Margraves sentence example

margraves
  • Members of the family were also margraves of Brandenburg from 1323 to 1373, and kings of Sweden from 1654 to 1718.
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  • The remains of the old castle of the margraves have been converted into barracks.
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  • Under these margraves the area of the mark was further increased, but when Ekkard II.
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  • The discoveries of silver brought great wealth to the margraves, but they resorted at times to bedes, which were contributions from the nobles and ecclesiastics who met in a kind of diet.
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  • In 1125 Fiesole was sacked and destroyed, but the feudal nobles of, the contado (surrounding country), protected by the imperial margraves, were still powerful.
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  • The early margraves had permitted the Florentines to wage war against the Alberti family, whose castles they destroyed.
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  • In the 10th century Naumburg was a stronghold of the margraves of Meissen, who in 1029 transferred to it the bishopric of Zeitz.
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  • Kulmbach and Plassenburg belonged to the dukes of Meran, and then to the counts of Orlamunde, from whom they passed in the 14th century to the Hohenzollerns, burgraves of Nuremberg, and thus to the margraves of Bayreuth.
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  • It was possibly at this time that Albert was made arch-chamberlain of the Empire, an office which afterwards gave the margraves of Brandenburg the rights of an elector.
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  • Its new parish (Evangelical) church (1897) is built at the foot of the 11 th-century castle which belonged to the margraves of Baden, and was destroyed by the French during the wars of Louis XV.
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  • Their land was formed into a separate march, which for about three centuries was sometimes attached to, and sometimes independent of, the margraviate of Meissen, its rulers being occasionally called margraves of Lusatia.
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  • The district of Eger was in 870 included in the new margraviate of East Franconia, which belonged at first to the Babenbergs, but from 906 to the counts of Vohburg, who took the title of margraves of Eger.
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  • In each duchy of the kingdom he appointed a count palatine, whose duty was to maintain the royal rights; and after Margrave Gero died in 965 his territory was divided into three marches, and placed under margraves, each with the same powers as Gero.
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  • The counts of Wernigerode, who can be traced back to the early 12th century, were successively vassals of the margraves of Brandenburg (1268),(1268), and the archbishops of Magdeburg (1381).
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  • A series of the East margraves ruled this small district from 799 to 907, Mark.
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  • The interests of the Austrian margraves and dukes were not confined to the acquisition of wealth either in land or chattels.
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  • Torgau is said to have existed as the capital of a distinct principality in the time of the German king Henry I., but early in the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen and later of the electors of Saxony, who frequently resided here.
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  • The only building of much antiquarian interest, with the exception of the castles, is the parish church, which dates from the 15th century, and contains the tombs of several of the margraves.
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  • From the 14th century down to the close of the 17th, Baden was the residence of the margraves, to whom it gave its name.
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  • The Rauberturm is a relic of the old castle of the margraves of Moravia; the round castle-chapel, known as the heathen temple (Heiden-Tempel), in the Romanesque style of the 12th century, was at one time considered the most ancient building in Moravia.
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  • In Tuscany, the historic role of the cities, with the exception of Pisa, begins at a later date, largely owing to the overlordship of the powerful margraves of the house of Canossa and their successors, who here represented the emperor.
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  • They, however, reserved certain rights, and their insistence on these led to fierce and sanguinary feuds between the burghers and the margraves Albert Achilles and Frederick and Albert Alcibiades of Bayreuth.
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  • The quarrel with the margraves, however, did not interfere with the growth of the town's prosperity, which reached its acme in the 16th century.
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  • Upon it stand the town-hall and the former palace of the margraves of Bayreuth, now the main building of the university.
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  • There for nearly three centuries it was the property of the margraves of Bayreuth, being ceded with the rest of Bayreuth to Prussia in 1791.
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  • In the chapel, which was built in 1347 and restored in 1787, lie the remains of ten margraves of Meissen, members of the family of Wettin.
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  • At the beginning of the 14th century it was in the possession of the margraves of Meissen, from whom it passed in 1423 to the elector of Saxony.
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  • From 968 until the Reformation, it was the seat of a bishop, and in addition to being for a time the residence of the margraves of Meissen, it was a favourite residence of the German kings during the loth, fi lth and 12th centuries.
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  • The district thus called Reuss was at one time much more extensive than it is at present, and for some years its rulers were margraves of Meissen.
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  • The most noteworthy of these are the Evangelical town church, the burial-place of the margraves of Baden; the Christuskirche, and the Bernharduskirche.
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  • It contains a palace, once the residence of the margraves of Anspach, with fine gardens; several churches, the finest of which are those dedicated to St John, containing the vault of the former margraves, and St Gumbert; a gymnasium; a picture gallery; a municipal museum and a special technical school.
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  • Under the fostering care of the margraves of Meissen, and then of the electors of Saxony they attained great popularity.
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  • The castle, built in the 14th century, was the chief residence of the margraves of Brandenburg.
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  • Among the ecclesiastical buildings, the Stadt-Pfarrkirche, dating from 1439, and containing the monuments of the margraves of Bayreuth, is the most important.
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  • After Otto the Great died, the Sla y s regained much of their territory, Brandenburg fell again into their hands, and a succession of feeble margraves ruled only the district west of the Elbe, together with a small district east of that river.
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  • When Otto died in 1267, the area of the mark had been almost doubled, and the margraves had attained to an influential position in the Empire.
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  • In order to pay for these wars, and to meet the expenses of a splendid court, the later margraves had sold various rights to the towns and provinces of Brandenburg, and so aided the development of local government.
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  • Under the rule of the earliest margraves, it was the official side of their position that was prominent, and it was not forgotten that they were technically only the representatives of the emperor.
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  • The emperor was still suzerain indeed, but his relations with the mark were so insignificant that they exercised practically no influence on its development; and so the power of the Ascanian margraves was virtually unlimited.
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  • The towns, the village communities and the knights held their lands and derived their rights directly from the margraves.
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  • The dues paid by these contractors in return for the concessions formed the main source of the revenue of the margraves.
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  • Others were able to maintain their independence, and to make use of the pecuniary needs of the margraves to become practically municipal republics.
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  • In the pecuniary embarrassments of the margraves also originated the power of the Stdnde, or estates, consisting of the nobles, the clergy and the towns.
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  • In 1355 the Stdnde secured the appointment of a permanent councillor, without whose concurrence the decrees of the margraves were invalid.
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