Manna sentence example

manna
  • The manna ash is a small tree found in Italy, and extending to Switzerland, South Tirol, Hungary, Greece, Turkey and Asia Minor.
    12
    3
  • Roscher (Nektar and Ambrosia, 1883; see also his article in Roscher's Lexikon der Mythologic) nectar and ambrosia were originally only different forms of the same substance - honey, regarded as a dew, like manna, fallen from heaven, which was used both as food and drink.
    12
    7
  • The best manna contains 70 to 80%.
    3
    1
  • This manna occurs in the form of small, roundish, hard, dry tears, varying from the size of a mustard seed to that of a coriander, of a lightbrown colour, sweet taste, and senna-like odour.
    4
    2
  • The finest or flaky manna appears to have been allowed to harden on the stem.
    6
    5
    Advertisement
  • It is collected before sunrise, by shaking the grains of manna on to linen cloths spread out beneath the trees, or by dipping the small branches in hot water and evaporating the solution thus obtained.
    3
    2
  • 2 f., 16 that JE contained an account of the manna, which included the explanation of Ex.
    1
    0
  • A very superior kind, obtained by allowing the juice to encrust pieces of wood or straws inserted in the cuts, is called manna a cannolo.
    0
    0
  • The fragments adhering to the stem, after the finest flakes have been removed are scraped off, and form the small or Tolfa manna of commerce.
    0
    0
  • In Italy mannite is prepared for sale in the shape of small cones resembling loaf sugar in shape, and is frequently prescribed in medicine instead of manna.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The manna of the present day appears to have been unknown before the 15th century, although a mountain in Sicily with the Arabic name Gibelman, i.e.
    0
    0
  • " manna mountain," appears to point to its collection there during the period that the island was held by the Saracens, 827-1070.
    0
    0
  • Various other kinds of manna are known, but none of these has been found to contain mannite.
    0
    0
  • Alhagi manna (Persian and Arabic tar-angubin, also known as terendschabin) is the produce of Alhagi maurorum, a small, spiny, leguminous plant, growing in Arabia, Asia Minor, Persia, Afghanistan, Baluchistan and northern India.
    0
    0
  • Tamarisk manna (Persian gaz-angubin, tamarisk honey) exudes in June and July from the slender branches of Tamarix gallica, var.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the valleys of the peninsula of Sinai, especially in the Wady elSheikh, this manna (Arabic man) is collected by the Arabs and sold to the monks of St Catherine, who supply it to the pilgrims visiting the convent.
    0
    0
  • A common Persian sweetmeat consists of wheat-flour kneaded with manna into a thick paste.
    0
    0
  • See Bentley and Trimen, Medicinal Plants (1880); Watt, Dictionary of Economic Products of India, under "Manna" (1891).
    0
    0
  • Other products are manna, suffron, asafoetida and other gums. The chief manufactures are swords, stoneware, carpets and rugs, woollens, cottons, silks and sheepskin pelisses (pustin, Afghan poshtin).
    0
    0
  • They had to collect and eat fresh manna everyday.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Moses gave the manna, but Iesous provided the first fruits of life from the grain of the Promised Land.
    0
    0
  • It also contained a golden jar having the manna and the rod of high priest Aaron.
    0
    0
  • The Israelites were to gather the manna, every man according to his eating (Exodus 16:16 ).
    0
    0
  • So each day they had to go out from the camp and collect the manna from heaven which God provided.
    0
    0
  • The one who has the Spirit will find in it the hidden manna.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I tell them about the search for food, and about the mysterious manna of the airship.
    0
    0
  • They are, of course, fed by manna from heaven, in thought as well as through their stomachs.
    0
    0
  • Actually, earlier in their wilderness wanderings the Israelites experienced the provision of manna.
    0
    0
  • Shir Khist, a manna known to writers on materia medica in the 16th century, is imported into India from Afghanistan and Turkestan to a limited extent; it is the produce of Cotoneaster nummularia (Rosaceae), and to a less extent of Atraphaxis spinosa (Polygonaceae); it is brought chiefly from Herat.
    0
    0
  • When God brought His people out of Egypt He gave them manna from heaven and water out of the smitten rock.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • While wandering in the desert, God helped them find water and sent them manna from heaven - a kind of flat bread.
    0
    0
  • For anyone who's ever dreamt of looking like Jessica, the singer's line of fashionable yet affordable footwear are manna from heaven.
    0
    0
  • Cedria, or cedar resin, is a substance similar to mastic, that flows from incisions in the tree; and cedar manna is a sweet exudation from its branches.
    4
    4
  • On the French Alps a sweet exudation is found on the small branchlets of young larches in June and July, resembling manna in taste and laxative properties, and known as Manna de Briancon or Manna Brigantina; it occurs in small whitish irregular granular masses, which are removed in the morning before they are too much dried by the sun; this manna seems to differ little in composition from the sap of the tree, which also contains mannite; its cathartic powers are weaker than those of the manna of the manna ash (Fraximus ornus), but it is employed in France for the same purposes.
    2
    2
  • Manna, of at least two kinds, is sold in the bazaars.
    7
    7
    Advertisement
  • Manna and gum tragacanth are also collected.
    5
    6
  • The land of the Manna (Minni), south-east of Ararat, had been wasted, its capital captured by the Assyrians, and its king reduced to vassalage.
    2
    3
  • At the present day the manna of commerce is collected exclusively in Sicily from cultivated trees, chiefly in the districts around Capaci, Carini, Cinisi and Favarota, small towns 20 to 25 m.
    1
    1
  • Manna of good quality dissolves at ordinary temperatures in about 6 parts of water, forming a clear liquid.
    1
    1
  • Its chief constituent is mannite or manna sugar, a hexatomic alcohol, C6H8(OH)6, which likewise occurs, in much smaller quantity, in certain species of the brown seaweed, Fucus, and in plants of several widely separated natural orders.
    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • Mannite is obtained by extracting manna with alcohol and crystallizing the solution.
    1
    1
  • Manna possesses mildly laxative properties, and on account of its sweet taste is employed as a mild aperient for children.
    2
    2
  • This manna occurs in the state of agglutinated tears, and forms an object of some industry among the wandering tribes of Kurdistan.
    2
    2
  • A substance collected by the inhabitants of Laristan from Pyrus glabra strongly resembles oak manna in appearance.
    0
    1
  • Briancon manna is met with on the leaves of the common Larch, and bide-khecht on those of the willow, Salix fragilis; and a kind of manna was at one time obtained from the cedar.
    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • The manna of the Biblical narrative, notwithstanding the miraculous circumstances which distinguish it from anything now known, answers in its description very closely to the tamarisk manna.
    0
    1
  • Boletus edulis, in the Oriental Trehala and in ergot of rye; melibiose, C12H22011, formed, with fructose, on hydrolysing the trisaccharose melitose (or raffinose), C18H32016.5H20, which occurs in Australian manna and in the molasses of sugar manufacture; touranose, C12H22011, formed with d-glucose and galactose on hydrolysing another trisaccharose, melizitose, C,8H32016 2H20, which occurs in Pinus larix and in Persian manna; and agavose, C12H22011, found in the stalks of Agave americana.
    2
    4
  • But the most singular esculent lichen of all is the " manna lichen," which in times of drought and famine has served as food for large numbers of men and cattle in the arid steppes of various countries stretching from Algiers to Tartary.
    1
    3
  • Closer examination also of P's narrative of the manna shows that its true position is after the departure from Mt.
    2
    4
  • A plausible explanation of R e 's action is supplied by the theory that an earlier account of the giving of the manna already existed at this point of the narrative.
    1
    3
    Advertisement
  • Fragments of this early story of Massah (testing) were incorporated by RP in his story of the manna and the quails, viz.
    0
    2
  • In an earlier passage, again in reference to the manna, Jesus is called " the bread of God, which cometh down out of heaven, and giveth life unto the world."
    1
    5