Manual-alphabet sentence example

manual-alphabet
  • We have cards, bookmarks and posters of the fingerspelling alphabet (sometimes called the manual alphabet ).
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  • Deafblind manual interpreters spell words into a deafblind person's hand using the deafblind manual alphabet or the block alphabet.
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  • It delighted me inexpressibly to find that they knew the manual alphabet.
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  • One who is entirely dependent upon the manual alphabet has always a sense of restraint, of narrowness.
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  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
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  • One who reads or talks to me spells with his hand, using the single-hand manual alphabet generally employed by the deaf.
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  • Mr. Gilman read all the papers to me by means of the manual alphabet.
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  • As to the two-handed alphabet, I think it is much easier for those who have sight than the manual alphabet; for most of the letters look like the large capitals in books; but I think when it comes to teaching a deaf-blind person to spell, the manual alphabet is much more convenient, and less conspicuous....
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  • On the whole, if they cannot be taught articulation, the manual alphabet seems the best and most convenient means of communication.
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  • Just think, she cannot use the manual alphabet!
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  • When Miss Keller puts her work in typewritten form, she cannot refer to it again unless some one reads it to her by means of the manual alphabet.
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  • Miss Keller's reading of the manual alphabet by her sense of touch seems to cause some perplexity.
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  • The manual alphabet is that in use among all educated deaf people.
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  • If more people knew this, and the friends and relatives of deaf children learned the manual alphabet at once the deaf all over the world would be happier and better educated.
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  • Miss Keller talks to herself absent-mindedly in the manual alphabet.
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  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.
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  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.
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  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
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  • She has learned that EVERYTHING HAS A NAME, AND THAT THE MANUAL ALPHABET IS THE KEY TO EVERYTHING SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
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  • The manual alphabet was not the only means of presenting words to Helen Keller's fingers.
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  • In the very nature of things, articulation is an unsatisfactory means of education; while the use of the manual alphabet quickens and invigorates mental activity, since through it the deaf child is brought into close contact with the English language, and the highest and most abstract ideas may be conveyed to the mind readily and accurately.
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  • It is a clumsy and unsatisfactory way of receiving communication, useless when Miss Sullivan or some one else who knows the manual alphabet is present to give Miss Keller the spoken words of others.
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