Marius sentence example

marius
  • From 104 to for he served again under Marius in the war with the Cimbri and Teutones and fought in the last great battle in the Raudian plains near Verona.
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  • It needed a change in the constitution to give the consulship to Lucius Sextius; it needed only union and energy in the electors to give it to Gaius Marius.
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  • He at first supported Marius and the popular party, but soon went over to the other side.
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  • Bocchus again made overtures to the Romans, and after an interview with Sulla, who was Marius's quaestor at that time, sent ambassadors to Rome.
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  • 181 letters of Theodoret have come down to us, partly in a separate collection, partly in the Acta of the councils, and partly in the Latin of Marius Mercator; they are of great value not only for the biography of the writer, but also for the history of his diocese and of the church in general.
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  • It was at this time that Marius's jealousy of his legate laid the foundations of their future rivalry and mutual hatred.
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  • The services of both Marius and Sulla were given; but Sulla was the more successful, or, at any rate, the more fortunate.
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  • The senate had already chosen Sulla; but the tribune Publius Sulpicius Rufus moved that Marius should have the command.
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  • Sulpicius was put to death, and Marius fled; and he and his party were crushed for the time.
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  • Papirius Carbo and the younger Marius, had massacred Sulla's supporters wholesale, confiscated his property, and declared him a public enemy.
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  • With the death of the younger Marius, who killed himself after the surrender of Praeneste, the civil war was at an end, and Sulla was master of Rome and of the Roman world.
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  • Remains of villas can also be traced, and to the largest of these, which occupied the summit of the promontory, and belonged first to Marius, then to Lucullus, and then to the imperial house, probably belongs the subterranean Grotta Dragonara.
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  • We have at Athens the exact parallel to the state of things when Appius Claudius shrank from the thought of the consulship of Gaius Licinius; we have no exact parallel to the state of things when Quintus Metellus shrank from the thought of the consulship of Gaius Marius.
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  • But, as the exclusive privileges of the nobility were never recognized by any legal or formal act, men like Gaius Marius would ever and anon thrust themselves in.
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  • In 101 the Cimbri were defeated on the Raudine plain, near Vercellae, by the united armies of Catulus and Marius.
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  • The chief honour being ascribed to Marius, Catulus became his bitter opponent.
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  • He sided with Sulla in the civil war, was included in the proscription list of 87, and when Marius declined to pardon him, committed suicide.
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  • He inherited his father's hatred of Marius, and was a consistent though moderate supporter of the aristocracy.
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  • 14, probably based on Marius Maximus; Eutropius viii.
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  • The autobiography was used by both Dio Cassius and Marius Maximus.
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  • He entered into an agreement with C. Marius, and in order to gain the favour of his soldiers proposed that each of his veterans should receive an allotment of Ioo jugera of land in Africa.
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  • He was also chiefly instrumental in securing the election of Marius to his fourth consulship (102).
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  • Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally C. Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and the needy rabble.
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  • It was proposed that all the land north of the Padus (Po) lately in possession of the Cimbri, including that of the independent Celtic tribes which had been temporarily occupied by them, should be held available for distribution among the veterans of Marius.
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  • Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope 1 According to some, the son of the Caepio mentioned above.
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  • The senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State.
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  • Marius had no alternative but to obey.
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  • In the Second Punic War it thrice bade defiance to Hannibal; but in the Social War it was betrayed into the hands of the Samnites, who kept possession till Marius, with whom they had sided, was defeated by Sulla, who in 80 B.C. subjected it with the rest of Samnium.
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  • We hear very little of it in ancient times; it appears to have suffered at the end of the war between Marius and Sulla, and in A.D.
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  • A native of Apamea in Syria and a pupil of Panaetius, he spent after his teacher's death many years in travel and scientific researches in Spain (particularly at Gades), Africa, Italy, Gaul, Liguria, Sicily and on the eastern shores of the Adriatic. When he settled as a teacher at Rhodes (hence his surname "the Rhodian") his fame attracted numerous scholars; next to Panaetius he did most, by writings and personal intercourse, to spread Stoicism in the Roman world, and he became well known to many leading men, such as Marius, Rutilius Rufus, Pompey and Cicero.
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  • That Barbaro was really the first to apply the lens to the camera obscura is supported by Marius Bettinus in his Apiaria (1645), and by Kaspar Schott in his Magia Universalis (1657), the former taunting Porta with the appropriation.
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  • It became a colony in 295 B.C. In 88 B.C. Marius in his flight from Sulla hid himself in the marshes of Minturnae.
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  • The tradition was continued in the 4th century by Nonius Marcellus and C. Marius Victorinus, both Africans; Aelius Donatus, the grammarian and commentator on Terence and Virgil, Flavius Sosipater Charisius and Diomedes, and Servius, the author of a valuable commentary on Virgil.
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  • No better representative of the true old hardy Roman type, little softened by either luxury or education, had come to the head of affairs since the days of Marius.
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  • Laurentum was also accessible by a branch from the Via Ostiensis at the eighth mile (at Malafede) leading past Castel Porziano, the royal hunting-lodge, which is identical with the ancient Ager Solonius (in which, Festus tells us, was situated the Pomonal or sacred grove of Pomona) and which later belonged to Marius.
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  • The villa of Marius, which was bought by Lucullus, and afterwards came into the possession of the imperial house, was the scene of the death of Tiberius.
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  • By this time Marius was generally recognized as the ablest general of the day, and was appointed to the chief command against the Cimbri and Teutones.
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  • In 101 Marius was elected consul a fifth time (previously in 107, 104, 103, 102), hailed as the "saviour of his country," and honoured with a triumph of unprecedented splendour.
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  • In 88 war broke out with Mithradates, and Sulla was appointed by the senate to the chief command, which was eagerly desired by Marius.
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  • With the assistance of the tribune Sulpicius Rufus, Marius succeeded in getting the command transferred to himself.
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  • Sulla marched upon Rome and defeated Marius, who fled to the marshes of Minturnae in Latium.
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  • The Gallic trooper sent to strike off the old man's head quailed, it is said, before the fire of his eyes, and fled exclaiming, "I cannot kill Gaius Marius."
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  • The inhabitants out of compassion then allowed Marius to depart, and put him on board a ship which conveyed him to Carthage.
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  • When forbidden to land, he told the messenger to inform the governor that he had seen Marius sitting as a fugitive among the ruins of Carthage.
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  • Meantime, Sulla having left Italy for the Mithradatic war, Cinna's sudden and violent revolution put the senate at the mercy of the popular leaders, and Marius greedily caught at the opportunity of a bloody vengeance, which became in fact a reign of terror in which senators and nobles were slaughtered wholesale.
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  • Marius was not only a great general, but also a great military reformer.
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  • He further made the cohort the military unit instead of the maniple, and his cavalry and light-armed troops were drawn from foreign countries, so that it may be said that Marius was the originator of the mercenary army.
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  • Marius, however, unlike Caesar, did not attempt to overturn the oligarchy by means of the army; he used rather such expedients as the constitution seemed to allow, though they had to be backed up by riot and violence.
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  • Marius had a decided tinge of fanaticism and superstition.
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  • For the life of Marius the original sources are numerous passages in Cicero's works, Sallust's Jugurtha, the epitomes of the lost books of Livy, Plutarch's Lives of Sulla and Marius, Velleius Paterculus, Florus and Appian's Bellum civile.
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  • During the war between Marius and Sulla it withstood the latter's troops for two years in 82-80 B.C. As a result of its resistance Sulla carried a law for the confiscation of the land of those inhabitants of Volaterrae who had had the privileges of Roman citizenship. This, however, does not seem to have been carried out until Caesar as dictator divided some of the territory of Volaterrae among his veterans.
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  • This other evidence consists partly of letters from Nestorius, preserved among the works of those to whom they were written, some sermons collected in a Latin translation by Marius Mercator, an African merchant who was doing business in Constantinople at the time of the dispute, and,other material gathered from Syriac manuscripts.
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  • In addition to being a good bishop, Marius was a clever goldsmith; he was present at the council of Macon in 585, and transferred the seat of his bishopric from Avenches to Lausanne.
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  • As a continuation of the Chronicon of Prosper of Aquitaine, Marius wrote a short Chronicon dealing with the period from 455 to 581; and although he borrowed from various sources his work has some importance for the history of Burgundy.
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  • In 102 B.C. its neighbourhood was the scene of the defeat inflicted on the Cimbri and Teutones by Marius.
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  • The determining factor is no doubt to be sought in his relationship with C. Marius, the husband of his aunt Julia.
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  • Caesar was born in the year of Marius's first great victory over the Teutones, and as he grew up, inspired by the traditions of the great soldier's career, attached himself to his party and its fortunes.
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  • The social war (90-89 B.C.) had been brought to a close by the enfranchisement of Rome's Italian subjects; and the civil war which followed it led, after the departure of Sulla for the East, to the temporary triumph of the populares, led by Marius and Cinna, and the indiscriminate massacre of their political opponents, including both of Caesar's uncles.
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  • In the following year (which saw the death of Marius) Caesar, rejecting a proposed marriage with a wealthy capitalist's heiress, sought and obtained the hand of Cornelia, the daughter of Cinna, and thus became further identified with the ruling party.
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  • Already in 68 B.C. he had paraded the bust of Marius at his aunt's funeral; in 65 B.C., as curule aedile, he restored the trophies of Marius to their place on the Capitol; in 64 B.C., as president of the murder commission, he brought three of Sulla's executioners to trial, and in 63 B.C. he caused the ancient procedure of trial by popular assembly to be revived against the murderer of Saturninus.
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  • At the same time the fears of the more sober and respectable citizens were allayed by Otho's liberal professions of his intention to govern equitably, and by his judicious clemency towards Marius Celsus, consul-designate, a devoted adherent of Galba.
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  • They can have exercised their public rights but seldom, owing to their distance from Rome; but the consulships of C. Marius, a municeps of Arpinum (between 107 and 100 B.C.), and the strength of the support given to Tiberius Gracchus in the assembly by the voters from Italian towns (133 B.C.) show what an important influence the members of these municipia could occasionally exercise over Roman politics.
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  • His first play, Marius d Minturnes (1791), immediately established his reputation.
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  • Some of the inhabitants took refuge in the hills above and there founded a new town, which acquired more importance when Bishop Marius about 590 chose it as his see city (perhaps transferring it from Avenches).
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  • In the civil wars of Sulla the younger Marius was blockaded in the town by the Sullans (82 B.C.); and on its capture Marius slew himself, the male inhabitants were massacred in cold blood, and a military colony was settled on part of its territory, though, possibly owing to the extravagance of the new coloni, we find that in 63 B.C. this was already in the possession of large proprietors.
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  • Arretium took the part of Marius against Sulla, and the latter settled some of his veterans there as colonists.
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  • We find no hint of it in Agathias (who wrote between 566 and 582), in Marius (532-596), or in Gregory of Tours (54 o -594).
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  • He also wrote A Political Life of Sir Robert Peel (London, 1856); A Financial, Statistical and Monetary History of England from 1688 (London, 1847); Matter for Materialists (London, 1870); The Eve of St Mark, a Romance of Venice; and three dramas, The Statue Wife, Diocletian and Caius Marius, in addition to some fishing songs, and many contributions to various newspapers and periodicals.
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  • He wrote a metrical handbook in four books, which has been incorporated by Marius Victorinus in his system of grammar.
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  • In rot Marius overthrew them on the Raudine Plain near Vercellae.
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  • An adherent of Sulla, he was put to death by Marius and Cinna when they obtained possession of Rome (87).
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  • Apart from the modern studies by Lair, FunckBrentano, Lang and Barnes, referred to above, there is valuable historical matter in the work of Roux-Fazaillac, Recherches historiques sur l'homme au masque defer (1801); see also Marius Topin, L'Homme au masque de fer (Paris, 1870), and Loiseleur, Trois Enigmes historiques (1882).
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  • The mention of the exile of Marius (49) shows that it was not published before loo.
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  • In the eighth satire another reference is made (120) to the misgovernment of Marius in Africa as a recent event, and at line 51 there may be an allusion to the Eastern wars that occupied the last years of Trajan's reign.
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  • He now declared for Marius and the democratic party, though of Marius himself as a man he had the worst opinion.
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  • He must have been a consenting party to the hideous massacres of Marius and Cinna in 87, though he seems to have done what he could to mitigate their horrors.
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  • These are twofold: that is to say, a personal name is followed by words indicating the subject-matter, as Marius de Fortuna, from which the contents may easily be guessed, and Sisenna de Historia, most likely a dialogue in which the old annalist of the name was the chief speaker, and discoursed of the principles on which history should be written.
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  • Marius and Martha and their companions; that of the latter has no better historical foundation: so that no argument can be drawn from either account to establish the differentiation of the two saints.
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  • During the civil wars of Marius and Sulla a body of partisans of the latter, having entered it by treachery (82 B.C.), made a general massacre of the inhabitants; but Neapolis soon recovered, as it was again a flourishing city in the time of Cicero.
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  • Marius Maximus and Aelius Junius Cordus, to whose qualifications they themselves bear no favourable testimony, were their chief authorities for the earlier lives of the series.
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  • Marius Maximus, who lived about 165-230, wrote biographies of the emperors, in continuation of those of Suetonius, from Nerva to Elagabalus; Junius Cordus dealt with the less-known emperors, perhaps down to Maximus and Balbinus.
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  • He took the side of Sulla against Marius and Cinna, but for a time, in consequence of the success of the Marians, he kept in the background.
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  • During the civil war between Marius and Sulla he seems to have shown no desire to attach himself definitely to either side.
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  • He certainly set out for Rome from the south of Italy (where he remained as proconsul) at the bidding of the aristocratic party, when the city was threatened by Marius and Cinna, but he displayed little energy, and the engagement which he fought before the Colline gate, although hotly contested, was indecisive.
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  • During the civil war between Marius and Sulla he sided with the former, but was defeated by Sulla at mount Tifata near Capua, and again by Metellus at Faventia in Cisalpine Gaul (82).
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  • Soon afterwards Sulpicius, hitherto an aristocrat, declared in favour of Marius and the popular party.
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  • He was deeply in debt, and it seems that Marius had promised him financial assistance in the event of his being appointed to the command in the Mithradatic War.
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  • The majority of the senate were strongly opposed to the proposals; a justitium (cessation of public business) was proclaimed by the consuls, but Marius and Sulpicius got up a riot, and the consuls, in fear of their lives, withdrew the justitium.
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  • The proposals of Sulpicius became law, and, with the assistance of the new voters, the command was bestowed upon Marius, then a mere privatus.
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  • Marius and Sulpicius, unable to resist him, fled from the city.
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  • Marius managed to escape to Africa, but Sulpicius was discovered in a villa at Laurentum and put to death; his head was sent to Sulla and exposed in the forum.
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  • Sometimes the storm had burst over Gaul, and there had been need of a Marius to stem the torrent of Cimbri and Teutons, or of a Caesar to drive back the Helvetians into their mountains.
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  • The author assumes the name of Isidore, evidently the archbishop of Seville, who was credited with a preponderating part in the compilation of the Hispana; he takes in addition the surname of Mercator, perhaps because he has made use of two passages of Marius Mercator.
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  • In 102 the Helvetii joined the Cimbri in the invasion of Italy, but after the defeat of the latter by Marius they returned home.
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  • In 88 B.C., after the triumph of Sulla, when the younger Marius fled from Rome to Africa, Hiempsal received him with apparent friendliness, his real intention being to detain him as a prisoner.
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  • Marius discovered this intention in time and made good his escape with the assistance of the king's daughter.
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  • It suffered greatly during the civil wars of Marius and Sulla.
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  • A: Plutarch's Life of Marius is the only literary evidence.
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  • In 90 B.C. it acquired Roman citizenship, but in 82 B.C. having been held by the partisans of Marius, it was plundered by those of Sulla (who probably made the Rubicon the frontier of Italy instead of the Aesis), and a military colony settled there.
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  • His political advancement was slow, and he did not obtain the quaestorship until 107, when he served in the Jugurthine war under Marius in Africa.
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  • Quintus Lutatius Catulus, Roman general and consul with Marius in 102 B.C. In the war against the Cimbri and Teutones he was sent to defend the passage of the Alps but found himself compelled to retreat over the Po, his troops having been reduced to a state of panic (see Marius, GAIus).
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  • Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law.
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  • Among them were: Leopold Pannier; Marius Sepet, the author of Le Drame chretien au moyen age (1878) and of the Origines catholiques du theatre moderne (1901); Charles Joret; Alfred Morel-Fatio; Gaston Raynaud, who is responsible for various volumes of the excellent editions published by the Societe des anciens textes francais; Arsene Darmesteter and others.
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  • The surrender of the person of Jugurtha to Sulla gave rise to the view that he, not Marius, had really ended the war, and so laid the foundation of the subsequent enmity between the two leaders.
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  • Marius, out of unpromising materials and a demoralized soldiery, organized a well-disciplined army, with which he inflicted on the invaders two decisive defeats, the first in 102 at Aquae Sextiae (Aix), 1 8 m.
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  • The manner in which he turned against his former associates (although he probably had no choice in the matter) alienated the sympathies of the plebs; and Marius, feeling that his only chance of rehabilitation lay in war, left Rome for Asia, where he endeavoured to provoke Mithradates to hostilities.
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  • So in Byron and Heine, and, in a sense, in Walter Pater (Marius the Epicurean), there is the same tendency to seek relief from the intellectual cul-de-sac in frankly aesthetic satisfaction.
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  • The statocyst (retro-cerebral organ of P. Marius de Beauchamp) is a sac filled with highly refractive granules soluble in dilute acids, and opening by a slender duct (or a pair) to the surface: its function is doubtless that of an organ of equilibrium, and it resembles in its opening to the surface the primitive internal ear of even Vertebrates, for the duct to the surface persists through life in the sharks.
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  • In 102 the Teutoni and Ambrones were totally defeated by Marius at Aquae Sextiae (see Marius, GAlus).
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  • He slew his inoffensive brother-in-law with his own hand, and tortured and mutilated the much-loved Marius Gratidianus.
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