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marble

marble

marble Sentence Examples

  • The room was chilly, the marble flooring freezing.

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  • The spell was broken like a dropped mirror on a marble floor.

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  • It was colder than her marble floor!

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  • She ran her fingers along the smooth marble mantle.

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  • The trees stood motionless and white like figures in a marble frieze.

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  • A huge marble fireplace dominated the large family room, its image reflected on the shiny expanse of hardwood floor.

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  • The commo room where he sat was large with marble walls and leather chairs, a sign of the upper class's decadence.

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  • The interior was marble and polished wood, dating back to a time when first generation craftsmen took pride in their workmanship.

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  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.

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  • Her blood was a slash of stark red against a white marble floor.

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  • Their gazes followed the drops of blood as they fell from her arm to the marble flooring.

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  • by Rysbrack, sculptured out of a single block of marble taken from the French by Admiral Sir George Rooke.

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  • by Rysbrack, sculptured out of a single block of marble taken from the French by Admiral Sir George Rooke.

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  • "This way," the fed said, starting down a corridor lined with gilded mirrors and marble statues.

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  • The current stopped, and she convulsed on the cold marble floor.

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  • But here was a fairy forest with black moving shadows, and a glitter of diamonds and a flight of marble steps and the silver roofs of fairy buildings and the shrill yells of some animals.

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  • They emerged through a back door into a massive foyer made of white marble and limestone with ancient carvings on the walls and statues positioned throughout.

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  • He was leaning over the railing overlooking the massive marble foyer.

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  • To the south-west of the Forum are the remains of three small temples, one dedicated to Venus, and a well-preserved Mithraeum, with mosaics representing the seven planets, &c. To the south-west again is the conspicuous brick cella of a lofty temple, on arched substructures, generally supposed to be that of Vulcan, with a threshold block of africano (Euboean) marble over 15 ft.

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  • A single marble obelisk marked the bloodline and legacy of a once powerful clan.

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  • He thought he glimpsed a marble wall and hesitated, peppered by memories and magic.

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  • Marble terraces and balustrades surround the tank, and a marble causeway leads across the water to the temple, whose gilded walls, roof, dome and cupolas, with vivid touches of red curtains, are reflected in the still water.

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  • Vermont marble is the best and most plentiful in the United States.

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  • The Renaissance artists and thinkers had very few tools: pen and paper, paint and canvas, marble and chisel, and a few more.

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  • By taking a block of marble and carving a statue, or taking a handful of seed and growing a cornfield, you have combined your labor and know-how with something of little value and have created something of more value.

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  • He leaned back, and a recessed, marble ceiling came into view.

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  • She forced herself to continue to the apartment's entrance and flung open the door, revealing a hall with auxiliary lighting reflecting off a white marble floor.

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  • Marble is found in many parts of New South Wales and South Australia.

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  • He leaned back, and a recessed, marble ceiling came into view.

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  • Darian guided the horse through marble streets marked by statues of his forefathers and beyond the city into the wood running along a stream that ran through the immortal countryside.

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  • At least somebody else would get the distasteful task of telling a wailing Mrs. Wassermann one of her bouncing baby boys was stretched out on a marble slab in Norfolk, Virginia.

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  • All he had to do was sell one of the original pieces of artwork displayed casually in the marble foyer and he'd be fine for years.

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  • The severe west front is relieved by three rows of semicircular arches, and has a central porch (there were at one time three) supported by huge red marble lions, sculptured no doubt with the rest of the façade by Giovanni Bono da Bissone in 1281.

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  • The principal supply is in West Rutland, Proctor and Pittsford; this, the "Rutland marble," is a duller, less lustrous white, and of a greater durability than the Carrara marble, and is used largely for monuments and statuary.

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  • On Isle La Motte, Grand Isle county, there are marble quarries, the characteristic colours of the marble being "Fisk black" and "Fisk grey."

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  • The output of marble in 1908 was valued at $4,679,960 (out of a total of $7,733,920 for the entire production of marble in the United States).

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  • The limestone and marble foyer was lined with artifacts, a sign of Tamer's passion for all things ancient.

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  • Heart beating fast, she descended the stairs in the marble foyer, listening.

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  • Opposite the living room was a massive bathroom with marble floors, a Jacuzzi, small sauna, and a large shower with multiple shower heads.

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  • He stepped through to a massive atrium with a marble floor, pillars, and water fountain surrounded by small gardens.

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  • The State Capitol, built of native granite and marble (1887-1895, cost $2,500,000), is an imposing building.

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  • He stepped through to a massive atrium with a marble floor, pillars, and water fountain surrounded by small gardens.

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  • Genius is not a retainer to any emperor, nor is its material silver, or gold, or marble, except to a trifling extent.

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  • "I'll kill you!" he shouted, and seizing the marble top of a table with a strength he had never before felt, he made a step toward her brandishing the slab.

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  • Katie sought an entrance into the palatial estate, not seeing one along this side.  She ran alongside the marble structure.  It was well over quarter mile in length.  Toby pulled away from her suddenly, and she stopped so fast, she tripped.

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  • There are also in that neighbourhood famous marble quarries.

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  • The environs of Creil (Oise) and Chteau-Landon (Seine-et-Marne) are noted for their freestone (pierre de taille), which is also abundant at Euville and Lrouville in Meuse; the production of plaster is particularly important in the environs of Paris, of kaolin of fine quality at Yrieix (1-Jaute-Vienne), of hydraulic lime in Ardche (Le Teil), of lime phosphates in the department of Somme, of marble in the departments of HauteGaronne (St Beat), Hautes-Pyrnes (Campan, Sarrancolin), Isre and Pas-de-Calais, and of cement in Pas-de-Calais (vicinity of Boulogne) and Isre (Grenoble).

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  • Their restoration was somewhat drastic, the ancient parts being cut away to allow of additions in marble, and the new parts treated in imitation of the ancient weathering.

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  • We find in nature two other unlike substances, marble and Iceland spar, each of which is wholly composed of carbon dioxide and lime.

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  • We find in nature two other unlike substances, marble and Iceland spar, each of which is wholly composed of carbon dioxide and lime.

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  • His eyes found her as he descended the marble stairs.

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  • It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;--not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.

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  • The marble ciborium, a small reproduction of the splendid one in S.

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  • On the other hand, inscriptions prove that the marble blocks intended for the pedimental statues of the Parthenon were not brought to Athens until 434 B.C., which was probably after the death of Pheidias.

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  • It has been quarried since 1785; marble monuments were first manufactured about 1808; and at South Dorset in 1818 marble seems first to have been sawed in blocks, the earlier method having been chiselling.

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  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"

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  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.

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  • Every man is the builder of a temple, called his body, to the god he worships, after a style purely his own, nor can he get off by hammering marble instead.

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  • Rhyn took in the small marble statues and portraits of wealthy Venetians on the walls.

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  • Ensconced lights glowed in the midday, and antique furniture, rare paintings, elegant marble sculptures befitting a museum, silk Persian rugs underfoot, and many other priceless displays of prestige lined the wide hall.

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  • Ensconced lights glowed in the midday, and antique furniture, rare paintings, elegant marble sculptures befitting a museum, silk Persian rugs underfoot, and many other priceless displays of prestige lined the wide hall.

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  • The marble he saw came into view as he crested the hill in the center of the orchard.

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  • Cesareo; this is a marble altar richly decorated with mosaic in sculptured panels, and (below) two angels drawing back a curtain (all in marble) so as to expose the open grating of the confessio.

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  • Granite is the most widely spread of the crystalline rocks; but dikes of various kinds occur, and gneiss, schist and marble are also met with.

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  • The principal mineral resource of Vermont is its building and monumental stone, including marble and granite and a small amount of limestone.

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  • The first marble quarry was opened in Dorset in 1785 and a second at Middlebury in 1805; and the first granite was quarried in 1812.

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  • Virgil is serene and lovely like a marble Apollo in the moonlight; Homer is a beautiful, animated youth in the full sunlight with the wind in his hair.

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  • Be this as it may, I know that I can feel the heart-throbs of the ancient Greeks in their marble gods and goddesses.

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  • Fina from his plans in 1468, and carved the fine marble altar, the original painting and gilding of which are still preserved.

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  • The most important export is fish, other items being seaweed, marble, preserved foods, butter and margarine and infusorial earth.

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  • She trotted away from him up the beach towards the marble obelisk that rose out of the orchard.

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  • Zinc and marble are worked in the neighbourhood.

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  • She opened her hand to reveal its contents, a marble.

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  • Its edges were gilded with gold marking a lazy geometric design across the marble.

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  • There was no human color in the woman's pale cheeks, and her expression was emotionless, as if carved from marble.

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  • Katie rolled onto her stomach, almost too tired to get up.  The sky and jungle were growing dark.  Through the bramble, she saw the marble palace.  Death's palace.  Katie's heart beat harder as she looked at her destination, not at all certain this was where she should've gone but not knowing where else to go.

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  • The White God, Darian, strode through his marble halls, the soft footfalls of his leather boots the only sound in the imperial corridor.

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  • Jenn climbed a tree close to the wall then leapt onto the top of the thick, marble wall.

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  • Jenn trotted forward, towards the huge block of marble.

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  • She touched her name, leaving bloodied streaks on the white marble.

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  • The whole structure is composed of red and grey Verona marble.

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  • No ancient writer ascribes them to him, and he seldom, if ever, executed works in marble.

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  • quarry from which other red marbles are taken; and at Roxbury, Washington county, a fine serpentine, called "green marble," or verde antique, is quarried.

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  • Barre is the centre of the granite business, and the region about Rutland, especially Proctor, is the principal seat of the marble industry.

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  • There still remain a minaret and some marble arches and columns.

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  • The principal facade, in the rue de la Marine, consists of a row of white marble columns supporting an arcade.

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  • The principal entrance, reached by a flight of 23 steps, is ornamented with a portico supported by four black-veined marble columns.

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  • It rests on a series of arcades supported by white marble columns.

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  • The "Marble Arch" cave near Florencecourt, with its emerging river, is a characteristic example of the subterranean waterways in the limestone.

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  • The interior is in the form of a basilica, the double aisles being borne by ancient columns, and contains ambones and a candelabrum of 1311, the former resting on columns supported by lions, and decorated with reliefs and coloured marble mosaic. The castle at the highest point of the town was erected in the 14th century.

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  • De Granier died in September 1602, and the new bishop entered on the administration of his vast diocese, which, as a contemporary says, "he found brick and left marble."

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  • San Pietro de' Cassinensi (outside the Porta Romana) is a basilica with nave and aisles, founded in the beginning of the i 1th century by San Pietro Vincioli on the site of a building of the 6th century, and remarkable for its conspicuous spire, its ancient granite and marble columns, its walnut stall-work of 1535 by Stefano de' Zambelli da Bergamo, and its numerous pictures (by Perugino, &c.).

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  • A more dignified type is the Vatican statue of Silenus carrying the infant Dionysus, and the marble group from the villa Borghese in the Louvre.

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  • His temptation was removed by the Host beginning to bleed, the blood soaking through the corporal into the marble of the altar.

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  • Good building materials are obtained from many of the rocks of the country, among which the Raialo limestone (a fine-grained crystalline marble) and the Jaisalmer limestone stand pre-eminent.

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  • Others, such as Paros, are mainly composed of marble, and iron ore occurs in some.

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  • Of these the most remarkable is the group between the valleys of the Serchio and the Magra, commonly known as the mountains of Carrara, from the celebrated marble quarries in the vicinity of that city.

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  • Other first-class timbers are koko (Albizzia lebbek), white chuglam (Terminalia bialata), black chuglam (Myristica irya), marble or zebra wood (Diospyros kurzii) and satin-wood (Murraya exotica), which differs from the satinwood of Ceylon (Chloroxylon swietenia).

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  • The memorial is crowned by the figure of an angel in white marble, and on the wall of the well itself is the following inscription: Sacred to the perpetual Memory of a great company of Christian people, chiefly Women and Children, who near this spot were cruelly murdered by the followers of the rebel Nana Dhundu Pant, of Bithur, and cast, the dying with the dead, into the well below, on the xvth day of July, Mdccclvii.

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  • Besides the university library, there is the Ohio state library occupying a room in the capitol and containing in 1908 126,000 volumes, including a "travelling library" of about 36,000 volumes, from which various organizations in different parts of the state may borrow books; the law library of the supreme court of Ohio, containing complete sets of English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, United States and state reports, statutes and digests; the public school library of about 68,000 volumes, and the public library (of about 55,000), which is housed in a marble and granite building completed in 1906.

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  • It is surrounded on the first story by a sixteensided gallery (the Hochmiinster) adorned by antique marble and granite columns, of various sizes, brought by Charlemagne's orders from Rome, Ravenna and Trier.

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  • in 1000, disclosed the body of the emperor, vested in white coronation robes and seated on a marble chair.

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  • The Post Office, at the corner of Exchange and Middle streets, is of white Vermont marble and has a Corinthian portico.

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  • The Public Library building is Romanesque and elaborately ornamented; the building was presented to the city by James P. Baxter; in the library is the statue, by Benjamin Paul Akers (1825-1861), of the dead pearl-diver, well known from Hawthorne's description in The Marble Faun.

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  • In the centre of the eastern side of the quadrangle two gigantic doors were thrown open to admit the people into the adytum or inner mosque (shrine) where is the marble tomb of Imam Reza, surrounded by a silver railing with knobs of gold.

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  • Among its manufactures are earthenware, tobacco, vinegar, flour, farm-gates (iron), sash and doors, marble and granite monuments, carriages and bricks.

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  • The chief manufactures are paper and wire, and from the quarries near the village of Lee is obtained an excellent quality of marble; these quarries furnished the marble for the extension of the Capitol at Washington, for St Patrick's cathedral in New York City and for the Lee High School and the Lee Public Library (1908).

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  • Sulphur is occasionally found crystallized in Carrara marble; and the mineral occurs also in Calabria.

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  • The architect was Mnesicles; the material Pentelic marble, with Eleusinian blackstone for dados and other details.

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  • The churches in Rome possess many fine examples of ambones in marble, of which the oldest is probably that in S.

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  • Those of slightly later date are enriched with marble mosaic known as Cosmati work, of which the examples in S.

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  • In the epistle ambo at Salerno and the gospel ambones at Cava and San Giovanni del Toro in Ravello, the columns support segmental arches carrying the ambones; the epistle ambo at Ravello and all those in Rome are raised on solid marble bases.

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  • The Finland rappa-kivi, the Serdobol gneiss, and the Pargas and Rustiala marble (with the so-called Eozoon canadense) yield good building stone; while iron, copper and zinc-ore are common in Finland and in the Urals.

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  • Of its many works of art may be mentioned the magnificent marble tomb of the founder and his wife, the empress Cunigunde, carved by Tilman Riemenschneider between 1499 and 1513, and an equestrian statue of the emperor Conrad III.

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  • This park is tastefully laid out, and is traversed by a lake, which is mainly noticeable from the remarkably handsome marble bridge which crosses it from east to west.

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  • The altar at which these solemn rites are performed consists of a triple circular marble terrace, 210 ft.

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  • The building contained one hundred marble pillars, and was also adorned with sculptures and mosaics sent from Ravenna by Pope Adrian I.

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  • Prospero, close by, has a facade of 1504, in which are incorporated six marble lions belonging to the original Romanesque edifice.

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  • The present cathedral contains several early Christian marble sarcophagi, a silver cross of the 6th century (that of Agnellus), and the so-called throne of the Archbishop Maximian (54655 2), adorned with reliefs in ivory, which, however, was really brought to Ravenna in iooi by John the Deacon, who recorded the fact in his Venetian chronicle, as a present from the Doge Pietro Orseolo to the Emperor Otho III.

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  • It is circular internally and decagonal externally, in two storeys, built of marble blocks, and surmounted by an enormous monolith, brought from the quarries of Istria and weighing more than 300 tons.

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  • The interior has twenty-four columns of marble (from Constantinople according to some, from Rome according to others), with almost uniform capitals.

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  • The marble screens of the altar are wonderfully finely carved.

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  • The marble mosaic pavement (11th century) is very effective.

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  • Remains of the original marble wall lining and stucco decoration also exist.

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  • It has twenty-four columns of Carystian (cipollino) marble, with capitals probably of Byzantine work with swelling acanthus leaves; but the rest of the church is due to native architects.

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  • The walls of the interior were stripped of their marble panelling by Sigismondo Malatesta in 1449, for the adornment of his church at Rimini.

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  • Charles the Great carried off the brazen statue of Theodoric and the marble columns of his palace to his own palace at Aix-la-Chapelle.

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  • The marble urn containing the body of the poet still rests at Ravenna, where what Byron calls "a little cupola more neat than solemn" has been erected over it.

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  • The houses, with very few exceptions, are built of wood, but the streets are paved with blocks of granite and marble.

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  • Here also are a tablet marking the location of the old fort (1621), which was also used as a place of worship, a tablet showing the site of the watch-tower built in 1643, and a marble obelisk erected in 1825 in memory of Governor William Bradford.

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  • On the faces of the buttresses below the statues are marble alto-reliefs illustrating scenes from the early history of the Pilgrims. On high panels between the buttresses are the names of the passengers of the "Mayflower."

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  • The exterior is covered with black and white marble; the interior is of grey limestone with bands of a dark basaltic stone.

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  • The most magnificent part of the exterior and indeed the finest polychrome monument in existence is the west façade, built of richlysculptured marble from the designs of Lorenzo Maitani of Siena, and divided into three gables with intervening pinnacles, closely resembling the front of Siena cathedral, of which it is a reproduction, with some improvements.

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  • The central object of cult in this shrine was apparently a marble cross.

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  • The recent excavations by the British School on the site of the Dictaean temple at Palaikastro bear out this conclusion, and an archaic marble head of Apollo found at Eleutherna shows that classical tradition was not at fault in recording the existence of a very early school of Greek sculpture in the island, illustrated by the names of Dipoenos and Scyllis.

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  • It retains a curiously carved screen, and the black marble tomb of Queen Elizabeth's physician, Marwood, who attained the age of 105.

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  • In front of Greyfriars church stands a marble statue of Burns, unveiled in 1882, and there is also a monument to Charles, third duke of Queensberry.

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  • The cathedral, of the 12th century, has a carved portal and three apses decorated with small arches and pilasters, and contains a fine pulpit and episcopal throne in marble mosaic. Near it are two grottos 1 To the period after 335 belong numerous silver and bronze coins with the legend Caleno.

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  • In its rotunda is Jean Antoine Houdon's full-length marble statue of Washington, provided for by the Virginia General Assembly in 1784, and erected in 1796; its base bears a fine inscription written by James Madison.

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  • In Capitol Square are also a marble statue of Henry Clay, by Joel T.

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  • Vases of all kinds, carved in marble or other stones, cast or beaten in metals or fashioned in clay, the latter in enormous number and variety, richly ornamented with coloured schemes, and sometimes bearing moulded decoration.

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  • It consists of a group of old-fashioned timber and plaster buildings, a tall belfry, and a diminutive church of white marble, founded in 1190 by King Stephen Nemanya, who himself turned monk and was canonized as St Simeon.

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  • The style is early Decorated, and a rich ornamentation is carried out in Italian marble, serpentine and alabaster.

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  • The exterior facade is enriched with marble columns brought from Alexandria and other cities of the East, and bearing in many cases incised graffiti.

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  • The pavement consists partly of opus Alexandrinum of red and green porphyry mixed with marbles, partly of tesselated work of glass and marble tesserae.

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  • above the nave and is separated from it by a marble rood-screen, on the architrave of which stand fourteen figures, the signed work of Jacobello and Pietro Paolo delle Masegne, 1394.

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  • The whole surface of the ponderous upper storey is covered with a diaper pattern in slabs of creamy white Istrian stone and red Verona marble, giving a delicate rosy-orange hue to the building.

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  • The facade has the characteristic circular pediment with a large west window surrounded by three smaller windows separated by two ornamental roundels in coloured marble and of geometric design.

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  • Two of the bays contain round-headed windows; the other three are filled in with white marble adorned by crosses and roundels in coloured marble.

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  • The grey column is surmounted by a fine bronze lion of Byzantine style, cast in Venice for Doge Ziani about 1178 (this was carried off to Paris by Napoleon in 1797, and sent back in pieces in 1816; but in 1893 it was put together again); and in 1329 a marble statue of St Theodore, standing upon a crocodile, was placed on the other column.

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  • The whole design was modified in 1688 so as to represent a triumphal arch in honour of Morosini Peloponnesiaco, who brought from Athens to Venice the four lions in Pentelic marble which now stand before the gate.

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  • The interior, a basilica with nave and two aisles, contains columns said to come from a temple of Minerva and a fine mosaic pavement of 1166, with interesting representations of the months, Old Testament subjects, &c. It has a crypt supported by forty-two marble columns.

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  • Olmsted, still other groups have formed - among others those of the marble buildings of the Harvard medical school; Fenway Court, a building in the style, internally, of a Venetian palace, that houses the art treasures of Mrs. J.

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  • A branch railway runs from Ceva through Garessio, with its marble quarries, to Ormea (2398 ft.), 22 m.

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  • Near Tortosa are rich quarries of marble and alabaster..

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  • Remains of the bridge of the Via Aemilia over the Rhenus have also been found - consisting of parts of the parapets on each side, in brick-faced concrete which belong to a restoration, the original construction (probably by Augustus in 2 B.C.) having been in blocks of Veronese red marble - and also of a massive protecting wall slightly above it, of late date, in the construction of which a large number of Roman tombstones were used.

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  • The cathedral has a Romanesque Gothic portal of 1332 by a Roman marble worker named Deodatus, and the interior is decorated in the Baroque style, but still retains the pointed vaulting of 1154, introduced into Italy by French Benedictines; it contains a splendid silver antependium by the 15th-century goldsmith Nicolo di Guardiagrele (1433-48).

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  • Topography And Antiquities The Attic plain, -ro ircSlov, slopes gently towards the coast of the Saronic Gulf on the south-west; on the east it is overlooked by Mount Hymettus (3369 ft.); on the north-east by Pentelicus or Brilessus (3635 ft.) from which, in ancient and modern times, an immense quantity of the finest marble has been quarried; on the north-west by Parnes (4636 ft.), a continuation of the Boeotian Cithaeron, and on the west by Aegaleus (1532 ft.), which descends abruptly to the bay of Salamis.

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  • For the architectural embellishment of the city the finest building material was procurable without difficulty and in abundance; Pentelicus forms a mass of white, transparent, blue-veined marble; another variety, somewhat similar in appearance, but generally of a bluer hue, was obtained from Hymettus.

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  • For sculpture and various architectural purposes white, fine-grained marble was brought from Paros and Naxos.

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  • The fine marble lion of the classical period which stood at the mouth of the Cantharus harbour gave the Peiraeus its medieval and modern names of Porto Leone and Porto Draco; it was carried away to Venice by Morosini.

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  • The temple, which is entirely of Pentelic marble, the Acro- is amphiprostyle tetrastyle, with fluted Ionic columns, polls.

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  • The temple is entirely of Pentelic marble, except the foundations and lowest step of the stylobate, which are of Peiraic stone, and the zophoros of the cella, which is in Parian marble.

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  • The monument consists of a small circular temple of Pentelic marble, 212 ft.

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  • With the exception of the foundations and two lower steps of the stylobate, it was entirely of Pentelic marble, and possessed 104 Corinthian columns, 56 ft.

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  • 5.17), and therefore cannot be of later date than 35 B.C. It is an octagonal marble structure, 42 ft.

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  • At the eastern end of the Acropolis a little circular temple of white marble with a peristyle of 9 Ionic columns was dedicated to Rome and Augustus; its foundations were discovered during the excavations of 1885-1888.

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  • The orchestra is paved with marble squares.

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  • Close by is the university, with a colonnade adorned with paintings, and the Vallianean library with a handsome Doric portico of Pentelic marble.

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  • It also possesses the famous collection of prehistoric antiquities found by Schliemann at Tiryns and Mycenae, other " Mycenaean " objects discovered at Nauplia and in Attica, as well as the still earlier remains excavated by Tsountas in the Cyclades and by the British School at Phylakopi in Melos; terra-cottas from Tanagra and Asia immense building, however, which was restored in 1896 and the following years, was that constructed in Pentelic marble about A.D.

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  • The principal exports are wine, cognac and marble from Pentelicus.

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  • The famous Rutland marble is quarried in W.

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  • Thus, Varro (De rustici) mentions a map of Italy engraved on marble, in the temple of Tellus, Pliny, a map of the seat of war in Armenia, of the time of the emperor Nero, and the more famous map of the Roman Empire which was ordered to be prepared for Julius Caesar (44 B.C.), but only completed in the reign of Augustus, who placed a copy of it, engraved in marble, in the Porticus of his sister Octavia (7 B.C.).

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  • The famous marble quarries of Paros have been practically abandoned in modern times; the marble of Tenos is now worked by a British syndicate.

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  • 10), protected ° - - from irreverence by lattice work (tra p - ` j '.?- ' `- sennae) of marble.

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  • by 13 ft., once lined with marble and the ceiling covered with mosaic, a few fragments of which still remain.

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  • The leading industries are linenweaving, tanning, brewing, horse-dealing and the quarrying of marble and gypsum.

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  • Bosnia is rich in minerals, including coal, iron, copper, chrome, manganese, cinnabar, zinc and mercury, besides marble and much excellent building stone.

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  • Directly under the altar is situated the pantheon or royal mausoleum, a richly decorated octagonal chamber with upwards of twenty niches, occupied by black marble urnas or sarcophagi, kept sacred for the dust of kings or mothers of kings.

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  • A marble statue of Commodore Oliver H.

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  • Besides huge masses of old schists and sandstones, the range contains extensive limestone, marble, diorite, basalt and porphyry formations, while granite prevails on its southern slopes.

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  • Marble is quarried; and at El Torcal, 6 m.

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  • south, there is a very curious labyrinth of red marble rocks.

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  • The most important monument is the Augusteum, a temple of white marble erected to "Rome and Augustus" during the lifetime of that emperor by the common council or diet of the three Galatian tribes.

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  • At Bethersden, between Ashford and Tenterden, marble quarries were formerly worked extensively, supplying material to the cathedrals of Canterbury and Rochester, and to many local churches.

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  • In art, the most famous representation was a marble group of Niobe and her children, taken by Sosius to Rome and set up in the temple of Apollo Sosianus (Pliny, Nat.

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  • The principal imports are coal, timber and slates, and the principal export stone of the Transition limestone or Devonshire marble.

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  • Marble of very fine quality and grain is extensively quarried and exported for architectural ornamentation and for furniture-making.

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  • 1337), has been repaired, and serves as the parish church, a blue marble slab in the floor marking the bishop's grave.

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  • It was originally intended to form a shrine for Flaxman's marble statue of the poet (now in the National Portrait Gallery), but it proved to be too confined to afford a satisfactory view of the sculptor's work and was at length converted into a museum of Burnsiana (afterwards removed to the municipal buildings).

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  • The range of Taygetus is well watered and was in ancient times covered with forests which afforded excellent hunting to the Spartans, while it had also large iron mines and quarries of an inferior bluish marble, as well as of the famous rosso antico of Taenarum.

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  • Galgano (infra), built in black and white marble, was begun in the early years of the 13th century, but interrupted by the plague of 1248 and wars at home and abroad, and in 1317 its walls were extended to the baptistery of San Giovanni; a further enlargement was begun in 1339 but never carried out, and a few ruined walls and arches alone remain to show the magnificence of the uncompleted design, which would have produced one of the largest churches in the-world.

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  • The church of San Giovanni, the ancient baptistery, beneath the cathedral is approached by an outer flight of marble steps built in 1451.

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  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).

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  • On the lower Umzimkulu, near Port Shepstone, marble is found in great quantities.

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  • Its chief mineral products are coal, nitre, sulphur, alum, soda, saltpetre, gypsum, porcelain-earth, pipe-clay, asphalt, petroleum, marble and ores of gold, silver, mercury, copper, iron, lead, zinc, antimony, cobalt and arsenic. The principal mining regions are Zsepes-Giimor in Upper Hungary, the Kremnitz-Schemnitz district, the Nagybanya district, the Transylvanian deposits and the Banat.

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  • Other precious stones found are chalcedony, garnet, jacinth, amethyst, carnelian, agate, rock-crystals, &c. Amber is found at Magura in Zsepes, while fine marble quarries are found in the counties of Esztergom, Komarom, Veszprem and Szepes.

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  • of marble for the markets; there are also locomotive works, planing mills, a canning factory, a knitting mill, &c. At Marietta there is a national cemetery, in which more than io,000 Federal soldiers are buried, and at Kenesaw Mountain (1809 ft.), about 22 m.

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  • The name Tyburn (q.v.) was notorious chiefly as applied to the gallows which stood near the existing junction of Edgware Road and Oxford Street (Marble Arch).

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  • Adjoining it on the west was the central chamber, on a lower level; this chamber was separated by a partition, originally of wood and later of marble, from the western compartment of the temple, which was of peculiar construction.

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  • The construction of the building at this southwestern corner shows that there was some sacred object that had to be bridged over by a huge block of marble; this we know from inscriptions to have been the Cecropeum or tomb of Cecrops.

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  • The frieze consisted of white marble figures in relief, affixed to a background of black Eleusinian stone.

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  • of its course winds among the Mandla hills, which form the head of the Satpura range; then at Jubbulpore, passing through the "Marble Rocks," it enters its proper valley between the Vindhyan and Satpura ranges, and pursues a direct westerly course to the Gulf of Cambay.

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  • His remains, with those of Frederick of Baden, still rest in the church of the monastery of Santa Maria del Carmine at Naples, founded by his mother for the good of his soul; and here in 1847 a marble statue, by Thorwaldsen, was erected to his memory by Maximilian, crown prince of Bavaria.

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  • He accordingly returned in 1871 to England from Italy, where he was studying, and modelled the figures of Shakespeare, Fame and Clio, which were rendered in marble and in bronze.

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  • In the following year he exhibited at the Royal Academy " Professor Sharpley," in marble, for the memorial in University College; and " Mrs Mordant," a relief - a form of art to which he has since devoted much attention.

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  • Then followed the dramatic " Lot's Wife," in marble (1878), and" Artemis " (1880), which for grace, elegance and purity of taste the sculptor never surpassed.

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  • List of authentic works of Jean Goujon: Two marble columns supporting the organ of the church of St Maclou (Rouen) on right and left of porch on entering; left-hand gate of the church of St Maclou; bas-reliefs for decoration of screen of St Germain l'Auxerrois (now in Louvre); "Victory" over chimney-piece of Salle des Gardes at Ecouen; altar at Chantilly; illustrations for Jean Martin's translation of Vitruvius; bas-reliefs and sculptural decoration of Fontaine des Innocents; bas-reliefs adorning entrance of Hotel Carnavalet, also series of satyrs' heads on keystones of arcade of courtyard; fountain of Diana from Anet (now in Louvre); internal decoration of chapel at Anet; portico of Anet (now in courtyard of Ecole des Beaux Arts); bust of Diane de Poictiers (now at Versailles); Tribune of Caryatides in the Louvre; decoration of "Escalier Henri II.," Louvre; eeils de beeuf and decoration of Henri II.

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  • in diameter, and having about sixty rows of seats; the eleven lower tiers were originally covered with marble.

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  • There is no modern survival of the name of Tyburn, which finds, indeed, its chief historical interest as attaching to the famous place of execution which lay near the modern Marble Arch.

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  • The straight highway from the northwest which as Edgware Road joins Oxford Street at the Marble Arch (the north-eastern entrance to Hyde Park) is coincident with the Roman Watling Street.

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  • Two of its gateways are noteworthy, namely that at Hyde Park Corner at the southeast and the Marble Arch at the north-east.

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  • The Marble Arch was intended as a monument to Nelson, and first stood in front of Buckingham Palace, being moved to its present site in 1851.

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  • The Marble Arch was thus left isolated.

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  • In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a favourite duellingground, and in the present day it is not infrequently the scene of political and other popular demonstrations (as is also Trafalgar Square), while the neighbourhood of Marble Arch is the constant resort of orators on social and religious topics.

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  • At the beginning of the 20th century several important local widenings of streets were put in hand, as for example between Sloane Street and Hyde Park Corner, in the Strand and at the Marble Arch (1908).

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  • 3202 Ladywell Ground, Lewisham 512 Marble Hill, Twickenham.

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  • Other important buildings are the old state hall, a handsome white marble building erected in 1842; the city hall, a beautiful French Gothic building of pink granite trimmed with red sandstone, designed by H.

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  • Gibson and begun in 1883; St Peter's Episcopal Church (French Gothic), of Hudson River bluestone; Emmanuel Baptist Church, of white granite; the Madison Avenue Reformed Church; and St Joseph's (Roman Catholic), of bluestone and Caen stone with marble trimmings.

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  • The early Pamphylians, like the Lycians, had an alphabet of their own, partly Greek, partly "Asianic," which a few inscriptions on marble and coins preserve.

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  • When the window openings were large, as was the case in basilicas and other public buildings, and even in houses, the pieces of glass were, doubtless, fixed in pierced slabs of marble or in frames of wood or bronze.

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  • St Sofia when erected by Justinian had vaults covered with mosaics and immense windows filled with plates of glass fitted into pierced marble frames; some of the plates, 7 to 8 in.

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  • A marble obelisk marks the spot where the 21st Lancers made a charge.

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  • Leather-dressing and wool-spinning are carried on and there is trade in live-stock, in agricultural produce, especially eggs, and in marble.

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  • Gypsum and marble also deserve mention.

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  • These inscriptions are generally on limestone or marble or on tablets of bronze, and vary from a few inches to some feet in length and height.

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  • Among its most striking features are the fine and lofty tower (450(450 ft.), rebuilt in 1860-64; the extensive catacombs, in which the emperors were formerly interred; the sarcophagus (1513) of Frederick III.; the tombs of Prince Eugene of Savoy; thirtyeight marble altars; and the fine groined ceiling.

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  • The pillars which support the nave are of marble from Elba and Giglio; those of the side aisles are the spoils of ancient Greek and Roman buildings brought by the Pisan galleys.

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  • thick, and at the top about half as much, they are constructed throughout of marble.

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  • Marble is found in the valley of the Majerda (at Shemtu), at Jebel Ust (about 35 m.

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  • It has been sought to work again the ancient quarries of Shemtu, but it was found that the marble had been spoilt by ferruginous and calcareous veins.

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  • Inez was buried at Alcobaga with extraordinary magnificence, in a tomb of white marble, surmounted by her crowned statue; and near her sepulchre Pedro caused his own to be placed.

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  • The most striking of these are the palaces of Duke Max and of Prince Luitpold; the Odeon, a large building for concerts, adorned with frescoes and marble busts; the war office; the royal library, in the Florentine palatial style; the Ludwigskirche, a successful reproduction of the Italian Romanesque style, built in 1829-1844, and containing a huge fresco of the Last Judgment by Cornelius; the blind asylum; and, lastly, the university.

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  • It is adorned with a cycle of religious paintings by Heinrich von Hess (1798-1863), and the dome is supported by sixtyfour monoliths of grey Tyrolese marble.

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  • and the elector Maximilian I., the obelisk erected to the 30,000 Bavarians who perished in Napoleon's expedition to Moscow, the Wittelsbach fountain (1895), the monument commemorative of the peace of 1871, and the marble statue of Justus Liebig, the chemist, set up in 1883.

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  • Several marble quarries are worked in the neighbourhood, and there are some large cement factories.

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  • Maria di Collemaggio, just outside the town, has a very fine Romanesque facade of simple design (1270-1280) in red and white marble, with three finely decorated portals and a rose-window above each.

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  • FL) The permanent tomb is of white granite and white marble and is 150 ft.

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  • It is an irregular pile of buildings, in fine and simple early Renaissance style; a small part of the original façade of 1028 in black and white marble is preserved.

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  • high, adorned with marble columns, and cased with mosaic of the most varied designs; a fountain of alabaster - of the kind known as Algerian onyx - stands in the alabaster-paved inner court; and 72 columns support the arches of the interior.

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  • Among the antiquities preserved in the museum are the epitaph of Boabdil, the last king of Granada, who died at Tlemcen in 1494, and the standard cubit measure - in marble - used in the Kissaria, bearing date A.H.

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  • long by zoo wide and was divided by magnificent marble columns into thirteen aisles.

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  • Zeno, rebuilt in 1123, are an interesting example of brick and marble construction.

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  • Zeno is mainly built of mixed brick and stone in alternate bands: four or five courses of fine red brick lie between bands of hard creamcoloured limestone or marble, forming broad stripes of red and white all over the wall.

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  • A similarly variegated effect in red and white is produced by building the arches of windows and doors with alternating voussoirs in brick and marble.

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  • The neighbourhood of Verona is especially rich in fine limestones and marbles of many different kinds, especially a close-grained creamcoloured marble and a rich mottled red marble, which are largely used, not only in Verona, but also in Venice and other cities of the province.

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  • It is mainly built of red brick, with fine nave columns of red and white marble and an elaborate marble pavement inlaid in many different patterns.

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  • The façade is of brick and marble used alternately.

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  • The arches, round or more often pointed in form, were decorated with moulded terra-cotta enrichments, and often with alternating voussoirs of marble.

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  • The monotony and lifelessness of this form of architecture are shown in the meaningless way in which details, suited only to the Venetian methods of veneering walls with thin marble slabs, are copied in the solid marbles of Verona.

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  • The font itself is interesting for its early form, one common in the chief baptisteries of northern Italy: like an island in the centre of the great octagonal tank is a lobed marble receptacle, in which the officiating priest stood while he immersed the catechumens.

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  • Most of the external ornamentation is usually concentrated on the western front, which often has a lofty arched porch on marble columns, resting on griffins or lions devouring their prey.

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  • At a school of art officially established in Tokyo in 1873 under the direction of Italian teachersa school which owed its signal failure partly to the incompetence and intemperate behaviour of some of its foreign professors, and partly to a strong renaissance of pure Japanese classicismone of the few accomplishments successfully taught was that of modelling in plaster and chiselling in marble after Occidental methods.

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  • Marble statues are out of place in the wooden buildings as well as in the parks of Japan, and even plaster busts or groups, though less incongruous perhaps.

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  • Its other mineral resources include graphite, copper, zinc, lead, salt, alum, potter's clay, marble and good mill and building stones.

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  • In 1902 a bronze statue was erected to his memory at Friesack, and there is also a marble one of the elector in the "Siegesallee" at Berlin.

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  • A small Ionic temple of marble with two caryatids between antae stood on this substructure.

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  • No trace of the marble seats mentioned by Pausanias has been found, but they have probably been carried off for lime or building, as they could easily be removed.

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  • The abbey, though greatly mutilated, is full of interesting details, and includes a lofty tower, a marble screen, a chapter-house, a notable east window, several fine tombs and an altar of St Francis.

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  • The hills which extend to the north are rich in marble and iron.

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  • Lessing was ducal librarian here, and the old library building, designed in 1723 in imitation of the Pantheon at Rome, contains a marble statue of him.

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  • high, is a landmark for sailors, dates only from 1819, but occupies the site of what was probably the first collegiate church in Scotland, and contains the large marble monument to Sir George Home, created earl of Dunbar and March by James VI.

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  • The marble, which is known throughout Persia as Maragha marble, is a travertine obtained at the village of Dashkesen (Turkish for stone-breakers " (about 30 m.

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  • An analysis of the marble gave the following result: calcium carbonate, 90 93; magnesium, 75; iron, 1.37; manganese, 4.34; calcium sulphate, 2.30; calcium phosphate, 24 (R.

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  • On a marble slab that once adorned the public baths at Comum, his distinctions were recorded in a long inscription, which was afterwards removed to Milan.

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  • The limestone pavement, with long porches on either side, was found to stop at the foot of a marble staircase of thirty-four steps of Byzantine construction, underneath which appeared a Roman arrangement of the two flights with a platform halfway up. The top flight led up to the propylaea.

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  • of earth, the famous fountain Pirene, tallying exactly with the description of Pausanias, as "a series of chambers that are like caves, and bearing a facade of white marble."

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  • This Pirene originally had a two-storey facade of Roman fashion made of limestone, but, before the time of Pausanias, it had received a covering of marble which has now fallen off, but has left traces of itself in the holes drilled into the limestone, in the rough hacking away of the half columns, and in the numerous marble fragments which lay in front of the facade.

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  • Blocks of marble which had seen use elsewhere ran from them back into the facade, which was hacked away in rough fashion to receive them.

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  • Probably these blocks formed the floor of a balcony, a tawdry marble addition.

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  • There is reason for supposing that the marble coating of the facade, and perhaps the erection of the quadrangle, also covered with marble, were the work of Herodes Atticus, and therefore just completed when Pausanias saw them.

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  • Approached by a flight of steps partly rock-cut, it had at the rear of the porch a balustrade with marble lions' heads through which the water overflowed.

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  • On a marble block broken away at both ends, which in a second use was a lintel, we read AFS2PHEBP, which can only be o-vvayoxyl) `E/3paiow (synagogue of the Hebrews).

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  • We are equally unfortunate in regard to Strabo's splendid marble Sisyphaeum just below the summit.

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  • The cathedral, built entirely of marble, occupies the site of an earlier church, and was begun in 1396, from which period the nave dates: the façade belongs to 1457-1486, while the east of the exterior was altered into the Renaissance style, and richly decorated with sculptures by Tommaso Rodari in 1487-1526.

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  • In the same line as the façade of the cathedral are the Broletto (in black and white marble), dating from 1215, the seat of the original rulers of the commune, and the massive clock-tower.

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  • The capital is named after its founder, the Grand Master de la Valette, but from its foundation it has been called Valletta (pop. 1901, 24,685); it contains the palace of the Grand Masters, the magnificent Auberges of the several " Langues " of the Order, the unique cathedral of St John with the tombs of the Knights and magnificent tapestries and marble work; a fine opera house and hospital are conspicuous.

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  • At the beginning of it stands the marble triumphal arch with a single opening, and without bas-reliefs, erected in his honour in A.D.

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  • In 1900 the French school at Athens recovered more fragments of sculpture, including a head of Heracles and the torso and possibly the head of Atalanta, these last two of Parian marble.

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  • The other heads are badly damaged owing to the fact that the white marble from Doliana, of which they are made, does not resist damp. But they still show in the intensity of their expression the power of expressing passion for which Scopas was famous beyond all other ancient sculptors.

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  • Adjoining the tomb also are numerous marble mausoleums, the sepulchres of princes of the house of Timur; and especially deserving of notice is a royal building tastefully decorated by an Italian artist named Geraldi, who was in the service of Shah Abbas the Great.

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  • present, and marble, lime and sandstone are abundant.

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  • Columbia is in a fine farming region; is engaged extensively in the mining and shipping of phosphates; has an important trade in live-stock, especially mules; manufactures cotton, lumber, flour, bricks, pumps and woollen goods; and has marble and stone works.

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  • There are cork woods and marble quarries in the vicinity, and the valley of the Seybuse and the neighbouring plains are rich in agricultural produce.

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  • in 1165, when the remains were removed from a marble sarcophagus and placed in a wooden coffin.

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  • Marble, granite and slate quarries are worked in different districts.

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  • In the adjacent gardens an open rotunda encloses a marble bust of the philosopher Leibnitz, and near it is a monument to General Count von Alten, the commander of the Hanoverian troops at Waterloo.

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  • Many of the mountains are clothed with forests of oak, chestnuts, beeches and other trees, and contain iron, copper, lead and marble.

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  • A marble bust of him stands in the public library and his portrait hangs in the Marischal College.

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  • St Michael's contains a Norman font of black marble, comparable with that in Winchester Cathedral.

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  • The value of the marble produced in the same year was $212,438, the state ranking fifth in the value of the total product and fourth in building-marble.

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  • Among other well-known plazas are: Loreto, on which faces the great enclosed market of the city; Guardiola, in the midst of handsome private residences; San Fernando, with its statue of Vicente Guerrero; and Morelos, with its marble statue of the national hero of that name.

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  • Its general plan is that of a Greek cross, with two great naves and three aisles, twenty side-chapels and a magnificent high altar supported by marble columns and surrounded by a tumbago balustrade with sixty-two tumbago statues carrying elaborate candelabra made from a rich alloy of gold, silver and copper.

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  • The Nahuatl lapidaries had at hand many varieties of workable and beautiful stone - onyx, marble, limestone, quartz and quartz crystal, granite, syenite, basalt, trachyte, rhyolite, diorite and obsidian, the best of material prepared for them by nature; while the Mayas had only limestone, and hard, tenacious rock with which to work it, and timber for burning lime.

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  • The marble of Hymettus, which often has a bluish tinge, was used extensively for building in ancient Athens, and also, in early times, for sculpture; but the white marble of Pentelicus was preferred for both purposes.

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  • Lead, copper, sulphur, orpiment, also lignite, have been found within the confines of the province; also a kind of beautiful, variegated, translucent marble, which takes a high polish, is used in the construction of palatial buildings, tanks, baths, &c., and is known as Maragha, or Tabriz marble.

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  • Many of the dwellings of the richer residents are adorned with arcades, the marble columns of which were taken from the ruins of Carthage.

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  • About a mile and a quarter from the Bab Bu Saadun, the north-west gate of the city, is the ancient palace called the Bardo, remarkable for the "lion court," a terrace to which access is gained by a flight of steps guarded by marble lions, and for some apartments in the Moorish style.

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  • It consisted of a rectangular court surrounded by chambers on the outside and with a colonnade of thirty-six columns of cipollino (Carystian) marble and grey granite.

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  • In the centre was a round colonnade with sixteen columns of Numidian marble (giallo antico) now in the theatre of the palace at Caserta.

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  • From Tuckahoe, Westchester county, has been taken white marble, used in some of the finest buildings in New York City, and a similar marble is obtained ih Putnam and Dutchess counties.

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  • Near Gouverneur, St Lawrence county, is a large quarry of coarsely crystalline magnesian limestone, used as monumental marble.

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  • From an extensive deposit of blue-black magnesian limestone at Glens Falls are taken the choicest varieties of black marble quarried in the United States.

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  • At Moriah and Port Henry, in Essex county, is a stone known as ophlite marble, a mixture of serpentine, dolomite and calcite interspersed with small flecks of phlogopite.

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  • Larger deposits of serpentine occur at several places in St Lawrence county; and at Warwick, in Orange county, is some beautiful marble of a carmine-red colour occasionally mottled with white or showing white veins.

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  • The marble quarried in 1908 was valued at $706,858.

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  • Marble and cement stones occur in many places.

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  • The emperor's boast that he had found the city of brick but left it of marble (` ` marmoream se relinquere, quam latericiam accepisset," Suet.

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  • From the materials at hand he constructed a circular chart, which was engraved on marble by Augustus and afterwards placed in the colonnade built by his sister Polla.

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  • It was excavated by Spiegelthal in 1854, who found that it covered a large vault of finely-cut marble blocks approached by a flat-roofed passage of the same stone from the south.

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  • In San Clemente at Rome the presbytery is enclosed with a marble balustrade or screen.

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  • In the neighbourhood of Glens Falls are valuable quarries of black marble and limestone, and lime, plaster and Portland cement works.

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  • Serpentine marble with seamed markings has been found in Adams and Stevens counties.

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  • In it stands a marble statue of the landgrave Frederick II.

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  • In the Karlsaue, a favourite public promenade lying just below the Schdne Aussicht, are the Orangerie and the marble baths.

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  • In 1551 a marble statue of a seated man was found in the cemetery of the Via Tiburtina: on the sides of the seat were carved a paschal cycle, and on the back the titles of numerous writings.

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  • long, constructed of polished marble slabs, fastened with copper bolts, flanked at the foot by two curious columns.

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  • Pieces of polished alabaster and marble, with small pieces of pure gold and gold-headed copper nails, found on and about the top of the second stage, indicated that a small but richly adorned sacred chamber, apparently plated within or without in gold, formerly crowned the top of this structure.

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  • Silver follows gold in importance, but the other minerals met with, including gypsum, mica, petroleum, natural gas, granite, marble and tin are not found in paying quantities.

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  • On the quay stands a marble statue erected to the memory of La Fontaine, who was born in the town in 1621; his house is still preserved in the street that bears his name.

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  • The streets are fairly wide and straight, and several of the houses belonging to aristocratic Moors, descendants of those expelled from Spain, have fine courts surrounded by arcades, some with marble fountains and planted with orange trees.

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  • His connexion with the Bombay presidency was appropriately commemorated in the endowment of the Elphinstone College by the native communities, and in the erection of a marble statue by the European inhabitants.

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  • The interior is richly decorated with marbles, almost all of which, except the white Carrara marble, are Neapolitan or Sicilian.

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  • Thus the sulphate constitutes the minerals anhydrite, alabaster, gypsum, and selenite; the carbonate occurs dissolved in most natural waters and as the minerals chalk, marble, calcite, aragonite; also in the double carbonates such as dolomite, bromlite, barytocalcite; the fluoride as fluorspar; the fluophosphate constitutes the mineral apatite; while all the more important mineral silicates contain a proportion of this element.

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  • Both these buildings are in black and white marble.

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  • Among the rocks of economic importance may be mentioned granite of numerous kinds, syenite, serpentine, porphyry, marble, sandstones and marls.

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  • Among the numerous churches, the largest and most imposing is the Jesuit church of San Juan de Dios, with its double towers and celebrated marble pulpit; an old monastery adjoins.

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  • There is a marble oscillum of Bacchus in the British Museum.

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  • STELE, the Greek name (aT'lX1J) for a pillar or vertical slab of stone or marble, sometimes decorated with bas-reliefs and bearing inscriptions, and generally terminated with a cresting (EfriOnpa) enriched with the anthemion plant.

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  • He also appears in many other groups, with Aphrodite, in marble and on engraved gems of Roman times.

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  • Over the porch is the fine emperor's hall, and the church has a marble statue of Charlemagne.

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  • The restored church of St Peter, of black and white marble (1118; destroyed by the Aragonese in 1494), is reputed to occupy the site of a temple of Venus.

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  • Yellowveined black marble, known as Portoro, and building-stone are quarried here and in the fortified island of Palmaria to the east of Portovenere.

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  • The " marble " or " Devonshire woody galls " of oak-buds, which often destroy the leading shoots of young trees, are produced by Cynips Kollari," already alluded to.

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  • In 1870, while some duties were lowered, others were raised, as, for instance, those on steel rails and on marble.

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  • The handsome cathedral of white marble in the Gothic style, dating from 1355, was completed in 1474.

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  • The cathedral of the 15th century contains an octagonal marble canopy with sculptures in relief, with a font below it belonging to the 8th century, but altered later.

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  • Besides its gold mines, the wine, nuts and marble of Thasos were well known in antiquity.

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  • The mines and marble quarries are no longer worked; and the chief exports are now fir timber for shipbuilding, olive oil, honey and wax.

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  • Shalmaneser died soon afterwards in 823 B.C. He had built a palace at Calah, and the annals of his reign are engraved on an obelisk of black marble which he erected there.

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  • 1868 to the memory of the soldiers who fell in the Mexican War; it has a column of Maryland marble 76 ft.

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  • high, which is surmounted by an Italian marble statue of Victory, executed in Rome.

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  • Most of the agricultural products are sent to the Peninsula; wine, figs, marble, almonds, lemons and rice to Europe and Africa.

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  • The altar is a board on four wooden pillars having upon it a small slab (tabut) of alabaster, marble, or shittim wood, which forms its essential part.

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  • Upjohn, architect), a magnificent white marble building, which was completed in 1880 at a cost of $2,534,000.

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  • In 1918 he unearthed on the Palatine Hill a Greek marble statue of Victory dating back to the 5th century B.C. Besides his reports on Roman antiquities he published Hibernica, notes on burial places and customs of ancient Ireland (Eng.

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  • In the Franz Josef-Platz stands a marble monument, known as Trinity Column, erected by the emperor Charles VI.

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  • The Maryland building stone, of which there is an abundance of good quality, consists chiefly of granites, limestones, slate, marble and sandstones, the greater part of which is quarried in the east section of the Piedmont Plateau especially in Cecil county, though some limestones, including those from which hydraulic cement is manufactured, and some sandstones are obtained from the western part of the Piedmont Plateau and the east section of the Appalachian region; the value of stone quarried in the state in 1907 was $1,439,355, of which $1,183,753 was the value of granite, $142,825 that of limestone, $98,918 that of marble, and $13,859 that of sandstone.

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  • It was a self-governing municipality, striking its, own coins, and stood on the Apamea-Synnada-Pessinus road, by which the celebrated marble called Synnadic, Docimian and Phrygian was conveyed to the coast.

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  • from the village, and the marble was carried thence direct to Synnada (Chifut Kassaba).

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  • Some of the marble has the rich purple veins in which poets saw the blood of Atys.

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  • The older and more interesting portions are the royal chapel (1232), with the marble sarcophagus of James II.

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  • The manufactures are insignificant; and although silver, copper, iron, zinc, lead and marble are said to exist in considerable quantities, the only ores that have been worked are gold, silver and copper.

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  • This church, by Giuliano da Sangallo (1485-1491), is a Greek cross, with barrel vaults over the arms, and a dome; it is a fine work, and the decoration of the exterior in marble of different colours (unfinished) is of a noble simplicity.

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  • The mineral wealth of Salzburg includes salt at Hallein, copper at Mitterberg, iron-ore at Werfen, marble in the Untersberg region and small quantities of gold near the Goldberg in the Rauris valley and at Bockstein in the Gastein valley.

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  • lies Adnet with extensive marble quarries, and to the N.

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  • Oberalln, with manufacture of marble articles.

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  • From Phoenicia this naturally became the main Punic unit; a bronze weight from Iol (18), marked 100, gives a drachma of 56 or 57 (224-228); and a Punic inscription (18) names 28 drachmae = 25 Attic, and therefore 57 to 59 grains (228-236); while a probably later series of 8 marble disks from Carthage (44) show 208, but vary from 197 to 234.

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  • Besides the above, the mineral resources of Mexico include coal, petroleum, asphalt, platinum, graphite, soda and marble.

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  • The accounts of the palaces of the native kings must be taken with some reserve, from the tendency to use descriptive terms not actually untrue, but which convey erroneous ideas taken from European architecture; thus what are called columns of porphyry and jasper supporting marble balconies might perhaps be better described as piers carrying slabs, while the apartments and terraces must have been more remarkable for number and extent than architectural grandeur, being but low one-storied buildings.

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  • The mosque to which the tower belongs is a large brick building erected by `Abd el Mumin; the interior is adorned with marble pillars, and the whole of the crypt is occupied by a vast cistern excavated by Yakub el Mansur.

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  • Antimony, quicksilver, stone, marble, slate and potter's clay are also worked, and there are brine springs in the Hellweg and mineral springs at Lippspringe, Oynhausen, &c.

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  • by 92, was built of blocks of greenstone and cased with marble.

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  • square, with pointed arches decorated with diaper work, supported on pairs of columns in white marble, 216 in all, which were alternately plain and decorated by bands of patterns in gold and colours, made of glass tesserae, arranged either spirally or vertically from end to end of each shaft.

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  • The marble caps are each richly carved with figures and foliage executed with great skill and wonderful fertility of invention - no two being alike.

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  • At one angle, a square pillared projection contains the marble fountain or monks' lavatory, evidently the work of Moslem sculptors.

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  • The outside of the church is plain, except the aisle walls and three eastern apses, which are decorated with intersecting pointed arches and other ornaments inlaid in marble.

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  • With the exception of a high dado, itself very beautiful, made of marble slabs with bands of mosaic between them, the whole interior surface of the walls, including soffits and jambs of all the arches, is covered with minute mosaic-pictures in brilliant colours on a gold ground.

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  • In the central apse at Monreale, behind the high altar, is a fine marble throne for the archbishop. This position of the throne is a survival of the early basilican arrangement, when the apse and altar were at the west end.

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  • The tomb of William I., the founder's father - a magnificent porphyry sarcophagus contemporary with the church, under a marble pillared canopy - and the founder William II.'s tomb, erected in 1575, were both shattered by a fire, which in 1811 broke out in the choir, injuring some of the mosaics, and destroying all the fine walnut choir-fittings, the organs, and most of the choir roof.

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  • The pavement of the triple choir, though much restored, is a very magnificent specimen of marble and porphyry mosaic in opus alexandrinum, with signs of Arab influence in its main lines.

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  • Manganese ore is the chief mineral, and is extracted for export to the extent of 160,000 to 180,000 tons annually, besides coal, lead and silver ores, copper, naphtha, some gold, lithographic stone and marble.

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  • The minerals include coal-beds in the Kidul hills and near Nangulan, marble and gold in the neighbourhood of Kalasan.

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  • During his pontificate a decree against simony was engraven on marble and placed before the altar of St Peter's.

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  • 4364 ft., Killington Peak, 4241 ft.) and their (west) piedmont ridges farther north in Vermont; and in the ridges of northern Maine: these are all in synipathy with Appalachian structure: so also are certain open valleys, as the Berkshire (limestone) Valley in western Massachusetts and the correspondin Rutland (limestone and marble) Valley in western Vermont; an more particularly the long Connecticut Valley from northern New Hampshire across Massachusetts to the sea at the southern border of Connecticut, the populous southern third of which is broadly &roded along a belt of red Triassic sandstones with trap ridges.

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  • The marble and graphite, as well as some other indirect evidence of life less susceptible of brief statement, have been thought by many geologists sufficient to warrant the inference that life existed before the close of the era when the Archean rocks were formed.

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  • 1411 on the site of several Hindu towns, which had preceded it, and was embellished by him with fine buildings of marble, brought from a distance.

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  • But perhaps the most unique sight in Ahmedabad is the two windows in Sidi Said's mosque of filigree marble work.

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  • There are marble and slate quarries near the town.

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  • In front of the church stands a marble fountain (F), covered by a dome supported on columns.

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  • The immense refectory, of the same cruciform shape as that of St Laura, will accommodate 500 guests at its 24 marble tables.

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  • His house still exists, and his tomb, a sarcophagus supported by four short columns of red marble, stands in front of the church.

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  • In the mountains were several valuable mines of iron and copper; and from Karystos, at the south of the island, came the green and white marble, the modern Cipollino, which was in great request among the Romans of the imperial period for architectural purposes, and the quarries of which belonged to the emperor.

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  • There are two Italian marble monuments in honour of Confederate soldiers, and monuments to the Southern poets, Paul Hamilton Hayne and Richard Henry Wilde (1789-1847).

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  • The once flourishing cloth and woollen trades have declined, but there are large breweries, roperies, potteries, and, in the neighbourhood, marble, granite, asphalt and lime works.

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  • In the Cathedral Square (Plaza de Armas), embracing two citysquares, and shaded - like all the plazas of the island - with laurels and royal palms, are a statue of Isabel the Catholic, and two marble lions given by Queen Isabel II.; elsewhere there are statues of General Clouet and Marshal Serrano, once captaingeneral.

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  • Grindstones, building-stone, talc, gypsum, marble and phosphates are also produced.

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  • The imports consist principally of machinery, coal, grain, dried fish, tobacco and hides, and the exports of hemp, hides, olive oil, soap, coral, candied fruit, wine, straw hats, boracic acid, mercury, and marble and alabaster.

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  • The handsome Roman Catholic cathedral for the diocese of Raphoe occupies a commanding site, and cost a large sum, as it contains carving from Rome, glass from Munich and a pulpit of Irish and Carrara marble.

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  • There are a number of theatres, but the city had no large theatre of architectural merit previous to the construction of the Municipal Theatre at the intersection of the Avenida Central with Rua 13 de Maio, with an elegant marble facade in the French Renaissance style.

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  • angle of the Praga da Republica, and the library building of the Gabinete Portuguez da Leitura with its exquisite " Manuelino " façade of Lisbon marble.

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  • The peak rises like a pyramid, with a steep summit of white marble, to a height of 6350 ft., and can be seen at sunset from the plain of Troy on the east, and the slopes of Olympus on the west.

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  • In the crypt there is a fine pieta in marble by Giovanni da Bologna.

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  • The cathedral is partly of the 12th century, with a porch and facade with small arcades - in black and white marble, as is the case with several other churches of Pistoiabut was remodelled in the 13th century, and modernized inside in the worst taste.

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  • Besides the silver altar it contains many fine works of sculpture; the chief are the monument of Cino da Pistoia, lawyer and poet, Dante's contemporary (1337), by Cellino di Nese, surrounded by his scholars, and Verrocchio's finest work in marble, the monument to Cardinal Forteguerra (1474), with a large figure of Christ, surrounded by angels, in high relief.

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  • Giovanni Fuorcivitus (so called because it was outside the line of the earliest, pentagonal, enceinte of the middle ages), with one of the long sides elaborately adorned with small arcades in the Pisan style, in black and white marble, also with sculpture by Gruamons (1162) on the facade.

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  • A marble shaft 80 ft.

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  • In the vicinity there are valuable lead, zinc and coal mines, and quarries of Carthage "marble," with which the county court house is built.

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  • Between these dates Houdon had not been idle; busts of Catharine II., Diderot and Prince Galitzin were remarked at the Salon of 1773, and at that of 1775 he produced, not only his Morpheus in marble, but busts of Turgot, Gluck (in which the marks of small-pox in the face were reproduced with striking effect) and Sophie Arnould as Iphigeneia (now in the Wallace Collection, London), together with his well-known marble relief, "Grive suspendue par les pattes."

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  • above the floor; the walls were frescoed or lined with marble, and for ornament there were probably statues.

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  • sq., and was lined with Purbeck marble.

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  • This baldachin, called liturgically the ciborium, is sometimes hung from the roof by chains in such a way that it can be lowered or raised; sometimes it is fixed to the wall or reredos; sometimes it is a solid structure of wood covered with metal or of marble supported on four columns.

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  • The town is adorned with a marble monument commemorating the war of 1870-71, a handsome fountain, and a statue of the Old Catholic bishop Reinkens.

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  • The remaining mineral products include lead, from which a considerable quantity of silver is extracted, copper, cobalt, arsenic, the rarer metal cadmium, alum, brown coal, marble, and a few of the commoner precious stones, jaspers, agates and amethysts.

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  • The mineral wealth of Silesia is great and consists in coal, iron-ore, marble and slate.

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  • Inscriptions found on the spot show that Kastro stands on the site of the ancient city of Siphnos; and Mr Bent identifies the other ancient town of Minoa with the place on the coast where a Hellenic white marble tower is distinguished as the Pharos or lighthouse, and another as the tower of St John.

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  • Thus the dressed stones of the ancient theatre served to build barracks; the material of the hippodrome went to build the church; while the portico of the hippodrome, supported by granite and marble columns, and approached by a fine flight of steps, was destroyed by Cardinal Lavigerie in a search for the tomb of St Marciana.

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  • There are many fragments of a white marble temple.

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  • These were cut out of great blocks of marble and granite, and have generally an overhanging lip. There is one in the Vatican of porphyry over 12 ft.

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  • The cathedral has two fine marble altars by the Lombardi of Venice (or their school).

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  • Her efforts greatly endeared her to those among whom she worked, and after her death a memorial window was erected in the parish church, and a marble portrait statue by F.

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  • It is situated at the foot of the Taragarh mountain, and consists of a block of white marble buildings without much pretension to architectural beauty.

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  • Under the half-dome were placed twenty-one marble statues, representing the family of Antoninus Pius, of Marcus Aurelius, and of the founder, Herodes Atticus.

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  • A marble bull; in front of the basin, bore an inscription saying that Herodes dedicates the whole to Zeus, in the name of his wife, Annia Regilla.

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  • Quantities of marble were formerly taken from quarries in the vicinity.

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  • In this he is described as a monster of ugliness and deformity, as he is also represented in a well-known marble figure in the Villa Albani at Rome.

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  • It consists of a marble statue of Austria erected on a pedestal of green Carpathian sandstone.

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  • In the mountains near Nanking, coal, plumbago, iron ore and marble are found.

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  • south-east of the city he came upon the ruins of a splendid tomb, and a colossal figure of a lion carved out of one block of Pentelic marble, 10 ft.

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  • It is built of brick cased in marble from the quarries which Gian Galeazzo Visconti gave in perpetuity to the cathedral chapter.

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  • The roof of the cathedral is built of blocks of marble, and the various levels are reached by staircases carried up the buttresses; it is ornamented with a profusion of turrets, pinnacles and statues, of which last there are said to be no fewer than 4440, of very various styles and periods.

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  • Close by to the south is the beautiful Loggia degli Osii, erected in 1316, with two loggie or open porticos, one above the other, in black and white marble.

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  • The choir, crossing, and beautiful sixteen-sided dome, with the elegant external decorations in terra-cotta and marble, are by Bramante (c. 1492).

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  • Marble Asymmetry of the Alps.

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  • There are numerous quarries of excellent marble, alabaster, gypsum and building stone; and the porcelain-clay is among the finest in Europe.

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  • In 1900 the association for the preservation of Virginia antiquities, to which the site was deeded in 1893, induced the United States government to build a wall to prevent the further encroachment of the river; the foundations of several of the old buildings have since been uncovered, many interesting relics have been found, and in 1907 there were erected a brick church (which is as far as possible a reproduction of the fourth one built in 1639-1647), a marble shaft marking the site of the first settlement, another shaft commemorating the first house of burgesses, a bronze monument to the memory of Captain John Smith, and another monument to the memory of Pocahontas.

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  • This is in the principal thoroughfare of the quarter, Bredgaden, and close at hand the palace of King George of Greece faces the Frederikskirke or Marble church.

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  • The lower part of the altar is composed of Italian marble, with a representation of Christ's sufferings in the garden of Gethsemane; and the organ is considered the finest in Copenhagen.

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  • It contains a large number of interesting monuments, including a brass with the date 873 (supposed to mark the restingplace of King !Ethelred I.), a lunar orrery of the 14th century and an octagonal Norman font of Purbeck marble.

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  • Limestone appears in various places, and in the north-east a light grey marble is quarried for lime.

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  • As the work grew, a training institution for evangelists was started in Oxford, but soon moved (1886) to London, where, in Bryanston Street near the Marble Arch, the headquarters of the army are now established.

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  • He was buried in the churchyard of St Sebastian, but in 1752 his bones were removed to the porch of the church, and a monument of reddish-white marble was erected to his memory.

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  • Since the opening of the new port the traffic has considerably increased, and it exports oil, pig-lead, silver, flour, wine, marble and sandstone for paving purposes, while it imports quantities of coal, iron, cereals, phosphates, timber, pitch, petroleum, and mineral oils.

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  • Belgium is particularly rich in quarries of marble, granite and slate.

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  • Of other mineral produce, chalk, exported from Lublin, a few quarries of marble and many of building stones, are worthy of notice.

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  • Maria in Trivio, erected in 1353 in gratitude for the liberation of the city from a plague which devastated it in 1348, is in the style of contemporary brick campanili in Rome, but built mainly of black selce, with white marble columns at the windows.

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  • The entrance, a door in a false arcade of black and white marble, leads into a court whose arches support an upper colonnade.

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  • The court which forms the entrance to the shrine of the saint is richly adorned with tiles and plaster-work, and is surrounded by an arcade of white marble columns, supporting a painted wooden roof.

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  • As early as the 14th century the quarrying and export of marble gave employment to the men of Corfe, and during the 18th century the knitting of stockings was a flourishing industry.

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  • But the survivors returned to the spot, and by digging down and tunnelling were able to remove all the objects of value, even the marble facing slabs of the large buildings.

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  • This temple appears to have suffered very severely from the earthquake, and at present affords little evidence of its original architectural ornament; but we learn from existing remains that its walls were covered with slabs of marble, and that the columns of the portico were of the same material.

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  • It was surrounded by a large colonnade, and the number of marble columns in the whole block has been reckoned at 296.

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  • The largest of these which was partly excavated in the side of the hill, was a building of considerable magnificence, being in great part cased with marble, and furnished with seats of the same material, which have, however, been almost wholly removed.

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  • Another curious discovery was that of the abode of a sculptor, containing his tools, as well as blocks of marble and half-finished statues.

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  • Of the numerous works of art discovered in the course of the excavations the statues and large works of sculpture, whether in marble or bronze, are inferior to those found at Herculaneum, but some of the bronze statuettes are of exquisite workmanship, while the profusion of ornamental works and objects in bronze and the elegance of their design, as well as the finished beauty of their execution, are such as to excite the utmost admiration - more especially when it is considered that these are the casual results of the examination of a second-rate provincial town, which had, further, been ransacked for valuables (as Herculaneum had not) after the eruption of 79.

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  • Marble appears to have been scarce, and was sparingly employed.

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  • The "quasi-reticulate" period - walling faced with masonry not yet quite so regular as opus reticulatum, and with brick quoins, coinciding with the second period of decoration (the architectural, partly imitating marble like the first style, but without relief, and by colour only, and partly making use of architectural designs).

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  • Marble first appears as a building material in the temple of Fortuna Augusta (c. 3 B.C.).

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  • The engine-house in which Brown was captured was exhibited at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago and was later rebuilt on Bolivar Heights; a marble pillar, marked "John Brown's Fort," has been erected on its original site.

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  • The Rhine lands were of course the centre of Roman civilization, with Roman roads, fortresses, stone and tiled houses and marble temples.

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  • From these rocks in the Ottawa valley are quarried or mined granite, marble, magnificent blue sodalite, felspar, talc, actinolite, mica, apatite, graphite and corundum; the latter mineral, which occurs on a larger scale here than elsewhere, is rapidly replacing emery as an abrasive.

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  • The main architectural features of Genoa are its medieval churches, with striped facades of black and white marble, and its magnificent 16th-century palaces.

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  • The earlier churches of Genoa show a mixture of French Romanesque and the Pisan style - they are mostly basilicas with transepts, and as a rule a small dome; the pillars are sometimes ancient columns, and sometimes formed of alternate layers of black and white marble.

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  • It is a cruciform structure, with a dome, and the central nave is supported by fourteen Corinthian columns of white marble.

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  • To the otherwise unfinished brick façade a portal borne by marble columns was added in 1843.

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  • The interior is covered with gilding and frescoes of the 17th century, and is somewhat overloaded with rich decoration, while a range of white marble columns supports the nave.

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  • The Palazzo Municipale, built by Rocco Lurago at the end of the 16th century, once the property of the dukes of Turin, has a beautiful entrance court and a hanging terraced garden fronting a noble staircase of marble which leads to the spacious council chamber.

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  • Opposite is the Palazzo Faraggiana, with scenes from the life of Columbus in relief on its marble pediment.

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  • The exports are olive oil, hemp, flax, rice, fruit, wine, hats, cheese, steel, velvets, gloves, flour, paper, soap and marble, while the main imports are coal, cotton, grain, machinery, &c. Genoa has a large emigrant traffic with America, and a large general passenger steamer traffic both for America and for the East.

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  • C. i is on the earliest dwellings of man; C. 2 on systems of Thales, Heraclitus, Democritus, &c.; c. 3 on bricks; c. 4 on sand; c. 5 on lime; c. 6 on pozzolana; c. 7 on kinds of stone for building; c. 8 on methods of constructing walls in stone, brick, concrete and marble, and on the materials for stucco; c. 9 on timber, time for felling it, seasoning, &c.; and c. to on the fir trees of the Apennines.

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  • C. t has for its subject pavements and roads, their construction, mosaic floors; c. 2 is on white stucco for walls (opus albarium); c. 3 on concrete vaults, gypsum mouldings, stucco prepared for painting; c. 4 on building of hollow walls to keep out the damp, wall decoration by various processes; c. 5 on methods and styles of wall painting, the debased taste of his time; c. 6 on fine stucco made of pounded marble - three coats to receive wall paintings; c. 7 on colours used for mural decoration; c. 8 on red lead (minium) and mercury, and how to use the latter to extract the gold from wornout pieces of stuff or embroidery; c. 9 on the preparation of red lead and the method of encaustic painting with hot wax, finished by friction; cc. to-14 on artificial colours - black, blue, purple;, c. to white lead and ostrum, i.e.

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  • (The architect being at that time also the contractor.) The chapters are -- (1) on various machines, such as scaling-ladders, windmills, &c.; (2) on windlasses, axles, pulleys and cranes for moving heavy weights, such as those used by Chersiphron in building the great temple of Diana at Ephesus, and on the discovery by a shepherd of a quarry of marble required to build the same temple; (3) on dynamics; (4) on machines for drawing water; (5) on wheels for irrigation worked by a river; (6) on raising water by a revolving spiral tube; (7) on the machine of Ctesibius for raising water to a height; (8) on a very complicated water engine, the description of which is not intelligible, though Vitruvius remarks that he has tried to make the matter clear; (9) on machines with wheels to register the distance travelled, either by land or water; (10) on the construction of scorpiones for hurling stones; (11) and (12) on balistae and catapults; (13) on battering rams and other machines for the attack of a fortress; (14) on shields (testudines) to enable soldiers to fill up the enemy's ditches; (15) on other kinds of testudines; (16) on machines for defence, and examples of their use in ancient times.

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  • The principal apartment is generally paved with marble; in the centre a decorated lantern is suspended over a fountain, while round the sides are richly inlaid cabinets and windows of stained glass; and in a recess is the divan, a low, narrow, cushioned seat.

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  • The pulpit is supported on fifteen columns, which rest on a slab of white marble.

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  • In the Der Abu Sephin, to the north of Babylon, is a Coptic church of the 10th century, possessing magnificent carved screens, a pulpit with fine mosaics and a semi-circle of marble steps.

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  • The decoration of the interior consists of the casing of the walls with marble with enriched borders, and (about 20 ft.

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  • The materials are quartz crystal, basalt, porphyry, syenite, granite, volcanic ash, various metamorphics, serpentine, slate, dolomite marble, alabaster, many colored marbles, saccharine marble, grey and white limestones.

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  • It is rich, however, in clays, while in the island of Bornholm there are quarries of freestone and marble.

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  • Silver, copper, lead and iron are worked to some profit, while arsenic, alum, graphite, marble, porcelain, precious and building stones are also found.

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  • Besides the fisheries there is fish-curing and a distillery; and the quarrying of a pink-coloured variety of granite and of Portsoy marble is carried on.

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  • The island is composed of marble, though gneiss and mica-schist are to be found in a few places.

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  • Here on a rock beside the sea are the remains of a medieval castle built almost entirely of ancient marble remains.

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  • Parian marble, which is white and semi-transparent, with a coarse grain and a very beautiful texture, was the chief source of wealth to the island.

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  • The celebrated marble quarries lie on the northern side of the mountain anciently known as Marpessa (afterwards Capresso), a little below a former convent of St Mina.

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  • The marble, which was exported from the 6th century B.C., and used by Praxiteles and other great Greek sculptors, was obtained by means of subterranean quarries driven horizontally or at a descending angle into the rock, and the marble thus quarried by lamplight got the name of Lychnites, Lychneus (from lychnos, a lamp), or Lygdos (Plin.

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  • Several attempts to work the marble have been made in modern times, but it has not been exported in any great quantities.

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  • - Mixtures of animal, vegetable and mineral substances are employed in great variety in the arts for making joints, mending broken china and other objects, &c. A strong cement for alabaster and marble, which sets in a day, may be prepared by mixing 12 parts of Portland cement, 8 of fine sand and 1 of infusorial earth, and making them into a thick paste with silicate of soda; the object to be cemented need not be heated.

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  • For stone, marble, and earthenware a strong cement, insoluble in water, can be made as follows: - skimmed-milk cheeseis boiled in water till of a gluey consistency, washed, kneaded well in cold water, and incorporated with quicklime; the composition is warmed for use.

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  • Marble >>

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  • Within, the palace is unsurpassed for the exquisite detail of its marble pillars and arches, its fretted ceilings and the veil-like transparency of its filigree work in stucco.

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  • broad; and in the centre there is a large pond set in the marble pavement, full of goldfish, and with myrtles growing along its sides.

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  • high, and supported by a marble colonnade.

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  • in breadth, surrounded by a low gallery supported on 124 white marble columns.

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  • The square is paved with coloured tiles, and the colonnade with white marble; while the walls are covered 5 ft.

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  • In the centre of the court is the celebrated Fountain of Lions, a magnificent alabaster basin supported by the figures of twelve lions in white marble, not designed with sculptural accuracy, but as emblems of strength and courage.

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  • Opposite to this hall is the Sala de las dos Hermanas (Hall of the two Sisters), so-called from two very beautiful white marble slabs laid as part of the pavement.

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  • The Langaza tomb had unusually elaborate architectural ornaments and two pairs of doors, one of wood, the other of marble.

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  • This was a stone building with outer columns of marble, not in the Doric style, as Vitruvius said.

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  • In recognition of his efforts, a marble bust of himself, by Boehm, subscribed for by 80,000 factory workers, chiefly women and children, was presented to Mrs Mundella.

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  • Iron was worked in the district of Cibyra, and the marble of Synnada, or more correctly of Docimium, was largely used by the Romans.

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  • Cehegin has a thriving trade in farm produce, especially wine, olive oil and hemp; and various kinds of marble are obtained from quarries near the town.

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  • Two of the best marble heads in the Constantinople museum came from Tralles; and both in the excavations conducted for that museum by.

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  • Ganymede being carried off by the eagle was the subject of a bronze group by the Athenian sculptor Leochares, imitated in a marble statuette in the Vatican.

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  • beautiful cloister (in brick and Verona marble), of the 12th-14th century.

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  • Marble was comparatively but little used by the earlier Greek sculptors, and even Myron, a rather older man than Pheidias, FIG.

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  • During the 13th and 14th centuries in Italy the widespread influence of Niccola Pisano and his school encouraged the sculptor to use marble rather than bronze for his work.

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  • The cathedral of St John Baptist is the principal object of interest; Theodelinda's basilica of 59 0 was enlarged at the close of the 13th century by throwing the atrium into the main building, and the present fine blackand-white marble façade was erected about the middle of the 14th by Matteo da Campione, and restored in 1899-1901.

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  • In 1719, while Prince Elbeuf of the house of Lorraine, in command of the armies of Charles VI., was seeking crushed marble to make plaster for his new villa near Portici, he learned from the peasants that there were in the vicinity some pits from which they not only quarried excellent marble, but had extracted many statues in the course of years (see Jorio, Notizia degli scavi d'Ercolano, Naples, 1827).

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  • From the city come, among many other marble statues, the two equestrian statues of the Balbi (Museo Borbonico, vol.

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  • The Villa Suburbana has given us a good number of marble busts, and the so-called statue of Aristides, but above all that splendid collection of bronze statues and busts mostly reproductions of famous Greek works now to be found in the Naples Museum.

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