Maritime sentence example

maritime
  • This is specially the case with the maritime ports.
    101
    97
  • The maritime traffic is largely conducted by the steamers of the subsidized Austrian-Lloyd company, Trieste being the principal commercial centre; the coasting trade is carried on by small Greek and Turkish sailing vessels.
    20
    19
  • The narrow strip of coast-land between the Maritime Alps, the Apennines and the sea—called in ancient times Liguria, and now known as the Riviera of Genoa—is throughout its extent, from Nice to Genoa on the one side, and from Genoa to Spezia on the other, almost wholly mountainous.
    30
    29
  • It does not seem that any maritime trade followed these discoveries, and indeed it is doubtful whether his contemporaries accepted the truth of Pytheas's narrative; Strabo four hundred years later certainly did not, but the critical studies of modern scholars have rehabilitated the Massilian explorer.
    19
    18
  • The forces of the powers shortly afterwards occupied Candia and the other maritime towns, while the international fleet blockaded the Cretan coast.
    28
    27
    Advertisement
  • Their skill in maritime affairs, exemplified first in the 9th century by the pagan corsairs of the Narenta (see Dalmatia: History), and later by the numerous Dalmatian and Croatian sailors who served in the navies of Venice and Austria, is remarkable in a Slavonic people, and one which had so recently migrated from central Europe.
    1
    0
  • He wanted to give 17th-century France the modern and industrial character which the New World had imprinted on the maritime states; and he created industry on a grand scale with an energy of labor, a prodigious genius for initiative and for organization; while, in order to attract a foreign clientele, he imposed upon it the habits of meticulous probity common to a middle-class draper.
    1
    0
  • The total yield annually amounts to some 700,000 oz., the largest quantity coming from the Olekminsk, district in the province of Yakutsk, and this district is followed by the Amur region, the Maritime province, and Nerchinsk and Transbaikalia.
    0
    0
  • Coal occurs in many Jurassic fresh-water;basins, namely, on the outskirts of the Altai, in south Yeniseisk, about Irkutsk, in the Nerchinsk district, at many places in the Maritime province, and on the island of Sakhalin.
    0
    0
  • 68, Egypt is still the chief goal of the maritime slave trade, and in Ezek.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The maritime population supplies the best sailors in India.
    0
    0
  • In any case, the antiquity of the town is undisputed, and it served as the seat of government for Ystrad Tywi until the year 877, when Prince Cadell of South Wales abandoned Carmarthen for Dinefawr, near Llandilo, probably on account of the maritime raids of the Danes and Saxons.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the conflict of claims which grew out of the controversy, maritime states had to moderate their demands and base their pretensions to maritime dominion on the principle that it extended seawards from land.
    0
    0
  • The interruption of maritime intercourse, the stagnation of industry and trade, the rise in the price of the necessaries of life, the impossibility of adequately providing for the families of those - call them reservists, " landwehr," or what you will - who are torn away from their daily toil to serve in the tented field, - these are considerations that may well make us pause before we abandon a peaceful solution and appeal to brute force.
    0
    0
  • This range forms the true backbone of the maritime mountainous belt and rises from the plateau itself, while the Coast Range rises on its eastern margin and forms a rim to the plateau.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • One of the purposes of this restrictive provision was that of creating a national merchant marine, but the disinclination of Brazilians for maritime pursuits has been a serious obstacle to its realization.
    0
    0
  • Rating, in maritime vocabulary, is the classification of men according to rank, and was formerly employed to class ships of a navy according to strength.
    0
    0
  • Beyond the Cojedes begin two parallel ranges known as the Maritime Andes of Venezuela, which stretch east and west along the coast.
    0
    0
  • Behind the wide bay between Cape Codera and Cumana there is an interruption in the Maritime Andes; but both ranges reappear between Cumana and the Gulf of Paria.
    0
    0
  • West of the Maritime Andes low ranges (3500-5000 ft.) trend northwards from the end of the Sierra de Merida towards the coast on the east side of the Lake of Maracaibo, while the region on the west of that lake consists of lagoon-studded lowlands.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the Maritime Andes at and above the altitude of Caracas it may be described as semitropical, and in the still higher regions of western Venezuela it approaches the mild temperate.
    0
    0
  • On the coast and the northern slopes of the Maritime Andes the tropical heat is greatly modified by the trade-winds.
    0
    0
  • Irrigation, which has not been used to any great extent, is needed in some parts of the country for the best results, but in others, as in the valleys and on the northern slopes of the Maritime Andes, the rainfall is sufficiently well distributed to meet most requirements.
    0
    0
  • To secure command of the maritime defile that links the Aegean with the Sea of Marmora was, in the opinion of most ' On Dec. 13 1914 the British submarine B11, Lt.
    0
    0
  • The fact that along the whole of its course this remarkable waterway is only separated from the Aegean by the attenuated Gallipoli Peninsula, did, on the other hand, suggest that the most promising method of attack upon the maritime defile from without would be to occupy that significant tongue of land.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1135 and 1137 it was taken by the Pisans, and rapidly declined in importance, though its maritime code, known as the Tavole Amalfitane, was recognized in the Mediterranean until 1570.
    0
    0
  • Florence now acquired a great seaport and was at last able to develop a direct maritime trade.
    0
    0
  • The same year the republic purchased Leghorn from the Genoese for zoo,000 florins, and established a body of "Consuls of the Sea" to superintend maritime trade.
    0
    0
  • He was restored to his rank in the navy in 1803, and died in 1822, after having been prefet maritime of Antwerp, and prefect of the department of Meurthe.
    0
    0
  • A low maritime plain, similar to the Tehama of the western coast, extends for some 200 m.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 649 he sanctioned the establishment of a maritime service, on condition that it should be voluntary.
    0
    0
  • The first known meeting of the "maritime towns," later known as the Wendish group and including Lubeck, Hamburg, Luneburg, Wismar, Rostock and Stralsund, took place in 1256.
    0
    0
  • Under the Byzantine dominion Pisa, like many other of the maritime cities of Italy, profited by the weakness of the government at Constantinople to reassert its strength.
    0
    0
  • The coast, extending from the base of the Western or Maritime Cordillera to the Pacific Ocean, consists of a sandy desert crossed at intervals by rivers flowing through narrow, fertile valleys.
    0
    0
  • Here the maritime range approaches the ocean, leaving a narrower strip of coast, but the fertile valleys are closer and more numerous.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • These three chains are called the Western or Maritime Cordillera, the Central Cordillera and the Andes.
    0
    0
  • The Maritime Cordillera of Peru has no connexion with the coast ranges of Chile, but is a continuation of the Cordillera Occidental of Chile, which under various local names forms the eastern margin of the coastal desert belt from Atacama northward into Peru.
    0
    0
  • At the point where the river Santa breaks through the Cordillera Negra that range begins to subside, while the Maritime Cordillera continues as one chain to and beyond the frontier of Ecuador.
    0
    0
  • No river, except the Maranon, breaks through it either to the east or west, while more than twenty coast streams rise on its slopes and force their way through the maritime chain.
    0
    0
  • It is nowhere disturbed by volcanic eruptions, except at the very edge of the formation near Lake Titicaca, and in this respect it differs essentially from the Maritime Cordillera.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The great rivers of the sierra are the Maranon, rising in the lake of Lauricocha and flowing northward in a deep gorge between the Maritime and Central Cordilleras for 350 m., when it forces its way through the mountains at the famous Pongo de Manseriche and enters the Amazonian plain.
    0
    0
  • The historical background is the raids of the Teutonic maritime tribes on the coasts of England and Ireland.
    0
    0
  • The first project was to carry the TOkyo-KiOto line through the interior of the island so as to secure it against enterprises on the part of a maritime enemy.
    0
    0
  • The war was very unpopular in Denmark, and the closing of the Sound against foreign shipping, in order to starve out Sweden, had exasperated the maritime powers and all the Baltic states.
    0
    0
  • The Persian invasions of Darius and Xerxes, with the consequent importance of maritime strength and the capacity for distant enterprise, as compared with that of purely military superiority in the Greek peninsula, caused a considerable loss of prestige which Sparta was unwilling to recognize.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At all events, it is significant of the success of the main object of the Delian League, the Athenians resigning Cyprus and Egypt, while Persia recognized the freedom of the maritime Greeks of Asia Minor.
    0
    0
  • Thus in 4 4 8 B.C. Athens was not only mistress of a maritime empire, but ruled over Megara, Boeotia, Phocis, Locris, Achaea and Troezen, i.e.
    0
    0
  • In the spring of 377 invitations were sent out to the maritime cities.
    0
    0
  • Some time in that year Tenedos, Chios, Chalcis in Euboea, and probably the Euboean cities Eretria, Carystus and Arethusa gave in their adherence, followed by Perinthus, Peparethus, Sciathus and other maritime cities.
    0
    0
  • The policy of Athens was mistaken for two reasons: (I) Sparta was not entirely humiliated, and (2) alliance with the land powers of Peloponnese was incalculably dangerous, inasmuch as it involved Athens in enterprises which could not awake the enthusiasm of her maritime allies.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The maritime allies naturally had no desire to be involved in the quarrels of Sicily, Thessaly and the Peloponnese.
    0
    0
  • During these fourteen years the policy of Athens towards her maritime allies was, as we have seen, shortsighted and inconsistent.
    0
    0
  • At the end of the 6th century the exarchate included Istria; the maritime part of Venetia as distinct from the interior which was in the hands of the Lombard kings at Pavia; the exarchate proper, or territory around Ravenna on the eastern side of the Apennines, to which was added Calabria, which at that period meant the heel and not the toe of the boot; the Pentapolis, or coast from Rimini to Ancona with the interior as far as the mountains; the duchy of Rome, or belt of territory connecting the Pentapolis with the western coast, the coast of Naples, w i th Bruttium the toe of the boot, the modern Calabria, and Liguria, or the Riviera of Genoa.
    0
    0
  • About 740 it consisted of Istria, Venetia (the maritime portion of which was ceasing to be a province and was becoming a protected state, the forerunner of the future republic of Venice), Ferrara, Ravenna (the exarchate in the limited sense), Pentapolis, Perusia, Rome, the coast of Naples and Calabria (in the sense of the toe and not the heel of the boot) which was being overrun by the Lombards of the duchy of Beneventum, which with Spoletum held the interior.
    0
    0
  • The maritime expansion of Corinth at this time is proved by the foundation of colonies at Syracuse and Corcyra, and the equipment of a fleet of triremes (the newly invented Greek men-of-war) to quell a revolt of the latter city.
    0
    0
  • In 1861 the strategic importance of Taranto was recognized by the Italian government, and in 1864 a Naval Commission designated it as third maritime arsenal after Spezia and Venice.
    0
    0
  • From the dawn of maritime trade its possession has been important to the strongest nations on the sea for the time being.
    0
    0
  • The contents of these logs, it is true, refer more to maritime meteorology than to oceanography properly so-called, as their main purpose is to promote a rational system of navigation especially for sailing ships, and they are supplied by the voluntary co-operation of the sailors themselves.
    0
    0
  • 2 3 in connexion with Dor, appears to have been situated in the maritime plain.
    0
    0
  • It is also hard to believe the statement in the Talleyrand Memoirs that the ex-foreign minister urged Napoleon to occupy Catalonia until a maritime peace could be arranged with England.
    0
    0
  • In commerce it had to compete with the highly developed maritime industry of Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • As patron of maritime adventure (i yee 6vtos) he struggles with Nereus and Triton, slays Eryx and Busiris, and perhaps captures the wild horses and oxen, which may stand for pirates.
    0
    0
  • On the summits of the Adirondacks are a few alpine species, such as reindeer moss and other lichens; on the shores of Long Island, Staten Island and Westchester county are a number of maritime species; and on Long Island are several species especially characteristic of the pine barrens of New Jersey.
    0
    0
  • This plan was first put into execution at the general election of 18 9 0, which was held during the industrial excitement aroused by the Australasian maritime strike of that year.
    0
    0
  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.
    0
    0
  • Macdonald, at the head of a representative delegation from Ontario and Quebec, met the public men of the maritime provinces in conference at Charlottetown in 1864, and the outline of confederation then agreed upon was filled out in detail at a conference held at Quebec soon afterwards.
    0
    0
  • The pledge made at confederation with regard to the building of the Intercolonial railway to connect the maritime provinces with those of the St Lawrence was fulfilled.
    0
    0
  • Louis fought a battle beneath the walls of Zara (July ist, 1346), which has been immortalized by Tintoretto, but was defeated and compelled to abandon the city to the republic. The struggle was renewed eleven years later when Louis, having formed, with infinite trouble, a league of all the enemies of Venice, including the emperor, the Habsburgs, Genoa and other Italian towns, attacked his maritime rival with such vigour that she sued for peace, and by the treaty of Zara (February 18th, 1358) ceded most of the Dalmatian towns and renounced the title of duke of Dalmatia and Croatia, hitherto borne by the doge.
    0
    0
  • This was assured to the insurgents at the outset by the revolt of the maritime communities of the Greek archipelago.
    0
    0
  • With the growth of confidence negotiations with France were reopened, and, after long discussion, the treaty of 1893 was set aside and Chantabun evacuated in return for the cession of the provinces of Bassac, Melupre, and the remainder of Luang Prabang, all on the right bank of the Mekong, and of the maritime district of Krat.
    0
    0
  • In 1907 a further convention was made with France, Siam returning to the French protectorate of Cambodia the province of Battambang conquered in 181r, and in compensation receiving hack from France the maritime province of Krat and the district of Dansai, which had been ceded in 1904.
    0
    0
  • The climate of the republic is a medium between a maritime and continental one.
    0
    0
  • The Teutonic Order, which had just been expelled from Hungary by Andrew II., joyfully accepted this new domicile, and its position in the north was definitely established by the compact of Kruschwitz in 1230, whereby it obtained absolute possession of the maritime district between Pomerania and Courland, and southwards as far as Thorn.
    0
    0
  • The Little Atlas, otherwise the Tell or Maritime Atlas, lies between the sea and the Saharan Atlas, and is composed of many distinct ranges, generally of no great elevation and connected by numerous transverse chains forming extensive table-lands and elevated valleys.
    0
    0
  • The "Marriage of the Adriatic," or more correctly "of the sea" (Sposalizio del Mar) was a ceremony symbolizing the maritime dominion of Venice.
    0
    0
  • For purposes of local administration the state is divided into five provinces, Alajuela, Cartago, Guanacaste, Heredia and San Jose, and two maritime districts (comarcas), Limon and Puntarenas.
    0
    0
  • It was included in the maritime province of northern Abyssinia, which was governed by a viceroy who bore the title of Bahar-nagash (ruler of the sea).
    0
    0
  • The progress of navigation and the association of divinities of the sky with maritime affairs probably also assisted to bring about the change, although the memory of her earlier function as a goddess of childbirth survived till imperial times.
    0
    0
  • He married in January 1562 Anne, daughter of George Barnes, Lord Mayor of London and widow of Alexander Ca rleill, whose son-in-law Christopher Hod desdon was closely associated with maritime and commercial enterprise.
    0
    0
  • This second period lasted from the summer of 1778 to the middle of 1783, and it included both such operations as had already been in progress in America, or for the protection of commerce, and naval campaigns on a great scale carried out by the fleets of the maritime powers.
    0
    0
  • It is interesting to find maritime plants, such as the samphire, growing on their shores a thousand miles from the sea and more than a thousand feet above it.
    0
    0
  • The " maritime provinces " of eastern Canada, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, may be considered together; and to these provinces as politically bounded may be added, from a physical point of view, the analogous south-eastern part of Quebec - the entire area being designated the Acadian region.
    0
    0
  • Leaving out the maritime provinces, southern Ontario, southern Alberta and the Pacific coast region on the one hand, and the Arctic north, particularly near Hudson Bay, on the other, Canada has snowy and severe winters, a very short spring with a sudden rise of temperature, short warm summers, and a delightful autumn with its " Indian summer."
    0
    0
  • The general flora of the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Eastern Ontario is much the same, except that in Nova Scotia a number of species are found common also to Newfoundland that are not apparent inland.
    0
    0
  • Between 1891 and 1901 the number of farmers in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces decreased, and there seemed a prospect of the country being divided into a manufacturing east and an agricultural west, but latterly large tracts in northern Ontario and Quebec have proved suitable for cultivation and are being opened up.
    0
    0
  • Next come the Presbyterians, the backbone of the maritime provinces.
    0
    0
  • There are four kinds of savings banks in Canada: - (1) the post-office savings banks; (2) the government savings banks of the Maritime provinces taken over at federation and being gradually merged with the former; (3) two special savings banks in the cities of Montreal and Quebec; (4) the savings bank departments of the chartered banks.
    0
    0
  • In the maritime provinces and in Prince Edward Island sheep and lambs are reared in large numbers.
    0
    0
  • One of the four branch farms then established is at Nappan, Nova Scotia, near the boundary between that province and New Brunswick, where it serves the farmers of the three maritime provinces.
    0
    0
  • University work in the maritime provinces, instead of being concentrated, as it might well be, in one powerful institution, is distributed among five small, but within their range efficient universities.
    0
    0
  • It originally consisted of 72 members, 24 from Quebec, 24 from Ontario, and 24 from the maritime provinces, but this number has been from time to time slightly increased as new provinces have been added.
    0
    0
  • Histories, Of The Maritime Provinces Have Been Written By Thomas Chandler;Haliburton, Beamish Murdoch And James Hannay.
    0
    0
  • The scenery of Euboea is perhaps the most beautiful in Greece, owing to the varied combinations of rock, wood and water; for from the uplands the sea is almost always in view, either the wide island-studded expanse of the Aegean, or the succession of lakes formed by the Euboic Sea, together with mountains of exquisite outline, while the valleys and maritime plains are clothed either with fruit trees or with plane trees of magnificent growth.
    0
    0
  • Under the Ptolemies, the inland cities declined in comparison with the maritime ones, and the Cyrenaica began to feel the commercial competition of Egypt and Carthage, whence easier roads lead into the continent.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile a conference of the maritime powers was held in London in1908-1909for the elaboration of a code of international maritime law in time of war, to be applied in the international Court of Prize, which had been proposed in a convention signed ad referendum at the Hague Conference of 1907.
    0
    0
  • - The two governments respectively promise not to increase their maritime armaments during five years, unless the one who shall wish to increase them shall give the other eighteen months' notice in advance.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand the lack of good harbours hindered its maritime development; and the Boeotian nation, although it produced great men like Pindar, Epaminondas, Pelopidas and Plutarch, was proverbially as dull as its native air.
    0
    0
  • Further, we learn from Osorio that the Arabs at the time of Gama "were instructed in so many of the arts of navigation, that they did not yield much to the Portuguese mariners in the science and practice of maritime matters."
    0
    0
  • 1), and on appeal in maritime causes nautical assessories are usually called in by the court of appeal, and may be called in by the House of Lords (Judicature Act 1891, s.
    0
    0
  • 'MESOPOTAMIA (ME601ro-rapLa, sc. wpa or /vpia, from 4cros,, middle, lroray63, river), one of the Greek renderings of the earlier Semitic names for the river-country that stretches eastward from northern maritime Syria.
    0
    0
  • 5 That probably originated in the maritime district of Syria.
    0
    0
  • It would thus include the country lying between Babylonia on the south and the Armenian Taurus highlands on the north, the maritime Syrian district on the west, and Assyria proper on the east.
    0
    0
  • Functionally, Mesopotamia is the domain that lies between Babylonia and the related trans-Tigris districts on the one hand, and the west Asian districts of Maritime Syria and Asia Minor on the other.
    0
    0
  • In the same year he became judge of the court of common pleas for Essex county, and sole judge of the maritime court for the counties of Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex.
    0
    0
  • Rodosto was long a great depot for the produce of the Adrianople district, but its trade suffered when Dedeagatch became the terminus of the railway up the Maritza, and the town is now dependent on its maritime trade, especially its exports to Constantinople.
    0
    0
  • The only town is Blagovyeshchensk, but the centre of the administration is Khabarovsk in the Maritime province.
    0
    0
  • The isolation of the Teutonic churches from the vast system with which they had been bound up, the conflicts and troubles among themselves, the necessity of fixing their own principles and defining their own rights, concentrated their attention upon themselves and their own home work, to the neglect of work abroad.8 Still the development of the maritime power of England, which the Portuguese and Spanish monarchies noted with fear and jealousy, was distinguished by a singular anxiety for the spread of the Christian faith.
    0
    0
  • To the east this plain stretches in an unbroken level, as far as the eye can follow it, towards Venice and the Adriatic; on the southern side the line of the Apennines from Bologna to Genoa closes the view; to the west rise the Maritime, Cottian and Graian Alps, with Monte Viso as their central point; while northward are the Pennine, Helvetic and Rhaetian Alps, of which Monte Rosa, the Saasgrat and Monte Leone are the most conspicuous features.
    0
    0
  • The gain of the Milanese in 18J9 by the future king of Italy (1861) meant that Italy then won the valley of Livigno (between the Upper Engadine and Bormio), which is the only important bit it holds on the nonItalian slope of the Alps, besides the county of Tenda (obtained in 1575, and not lost in 1860), with the heads of certain glens in the Maritime Alps, reserved in 1860 for reasons connected with hunting.
    0
    0
  • The museums of the city comprise an ethnographical museum, the maritime museum established by the Yacht Club in 1874, and the Boyman's Museum (1867) containing pictures, drawings and engravings, as well as the town library.
    0
    0
  • Besides its maritime trade Rotterdam has an extensive river traffic, not only with Holland, but also with Belgium and Germany.
    0
    0
  • The canal system of Holland is peculiarly complete and extends into every part of the country, giving to many inland towns almost a maritime appearance.
    0
    0
  • Recruiting is by voluntary enlistment, with contingent powers of; conscription amongst the maritime population.
    0
    0
  • Never for one moment did William lose heart or relax his efforts and vigilance; he felt that with the two maritime provinces secure the national cause need not be despaired of.
    0
    0
  • Here were situated Signia, Frusino, Fabrateria, Fregellae, Sora, Arpinum, Atina, Aquinum, Casinum and Interamna; Anxur (Terracina) was the only seaport that properly belonged to the Volscians, the coast from thence to the mouth of the Liris being included in the territory of the Aurunci, or Ausones as they were termed by Greek writers, who possessed the maritime towns of Fundi, Formiae, Caieta and Minturnae, together with Suessa in the interior, which had replaced their more ancient capital of Aurunca.
    0
    0
  • The Ashanti first came under the notice of Europeans early in the 18th century, through their successful wars with the kingdoms bordering the maritime territory.
    0
    0
  • He found in 1653 his country brought to the brink of ruin through the war with England, which had been caused by the keen commercial rivalry of the two maritime states.
    0
    0
  • This led to ill-will between the English and Dutch governments, and to a renewal of the old grievances about maritime and commercial rights, and war broke out in 1665.
    0
    0
  • After subduing the Parliamentary party in the island, he was commissioned (1644) a vice-admiral of Jersey and "the maritime parts adjacent," and by virtue of that office he carried on from there an active privateering campaign in the Royalist cause.
    0
    0
  • It is beautifully situated in a large fertile valley between parallel ranges of the Maritime Andes, about 1625 ft.
    0
    0
  • 1 Lake Valencia occupies one of the so-called Aragua valleys, enclosed between the parallel ranges of the Maritime Andes.
    0
    0
  • The ports of Hamburg and Bremen, which are the chief outlets for emigration to the United States of America, carry on a vast commercial trade with all the chief countries of the world, and are the main gates of maritime intercourse between the United Kingdom and Germany.
    0
    0
  • Personnel .T he German navy is manned by the obligatory service of the essentially maritime populationsuch as sailors, fishermen and others, as well as by volunteers, who elect for naval service in preference to that in the army.
    0
    0
  • In 286 we hear for the first time of maritime raids by the Saxons in the same quarter.
    0
    0
  • The first step was the inclusion of Hamburg and Bremen in the Zollverein; this was necessary if German maritime enterprise was to become a national and not merely a local concern, for the two Hansa cities practically controlled the whole foreign trade and owned three-quarters of the shipping; but so long as they were excluded for the Customs Union their interests were more -cosmopolitan than national.
    0
    0
  • Encouraged by the interest which the events in China had aroused, a very important project was laid before the Reichstag in November 1897, which would enable Germany to Navalpro- take a higher place among the maritime powers.
    0
    0
  • Though its existence as a maritime power was originally due to its port, it is only since 1870 that Genoa has provided the conveniences necessary for the modern development of its trade, the duke of Galliera's gift of £800,000 to the city in 1875 being devoted to this purpose.
    0
    0
  • Prussia was thus for the first time formally recognized as the protector of the German states against Austrian ambition, and had at the same time become the centre of an anti-Austrian alliance, which embraced Sweden, Poland and the maritime powers.
    0
    0
  • It has been introduced in all schools, so that nearly all education is given in Croatian, even though a knowledge of Italian is quite essential for the maritime population; and it is only in one or two towns, such as Zara, the ancient capital of the country, that Italian is able to maintain itself.
    0
    0
  • During his minority the land was torn in pieces by turbulent nobles, revolted Saracens, German captains seeking settlements, the maritime cities of Italy, and professed French deliverers.
    0
    0
  • Megara, Phocis, Boeotia and Locris (which had formed part of the Athenian land empire), and the maritime colonies round the Ambracian Gulf.
    0
    0
  • The temperature in the central part of the protectorate is much the same average as at the coast, but the range is far greater, varying from a shade minimum of 59° to a shade maximum of 107 0.1 The rainfall is much scantier on the plateaus than in the maritime regions, averaging in Northern Nigeria about 50 in.
    0
    0
  • This has been the case from time immemorial, and the provision, in 1869, of direct maritime communication between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, by the completion of the Suez Canal, ensured for the Egyptian route the supremacy in sea-borne traffic to Asia, which the discovery of the passage to India by way of the Cape of Good Hope had menaced for three and a half centuries.
    0
    0
  • It enabled him to prosecute shipbuilding with such energy that, 'by 1550, the royal fleet numbered at least thirty vessels, which were largely employed as a maritime police in the pirate-haunted Baltic and North Seas.
    0
    0
  • Favourable political circumstances also contributed to this general acknowledgment of Denmark's maritime greatness.
    0
    0
  • The power of the Hansa had gone; the Dutch were enfeebled by their contest with Spain; England's sea-power was yet in the making; Spain, still the greatest of the maritime nations, was exhausting her resources in the vain effort to conquer the Dutch.
    0
    0
  • Their maritime and commercial instincts have led them from the earliest times to found settlements on the sea-coast and the islands.
    0
    0
  • The Greeks, who occupied the maritime and southern regions, were driven to the sea-coast, the islands and the fortified towns.
    0
    0
  • In 1204 Constantinople was captured by the Latins of the Fourth Crusade, and Baldwin of Flanders was crowned emperor; the Venetians acquired several maritime towns and islands, and Frankish feudal dynasties were established in Salonica, Athens, Achaea and elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • Roger, now become one of the greatest kings in Europe, made Sicily the leading maritime power in the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • And yet the Romans, when threatened by the Carthaginian power, built in one year a fleet capable of holding its own against the, till then, greatest maritime nation in the world.
    0
    0
  • Up to 1913 the Turks exercised the right of suzerainty over the maritime districts of El Hasa and Hofuf, and claimed it in Qatar and Kuwait.
    0
    0
  • The Sunnis are estimated at Ioo,000 out of a total population in the maritime districts of 300,000.
    0
    0
  • After the Phoenicians, Babylonians, and Arabs came the Persians; though they never aspired to command of the seas and are indeed not a maritime race, the Persian Gulf was no obstacle to them, and at one time or another they occupied Muscat and parts of Oman and Bahrein, and penetrated into the greater part of Arabia.
    0
    0
  • In 1386, however, the people of Corfu made voluntary submission to the Venetian republic which had now risen to be the first maritime power in the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • The Maritime Plain, which, with a few interruptions, extends along the Mediterranean coast from Lebanon to Egypt, is a strip of land of remarkable fertility.
    0
    0
  • From the Kasimiya southwards the maritime plain is crossed by numerous river-beds, with a few exceptions winter torrents only.
    0
    0
  • Between the mountainous country of J udaea and the maritime plain is an undulating region anciently known as the Shephelah.
    0
    0
  • The adjacent part of the maritime plain is composed of a rich, light brown loamy soil.
    0
    0
  • Of exceptional interest are the letters from Jerusalem describing the hostility of the maritime coast and the disturbances of the IIabiru (" allies "), a name which, though often equated with that of the Hebrews, may have no ethnological or historical significance s But Egypt was unable to help the loyalists, even ancient Mitanni lost its political independence, and the supremacy of the Hittites was assured.
    0
    0
  • Its stability and the necessary furtherance of commerce, usual among Oriental kings, depended upon the attitude of the maritime coast (Philistia and Phoenicia), Edom, Moab, Ammon, Gilead and the Syrian states; and the biblical and external records for the next four centuries (to 586) frequently illustrate situations growing out of this interrelation.
    0
    0
  • The dynasty lasted nearly half a century, and is contemporary with the expansion of Phoenicia, and presumably therefore with some prominence of the south maritime coast.
    0
    0
  • The union held its own, chiefly along the maritime outskirts of the Empire, rather against the will of king and emperor, but nevertheless Rudolph of Habsburg and several of his successors issued new charters to Lubeck.
    0
    0
  • The " East Indies," as opposed to the " West Indies," is an old-fashioned and inaccurate phrase, dating from the dawn of maritime discovery, and still lingering in certain parliamentary papers.
    0
    0
  • Bombay possesses three peculiar classes of Mussulmans, each of which is specially devoted to maritime trade - the Memons, chiefly in Sind; the Borahs, mainly in Gujarat; and the Khojahs, of whom half live in the island of Bombay.
    0
    0
  • There are also Port Trusts in the great maritime cities of Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Karachi and Rangoon.
    0
    0
  • Their historians spoke of two classes of Indians - certain mountainous tribes who dwelt in northern Afghanistan under the Caucasus or Hindu Kush, and a maritime race living on the coast of Baluchistan.
    0
    0
  • During the 17th century the Dutch maritime power was the first in the world.
    0
    0
  • The defeat of the " Invincible Armada " in 1588, at which time the crowns of Spain and Portugal were united, gave a fresh stimulus to maritime enterprise in England; and the successful voyage of Cornelius Houtman in East 1596 showed the way round the Cape of Good Hoe lnd,a 59 Y P P Company.
    0
    0
  • Wherever the English went they were met by the hostility of the Portuguese; and on the 29th of November 1612 the Portuguese admiral with four ships attempted to capture the English vessels under Captain Best at Swally, off the mouth of the Tapti river; but the Portuguese were severely defeated, to the great astonishment of the natives, and that action formed the beginning of British maritime supremacy in Indian seas.
    0
    0
  • Originally it was a mere fishing village, but when the British government in 1826 removed the restrictions on trade imposed by the Burmese, Akyab quickly grew into an important seat of maritime commerce.
    0
    0
  • There is a thriving trade in wine, oil, wool, timber, cattle, mules, horses and sheep, but agriculture is far less prosperous than in the maritime provinces of Catalonia.
    0
    0
  • His civil reforms include the abolition of the system of prepaying taxes which had weighed heavily upon the wealthier proprietors, the elevation of the serfs into a class of free tenants, the remodelling of family and of maritime law.
    0
    0
  • Among the maritime population a small number of Chinese, Arabs and other races are also found.
    0
    0
  • The second Hague conference, of 1907, besides revising the convention made by the first conference, of 18 99, as to the laws of war on land, produced new conventions, dealing respectively with the opening of hostilities; neutral rights and duties in land warfare; the status of enemy merchant ships at the outbreak of war; the conversion of merchant ships into ships of war; submarine mines; bombardment by naval forces; the application of the Geneva principles to naval warfare; the rights of maritime capture; the establishment of an international prize court; and neutral rights and duties in maritime warfare.
    0
    0
  • Pisa, one time the mightiest, had been crushed between its inland neighbour and its maritime rival Genoa (battle of Meloria, 1282).
    0
    0
  • The extension of responsible constitutional government by Great Britain to her chief colonies, under a governor or viceregal representative of the crown, has been followed in British North America by the union of the Canadian, maritime and Pacific provinces under a federal government - with a senate, the members of which are nominated by the crown, and a house of commons elected by the different provinces according to their relative population.
    0
    0
  • It was mainly the spirit of commercial enterprise that led the Phoenicians to plant their colonies upon the islands and along the southern coast of the Mediterranean; and even beyond the Pillars of Hercules this earliest great colonizing race left enduring traces of its maritime supremacy.
    0
    0
  • But it spread in fact over the whole Roman world, beginning in maritime towns and radiating inland.
    0
    0
  • Rhodes became a great maritime republic, and much of the south and west coast belonged at one time or another to the Ptolemies of Egypt.
    0
    0
  • Altona carries on an extensive maritime trade with Great Britain, France and America, but it has by no means succeeded in depriving Hamburg of its commercial superiority - indeed, so dependent is it upon its rival that most of its business is transacted on the Hamburg exchange, while the magnificent warehouses on the Altona river bank are to a large extent occupied by the goods of Hamburg merchants.
    0
    0
  • By this time its maritime commerce had suffered disaster owing to the silting up of its port and the deflection of the Adour.
    0
    0
  • - Average, in modern law, is the term used in maritime commerce to signify damages or expenses resulting from the accidents of navigation.
    0
    0
  • In 1759, by the conquest of the fortress of Masulipatam, the dominion of the maritime provinces on both sides, from the river Gundlakamma to the Chilka lake, was necessarily transferred from the French to the British.
    0
    0
  • Agriculture, cattle-rearing, fishing and other maritime pursuits are the chief occupations of the inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • They are divided into four sections: - those of the Maritime Provinces, with their Convention, their Home and Foreign Mission Boards, an Education Board and a Publication Board, and with M `Master University (Arts, Theological and Academic departments) as its educational institution; those of Manitoba and the North-west, with Brandon College as its educational institution; and those of British Columbia, Caiiadian Baptists numbered 120,000 in 1909, and are considered in the above general estimates.
    0
    0
  • The mountains of the Keel are not so high as wholly to destroy this effect over Sweden, and the maritime influence of the Baltic system has also to be considered.
    0
    0
  • Thus he rejected advantageous offers of mediation and alliance made to him, during 1712, by the maritime powers and by Prussia; and, in 1714, he scouted the friendly overtures of Louis XIV.
    0
    0
  • A watchful neutrality, not venturing much beyond defensive alliances and commercial treaties with the maritime powers, was therefore Sweden's safest policy, and this the older Caps had always followed out.
    0
    0
  • This maritime range is traversed by several river valleys, some of which, like the Bio-Bio, are broad and have so gentle a slope as to be navigable.
    0
    0
  • Great Britain had almost a monopoly of maritime commerce in the Gulf, and was alone responsible for buoying, lighting and policing its waters.
    0
    0
  • Almost alone among the Teutonic invaders of the empire he set himself to form a powerful fleet, and was probably for thirty years the leading maritime power in the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • It was in that century that Portugal rose to prominence as a maritime power; and being anxious to enjoy at first hand some of the commerce which had brought such prosperity to Venice, Portugal determined to seek out an ocean pathway to the Indies.
    0
    0
  • It is one of the most thriving towns in the Levant, with a purely Greek population distinguished for its commercial, industrial and maritime enterprise.
    0
    0
  • But from these obscure beginnings Portugal rose in four centuries to be the greatest maritime, commercial and colonial power in Europe.
    0
    0
  • He had laid the foundation of its navy and had strengthened, if he did not inaugurate, that system of co-operation between the Crown and the military orders which afterwards proved of incalculable service in the maritime and colonial development of the nation.
    0
    0
  • He encouraged maritime trade by negotiating a commercial treaty with England (1294) and forming a royal navy (1317) under the command of a Genoese admiral named Emmanuele di Pezagna (Manoel Pessanha).
    0
    0
  • Almeida sought to subordinate all else to sea power and commerce, to concentrate the whole naval and military force of the kingdom on the maintenance of maritime ascendancy; to annex no territory, to avoid risking troops ashore, and to leave the defence of such factories as might be necessary to friendly native powers, which would receive in return the support of the Portuguese fleet.
    0
    0
  • But their artillery and superior maritime science made them almost invulnerable at sea, and their principal military achievements consisted in the capture or defence of positions accessible from the sea, e.g.
    0
    0
  • Portugal, like every great maritime trading community from Carthage to Venice, discovered that the ideal of " sea power and commerce " led directly to empire.
    0
    0
  • Other seaports and islands were conquered or colonized in rapid succession, and by 1540 Portugal had acquired a line of scattered maritime possessions extending along the coasts of Brazil, East and West Africa, Malabar, Ceylon, Persia, Indo-China and the Malay Archipelago.
    0
    0
  • In Malacca they possessed the connecting link between the traderoutes of the Far and Middle East, and thus they controlled the three sea-gates of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea - the Straits of Hormuz, Bab el-Mandeb and Malacca - and diverted the maritime trade with Europe to the Cape route.
    0
    0
  • The loss of her maritime department has left Bolivia with no other ports than those of Lake Titicaca (especially Guaqui, or Huaqui, which trades with the Peruvian port of Puno), and those of the Madeira and Paraguay rivers and their affluents.
    0
    0
  • A treaty was accordingly ratified in 1905, which was in many ways advantageous to Bolivia, though the republic was compelled to cede to Chile the maritime provinces occupied by the latter power since the war of 1881, and to do without a seaport.
    0
    0
  • Foreign residents are few, and the trade passing through the maritime customs is comparatively insignificant.
    0
    0
  • It comprises two distinct zones, a maritime zone and an inland zone.
    0
    0
  • It forms part of the Russian Maritime Province.
    0
    0
  • The invaders failed to secure any maritime ports or any territory that was conveniently commanded from the sea.
    0
    0
  • By the same article the parties agreed to observe these rules as between themselves in future, and to bring them to the knowledge of other maritime powers.
    0
    0
  • By this time they had reached the coasts of the Black Sea, and during the next twenty years they frequently ravaged the maritime regions of Asia Minor and Greece.
    0
    0
  • His equally careful experiments on various acoustic instruments also resulted in giving to his country the most serviceable system of fog-signals known to maritime powers.
    0
    0
  • Thus Pontus, with the exception of some of the maritime cities, such as Sinope, Heraclea and Amisus, became Roman territory.
    0
    0
  • The other strange feature is that from near Isola in the upper Tinee valley southwards the political frontier does not coincide with the physical frontier, or the main watershed of the Alpine chain; the reason (it is said) is that in 1860 all the higher valleys of the Maritime Alps (on both sides of the watershed) were expressly excepted from the treaty of cession, in order that Victor Emmanuel II.
    0
    0
  • Lydd and Romney, though maritime still in name, retaining some of the ancient privileges of the Cinque Ports, have become, through changes in the coast-line, small inland towns; and the same has been the fate of Rye, Winchelsea, and other places in that district.
    0
    0
  • Boston and King's Lynn are memorials of the maritime importance of the Wash in the days of small ships.
    0
    0
  • But, with the exception of those from the west, they are maritime and consequently moisture-bearing.
    0
    0
  • Rocks of Cretaceous and Tertiary ages are confined to the maritime zone.
    0
    0
  • Peculiar to the maritime zone are mangoes and the coco-nut palm.
    0
    0
  • Almeria, a maritime province of southern Spain, formed in 1833, and comprehending the eastern territories of the ancient kingdom of Granada.
    0
    0
  • In 1580, when the sovereignty of the Netherlands was offered to the Abjura- duke of Anjou, the two maritime provinces refused tion of to acquiesce, and forced William to accept the title Philip's of count of Holland and Zeeland.
    0
    0
  • Unhappily there arose a suspicion that his views on maritime law were not favourable to the pretensions of Venice, and this suspicion, notwithstanding all his efforts to dissipate it, together with clerical intrigues, led to his expulsion from the state.
    0
    0
  • Farther round the island, beyond the fort, is Mazagon Bay, commanding the harbour, and the centre of maritime activity.
    0
    0
  • It in circa cluded the Carpathian region of Bukovina, literally the beechwood, " where lay Sereth and Suciava (Suczawa), the earliest residences of the voivodes, the maritime district of Budzak (the later Bessarabia), with Kilia, Byelgorod and the left bank of the lower Danube from Galatz to the Sulina mouth.
    0
    0
  • Phanaces, the son of Mithradates, became the founder of a new line under the protection of the Romans, which continued to exist till the middle of the 4th century A.D., and extended its power over the maritime parts of Tauris.
    0
    0
  • These maritime cults of Apollo are probably due to his importance as the god of colonization, who accompanied emigrants on their voyage.
    0
    0
  • The ancient Calauria, with which Poros is identified, was given, according to the myth, by Apollo to Poseidon in exchange for Delos; and it became in historic times famous for a temple of the sea-god, which formed the centre of an amphictyony of seven maritime states' - Hermione, Epidaurus, Aegina, Athens, Prasiae, Nauplia, and Orchomenus.
    0
    0
  • The town still possesses a large maritime trade, despite the silting-up of the river mouth.
    0
    0
  • This long and varied service gave him extensive opportunities for observation, which he supplemented by constant study of naval authorities and reflection on the interpretation of the problems of maritime history.
    0
    0
  • The author's general aim in these works - some of which have been translated into French, German and Japanese - was to make the consideration of maritime matters paramount to that of military, political or economic movements, without, however, as he himself says "divorcing them from their surroundings of cause and effect in general history, but seeking to show how they modified the latter, and were modified by them."
    0
    0
  • Civilized Europe had been caught at a moment when it was completely destitute of a war-navy; the Franks had never been maritime in their tastes, the English seemed to have forgotten their ancient seafaring habits.
    0
    0
  • The name is probably derived from the Celtic pen, a mountain top: it originally belonged to the northern portion of the chain, from the Maritime Alps to Ancona; and Polybius is probably the first writer who applied it to the whole chain, making, indeed, no distinction between the Apennines and the Maritime Alps, and extending the former name as far as Marseilles.
    0
    0
  • The northernApennines are generally distinguished (though there is no real solution of continuity) from the Maritime Alps at the Bocchetta dell' Altare, some 5 m.
    0
    0
  • The Tanaro (Tanarus), though largely fed by tributaries from the Ligurian Apennines, itself rises in the Maritime Alps, while the rivers on the south and south-west of the range are short and unimportant.
    0
    0
  • The maritime commerce of the town has declined, owing partly to the neighbourhood of Cette, partly to the shallowness of the Herault.
    0
    0
  • Hence in part arose the maritime character of its inhabitants; and when they had once taken to the sea, the string of neighbouring islands, Ceos, Cythnos and others, some of which lay within sight of their coasts, and from one to another of which it was possible to sail without losing sight of land, served to tempt them on to further enterprises.
    0
    0
  • The soil is light and thin, and requires very careful agriculture not only on the rocky mountain sides but to some extent also in the maritime plains.
    0
    0
  • The township had previously been engaged in maritime pursuits, agriculture, and the manufacture of leather.
    0
    0
  • Lay, of the British consular service, was in consequence appointed inspector of the Shanghai customs. The results of Mr Lay's administration proved so successful that when arranging the terms of the treaty of 1858 the Chinese willingly assented to the application of the same system to all the treaty ports, and Mr Lay was thereupon appointed inspector-general of maritime customs. On the retirement of Mr Lay in 1862 Sir Robert Hart was appointed to the post.
    0
    0
  • In 1444-1446 there was an immense burst of maritime and exploring activity; more than 30 ships sailed with Henry's licence to Guinea; and several of their commanders achieved notable success.
    0
    0
  • To him the human race is indebted, in large measure, for the maritime exploration, within one century (1420-1522), of more than half the globe, and especially of the great waterways from Europe to Asia both by east and by west.
    0
    0
  • Halophila, Enhalus and Thalassia are submerged maritime plants found on tropical coasts, mainly in the Indian and Pacific oceans; Halophila has an elongated stem rooting at the nodes; Enhalus a short, thick rhizome, clothed with black threads resembling horse-hair, the persistent hard-bast strands of the leaves; Thalassia has a creeping rooting stem with upright branches bearing crowded strap-shaped leaves in two rows.
    0
    0
  • In April 1921, a special session of the Southern (Canton) Parliament elected him to be President of the Chinese Republic, his supporters declaring the Canton " Military Government " to be the only lawfully constituted government in the country; but the influence of these Cantonese " Constitutionalists " over the other southern provinces had then become almost insignificant, and the " Military Government," prohibited by the Foreign Powers from interfering with the revenues of the Maritime Customs, was confronted by financial problems of a kind which threatened not only its reforming activities but its continued existence.
    0
    0
  • The maritime supremacy of Athens was used for commercial purposes, and important members of the Peloponnesian confederacy, whose wealth depended largely on their commerce, notably Corinth, Megara, Sicyon and Epidaurus, were being slowly but relentlessly crushed.
    0
    0
  • In the following year the Spartan navy under Peisander, Agesilaus' brother-in-law, was defeated off Cnidus by the Persian fleet under Conon and Pharnabazus, and for the future Sparta ceased to be a maritime power.
    0
    0
  • The economic renaissance due to the great maritime discoveries had the consequence of concentrating wealth in the hands of the bourgeoisie.
    0
    0
  • His colonial and maritime policy was the newest and most fruitful part of his work.
    0
    0
  • Authorized after many difficulties to organize a private bank of deposit and account, which being well conceived prospered and revived commerce, Law proposed to lighten the treasury by the profits accruing to a great maritime and colonial company.
    0
    0
  • The disafforesting of Kesteven in 1230 brought large areas under cultivation, and the same period is marked by the growth of the maritime and fishing towns, especially Boston (which had a famous fish-market), Grimsby, Barton, Saltfleet, Wainfleet and Wrangle.
    0
    0
  • It is a station of the Chinese imperial maritime customs which collects duties on vessels trading between China and the Portuguese colony of Macao.
    0
    0
  • On the side of Portugal a tract of inhospitable country sled originally to the separation between the two kingdoms, inasmuch as it caused the reconquest of the comparatively populous maritime tracts from the Moors to be carried out independently of that of the eastern kingdoms, which were also well peopled.
    0
    0
  • The northern and north-western maritime provinces, on the other hand, have a climate as equable, and as moist, as that of the west of England or Scotland.
    0
    0
  • The fourth zone, that of the north and north-west maritime provinces, presents a marked contrast to all the others.
    0
    0
  • In the maritime parts of Malaga and Granada the vegetation is of almost tropical richness and beauty, while in Murcia, Alicante and Almeria the aspect is truly African, fertile oases appearing in the midst of rocky deserts or barren steppes.
    0
    0
  • The northern maritime province, in accordance with its climate, has a vegetation resembling that of central Europe.
    0
    0
  • Oranges and lemons, excluded from the plateau by the severity of the Winter cold, are grown in great quantities on the plains of Andalusia and all round the Mediterranean coast; the peel of the bigarade or bitter orange is exported to Holland for the manufacture of curacao; and figs, almonds, pomegranates, carobs and other southern fruits are also grown abundantly in all the warmer parts, the first two even in central Spain and the more sheltered parts of the northern maritime provinces.
    0
    0
  • Manufactures .T he maritime provinces, being those most favorably situated for the import of coal, and, where necessary, of raw material, are the chief seats of Spanish manufactures.
    0
    0
  • The navy is recruited by conscription in the coast or maritime districts, which are divided into three naval captaincies-general, those of Ferrol, Cadiz and Cartagenaat the head of each being a vice-admiral.
    0
    0
  • Instead of reducing the southern provinces of France, the Spaniards were driven from the strong fortresses that guarded the Pyrenees, and the French advanced almost to the Ebro; and at the same time the British were utilizing the war to extend their colonial power and were establishing more firmly that maritime supremacy which the Spanish government had been struggling for almost a century to overthrow.
    0
    0
  • The last remnants of its maritime power were shattered in the battles of Cape Finisterre and Trafalgar, and the English seized Buenos Aires.
    0
    0
  • In the maritime district there are occasional heavy rains between August and January.
    0
    0
  • Under the Mermnads Lydia became a maritime as well as an inland power.
    0
    0
  • Gyges (q.v.) put him to death and established the dynasty of the Mermnads, 687 B.C. Gyges initiated a new policy, that of making Lydia a maritime power; but towards the middle of his reign the kingdom was overrun by the Cimmerii.
    0
    0
  • The maritime side of this long-lived brigandage was conducted by the captains, or reises, who formed a class or even a corporation.
    0
    0
  • He admitted the difficulties of this enterprise, but thought that a force of picked French troops, aided by Persians and Afghans, might under favourable conditions penetrate into India by way of Kandahar, or through Sind, especially if the British were distracted by maritime attacks from Mauritius.
    0
    0
  • One result was to show the necessity for combined action on the part of maritime nations in regard to ocean meteorology.
    0
    0
  • To Nicholas this seemed to be a blow aimed at Russia, and he refused to be a party to it.8 Moreover, in view of the tendency of Austria to forget the conventions of Miinchengr.tz and Toplitz, and to approach the maritime powers, he determined to checkmate her by himself coming to an agreement with Great Britain, in order to settle the Eastern Question according to his own views: a double gain, if by this means Queen Victoria (a " legitimate " sovereign) could be drawn away from her unholy alliance with the Jacobin Louis Philippe.
    0
    0
  • They thus emulated, in somewhat different form, the maritime associations of their predecessors.
    0
    0
  • Once a haven for smugglers, Salcombe pays due homage to this past in it's excellent maritime museum.
    0
    0
  • Maritime transport remains accountable for over 90% of the movement of international trade.
    0
    0
  • From the beginning, the Flight proved a valuable adjunct to the civilian mountain and maritime rescue services.
    0
    0
  • Janet Young was an enthusiastic advocate of the university's acquisition of the Natural Resources Institute at Chatham Maritime.
    0
    0
  • There is also a Maritime Museum and the Two oceans aquarium.
    0
    0
  • The National Maritime Museum and a 12 lane bowling alley are always worth a visit.
    0
    0
  • A Portuguese carrack before the wind. © NMM It is hardly surprising that the Portuguese have a rich maritime heritage.
    0
    0
  • Guano expeditions drew on the expertise of the country's best cartographers and naturalists, hired by maritime speculators seeking uncharted and fertile islands.
    0
    0
  • Learn could sign still elegant enough maritime provinces ports on staniel cay.
    0
    0
  • Iceland, meanwhile, temporarily abandons its maritime pretensions and instead dedicates itself to producing highly-talented elfin chanteuse Bjork.
    0
    0
  • I asked academic colleagues in maritime law what they thought were obstacles in the way of uniformity.
    0
    0
  • The weekend will feature ship visits, maritime exhibits and displays, seafood cookery demonstrations, a French market and live outdoor music.
    0
    0
  • Further on, the maritime heathland was alive with Arctic Terns, Great and Arctic Skuas, all engaged in dramatic aerial dogfights.
    0
    0
  • A long forgotten incident of British maritime history appears to be at the heart of this intriguing enigma.
    0
    0
  • Documents covering the whole gambit of Cornish and general Maritime History.
    0
    0
  • The ship has remained a Holy Grail for maritime archeologists ever since.
    0
    0
  • The Sureties claimed a maritime lien for necessaries against Commodore's vessels based on the bond.
    0
    0
  • Swansea also boasts a new Maritime Quarter, complete with waterfront village and a 600 berth marina.
    0
    0
  • Orkney maritime museum on the cards Orkney could get its own maritime museum, with the OIC looking at three possible sites.
    0
    0
  • Not only is a gulet cruise the best way to explore such an essentially maritime civilization, sometimes itâs the only way.
    0
    0
  • The term ' marine ' included all aspects of sea based and inland maritime activities as well as ports services.
    0
    0
  • She was opened as Ohio's only floating maritime museum in 1991.
    0
    0
  • In June 1997 DERA initiated concept studies into using UAVs for transport, naval airborne early warning (AEW) and maritime patrol.
    0
    0
  • The threat of terrorism Historically major incidents of maritime piracy have been rare.
    0
    0
  • The National Maritime Museum shows you how to make a pomander on their website.
    0
    0
  • The hotel's maritime heritage is interwoven into the design with a subtle recurring motif based on a ship's porthole.
    0
    0
  • It is home to 744 and 848 Squadrons, who are responsible for maritime reconnaissance and SAR coverage along the Eastern coast of India.
    0
    0
  • Trustees of the National Maritime Museum are not remunerated.
    0
    0
  • As a naval station, Cartagena suffered severely in 1898 from the maritime disasters of the SpanishAmerican War; and its commerce was much affected when, at the beginning of the same year, Porman, or Portman, a mining village on a well-sheltered bay about 11 m.
    0
    0
  • While the Alps thus constitute the northern boundary of Italy, configuration and internal geography are determined almost entirely by the great chain of the Apennines, which branches off from the Maritime Alps between Nice and Genoa, and, after etching in an unbroken line from the Gulf of Genoa to the Adriatic, turns more to the south, and is continued throughout Central and Southern Italy, of which it forms as it were the back-bone, until it ends in the southernmost extremity of Calabria at Cape Spartivento.
    0
    0
  • The largest and most important are those which descend from the Maritime Alps between Nice and Albenga.
    0
    0
  • The output nf stone from quarries is greatly diminished (from 12,500,000 tons, worth 1/21,920,000, in 1890, to 8,000,000 tons, worth 1/2f 400,000, in 1899), a circumstance probably attributable to the slackening of building enterprise in many cities, and to the decrease in the demand for stone for railway, maritime and river embankment works.
    0
    0
  • The Nilotic influence visible in the vases, seals and other fabrics of the Early Minoan age, seems to imply a maritime activity on the part of the islanders going - back to the days of the first Egyptian dynasties.
    0
    0
  • Tradition ascribed to him the capture of the maritime town of Helos, which resisted his attempt to curtail its guaranteed rights, and the institution of the class of serfs called Helots.
    0
    0
  • Outside the domain of myth, the earliest connexion of the Greeks with that part of the world would appear to have been through the maritime colonies, such as Dioscurias, which the Milesians founded on the Black Sea coast in the 7th century B.C. For more than two thousand years the most powerful state in Caucasia was that of Georgia, the authentic history of which begins with its submission to Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. The southern portion of Transcaucasia fell during the ist century B.C. under the sway of Armenia, and with that country passed under the dominion of Rome, and so eventually of the Eastern empire.
    0
    0
  • Small settlements, in very close relation with the capital, were founded in the east of the island to command fertile districts and assist maritime commerce.
    0
    0
  • The growing importance of the lagoon townships, owing to their maritime skill, their expanding trade, created by their position between east and west, their monopoly of salt and salted fish, which gave them a strong position in the mainland markets, rendered it inevitable that a clash must come over the question of independence, when either east or west should claim that Venice belonged to them; and inside the lagoons the growing prosperity, coupled with the external threat to their liberties, concentrated the population into two well-defined parties - what may be called the aristocratic party, because it leaned towards imperial Byzantium and also displayed a tendency to make the dogeship hereditary, and the democratic party, connected with the original population of the lagoons, aspiring to free institutions, and consequently leaning more towards the church and the Frankish kingdom which protected the church.
    0
    0
  • The same series of experimental studies led him to conclusions concerning the chief causes of collisions at sea; and these conclusions, though stoutly combated in many quarters at the outset, have since been generally accepted, and were ultimately embodied in the international code of regulations adopted by the leading maritime nations on the recommendation of a conference at Washington in 1889.
    0
    0
  • East and south of the Sierra de Merida and the Maritime Andes the region is thinly populated and little known.
    0
    0
  • Prussia received the maritime palatinate minus Danzig, the palatinate of Kulm minus Thorn, Great Poland as far as .the Nitza, and the palatinates of Marienburg and Ermeland: 629 sq.
    0
    0
  • In 1899 twenty-six states met at the Hague and began the work, which was continued at the second conference in 1907, and furthered by the Maritime Conference of London of 1908-1909.
    0
    0
  • The products of the interior were conveyed by the native Iberians to the maritime colonies, such as Abdera (Adra), Calpe (Gibraltar) or Malaca (Malaga), founded by the foreign merchants.
    0
    0
  • The governor-generalship of Amur includes this government and the Maritime province, the total area being 888,830 sq.
    0
    0
  • When Peter the Great went to Holland in 1715, to instruct himself in maritime affairs, he also took lessons from Boerhaave.
    0
    0
  • The temperature in the central part of the protectorate is much the same average as at the coast, but the range is far greater, varying from a shade minimum of 59° to a shade maximum of 107 0.1 The rainfall is much scantier on the plateaus than in the maritime regions, averaging in Northern Nigeria about 50 in.
    0
    0
  • The events that followed; the occupation of the duchies by Austria and Prussia, the war of 1864, gallantly fought by the Danes against overwhelming odds, and the astute diplomacy by which Bismarck succeeded in ultimately gaining for Prussia the seaboard so essential for her maritime power, are dealt with elsewhere (see Schleswig-Holstein Question).
    0
    0
  • Ionian maritime enterprise opened a new way over Sinope.5 The downfall of the Phrygian monarchy can be dated with comparative accuracy.
    0
    0
  • Although nothing can be more simple than the fundamental principle of general average, that a loss incurred for the advantage of all the coadventurers should be made good by them all in equitable proportion to their stakes in the adventure, the application of this principle to the varied and complicated cases which occur in the course of maritime commerce has given rise to many diversities of usage at different periods and in different countries.
    0
    0
  • The difficulty, which at one time seemed nearly insuperable, of bringing together the rules in force in the several maritime countries, has been to a large extent overcome - not by legislation but by framing a set of rules covering the principal points of difference in such a manner as to satisfy, on the whole, those who are practically concerned, and to lead them to adopt these rules in their contracts of affreightment and contracts of insurance (see Insurance: Marine).
    0
    0
  • It is impossible to give more than approximately accurate statistics of the resultant depopulation of Portugal; but it seems probable that the inhabitants of the kingdom decreased from about 1,800,000 or 2,000,000 in 1500 to The Slave thus discredited; the peasants sold their farms and p emigrated or flocked to the towns; and small holdings were merged into vast estates, unscientifically cultivated by slaves and comparable with the latifundia which caused so many agrarian evils during the last two centuries of the Roman republic. The decadence of agriculture partly explains the prevalence of famine at a time when Portuguese maritime commerce was most prosperous.
    0
    0
  • Chemring Group PLC / Comet GmbH - manufacture of maritime pyrotechnic products.
    0
    0
  • That time is of the essence regarding charter hire payment is a sacrosanct principle in American maritime commercial practice.
    0
    0
  • Climate and meteorology The SEA 6 area has a mild maritime climate, but with periods of strong winds and rough seas.
    0
    0
  • Falmouth is a bustling Seaport with plenty of restaurants, shops, Art theater, Castle and the National Maritime Museum.
    0
    0
  • According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) the average shipboard fire burns for 23 hours at sea and 20 hours in port.
    0
    0
  • New India settled the claim and sought to exercise subrogated rights against the carrier, Borneo Maritime Oi.
    0
    0
  • But surely this monstrous piece of maritime engineering would be so solid and stable I 'd never know we 'd left terra firma.
    0
    0
  • Could n't they have had a few regular people unqualified to deal with maritime calamity?
    0
    0
  • The Tay ferries are featured, as of course is Dundee 's more general maritime history, including whaling.
    0
    0
  • There is a maritime center with its own marina for visiting yachtsmen.
    0
    0
  • For instance, if you want a nautical theme, seashell accents and maritime themed wall art is a must.
    0
    0
  • In many cases, passengers will need to find a suitable lawyer in the port city where the ship docks because those lawyers are more familiar with admiralty and maritime law.
    0
    0
  • Maritime Experience: The lawyer should have extensive experience with maritime law, preferably in similar cases against cruise lines.
    0
    0
  • Archaeology expeditions, which feature tours of ancient sites once inhabited by Alaska's maritime cultures.
    0
    0
  • The canal is a key conduit for international maritime travel and each year dozens of cruise lines travel to the isthmus on their journeys to the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America.
    0
    0
  • The North Coast benefits from a proximity to a maritime climate that is buffered by steep mountain ranges.
    0
    0
  • These are Chardonnay and Pinot Noir wines from the Santa Maria Valley in Santa Barbara County with its cool and hot maritime climate.
    0
    0
  • The terrain is mountainous, rugged, redwood forested, and influenced more heavily by the Pacific maritime climate.
    0
    0
  • The maritime influence refreshes the vineyards, effectively moderating the extreme heat of the southern California sun.
    0
    0
  • Fishing for king crab in Alaska is perhaps the most challenging maritime industry jobs.
    0
    0
  • Maritime industry jobs do not have to focus specifically to duties at sea.
    0
    0
  • The Maritime Museum gives you a flavor of San Francisco's early maritime relevance with a collection of ships and ferries that made the City its destination.
    0
    0
  • It comes in a tropical design and has chrome accents and maritime markings.
    0
    0
  • This maker comes in key lime with maritime markings.
    0
    0
  • Maritime Seashell Votive: Craftideas.info has instructions on how to make a votive holder using hot glue, cords, raffia and seashells.
    0
    0
  • San Diego-based Pirate Camp for Kids offers both camp activities and private birthday parties held at the Maritime Museum on the San Diego harbor.
    0
    0
  • The French navy is manned partly by voluntary enlistment, partly by the transference to the navy of a certain proportion of each years recruits for the army, but mainly by a system known as inscription maritime.
    0
    1
  • One important object of English maritime adventurers of those days was to discover a route to Cathay by the north-west, a second was to settle Virginia, and a third was to raid the Spanish settlements in the West Indies.
    23
    24
  • Generally speaking, it may be characterized as a climate of extremes on the Armenian highlands, in the Kura valley and in northern Caucasia, and as maritime and genial in Lenkoran, on the Black Sea coastlands, and in the valley of the Rion.
    0
    1
  • Though for the present the Sultan regained his hold upon Egypt, yet in reality Bonaparte set in motion forces which could not be stayed until the ascendancy of one or other of the western maritime powers in that land was definitely decided.
    0
    1
  • Of their many maritime conquests the British retained only the Spanish island of Trinidad and the Dutch settlements in Ceylon.
    0
    1
  • Disputes with Russia respecting Malta and the British maritime code kept the two states apart for nearly a year; and Austria was too timid to move.
    0
    1
  • It is, however, highly probable that he meant to strike at London if naval affairs went well, but that he was glad to have at hand an alternative which would shroud a maritime failure under military laurels.
    0
    1
  • To this demand (the real commencement of the "Continental System") the Berlin government had to accede, though at the cost of a naval war with England, and the ruin of its maritime trade.
    0
    1
  • The imperious terms in which this decree was couched and its misleading reference to the British maritime code showed that Napoleon believed in the imminent collapse of his sole remaining enemy.
    0
    1
  • Meanwhile, at other favourable spots in the Aegean, but chiefly, it appears, on sites in easy relation to maritime commerce, e.g.
    0
    1
  • But the allies interfered in Charles's favour, lest he might be tempted to aid France, and induced the emperor to satisfy all the Swedish king's demands, the maritime Powers at the same time agreeing to guarantee the provisions of the peace of Altranstadt.
    0
    1
  • Their development as a maritime people, engaged in small trading and intimately acquainted with their home waters, led Belisarius to seek their help in his task of recovering Italy from the Goths.
    0
    1
  • Their maritime importance compelled Narses, the imperial commander, to seek their aid in transporting his army from Grado; and when the Paduans appealed to the Eunuch to restore their rights over the Brenta, the Venetians replied by declaring that islands of the lagoon and the river mouths that fell into the estuary were the property of those who had rendered them habitable and serviceable.
    0
    1
  • He turned his attention to the lagoon of Venice, which had been steadily growing in commercial and maritime importance, and had, on the whole, shown a sympathy for Byzantium rather than for the Franks.
    0
    1
  • The appearance of the Ottoman Turk and the final collapse of the Latin empire in Syria brought about the next campaign between the rival maritime powers.
    0
    1
  • The lord of Milan again arranged a peace (1355) We have now reached the last phase of the struggle for maritime supremacy.
    0
    1
  • The acquisition of Cyprus marks the extreme limit of Venetian expansion in the Levant; from this date onward there is little to record save the gradual loss of her maritime possessions.
    0
    1
  • Between 1499 and 1716 she went to war four times with the Turks, emerging from each campaign with some further loss of maritime territory.
    0
    1
  • But, with Syria in the hands of the Mahommedans, the attack on Egypt must necessarily be directed by sea; and thus the Crusade henceforth becomes - what the Third Crusade, here as elsewhere the turning-point in crusading history, had already in part been - a maritime enterprise.
    0
    1
  • The principal officers of the court in subordination to the judge were the registrar (an office which always points to a connexion with canon or civil law), and the marshal, who acted as the maritime sheriff, having for his baton of office a silver oar.
    0
    1
  • At the Union, while the national functions of the lord high admiral were merged in the English office it was provided by the Act of Union that the Court of Admiralty in Scotland should be continued "for determination of all maritime cases relating to private rights in Scotland competent to the jurisdiction of the Admiralty Court."
    0
    1
  • The Malays of the coast are a maritime people, and were long famous for the daring character of their acts of piracy.
    0
    1
  • It soon becomes the boundary for a while between the departments of the HautesAlpes and of the Basses-Alpes, and receives successively the considerable Ubaye river, flowing from near the foot of Monte Viso past Barcelonnette (left), and then the small stream of the Luye (right), on which, a few miles above, is Gap. It enters the Basses-Alpes shortly before reaching Sisteron, where it is joined (right) by the wild torrent of the Busch, flowing from the desolate region of the Devoluy, and receives the Bleone (left) (on which Digne, the capital of the department, is situated) and the Asse (left), before quitting the department of the Basses-Alpes just as it is reinforced (left) by the Verdon, flowing from the lower summits of the Maritime Alps past Castellane.
    0
    1
  • At the same time the relative proximity of three natural harbours, Peiraeus, Zea and Munychia, favoured the development of maritime commerce and of the sea power which formed the basis of Athenian hegemony.
    0
    1
  • As a place of import, the Peiraeus surpasses Patras, Syra and all the other Greek maritime towns, receiving about 53% of all the merchandise brought into Greece.
    0
    1
  • Under the guidance of Pericles the Athenians renounced the unprofitable rivalry with Sparta and Persia, and devoted themselves to the consolidation and judicious extension of their maritime influence.
    0
    1
  • The maritime discoveries and surveys of that age of great discoveries were laid down upon so-called " plane-charts," that is, charts having merely equidistant parallels indicated upon them, together with the equator, the tropics and polar FIG.
    0
    1
  • The plains inland from Berbera, and the maritime margins between the coast and foot of the plateau, consist of limestones of Lower Oolitic age with Belemnites subhastatus.
    0
    1
  • At some points the rugged cliffs, furrowed by deep ravines, approach close to the sea; elsewhere the hills leave a considerable maritime plain between their base and the shore line.
    0
    1
  • It became a permanent French settlement in 1688, but did not rise to any importance till the time of Dupleix, during whose administration more than two thousand brick houses were erected in the town and a considerable maritime trade was carried on.
    0
    1
  • Since that time conditions of health in New Orleans have been revolutionized (in 1907 state control of maritime quarantine on the Mississippi was supplanted by that of the national government), and smaller cities and towns have been stimulated to take action by her example.
    0
    1
  • The death of Louis in 1392, the regency of his widow Elizabeth, and a fresh outbreak in Croatia, enabled Tvrtko to fulfil his predecessor's designs by establishing a maritime state.
    0
    1
  • Some of the most daring spirits waged war on their conquerors from Clissa in Dalmatia, and afterwards from Zengg in maritime Croatia, where they formed the notorious pirate community of the Uskoks.
    0
    1
  • The Atlas consist of many distinct ranges, but they can be roughly divided into two main chains: (I) the Maritime Atlas, i.e.
    0
    1
  • The maritime Atlas and the inner ranges in Algeria and Tunisia are then treated under the heading Eastern Ranges.
    0
    1
  • The lesser range, nearer the sea, known to the French as the Maritime Atlas, calls for little detailed notice.
    0
    1
  • In Algeria the Maritime Atlas has five chief ranges, several mountains rising over 5000 ft.
    0
    1
  • The Jurjura range, extending through Kabylia from Algiers to Bougie, contains the peaks of Lalla Kedija (7542 ft.), the culminating point of the maritime chains, and Babor (6447 ft.).
    0
    1
  • This range sends a branch northward which joins the Mejerda range of the Maritime Atlas, and another branch runs south by Gafsa to the Gulf of Gabes.
    0
    1
  • But in general the Maritime range was well known to the Romans.
    0
    1
  • In 1904 the territory of Cambodia was increased by the addition to it of the Siamese provinces of Melupre and Bassac, and the maritime district of Krat, the latter of which, together with the province of Dansai, was in 1907 exchanged for the provinces of Battambang, Siem-reap and Sisophon.
    0
    1
  • The book attained an almost unprecedented popularity both in America and in Europe, where it was translated into several languages; and it came to be considered a classic. Immediately after the appearance of this book Dana began the practice of law, which brought him a large number of maritime cases.
    1
    2
  • With the completion of the new maritime lock, ships drawing 30 ft.
    1
    1
  • Discover the great maritime experience and capture the romance of cruising at sea.
    1
    1
  • Climate and meteorology The sea 6 area has a mild maritime climate, but with periods of strong winds and rough seas.
    1
    1
  • Falmouth is a bustling seaport with plenty of restaurants, shops, Art theater, Castle and the National Maritime Museum.
    1
    1
  • Common sorrel is found in open woodland, woodland rides and edges, in maritime and river shingle, and on mountain ledges.
    1
    1
  • Through Mighty Seas Maritime History of the NW England, primarily based on the history of over 550 sailing ships.
    1
    1
  • This Association draws its members from the British shipping community including shipowners, insurers, insurance brokers and maritime lawyers.
    1
    1
  • It is unseamanlike for a yacht to hoist a spinnaker in the congested waters above the College of Maritime Studies jetty.
    1
    1