th.

  • These writings bear the mark of a clear mind and a moderate and gentle spirit.

  • As these lakes shrank after the return of an arid climate, they left elevated beaches and deposits of various minerals, which mark their former extent.

  • When the boy grew up, he went to some funeral games at Thebes, and was recognized by the mark of a dragon on his body.

  • those on the Germanic mark and on the allodium and beneficium) were models of learning and sagacity, all were dominated by his general idea and characterized by a total disregard for the results of such historical disciplines as diplomatic. From this crucible issued an entirely new work, less well arranged than the original, but richer in facts and critical comments.

  • Surrounded by ancient civilizations where writing had long been known, and enjoying, as excavation has proved, a considerable amount of material culture, Palestine could look back upon a lengthy and stirring history which, however, has rarely left its mark upon our records.

  • Worship is simpler at the smaller shrines than at the more famous temples; and, as the rulers are the patrons of the religion and are brought into contact with the religious personnel, the character of the social organization leaves its mark upon those who hold religious and judicial functions alike.

  • Consequently, although small bodies of individuals no doubt came back to Judah from time to time, and some special mark of favour may have been shown by Cyrus, the opinion has gained ground since the early arguments of E.

  • There were catastrophes detrimental to the preservation of older literary records, and vicissitudes which, if they have not left their mark on contemporary history - which is singularly blank - may be traced on the representations of the past.

  • The " priestly " traditions of the creation and of the patriarchs mark a very distinct advance upon the earlier narratives, and appear in a further developed form in the still later book of Jubilees, or " Little Genesis," where they are used to demonstrate the pre-Mosaic antiquity of the priestly or Levitical institutions.

  • Such incidents as the rise of Joseph Nasi to high position under the Turkish government as duke of Naxos mark the coming change.

  • In 1828 the Astronomical Society, to mark their sense of the benefits conferred on science by such a series of laborious exertions, unanimously resolved to present her with their gold medal, and in 1835 elected her an honorary member of the society.

  • 14 a account of these is preserved in a MS. description of the island drawn up under the Venetians about 1538, and existing in the library of St Mark (published by Falkener, Museum of Classical Antiquities, ii.

  • He early made his mark as a church leader, and took an active part in petitioning against the " five acts " and later against the introduction of a service-book and canons drawn up on the model of the English prayer-book.

  • He has made a deep mark on the history, not only of Scotland, but of England; and the existing Presbyterian churches in Scotland are largely indebted to him for the forms of their dogmas and their ecclesiastical organization.

  • When the Labour party were first returned to Parliament in force, in 1906, he soon made his mark as one of their leaders.

  • In the east of the state much of the valley of each of the larger streams is several feet above the stream's present highwater mark and forms the "hommock" or "second bottom" lands.

  • The production in Rutherford and Burke counties and their vicinity was so great, and transportation to the United States Mint at Philadelphia so difficult, that from 1831 to 1857 gold was privately coined in I, 22 and 5 dollar pieces bearing the mark of the coiner " C. Bechtler, Rutherford county, N.C."

  • It appears, therefore, contemporaneously with Christianity, and is a sign of the world-weariness and deep religious need that mark the decay of the old world.

  • Mark Bell crossed the continent in 1887 and illustrated its ancient trade routes, following the steps of Archibald Colquhoun, who wandered from Peking to Talifu in 1881.

  • He was buried on the 10th in the cemetery of Ste Marguerite, but no stone was erected to mark the spot.

  • This same magnanimity towards the survivors of Saul's house has left its mark upon many of the narratives, and helps to a truer understanding of the stories of his early life.

  • Personally he had that which is the truest mark of nobility of mind, a power of attracting love and winning faithful friends.

  • A market on Wednesday and a fortnightly fair on the same day from the Feast of St Mark to that of St Andrew are claimed under a charter of Charles II.

  • The designer of the instrument shown no doubt thought that the north pole might suitably have the same ornament as was used to mark N.

  • 3 sqq.; Mark vi.

  • Salome is also the name of one of the women who are mentioned as present at the Crucifixion (Mark xv.

  • The buildings are modern, but some scanty remains of rock-hewn wine presses and a few scattered sarcophagi mark the antiquity of the site.

  • The rest of his life was spent in peaceful obscurity as cardinal-bishop of Porto and legate of the mark of Ancona.

  • In 1727 he was appointed one of the commission (of which William Fitzwilliams and William Dandridge were the other members) to mark the boundary between North Carolina and Virginia, concerning which undertaking he wrote (probably in 1737) The History of the Dividing Line.

  • The restoration of peace to Europe, and the re-enactment of the Corn Laws in 1815, mark the beginning of another era in the history of agriculture.

  • At the centenary show in 1898 provision was made for 40 classes for cattle, 29 for sheep, 18 for pigs, and 7 for animals to be slaughtered, whilst to mark the importance of the occasion the prizes offered amounted to close upon 5000 in value.

  • But his zeal encountered a check which baffled him for several years, and which left its mark in various inconsistencies and incoherences in his completed system.

  • Huxley, Tyndall, Cairnes, Mark Pattison, F.

  • In April 1294 the younger Bruce had permission to visit Ireland for a year and a half, and as a further mark of Edward's favour a respite of all debts owing by him to the exchequer.

  • As a philosophical idealist, however, he transmutes the whole contents of the faith of the church into ideas which bear the mark of Neo-Platonism, and were accordingly recognized by the later Neo-Platonists as Hellenic. 4 In Origen, however, 1 There are, however, extensive fragments of the original in existence.

  • In one respect the new institution marked an enormous advance on titles of nobility, which had been granted nearly always for warlike exploits, or merely as a mark of the favour of the sovereign.

  • It is upon the line of the rim of the inner crater of the great volcano, while Tusculum and Algidus Mons mark the edge of the earlier outer crater, which was about 7 m.

  • remain in the library of St Mark at Venice.

  • 1743 Mark Catesby brought out in London his Natural History of Carolina - two large folios containing highly coloured plates of the birds of that colony, Florida and the Bahamas.'

  • However, to have conceived the idea of executing a work on so grand a scale as this - it forms three folio volumes, and contains one hundred and eighty-five coloured and one hundred and forty-eight uncoloured plates, with references to upwards of two thousand four hundred generic names - was in itself a mark of genius, and it was brought to a successful conclusion in 1849.

  • Moreover, the author goes on to remark that in adult birds trace of the origin of the sternum from five centres of ossification is always more or less indicated by sutures, and that, though these sutures had been generally regarded as ridges for the attachment of the sternal muscles, they indeed mark the extreme points of the five primary bony pieces of the sternum.

  • The system of Forbes was reconstructed after his death from notebook jottings, and neither Garrod nor Forbes have left any permanent mark on.

  • The church of St Mark's, originally the private chapel of the doge, is unique among the buildings of the world in respect of its unparalleled richness of material and decoration.

  • St Mark then became the patron saint of Venice in place of St Theodore.

  • About the year 1063 the Doge Contarini resolved to remodel St Mark's.

  • There can be no doubt that Byzantine artists had a large share in the work, but it is equally certain that Lombard workmen were employed along with the Orientals, and thus St Mark's became, as it were, a workshop in which twd styles, Byzantine and Lombard, met and were fused together, giving birth to a new style, peculiar to the district, which may fairly be called Veneto-Byzantine.

  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

  • The body of St Mark formerly rested here, but is now within the high altar.

  • The Pala d'oro, or retable of the high altar, is one of the chief glories of St Mark's.

  • The treasury of St Mark's contains a magnificent collection of church plate and jewels.

  • - Square of St Mark and surrounding buildings.

  • At Z is the treasury of St Mark, which was originally one of the towers belonging to the old ducal palace; E, site of old houses; G, clocktower; H, old palace of procurators; J, old library; M, two columns; N, Ponte della Paglia; 0, Bridge of Sighs; W, Giants' Staircase; X, sacristy of St Mark; Y, Piazzetta.

  • Flatness and lack of deep shadows, owing to the impossibility of obtaining heavy cornices in that material, mark the style.

  • a small, strongly fortified castle; one of its massive angle-towers is now incorporated in St Mark's and serves as the treasury.

  • At this point, perhaps out of regard for the remains of Ziani's palace, the work seems to have been arrested for many years, but in 1424 the building was resumed and carried as far as the north-west, or judgment, angle, near St Mark's, thus completing the sea and piazzetta facades as we now see them.

  • By his will Colleoni left his vast fortune to Venice on condition that a monument should be raised to him at St Mark's.

  • He meant the great piazza, but by a quibble the republic evaded the concession of so unique an honour and claimed to have fulfilled the conditions of the bequest by erecting the monument at the Scuola of St Mark.

  • Leopardo was also the creator (1505) of the three handsome bronze sockets in front of St Mark's which held the flagstaffs of the banners of Cyprus, Morea and Crete, when the republic was mistress of those territories.

  • It is a noble portal, erected in 1460, apparently from designs by Fra Giocondo, with the lion of St Mark in the attic. The statuary, with Sta Giustina on the summit of the tympanum, was added in 1571 and 1578.

  • In 1635 Fra Fortunato Olmo found in a room over the great door of St Mark's a number of books which he supposed to be Petrarch's gift.

  • On the fall of the republic St Mark's became the cathedral church of the patriarch.

  • St Mark's suffered on two occasions: first during the restoration of the north facade in 1843, and again during that of the south facade,, begun in 1865 and finished in 1878.

  • Contemporaneously with the restoration of the southern facade of St Mark's, the restoration of the colonnade of the ducal palace towards the Piazzetta and the Mole was undertaken at a cost of £23,000.

  • The league broke up, and the mainland cities of the Veneto returned of their own accord to their allegiance to St Mark.

  • Antonius (Mark Antony), while the population was not too large to save itself by timely flight.

  • The freshness, the air of leisure, the enthusiasm of discovery that mark the work of these old writers have lessons for the modern professional zoologist, who at times feels burdened with the accumulated knowledge of a century and a half.

  • 54) If we conceive God as personal, and His will as related to the course of nature analogously to the relation of the human will to the human body, then the laws of nature may be regarded as habits of the divine activity, and miracles as unusual acts which, while consistent with the divine character, mark a new stage in the fulfilment of the purpose of God.

  • A monument was erected in 1887 to mark the supposed scene of the accident.

  • From his reign therefore Antioch may be regarded as a dependency of Jerusalem; and thus the end of Baldwin's reign (1131) may be said to mark the time when the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem stands complete, with its own boundaries stretching from Beirut in the north to el-Arish and Aila in the south, and with the three Frankish powers of the north admitting its suzerainty.

  • His view of the value of Albert of Aix, and his account of the First Crusade, have been generally followed (Kugler alone having attempted, to some extent, to rehabilitate Albert of Aix); and thus von Sybel's work may be said to mark a revolution in the history of the First Crusade, when its legendary features were stripped away, and its real progress was first properly discovered.

  • He was one of the rare instances among the Kaffirs of a leader endowed with intellectual gifts which placed him on a level with Europeans, and his life-work has left a permanent mark on South African history.

  • He was wanting in mathematical ability, and never displayed in any remarkable degree the still more important power of scientific generalization, which, whether accompanied by mathematical skill or not, never fails to mark the highest genius in physical science.

  • He is erroneously spoken of as a king in Mark vi.

  • Eusebius was so much struck by the likeness of the Therapeutae to the Christian monks of his own day as to claim that they were Christians converted by the preaching of St Mark.

  • She was acquitted by Agamemnon; but, as Polymestor foretold, she was turned into a dog, and her grave became a mark for ships (Ovid, Metam.

  • of the 10th century, preserved in the library of St Mark's at Venice.

  • belonging to the various great libraries of Europe, the oldest being that at St Mark's, just mentioned.

  • His organizing genius, even more than his missionary zeal, left its mark upon the German church throughout all the middle ages.

  • This development is a mark of superior culture and may have been spread through Babylonian influence.

  • These, however, are sufficient to mark out the circuit of the ancient orchestra, on which the subsequently built proscenia encroached.

  • Mark Rutherford >>

  • The literary and artistic value of many of the Robin Hood ballads cannot be pronounced considerable, but eight of them attain the high-water mark of their class.

  • In 1857 he undertook with other scholars a Theologisch-homiletisches Bibelwerk, to which he contributed commentaries on the first four books of the Pentateuch, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Matthew, Mark, Revelation.

  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

  • 16; Mark xiv.

  • Even Iranian kings in the last century B.C. found pleasure in composing, or listening to, Greek tragedies, and Herod the Great kept Greek men of letters beside him and had spasmodic ambitions to make his mark as an orator or author (Nicol.

  • A simple plan is as follows - draw an outline of the country of which a map is to be produced upon a board; mark all points the altitude of which is known or can be estimated by pins or wires clipped off so as to denote the heights; mark river-courses and suitable profiles by strips of vellum and finally finish your model with the aid of a good map, in clay or wax.

  • Glockedon, the author of an interesting road-map of central Europe (1soi), Sebastian Munster (1489-1552), Elias Camerarius, whose map of the mark of Brandenburg won the praise of Mercator; Wolfgang Latz von Lazius, to whom we are indebted for maps of Austria and Hungary (1561), and Philip Apianus, who made a survey of Bavaria (1553-1563), which was published 1568 on the reduced scale of 1:144,000, and is fairly described as the topographical masterpiece of the 16th century.

  • There is one circumstance, however, which seems to mark a difference between the two animals: the eye of the dog of every country and species has a circular pupil, but the position or form of the pupil is oblique in the wolf.

  • Pointers are employed to mark game for guns, and are especially' useful in low cover such as that afforded by turnip fields.

  • A white mark up the face.

  • By their special insistence on the fact of immediate communion between God and man, Friends have been led into those views and practices which still mark them off from their fellowChristians.

  • Dio Chrysostom, the adviser of Trajan, is the first Greek writer who has pronounced the principle of slavery to be contrary to the law of nature " (Mark Pattison).

  • Sir Leslie Stephen pays high praise to Wesley's writings, which went "straight to the mark without one superfluous flourish."

  • For this a curse was pronounced upon him, and he was condemned to be a "fugitive and a wanderer" on the earth, a mark being set upon him "lest any finding him should kill him."

  • The mark set upon Cain is usually regarded as some tribal mark or sign analogous to the cattle marks of Bedouin and the related usages in Europe.

  • The palm branch, which is also of frequent occurrence, is not an indisputable mark of the last resting-place of a martyr, being found in connexion with epitaphs of persons dying natural deaths, or those prepared by persons in their lifetime, as well as in those of little children, and even of pagans.

  • c. 19, § 4), was the distinguishing mark of Porsena's tomb, and which have led some adventurous archaeologists to identify this sepulchre with that of the great king of Etruria (Dennis, u.s., pp. 393 ff.).

  • Prior to 1902 the million mark was reached only twice - in 1894 and 1895.

  • in length, 3 in height and 3 in breadth, which have been supposed to mark the graves of the Bogomils.

  • von Oppenheim, Vom Mittelmeer zum persischen Golfe, &c. (2 vols., Berlin, 18 991900); Lord Warkworth, Notes from a Diary in Asiatic Turkey (London, 1898); Mark Sykes, Dar-el-Islam (London, 1903); D.

  • In spite of frequent causes of friction, good relations were maintained with Venice, through the influence of the sultana Safie, and the capitulations with the republic of St Mark were renewed in 1589.

  • corps had well overshot the mark.

  • is an admirable exposition of the narrative contained in St Mark's Gospel x.

  • 13-14) to be engraved on two bronze tablets placed in front of his mausoleum in Rome, and as a mark of respect to his memory a copy was inscribed on the temple walls by the council of the Galatians.

  • The King's Own was a vast improvement, in point of construction, upon Frank Mildmay; and he went on, through a quick succession of tales, Newton Forster (1832), Peter Simple (1834), Jacob Faithful (1834), The Pacha of Many Tales (1835), Japhet in Search of a Father (1836), Mr Midshipman Easy (1836), The Pirate and the Three Cutters (1836), till he reached his highwater mark of constructive skill in Snarley-yow, or the Dog Fiend (1837).

  • Loisy recognizes two eye-witness documents, as utilized by all three synoptists, while Matthew and Luke have also incorporated Mark.

  • His chief peculiarity consists in clearly tracing a strong Pauline influence, especially in Mark, which there remodels certain sayings and actions as these were first registered by the eye-witness documents.

  • Mark's narratives of the sepulture by Joseph of Arirathea and of the empty tomb are taken as posterior to St Paul; the narratives of the infancy in Matthew and Luke as later still.

  • To get drunk for the sake of the drink was the mark of a beast; but wine was a powerful stimulant to the brain, and to fuddle oneself in order to think great thoughts was worthy of a sage.

  • After the capture of Carthage by Scipio (146 B.C.) this territory was erected into a Roman province, and a trench, the fossa regia, was dug to mark the boundary of the Roman province of Africa and the dominions of the Numidian princes.

  • Emerson's transcendentalism greatly influenced him, and Strauss's Leben Jesu left its mark upon his thought.

  • Reiske (1716-1774); and, though for many years the most famous teacher of Semitic languages in Europe, he had little of the higher philological faculty, and neither his grammatical nor his critical work has left a permanent mark, with the exception perhaps of his text-critical studies on the Peshitta.

  • The compass needle is a little steel magnet balanced upon a pivot; one end of the needle, which always bears a distinguishing mark, points approximately, but not in general exactly, to the north,' the vertical plane through the direction of the needle being termed the magnetic meridian.

  • Sutures are stated to mark off some of these pieces, but in the proper sense of that term as applied to the skeletal structures of the Vertebrata, no sutures exist in the chitinous cuticle of Arthropods.

  • In due course the Jewish authorities were forced to draw up a canon or book of sacred scriptures, and mark them off from those which claimed to be such without justification.

  • 31-34, Mark xiv.

  • Like Mark it seems to have had no history of the birth of Christ, and to have begun with the baptism.

  • Cunning and ambitious, he soon made his mark, and his cousin having died during his embassy, Marillac was appointed his successor.

  • In 1 555 he was one of the French deputies at the conferences held at Mark near Ardres to discuss peace with England.

  • The mark of Meissen was originally a district centring round the castle of Meissen or Misnia on the Middle Elbe, which was built about 920 by the German king Henry I., the Fowler, as a defence against the Sla y s.

  • After the death of Gero, margrave of the Saxon east mark, in 965, his territory was divided into five marks, one of which was called Meissen.

  • bestowed the office of margrave upon Ekkard I., margrave of Merseburg, and, the district comprising the marks of Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz was generally known as the mark of Meissen.

  • Under these margraves the area of the mark was further increased, but when Ekkard II.

  • Henry, who already ruled lower Lusatia and the new and smaller Saxon east mark, was succeeded in 1103 by his cousin Thimo, and in 1104 by his son Henry II., whose claim on the mark was contested by Thimo's son Conrad.

  • as a vacant fief of the empire; but Dietrich, called the Oppressed, secured the mark after Henry's death in 1197.

  • About this time he sold his portion of Meissen to his nephew Frederick Tutta, who held the title of margrave and ruled the greater part of the mark until his death in 1291.

  • In the course of constant efforts to secure the mark the brothers Frederick and Dietrich defeated the troops of King Albert at Lucka in May 1307 and secured partial possession of their lands.

  • Having obtained possession of the greater part of the mark, Frederick was invested with it by the German king Henry VII.

  • The mark then became merged in the duchy of Saxony, and at the partition of 1485 fell to the Albertine line.

  • Its popularity remained unimpaired after the fall of Persia, and it was during the ferment following the conquests of Alexander that the characteristics which mark it during the Roman period were firmly fixed.

  • At first the revolutionary propaganda produced no personal animosity against the emperor, who continued to be treated by his people with every mark of respect and affection, but this state of things gradually changed.

  • Towards the north the site of the city slopes gently to the Firth of Forth and the port of Leith; while to the south, Liberton Hill, Blackford Hill, Braid Hills and Craiglockhart Hills roughly mark the city bounds, as Corstorphine Hill and the Water of Leith do the western limits.

  • 1837), a man of great mark and influence in the city, and his successor Hugh Black (b.

  • - figures enclosed in large swallow-tail tablets - the lowest mark, 3 or 4 ft.

  • holy order is a sacrament, and as such instituted by Christ; it confers grace and power, besides setting a mark or character upon the soul, in consequence of which ordination to the same office cannot be reiterated.

  • The next centuries show that peculiar combination of logic and theology which is the mark of Scholasticism, especially in the period before the r3th century.

  • The union of philosophy and theology is the mark of the middle ages, but in Occam their severance is complete.

  • "Rare," said Mr Gladstone, "is the privilege of any man who, having fourteen years ago rendered to his country one signal service, now again, within the same brief span of life, decorated neither by land nor title, bearing no mark to distinguish him from the people he loves, has been permitted to perform another great and memorable service to his sovereign and his country."

  • Cobden has left a deep mark on English history, but he was not himself a "scientific economist," and many of his confident prophecies were completely falsified.

  • He never, indeed, jeopardized the position of the Moslems in Europe as his father had done, and thus the peace of Szeged (1444), which regained the line of the Danube and drove the Turk behind the Balkans, must always be reckoned as the high-water mark of Hungary's Turkish triumphs.

  • (1657-1705), who left the government of the country to two bigoted Magyar prelates, GyOrgy Szelepesenyi (1595-1685) and Lip&t (Leopold) Kollonich (1631-1707), whose domination represents the high-water mark of the antinational regimen.

  • The following nine years mark the financial and commercial rehabilitation of Hungary, the establishment of a vast and original railway system which won the admiration of Europe, the liberation and expansion of her over-sea trade, the conversion of her national debt under the most favourable conditions and the consequent equilibrium of her finances.

  • These works exhibit great originality and mark an important epoch in the history of algebra.

  • This short-lived experiment, which inspired the muse of Vodnik, the first Slovene poet of real mark, had its aftermath in the Illyrian movement of the forties, which centred in Zagreb, the Croatian capital.

  • P. de Lamarck (1744-1829) represents most completely, both by his development theory (to be further mentioned below) and by his scheme of classifica- tion, the high-water mark of the popular but cation.

  • The Meini gwyr Ardudwy (stones of the men of Ardudwy) possibly mark the site of a fight.

  • It is true that in 1823 Fraunhofer, inspired by his observations upon gratings, had very nearly hit the mark.'

  • In these instruments the lines are ruled upon a spherical surface of speculum metal, and mark the intersections of the surface by a system of parallel and equidistant planes, o; of which the middle member passes through the centre of the sphere.

  • It may be due partly to the natural conformation of the rock and the differences of level, partly to the necessity of enclosing within a single building several objects of ancient sanctity, such as the mark of Poseidon's trident and the spring that arose from it, the sacred olive tree of Athena, and the tomb of Cecrops.

  • In the north portico a square hole in the floor, with a corresponding hole in the roof above it, must have given access to another sacred object, the mark of Poseidon's trident in the rock.

  • Studying in his youth for the Church, he was admitted to the minor orders in 1539 and ordained deacon in 1541 at Venice; but he soon devoted himself entirely to the study of music under the guidance of Adrian Willaert, then choirmaster at St Mark's.

  • The ode was followed by a solemn service in St Mark's, in which Zarlino's music formed a prominent feature, and the festival concluded with the representation of a dramatic piece entitled Orfeo composed by Zarlino.

  • Wesley preached his funeral sermon from the words "Mark the perfect man."

  • The division into five books was known to Hippolytus, but a closer examination of the doxologies shows that it does not represent the original scheme of the Psalter; for, while the doxologies to the first three books are no part of the psalms to which they are attached, but really mark the end of a book in a pious fashion not uncommon in Eastern literature, that to book IV., with its rubric addressed to the people, plainly belongs to the psalm, or rather to its liturgical execution, and does not therefore really mark the close of a collection once separate.

  • It is surely as difficult to suppose that the Davidic psalms of the first book are a selection made from a greater collection of such psalms contained in the " Director's Psalter " as it is to imagine that St Mark's Gospel is an abridgment of St, Matthew's.

  • Now the rise of the problems of individual faith is the mark of the age that followed Jeremiah, while the confident assertion of national righteousness under misfortune is a characteristic mark of pious Judaism after Ezra, in the period of the law but not earlier.

  • He is also found confirming his old rival Arnulf in the see of Reims; summoning Adalbero or Azelmus of Laon to Rome to answer for his crimes; judging between the archbishop of Mainz and the bishop of Hildesheim; besieging the revolted town of Cesena; flinging the count of Angouleme into prison for an offence against a bishop; confirming the privileges of Fulda abbey; granting charters to bishoprics far away on the Spanish mark; and, on the eastern borders of the empire, erecting Prague as the seat of an archbishopric for the Sla y s.

  • Despite his residence on the Spanish mark, he shows no token of a knowledge of Arabic, a fact which is perhaps sufficient to overthrow the statement of Adhemar as to his having studied at Cordova.

  • So remarkable a character as that of Gerbert left its mark on the age, and fables soon began to cluster round his name.

  • The "King's Stone," said to mark the spot where James was killed, is at some distance from the actual battlefield.

  • Thence issue many streams which in their way to the ocean have forced their way through the ranges of hills which mark the steps in the plateau, forming the narrow passes or poorts characteristic of South African scenery.

  • The death of their commandantgeneral, Piet Joubert, on the 28th of March, seemed to mark a change in the fortunes of the Republican army.

  • ., published anonymously in 1685, was an amusing collection of stories that immediately made its mark.

  • Mark Twain's boyhood was spent at Hannibal, which is the setting of Life on the Mississippi, Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer; Hannibal Cave, described in Tom Sawyer, extends for miles beneath the river and its bluffs.

  • Jesus was a new Adam and a fresh beginning, in so far as he was made flesh in and not of his mother, to whom, as both Esc. and the Key insist, Jesus particularly denied blessedness and honour (Mark iii.

  • Rank has accounted for much, and ceremonial dress - the apparel Romans, naturally left its mark, and there have been ages of increasing luxury followed by periods of reaction, with a general levelling and nationalization on religious grounds (Judaism, Islam).

  • immediately from the shores, while the mountains of Tongariro, Ngauruhoe, an active volcano, and Ruapehu, a snow-clad peak, back the view to the south and mark the limit of the great volcanic line which extends 160 m.

  • It is simple and severe, classic yet instinct with life and noble in form; and in it he touched the high-water mark of his career.

  • He edited and revised Matthew (the 9th ed., 1897), Mark and Luke (the 9th ed., 1901), John (the 9th ed., 1902), Romans (the 9th ed., 1899), the Epistles to Timothy and Titus (the 7th ed., 1902), Hebrews (the 6th ed., 1897), the Epistles of John (the 6th ed., 1900).

  • The term, in Hungarian, means generally a frontier province governed by a ban and is equivalent to the German term Mark.

  • From this time the Babenbergs lost their influence in Franconia; but in 976 Leopold, a member of the family who was a count in the Donnegau, is described as margrave of the East Mark, a district not more than 60 m.

  • Leopold, who probably received the mark as a reward for his fidelity to the emperor Otto II.

  • The succeeding margrave, Leopold II., quarrelled with Henry IV., who was unable to oust him from the mark or to prevent the succession of his son Leopold III.

  • retrotabulum (modernized retabulum) was applied to an architectural feature set up at the back of an altar, and generally taking the form of a screen framing a picture, carved or sculptured work in wood or stone, or mosaic, or of a movable feature such as the famous Pala d'Oro in St Mark's, Venice, of gold, jewels and enamels.

  • Here the wall gained the top of the cliffs which mark the southern edge of the plateau of Epipolae, which from this point onwards it followed as far as Euryelus.

  • 3 This highroad, which probably follows an ancient line, may be reasonably held to mark the west boundary of Tyche.

  • The rise of the Mahommedan Empire, which influenced Europe so deeply both politically and intellectually, made its mark also in the history of medicine.

  • In France the introduction of antimony gave rise to a bitter controversy which lasted into the 17th century, and led to the expulsion of some men of mark from the Paris faculty.

  • "It is very evident," he says, "that all other means of improving medicine have been found ineffectual, by the stand it was at for two thousand years, and that, since mathematicians have sot themselves to the study of it, men already begin to talk so intelligibly and comprehensibly, even about abstruse matters, that it is to be hoped that mathematical learning will be the distinguishing mark of a physician and a quack."

  • In the opening lines of the second and third books we can mark the recoil of a humane and sensitive spirit from the horrors of the reign of terror which he witnessed in his youth, and from the anarchy and confusion which prevailed at Rome during his later years.

  • Among these are the Corn Exchange in Mark Lane, where the privilege of a fair was originally granted by Edward I.; the Wool Exchange, Coleman Street; the Coal Exchange, Lower Thames Street; the Shipping Exchange, Billiter Street; and the auction mart for landed property in Tokenhouse Yard.

  • They all prove the remarkable position mayor of Old London, and mark it off from all other cities of modern Europe.

  • (1800 to 2000 ft.), which separate the coast plains from the interior, mark the frontier between Swaziland and Zululand.

  • and the suppression of the revolt of 1715; and the total failure of the rising of 1745 may be said to mark its end as a serious political force.

  • 20-24 with Mark xiii.

  • The former, which in Mark is placed some way on in the Galilean ministry (vi.

  • Many sections, however, contained in the corresponding part of Mark have no parallel in Luke, while the parallel to one of them is placed later and differs considerably in form.

  • - Luke again takes up his Marcan document, nearly at the point at which he left it, and follows it in the main, though he adds the story of Zacchaeus and the parable of the Minae (the Ten Pieces of Money), and omits the withering of the fig-tree and some matter at the end of the discourse on the Last Things, which are given in Mark.

  • - Though in this portion of his Gospel signs of use of Mark are not wanting, he also has much that is peculiar to himself.

  • This feature of Christ's ministry appears only in one passage of Mark; some other illustrations of it are mentioned in Matthew, but in Luke there are several more which are peculiar to himself (see the three individual cases vii.

  • 15-19; whereas they are not mentioned in Mark, and in Matthew only in the saying (x.

  • Further, during the years of His public ministry more glimpses of His inner life are given us than in either Matthew or Mark.

  • In the second of these passages the disciples are exhorted to choose a life of voluntary poverty; the nearest parallel is the ideal set before the rich young man at Mark x.

  • at the bottom, preserved in the treasury of St Mark at Venice.

  • Of uncoloured glass brought from Constantinople several examples exist in the treasury of St Mark's at Venice, part of the plunder of the imperial city when taken by the crusaders in 1204.

  • The eighth guru was the second son of Har Rai, but he died when a child and too young to leave any mark on in his favour and also in favour of the next guru for having altered a line of the Granth to please the emperor Aurangzeb.

  • 3.16) was regarded by Assur-bani-pal as a special mark of divine favour.

  • (i.) Canonical: Apocalypse in Mark xiii.

  • Apocalypse in Mark xiii.

  • Only one passage (Mark xiii.

  • Our suspicion is justified by a further examination of Mark xiii.

  • Of the monasteries, that of St Mark should be mentioned, as containing many works of Fra Angelico, besides relics of Savonarola, while of the private collections the only one of importance is that of Prince Corsini.

  • The Piagnoni were out of power, and a signory of Arrabbiati having been elected in 1498, a mob of Savonarola's opponents attacked the convent of St Mark where he resided, and he himself was arrested and imprisoned.

  • In the Episcopal cemetery two monuments mark the graves of Charles Louis Napoleon Achille Murat (1801-1847), the eldest son of Joachim Murat, and of his wife Catherine (1803-1867), the daughter of Col.

  • He had disciples who fasted (Mark ii.

  • Mark on them) and several palaces in the Venetian style.

  • They are pressed into the cigar boxes for sale, and branded with the name or trade mark of their makers.

  • The length of time for which the holding should last came to be specified, at first for a term of years and then for life, and some payment to the grantor was provided for, not pretending to represent the economic value of the land, but only to serve as a mark of his continued ownership.

  • They did not have their origin in economic considerations, but were either intended to mark the vassal's tenant relation, like the relief, or to be a part of his service, like the aid, that is, he was held to come to the aid of his lord in a case of financial as of military necessity.

  • When the mark was divided in 1258, Stendal became the seat of the elder or Stendal branch of the house of Ascania, which, however, became extinct in 1320.

  • 13, "Paul and his company," and note the turning back of Mark, the kinsman of Barnabas).

  • When Barnabas sails away with Mark to resume work in Cyprus, the mists of history hide him from our sight.

  • As an exegete and biblical critic no less than as a grammarian he has left his abiding mark.

  • Previous to the loss of the Italian provinces, a considerable proportion came from Italy (30,000 in 1859), including artists, members of the learned professions and artisans who left their mark on Viennese art and taste.

  • (976) this "East Mark" (Ostmark, Oesterreich, Austria) was granted in fief to the Babenbergers, and in the reign of Frederick Barbarossa (1156) it was advanced to the rank of a duchy.

  • The formal recognition of Budapest as a royal residence and capital in 1892, and the appointment of independent Hungarian court functionaries in November 1893, mark new stages in its progress.

  • 88) and in the Germania he speaks of " old songs " as the only kind of " annals " which the ancient Germans possessed; but, whatever relics of the old songs may be embedded in the Teutonic sagas, they have left no recognizable mark on the heroic poetry of the German peoples.

  • Thence he was despatched to St Mark's in Florence.

  • The Florence streets rang with Lorenzo's ribald songs (the "canti carnascialeschi"); the smooth, cultured citizens were dead to all sense of religion or morality; and the spirit of the fashionable heathen philosophy had even infected the brotherhood of St Mark.

  • The cloister garden was too small for the crowds attending his lectures, and on the 1st of August 1490 he gave his first sermon in the church of St Mark.

  • In the July of the same year he was elected prior of St Mark's.

  • He was rapturously welcomed by the community of St Mark's, and at once proceeded to re-establish the discipline of the order and to sweep away abuses.

  • For this purpose he obtained, after much difficulty, a papal brief emancipating the Dominicans of St Mark from the rule of the Lombard vicars of that order.

  • His efforts were successful; religion and learning made equal progress; St Mark's became the most popular monastery in Florence, and many citizens of noble birth flocked thither to take the vows.

  • Without holding any official post in the commonwealth he had created, the prior of St Mark's was the real head of the state, the dictator of Florence, and guarded the public weal "Dictator with extraordinary political wisdom.

  • had long regretted the enfranchisement of St Mark's from the rule of the Lombard Dominicans, and now, having seen a transcript of one of Savonarola's denunciations of his crimes, resolved to silence this daring preacher.

  • The threatened anathema was deferred, but a brief uniting St Mark's to a new Tuscan branch of the Dominicans now deprived Savonarola of his independent power.

  • He refrained from public preaching, but held conferences in St Mark's with large gatherings of his disciples, and defied the interdict on Christmas Day by publicly celebrating mass and heading a procession through the cloisters.

  • Now too the Piagnoni quitted office; the new signory was less friendly, and the prior was persuaded by his adherents to retire to St Mark's.

  • would have lived to reach St Mark's but for the devoted help of Salviati and his men.

  • Mounting his own pulpit in St Mark's he quietly related the events of the day to the faithful assembled in the church, and then withdrew to his cell, while the mob on the square outside was clamouring for his blood.

  • The site of Mainz would seem to mark it out naturally as a great centre of trade, but the illiberal rule of the archbishops and its military importance seriously hampered its commercial and industrial development, and prevented it from rivalling its neighbour Frankfort.

  • Abulwalid's works mark the culminating point of Hebrew scholarship during the middle ages, and he attained a level which was not surpassed till the modern development of philological science in the 19th century.

  • The broad lower end of the symbol is rather an accidental pit in the stone than an attempt at a diacritic mark - the word is regei, in all probability the early dative form of rex, " king."

  • Beyond this, he eloquently pleaded the cause of painting as a distinct art, which Lessing in his desire to mark off the formative arts from poetry and music had confounded with sculpture.

  • It gradually acquired various privileges, and by the close of the 14th century the only mark of dependence was the payment of a yearly tax.

  • Its political position between 64 and 41 B.C., when Mark Antony became master of the East, is not quite certain.

  • Farther south, in the same range, stands Ontake (10,450 ft.), the second highest mountain in Japan proper (as distinguished from Formosa); and other remarkable though not so lofty peaks mark the same regions.

  • As a lacquer painter he left a strong mark upon the work of his contemporaries and successors.

  • A wonderfully accurate register, or successive superposition of each block, is got mainly by the skill of the printer, who is assisted only by a mark defining one corner and another mark showing the opposite side limit.

  • At first the identity of Styria is lost in the great duchy of Carinthia, corresponding more or less closely to the Upper Carinthian mark.

  • This duchy, however, afterwards fell to pieces, and a distinct mark of Styria was recognized, taking its name from the margrave Ottacar of Steier (1056).

  • HERODIANS (`HpwStavoi), a sect or party mentioned in Scripture as having on two occasions - once in Galilee, and again in Jerusalem - manifested an unfriendly disposition towards Jesus (Mark iii.

  • also Mark viii.

  • It cannot be said, however, that Ramus's innovations mark any epoch in the history of logic. His rhetorical leaning is seen in the definition of logic as the "ars disserendi"; he maintains that the rules of logic may be better learned from observation of the way in which Cicero persuaded his hearers than from a study of the Organon.

  • The Contemporary Review (1866), long edited by Sir Percy Bunting, and the Nineteenth Century (1877), founded and edited by Sir James Knowles, and renamed Nineteenth Century and After in 1900, are similar in character, consisting of signed articles by men of mark of all opinions upon questions of the day.

  • Probably this was the road taken by Decimus Brutus when he succeeded, after the raising of the siege of Mutina in 43 B.C., in occupying Pollentia just before Mark Antony's cavalry came in sight.

  • 9, 10, 14, 15, that God divided the primeval waters into two parts by an intervening " firmament " or " platform," on which the sun, moon and stars (planets) were placed to mark times and to give light.

  • Some of these criticisms are rather beside the mark, but were all true, they would not impair his essential greatness, which lay in another sphere.

  • It varies in colour, but a black mark on the head like an inverted V remains nearly always visible.

  • Corinth, Sicyon and Megara, with similar political compromises, mark the limits of Dorian conquest; a Dorian invasion of Attica (c. 1066 B.C.) was checked by the self-sacrifice of King Codrus: "Either Athens must perish or her king."

  • Delphi also contained the "Omphalos," a sacred stone bound with fillets, supposed to mark the centre of the earth.

  • Its first recorded use is by Athanasius, bishop of Alexandria, who applied it to his predecessor Alexander as a mark of respect.

  • The metropolitans now commonly assumed the title of archbishop to mark their preeminence over the other bishops; at the same time the obligation imposed upon them, mainly at the instance of St Boniface, to receive thepallium from Rome, definitely marked the defeat of their claim to exercise metropolitan jurisdiction independently of the pope.

  • Though his fame has become dimmed in comparison with that of Shaftesbury, Russell and Sidney, he was not less conspicuous in the parliamentary proceedings of Charles II.'s reign, and he left a more permanent mark than any of them on the constitutional changes of the period.

  • They occur in mud and on sea-weeds at the bottom of shallow seas below low-water mark and devour organic debris.

  • He matriculated at Balliol College, Oxford, in 1827, and soon made his mark as a debater at the Union, where Gladstone succeeded him as president in 1830.

  • To mark the solemnity of the occasion, the patriarch's name was changed to Abraham, and that of his wife to Sarah.

  • 55; Mark vi.

  • Mark Akenside >>

  • above high water mark, and was thus for a long period subject to inundation and epidemics, and only careful drainage rendered the site healthy.

  • No accusation made by a critic ever fell so wide of the mark.

  • The substance whose volume is to be determined is placed in the cup PE, and the tube PC is immersed in the vessel of mercury D, until the mercury reaches the mark P. The plate E is then placed on the cup, and the tube PC raised until the surface of the mercury in the tube stands at M, that in the vessel D being at C, and the height MC is measured.

  • The bringing of the liquid to the mark is effected by removing the excess by means of a capillary.

  • The liquid is adjusted to the mark by withdrawing any excess from the capillary end by a strip of bibulous paper or by a capillary tube.

  • by weighing in mercury; below this mark it was calibrated in the ordinary way so that a scale reading gave the volume at once.

  • All parts of the apparatus are open to the air, and the mercury in the manometer is adjusted so as to come to a fixed mark a.

  • To calculate the result it is necessary to know the capacity of the apparatus to the mark a, and the temperature of the jacket.

  • A few unimportant ruins mark the ancient site, about 12 m.

  • The work done by Trajan in the Danubian regions left a lasting mark upon their history.

  • In the market-place, side by side, are two houses wherein two important historical events are said to have taken place - in the "Gasthaus zum Barbarossa" Frederick Barbarossa signed the peace of Constance (1183), while in the house named "zum Hohen Hafen" the emperor Sigismund invested Frederick of Hohenzollern with the mark of Brandenburg (1417).

  • His brother Thomas made some mark as a Constitutional bishop and member of the Convention.

  • First, there was the primitive Christian apocalypse embracing the letters and the seals written by John Mark soon after A.D.

  • Doubtless there were many who bore the name of John in the early Christian communities; we read, for instance, of ` John, whose surname was Mark,' and there may have been a second John in Asia, since at Ephesus, we are told, there were two tombs said to be John's..

  • The time of touching bottom i studied by the Norwegian expedition on board the " VOringen " was judged by timing each loo-fathom mark and noting the in 1876-1878, and the north polar basin by Nansen and Sverdrup sudden increase in the time interval when the shot reached the in the " Fram " in 1893-1896, the Mediterranean by the Italians bottom.

  • In 1318 it passed to the mark of Brandenburg; in 1319 to Bohemia; and in 1635, after suffering much in the Hussite and Thirty Years' wars, it came into the possession of Saxony.

  • They mark the area of growth of some fungus, starting from a centre of one or more plants.

  • of high-water mark, and 383,024,000 tons in the South Wales coalfield under the sea in St Bride's Bay and part of Carmarthen Bay.

  • Coal lying under the sea below low-water mark belongs to the crown, and can only be worked upon payment of royalties, even when it is approached from shafts sunk upon land in private ownership. In the Forest of Dean, which is the property of the crown as a royal forest,there are certain curious rights held by a portion of the inhabitants known as the Free Miners of the Forest, who are entitled to mine for coal and iron ore, under leases, known as gales, granted by the principal agent or gaveller representing the crown, in tracts not otherwise occupied.

  • We learn further that Anicetus as a mark of special honour allowed Polycarp to celebrate the Eucharist in the church, and that many Marcionites and Valentinians were converted by him during his stay in Rome.

  • In or near the city of San Antonio are the ruins of five missions built of stone; and missions were more numerous in east Texas, but they were built of wood and nothing remains to mark their location.

  • The Ripon Falls, in the centre of the northern coast of the Victoria Nyanza, at the head of the exquisitely beautiful Napoleon Gulf, mark the exit of the fully born Nile from the great lake.

  • The country on Portal's arrival bore every mark of prosperity and revival.

  • So large an area of New Guinea remains unexplored that it is impossible, except approximately, to state the number of its inhabitants, but probably 600,000 is under rather than over the mark.

  • The recognition by the Church of the lastnamed as a sacrament was, in spite of the commendation uttered by Jesus (Mark x.

  • The emperor seconded the efforts of his vassals, Albert the Bear, margrave of the Saxon north mark, and Conrad I., margrave of Meissen and Lusatia, to extend the authority of the Germans in the districts east of the Elbe, and assisted Norbert, archbishop of Magdeburg, and Albert I., archbishop of Bremen, to spread Christianity.

  • The non-importation sentiment preceding the War of Independence fostered home manufactures considerably, and the Embargo and Non-Intercourse Acts before the war of 1812, as well as that war itself (despite the subsequent glut of British goods) had a much greater effect; for they mark the introduction of the factory system, which by 1830 was firmly established in the textile industry and was rapidly transforming other industries.

  • Butler - all men of mark in the history of the state.

  • Antonius (Mark Antony).

  • The number of men arrayed under one banner, the time during which they might cohere, the distances from home they could march, their ability to hold permanently what they had gained, together form an excellent metric scale of the culture grade in the several American provinces, and nowhere, even in the most favoured, is this mark high.

  • The Pisan fleet represented the whole power of the city, and carried members of every family of mark and most of the great officers of state.

  • In Scott's sight, mark iv., there is a longitudinal level pivoted at one end and provided with a degree scale up to 4°; the level is moved by a spindle and micrometer screw reading to 2'.

  • One end of the bar is slotted to take the sliding leaf; this end of the bar is graduated from o° to 6°, and in conjunction with the fore-sight affords a lateral scope of 6° on either side of the normal for picking up an auxiliary mark.

  • At night this mark is replaced by a lamp installed in rear sight has a fixed horizontal bar slotted and graduated similarly to the slotted portion of the tangent sight.

  • They have been celebrated as the birthplace of King Arthur, or as the stronghold of King Mark, in a host of medieval romances, and in the poems of Tennyson and Swinburne.

  • Venetian influence is everywhere manifest; the Lion of St Mark is carved over the main gateway and on many public buildings; and among the narrow and steep lanes of the city there are numerous examples of Venetian Gothic or early Renaissance architecture.

  • A trace of them is found in one of the liturgical prayers of Serapion, bishop of Thmui, in Egypt, but they have left little mark on the liturgies of the church.

  • The group, consisting of small islands and reefs (which mark the extreme northern range of the coral-building polyps), is of oval form, measuring 22 m.

  • The reverse or lower side of the coin received a rectangular mark made by the sharp edges of the little anvil.

  • This act of ordaining ministers, probably after the Genevan order - which they certainly used from May 1568 - and their excommunication of certain deserters from their " church " (so Grindal), clearly mark the fact that this body of some 200 persons had now deliberately taken up a position outside the national church, as being themselves a " church " in a truer sense than any parish church, inasmuch as they conformed to the primitive pattern.

  • But they realized that " the Lord had more truth and light yet to break forth of his Holy Word "; and this gave them an open-minded and tolerant spirit, which continued to mark the church in Plymouth Colony, as distinct from the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay.

  • Fortunately the college was more or less successful, owing largely to his enthusiasm and energy, and many of the men who were trained there subsequently made their mark in chemical history.

  • 6 Mark iii.

  • ' Mark i.

  • Agrippa played a conspicuous part in the war against Lucius, brother of Mark Antony, which ended in the capture of Perusia (40).

  • Herzl thus left an indelible mark on his time, and his renown is assured whatever be the fate in store for the political Zionism which he founded and for which he gave his life.

  • Similarly the collection of sayings after Mark ix.

  • (4) The Leading Ideas of St Mark.

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