Maori sentence example

maori
  • The museum contains one of the best existing collections of Maori art.
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  • Many of the myths of the origin of the divine beings are on a level with the Maori theory that Heaven and Earth begat them in the ordinary way.
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  • We didn't discover the Maori word for cabaret artistes.
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  • The Maori also possess considerable astronomical knowledge, including that of a planet that wears a circlet or headband (46 ).
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  • Maori mythology has also interwoven itself into my own poetical cosmos.
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  • As at last summer solstice a Maori group greeted the sun, the ancestors who built the place, and the other celebrants present.
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  • One of the best-known types of Maori object is the pendant or hei Tiki (see top of the page ).
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  • It is clearly male, and has the typical Maori male hair topknot and a fully tattooed face.
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  • The Pleistocene swamp deposits are rich in the bones of the moa and other gigantic extinct birds, which lived on until they were exterminated by the Maori.
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  • They were hindered by murderous tribal wars in which imported muskets more than decimated the Maori.
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  • The other prolonged contest was racial - the conflict between settler and Maori.
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  • (The registration of 1905 showed that there were over 23,000 coloured voters in the colony.) The commission proposed separate voting by natives only for a fixed number of members of the legislature - the plan adopted in New Zealand with the Maori voters.
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  • The Mexican and Peruvian civilizations were far ahead of Maori culture, in so far as they possessed the elements of a much more settled and highly-organized society.
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  • 5 The best authorities for the New Zealand myths are the old traditional priestly hymns, collected and translated in the works of Sir George Grey, in Taylor's New Zealand, in Shortland's Traditions of New Zealand (1857), in Bastian's Heilige Sage der Polynesier, and in White's Ancient History of the Maori, i.
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  • In this aspect they are natural phenomena still, but phenomena as originally conceived of by the personifying imagination of the savage, and credited, like the gods of the Maori or the Australian, with all manner of freaks, adventures and disguises.
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  • This idea recurs in Maori, Vedic and Chinese mythology.
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  • Like the Australian Pundjel, and the Maori Tiki, he made men of clay.
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  • Figures include a Canadian trapper, a Zulu warrior, a turbaned Indian an Australian farmer and a New Zealand Maori.
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  • Its deck is comprehensively encrusted with sponges and corals, and patrolled by giant Maori wrasse and jacks.
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  • Around 8 huge giant Maori wrasse, biggest any of us had ever seen, lurking around too.
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  • Where this home lay it is not easy to say, but the facts recorded by many writers as to the resemblance between the Polynesian and the Malayan races, and the strong Malayan element found in the languages of the former (see Tregear's Maori and Comparative Polynesian Dictionary, London, 1891), have led some students to think that the two races may have had a common origin.
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  • The Maori story, told by Grey and others, of the rending apart of Rangi (= Langi, heaven) 5 See Schoolcraft, Myth of Hiawatha (1856), pp. 35-39; and cf.
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  • The Public Health Department has exerted itself to improve the sanitation of native villages and combat the mischievous trickery of Maori wizards and "doctors."
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  • Other destructive agencies were epidemics, such especially as measles and small-pox, which swept away 30,000 Fijians in 1875; the introduction of strong drinks, including, besides vile spirits, a most pernicious concoction brewed in Tahiti from oranges; Maori Religion and Mythology, p. 26.
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  • One of the best-known types of Maori object is the pendant or hei tiki (see top of the page).
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  • Around 8 huge giant maori wrasse, biggest any of us had ever seen, lurking around too.
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  • Celmisia spectabilis - also known as cotton plant, shepherd's daisy, and mountain daisy or by its Maori name, tikumu -- is an subalpine perennial native to New Zealand.
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  • The idea of dancers competing for talent is as old as dancing itself, starting with the middle-eastern women who danced for each other to the "Haka" Maori war dance.
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  • The company is headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii, and offers a variety of grass skirt styles, including Maori and Tahitian.
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  • This tribal ink was originally inspired by tats done by the Maori tribe, as well as other Polynesian tribes.
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  • This process is very similar to tribal tattoos performed by the Maori and other Polynesian tribes - and continues to this day.
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  • The Maori tribe creates intricate swirled designs known as moko that adorn the faces of their tribesmen.
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  • These designs can also be seen trailing down the necks and shoulders of the Maori and also adorning their chests.
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  • For instance, while the Maori tribe may have inked their faces in order to show their tribal origins (a process known as moko), other Polynesian islands did not follow the same practice.
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  • A Maori tribal half sleeve: Located on his right shoulder, this design is exquisitely detailed and is believed to represent Williams' life.
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  • Of all the body modifications practiced around the world, there is perhaps none as intriguing as the pre-European moko of the Maori.
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  • This type of body art remains a cultural mainstay of the Maori in modern times.
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  • Among the early cultures that practiced scarification are Australian aborigines, Maori people, ancient Mayans, Sepik River tribes and people of many African nations.
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  • This absence of mammalian life in oceanic islands extends even to New Zealand, where the indigenous mammals comprise only two peculiar species of bats, the so-called Maori rat having been introduced by man.
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  • In Maori mythology it is more than usually difficult to keep apart the origin of the world and the origin and nature of the gods.
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  • The whole system, as far as it can be called a system, of Maori mythology is obviously based on the savage conceptions of the world which have already been explained.
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  • Dr Thomson, in his Story of New Zealand, quotes a Maori tradition, published by Sir George Grey, that certain islands, among which it names Rarotonga, Parima and Manono, are islands near Hawaiki.
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  • The Rarotongas call themselves Maori, and state that their ancestors came from Hawaiki, and Pirima and Manono are the native names of two islands in the Samoan group. The almost identical languages of the Rarotongas and the Maoris strengthen the theory that the two peoples are descended from Polynesians migrating, possibly at widely different dates, from Samoa.
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  • Maori tradition is explicit as to the cause of the exodus from Samoa, gives the names of the canoes in which the journey was made and the time of year at which the coast of New Zealand was sighted.
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  • On the question of the date a comparison of genealogies of Maori chiefs shows that, up to the beginning of the 10th century, about eighteen generations or probably not much more than five centuries had passed since the first Maori arrivals.
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  • In the Maori wars they showed much strategic skill, and their knowledge of fortification was very remarkable.
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  • Every Maori was a soldier, and war was the chief business and joy of his life.
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  • Grant, an eccentric genius, the Monthly Review (1888-1890), the New Zealand Illustrated Magazine (1899-1905), chiefly devoted to the light literature of New Zealand subjects, the Maori Record (1905-1907), and the Red Funnel, published since 1905.
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  • The people of colour in 1906 numbered 53,000, including 2300 Chinese and 6500 Maori half-castes.
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  • An apparent increase of 7000 in the Maori and half-castes between 1891 and 1906 is, perhaps, partly due to more accurate computation.
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  • It seems probable that the number of Maori and half-castes taken together is about the same as it was thirty years ago, though the infusion of white blood is larger.
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  • Four members of the house must be Maori elected by their own race.
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  • About 157,000 white children and 6500 Maori children attend schools of one degree or another.
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  • During ten years of intermittent marching and fighting between 1861 and 1871 the Maori did no more than prove that they had in them the stuff to stand up against fearful odds and not always to be worsted.
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  • Even as it was the resistance of the Maori was utterly worn out at last.
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  • Politics, cleared of the cross-issues of provincialism and Maori warfare, took the usual shape of a struggle between wealth and radicalism.
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  • - The only lengthy historical account of any note is Rusden's three-volume History of New Zealand (2nd ed., Melbourne, 1896), chiefly valuable as a statement of the grievances of the Maori race.
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  • For early accounts of the Maori race, see Cook's Voyage and Boose's translation of Crozet's Voyage.
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  • The Maori rebellion, fomented by French Catholics, was an outbreak against everything foreign, and the strange religion Hau-hauism, a blend of Old Testament history, Roman Catholic dogmas, pagan rites and ventriloquism, found many adherents.
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  • But the fibre produced by these rapid and economical means was very inferior in quality to the product of Maori handiwork, mainly because weak and undeveloped strands are, by machine preparation, unavoidably intermixed with the perfect fibres, which alone the Maoris select, and so the uniform quality and strength of the material are destroyed.
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  • When New Zealand was occupied (1840) the Maori were said to number 120,000, and were doubtfully stated to be still 56,000 in 1857; since then the returns of the 1881 and 1891 censuses gave 44,000 and 40,000 respectively.
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  • If such be indeed the case, perhaps the noblest of all primitive races may yet be saved from what at one time seemed inevitable extinction; and the Maori, the Samoans, and Tahitians may, like the Hawaiians, take their place beside the Europeans as free citizens of the various states of which they are now subjects.
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  • The museum contains a beautiful Maori house of carved woodwork, and biological collections.
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  • Here the wheel is added to the Maori conception of the making of man.
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