Mansur sentence example

mansur
  • But in the end they became less fanatical than the Murabtis, and Ya`kub el Mansur was a highly accomplished man, who wrote a good Arabic style and who protected the philosopher Averroes.
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  • His title of El Mansur, "The Victorious," was earned by the defeat he inflicted on Alphonso VIII.
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  • Abu '1 Kasim Mansur (or Hasan), who took the nom de plume of Firdousi, author of the epic poem the Shahnama, or "Book of Kings," a complete history of Persia in nearly 60,000 verses, was born at Shadab, a suburb of Tus, about the year 329 of the Hegira (941 A.D.), or earlier.
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  • Abu Mansur, the governor of Tus, patronized him and encouraged him by substantial pecuniary support.
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  • Mansur, whose court-poet Daqiqi (Dakiki) began the Shahnama (976-997); Mansur II.
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  • Mahmud refrained for the moment from vindicating his right; but, as soon as, through court intrigues, Mansur II.
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  • References in the Jewish Talmud show that this city still continued to exist at and after the commencement of our era; but according to Arabian writers, at the time when the Arab city of Bagdad was founded by the caliph Mansur, there was nothing on that site except an old convent.
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  • The Arab city, the old or round city of Bagdad, was founded by the caliph Mansur of the Abbasid dynasty on the west side of the Tigris just north of the Isa canal in A.D.
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  • In 762 there was a rebellion in favour of a descendant of 'Ali, but it was put down with great severity by the army of the caliph Mansur.
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  • In the 10th century it suffered severely, being repeatedly pillaged in the wars of the Fatimite caliphs Al-Qaim and Abu Tahir Ismail el Mansur with the Sunnite leader Abu Yazid and the Zenata Berbers.
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  • Rabat was founded by Yak'ub el Mansur in 1184, but Salli was then already an ancient city, and on the scarped hills to the west of Rabat stand the ruins of Sala, a Roman colony, known as Shelia.
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  • The mosque to which the tower belongs is a large brick building erected by `Abd el Mumin; the interior is adorned with marble pillars, and the whole of the crypt is occupied by a vast cistern excavated by Yakub el Mansur.
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  • Other mosques of some note are those of Ibn Yusef, El Mansur and El Mo`izz; the chapel of Sidi Bel Abbas, in the extreme north of the city, possesses property of great value, and serves as an almshouse and asylum.
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  • Al Kasr al Kebir was built, according to Leo Africanus, by Yakub el Mansur (1184-1199).
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  • Mansur, the second of the house, who transferred the seat of government to Bagdad, fought successfully against the peoples of Asia Minor, and the reigns of Harun al-Rashid (786-809) and Mamun (813833) were periods of extraordinary splendour.
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  • His Arabic name was Mansur (the victor), and he received the epithet Chrysorrhoas (gold-pouring) on account of his eloquence.
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  • The governorship of Irak was confided to a Kalbite, Mansur b.
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  • Mansur had hardly been three months in office when Yazid replaced him by Abdallah, son of Omar II.
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  • This adventurer now went into Media (Jabal), where a great number of maulas and Shiites, even members of the reigning dynasty and of the Abbasid family, such as the future caliph Mansur, rejoined him.
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  • Ibn Omar was taken prisoner; Mansur b.
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  • A year later he asked for pardon, and took the oath of allegiance to Mansur.
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  • The first care of Mansur was now to get rid of the powerful Abu Moslim, who had thus by another brilliant service strengthened his great reputation.
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  • On pretence of conferring with him on important business of state, Mansur induced him, in spite of the warnings of his best general, Abu Nasr, to come to Madam (Ctesiphon), and in the most perfidious manner caused him to be murdered by his guards.
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  • A witty man, being asked his opinion about Abu Ja`far (Mansur) and Abu Moslim, said, alluding to the Koran 21, verse 22, "if there were two Gods, the universe would be ruined."
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  • The Khorasanian chiefs were bribed into submission, and order was at last re-established by Mansur's general Khazim b.
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  • Mansur had written to Abdarrahman, announcing the death of Abu`l-Abbas, and requiring him to take the oath of allegiance.
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  • He called the people together at the hour of prayer, publicly cursed Mansur from the pulpit and declared him deposed.
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  • While Mansur was thus losing Africa and Spain, he was trying to redeem the losses the empire had sustained on the northern frontier by the Byzantines.
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  • But from 758 till 763 Mansur was so occupied with his own affairs that he could not think of further raids.
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  • Mansur being told of it said: "I would rather they went to hell in obedience to us, than to heaven in disobedience."
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  • A much greater danger now threatened Mansur.
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  • Hasan, whom they called the Mandi and the "pure soul," and Mansur had been among those who pledged themselves to him by oath.
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  • In 758 Mansur, informed that a revolt was in preparation, came himself to Medina and ordered Abdallah to tell him where his sons were.
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  • His head was cut off and sent to Mansur.
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  • For fifty days Mansur stayed in his room, neither changing his clothes nor allowing himself a moment's repose.
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  • Had Ibrahim marched at once against Kufa he might have crushed Mansur, but he let slip the opportunity.
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  • Qahtaba, the commander of Mansur's army, was defeated, only a small division under `Isa b.
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  • His head was cut off and brought to Mansur.
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  • Mansur could now give his mind to the founding of the new capital.
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  • So Bagdad, or properly "the round city" of Mansur, on the western bank of the Tigris, was built as the capital.
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  • The reign of Abu'l-Abbas and the first part of that of Mansur had been almost a continuation of the former period.
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  • Musa had been designated, as we have seen, by Abu'lAbbas as successor to Mansur.
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  • The latter having vainly tried to compel `Isa to renounce his right of succession, in favour of Mansur's son Mahommed al-Mandi, produced false witnesses who swore that he had done so.
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  • This Khalid, who was descended from an old sacerdotal family in Balkh, and had been one of the trusty supporters of Abu Moslim, Mansur appointed as minister of finance.
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  • Mansur discovered his abode, and caused him to be killed.
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  • Mansur discovered this in the same year in which he died, and threatened him with death unless he should pay to the treasury three millions of dirhems within three days.
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  • Thereupon Mansur overlooked the deficiency and gave Khalid the government of Mosul.
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  • - As soon as Mansur was dead, Rabi`, his client and chamberlain, induced all the princes and generals who accompanied the caliph, to take the oath of allegiance to his son Mahommed al-Mandi, who was then at Bagdad.
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  • Mansur wrote in his testament to his son that he had brought together so much money that, even if no revenue should come in for ten years, it would suffice for all the wants of the state.
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  • Mansur, the caliph's representative in the pilgrimage of that year, was entrusted with the command against him.
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  • He was far from having the high qualifications of his grandfather Mansur; indeed he did not even possess the qualities of his father and his brother.
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  • Sahl, called by them the Majuzi ("the Zoroastrian"), who had chosen Madain for his residence, and put at their head Mansur, a son of Mandi, who refused to assume the title of caliph, but consented to be Mamun's vicegerent instead of Hasan b.
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  • Mamun was a man of rare qualities, and one of the best rulers of the whole dynasty after Mansur.
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  • But with the increasing luxury after Mansur, the thirst for money became universal, and the number of honest officials lessened fast.
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  • - Motadid may be called, after Mansur, the most able and energetic of all the Abbasid rulers.
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  • His successors were Zahir addaula (ud-daula, ed-dowleh) Abu Mansur Washmagir (935967), Bistun (967976), Shams al Maali Qabus (97&1o12), Falak al Maali Manushahr (1012-1029), Anushirw~n (1029-1042).
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  • The first of the house was Aiptagin, a Turkish slave of the Samanid Mansur I., who, having quarrelled with his master, took refuge in Afghanistan and founded a semi-independent authority.
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  • The affairs of State Shahs during his absence were entrusted to a council of Visits to ministers, under the presidency of his second son, Europe, Malik Mansur Mirza, Shua-es-Sultaneh, who had made 1909, 1902.
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  • The same prince employed the most learned among the ulema of Transoxiana for a translation of TabarIs second great work, the Tafsir, or commentary on the Koran, and accepted the dedication of the first Persian book on medicine, a pharmacopoeia by the physician Abfl MansUr Muwaffaq b.
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  • He consequently left Medina in 733, and went to Alexandria, then to Kufa and Hira, and finally to Bagdad, where the caliph Mansur provided him with the means of writing his great work.
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  • The town was largely rebuilt by Mansur in 758, and during subsequent centuries it often changed hands and suffered many vicissitudes.
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  • Mansur, the second of the Abbasids, encouraged the appropriation of Greek science; but it was al-Ma ` mun, the son of Harun al-Rashid, who deserves in the Mahommedan empire the same position of royal founder and benefactor which is held by Charlemagne in the history of the Latin schools.
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  • Mansur made raids, and left his enemies in a position to regain all they had lost.
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  • In later times Christian ecclesiastical writers, finding it difficult to justify the unbroken prosperity of the wicked to an age which believed in the judgment of God and trial by combat, invented a final defeat for Mansur at Calatanaxor.
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  • But Mozaffar lasted for a short time, and then died, poisoned, as it was said, by his brother Abdurrahman, called Sanchol, the son of Mansur by one of the Christian ladies whom he extorted for his harem from the fears of the Christian princes.
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  • The fundamental difference between the Moslem, who know only the despot and the Koran, and a Christian people who have tievelopmentthle Church, a body of law and a Latin speech, was of the well seen in the contrast between the end of the christian greatness of Mansur, and the end of the weakness Kingdoms, of his Christian contemporaries.
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  • He and his immediate descendants gradually fsubdued the other counts, They suffered much from the inroads of Mansur in the 10th century, but on the decline of the caliphate, they took part in the general advance.
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  • Yesterday's was a mournful scene in Mansur, close to an old racecourse where trainers used to walk their horses.
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  • Abu'l-Wafa and Abu Nasr Mansur both applied spherical geometry to astronomy and also used formulas involving sin and tan.
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  • Mahommedan Spain followed the fate of Africa, and in 1170 the Muwahhadis transferred their capital to Seville, a step followed by the founding of the great mosque, now superseded by the cathedral, the tower of which they erected in 1184 to mark the accession of Ya`kub el Mansur, From the time of Yusef II., however, they governed their co-religionists in Spain and Central North Africa through lieutenants, their dominions outside Morocco being treated as provinces.
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  • In 1212 Mahommed III., "En-Nasir" (1199-1214), the successor of El Mansur, was utterly defeated by the allied five Christian princes of Spain, Navarre and Portugal, at Las Navas de Tolosa in the Sierra Morena.
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  • This interval sufficed for the old rebel leader Fa'iq, supported by a strong Tatar army under the Ilek Khan Abu'l I;Iosain Nasr I., to turn Nub's successor Mansur II.
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  • During the 8th and 9th centuries, when the direct pass from Cocysus came into military use, Marasion (the older name had returned into general use) was often the Byzantine objective and was more than once retaken; but after 77 0, when Mansur incorporated it in "Palestine" it remained definitely in Moslem power and was refortified by Harun-alRashid.
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  • Mansur built a castle at Rafiqa opposite Rakka to control the country round, and his son Harun al-Rashid actually resided during most of his reign, not at Bagdad but at Rakka, where two generations later al-Battani of Harran was making the astronomical observations on which his tables were based (see Albategnius) Abu Qurra, bishop of Harran, and acquaintance of the caliph Ma'mun, who was one of the earlier Aramaean Christians to use Arabic, has been thought to have contributed to the influences For this and following section see further Caliphate and Persia: History.
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  • Not unnaturally, the Alids in Medina were indignant at being supplanted by the Abbasids, and Mansur's chief concern was to get Mahommed into his power.
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  • Abdallah, a brother of Mahommed and Ibrahim, the rivals of Mansur, succeeded in escaping, and fled to Egypt, whence by the help of the postmaster, himself a secret partisan of the Shiites, he passed into West Africa, where at a later period his son founded the Idrisite dynasty in Fez (see Morocco).
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  • Once upon a time there was a famous Arab whose name was Al Mansur.
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  • Al Mansur loved poetry and was fond of hearing poets repeat their own verses.
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  • The caliph, Al Mansur, lived nearly twelve hundred years ago.
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  • Yesterday 's was a mournful scene in Mansur, close to an old racecourse where trainers used to walk their horses.
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