Manila sentence examples

manila
  • terminal of the Manila & Dagupan railway.

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  • MANILA, the capital city and principal port of the Philippine Islands, situated on the W.

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  • It is served by the Manila & Dagupan railway.

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  • The exports of manufactured tobacco, such as Manila cheroots, find their principal market in China, British India, Australasia and the United Kingdom, whilst of the leaf tobacco fully three-quarters goes to Spain.

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  • Manila has a spring and summer hot season, an autumn and winter cooler season, a summer and autumn rainy season, and a winter and spring dry season.

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  • It is, however, principally a cordage fibre, and in tensile strength it is second only to manila hemp; but it does not bear well the alternations of wet and dry to which ship-ropes are subject.

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  • plain-laid manila cable a wire rope has in some cases been successfully substituted.

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  • ABACA, or Abaka, a native name for the plant Musa textilis, which produces the fibre called Manila Hemp.

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  • In Belgium and the north of France flat ropes of aloe fibre (Manila hemp or plantain fibre) are in high repute, being considered preferable by many colliery managers to wire, in spite of their great weight.

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  • To the west is the broad expanse of Manila Bay, beyond which are the rugged Mariveles Mountains; to the eastward the city extends about half-way to Laguna de Bay, a lake nearly as large as Manila Bay and surrounded on three sides by mountains.

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  • At the Manila observatory, about 1 m.

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  • The typhoon warnings sent out from the Manila observatory annually save heavy loss of life and property.

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  • At the beginning of the 17th century Manila had become the commercial metropolis of the Far East.

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  • Calbayog has an important export trade in hemp, which is shipped to Manila.

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  • of the city of Manila.

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  • Using these buoys to guide the direction of tow, a grapnel, a species of fivepronged anchor, attached to a strong compound rope formed of strands of steel and manila, is lowered to the bottom and dragged at a slow speed, as it were ploughing a furrow in the sea bottom, in a line at right angles to the cable route, until the behaviour of the dynamometer shows that the cable is hooked.

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  • Among the imported flora are tea, Siberian coffee, cocoa, Ceara rubber (which has not done well), Manila hemp, teak, cocoanut and a number of ornamental trees, fruit-trees, vegetables and garden plants.

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  • His young widow took command of the survivors and brought them safely to Manila.

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  • of Manila.

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  • The cordage works are among the largest in the world, and consume immense quantities of sisal fibre imported from Mexico and manila from the Philippine Islands; binder-twine for binding wheat is one of the principal products.

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  • In northern China, at Peking, it is 55°, reduced to 30° at Canton, and to 20° at Manila.

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  • of Dagupan, the north terminus of the Manila & Dagupan railway.

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  • Honolulu is served by the Oahu railway, by electric lines to the principal suburbs, and by steamship lines to San Francisco, Seattle, Vancouver, Manila, Salina Cruz (Mexico), Victoria, Sydney, and Chinese and Japanese ports.

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  • In commercial importance Iloilo ranks next to Manila among Philippine cities; it has manufactures of pina, jusi, coconut oil, lime, vinegar and various articles made from palm wood.

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  • Balivag is served by an extension of the railway between Manila and Dagupan.

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  • Cheroots come principally from Manila, but there are now large quantities imported into the United Kingdom from the East Indies and Burma.

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  • In consequence its price in London nearly approaches that paid for manila.

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  • On the 18th of August his squadron assisted in the capture of the city of Manila.

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  • New Spain in its widest meaning includes the audiencias or judicial districts of Manila, San Domingo and Guatemala, and the viceroy had some sort of authority over them: but in its narrower meaning it comprised the audiencia district of Mexico and the subordinate audiencia district of Guadalajara, which together extended from Chiapas and Guatemala to beyond the eastern boundary of the modern state of Texas and northwards, eventually, to Vancouver's Island.

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  • The fact that the trade route to Manila passed through Vera Cruz, Mexico City and Acapulco entailed the settlement also of a few Chinese and Malays, chiefly on the Pacific coast.

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  • In 1685-86 the Pacific coast was ravaged by Dampier and Swan, and in 1709 Woodes Rogers, with Dampier as pilot, captured the Manila treasure galleon, a feat repeated by Anson in 1743.

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  • CAVITE, a fortified seaport, the capital of the province of Cavite, Luzon, Philippine Islands, and the seat of the principal Asiatic naval station of the United States, on a forked tongue of land in Manila Bay, 8 m.

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  • Cavite is the terminus of a railway which follows the shore of the bay from Manila.

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  • In 1870 he succeeded Farragut in the grade of admiral, which lapsed after Porter's death until 1899, when it was re-established to reward Rear-Admiral George Dewey for his victory at Manila.

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  • of the middle of the inhabited group, the distance to San Francisco is about 2100 m.; to Auckland, New Zealand, about 3810 m.; to Sydney, New South Wales, about 4410 m.; to Yokohama, about 3400 m.; to Hong-Kong, about 4920 m.; to Manila, about 4890 m.

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  • In William Barlowe's Navigator's Supply, published in 1597, we read:- "Some fewe yeeres since, it so fell out that I had severall conferences with two East Indians which were brought into England by master Candish [[[Thomas Cavendish (Candish)|Thomas Cavendish]]], and had learned our language: The one of them was of Mamillia [[[Manila]]] in the Isle of Luzon, the other of Miaco in Japan.

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  • The surrounding country is one of the most important hemp-producing districts in the Philippines; sinamay is woven here, and large quantities of hemp are shipped from here to Manila.

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  • The better sort of houses in Manila have two storeys, the lower one built of brick or stone and the upper one of wood, roofed with red Spanish tile or with corrugated iron; the upper storey contains the living-rooms, and the lower has servants' rooms, store-houses, stables, carriage-houses and poultry yards.

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  • 1572), the founder of the Spanish city, and of Andres de Urdaneta (1498-1568), the Augustinian friar who accompanied Legaspi to Cebu (but not to what is now Manila).

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  • Connected with Manila by electric railway is Fort William McKinley, a U.S. army post in the hills five miles away, quartering about 3000 men.

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  • Although Manila Bay is nearly landlocked, it is so large that in times of strong winds it becomes nearly as turbulent as the open sea, and it was formerly so shallow that vessels drawing more than 16 ft.

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  • The public school system of Manila includes, besides the common schools and Manila high school, the American school, the Philippine normal school (1901), the Philippine school of arts and trades (1901), the Philippine medical school (1907) and the Philippine school of commerce (1908).

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  • The Philippine government also maintains here a bureau of science which publishes the monthly Philippine Journal of Science, and co-operates with the Jesuits in maintaining, in Ermita, the Manila observatory (meteorological, seismological and astronomical), which is one of the best equipped institutions of the kind in the East.

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  • In 1908 there were thirtyfour newspapers and periodicals published in the cit y, of which thirteen were Spanish, fourteen were English, two were Chinese, and five were Tagalog; the principal dailies were the Manila Times, Cablenews American, El Comercio, El Libertas, El Mercantil, El Renacimiento and La Democracia.

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  • Manila is important chiefly for its commerce, and to make it the chief distributing point for American goods consigned to Eastern markets the American government undertook the harbour improvements, and abolished the tonnage dues levied under Spanish rule.

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  • Manila is the greatest hemp market in the world; 110, 399 tons, valued at $19,444,769, were exported from the archipelago in 1906, almost all being shipped from Manila.

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  • Manila is governed under a charter enacted in 1901 by the Philippine commission, and amended in 1903.

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  • The Spanish city of Manila (named from " nilad," a weed or bush which grew in the locality) was founded by Legaspi in 1571.

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  • In 1837 the port of Manila was opened to foreign trade, and there was a steady but slow increase in prosperity up to about 1890.

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  • About 1892 a large number of Filipinos in and near Manila formed a secret association whose object was independence and separation from Spain.

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  • In August 1896 members of this association began an attack; and late in December the movement was reinforced as a result of the execution in Manila of Dr Jose Rizal y Mercado (1861-1896), a Filipino patriot.

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  • On the 1st of May an American fleet under Commodore George Dewey destroyed the Spanish fleet stationed in Manila Bay.

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  • Manila Hemp >>

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  • The town is surrounded by an extensive and extremely fertile plain which produces very large quantities of rice as well as a great variety of tropical fruits, and a ready market for these products is found in Manila whither they are shipped by boat.

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  • It is served by the Manila & Dagupan railway, and the bridge across the Rio Grande is one of the longest in the Philippines.

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  • On the west coast are the Caraballos Occidentales north from the Gulf of Lingayen and the Zambales southward from that gulf to Manila Bay.

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  • The Pampanga rises in the highlands on the north-east border, flows south by west, and discharges through several channels into Manila Bay.

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  • D Catanduanes Environs of Manila Scale, 26° F PA NA C u !1

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  • Each of these has a great number of small tributaries, and along the coast of this lowland basin are many small tide water streams. The Pasig is a short but commercially important stream connecting Laguna de Bay with Manila Bay.

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  • inland from Manila Bay, is Laguna de Bay, the largest body of fresh water in the Philippines.

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  • In the seven years1902-1908the microseismograph at Manila recorded 796 local earthquakes.

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  • Plants valuable for their fibre number about 300, and among them is the abaca (Musa texilis), from the leaves of which Manila hemp is made.

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  • At Manila the mean annual temperature is about 80° F., the range of mean monthly temperature 6.48°, from 77° in January to 83.48° in May; and the range of extremes (during the period from 1881 to 1902) 39.96° from 60.08° in January 1881 to Ioo 04° in May 1889.

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  • In accordance with the monthly variations in temperature at Manila the year is divided into three seasons: temperate (November, December, January and February), hot (April, May and June) and intermediate (March, July, September and October).

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  • The maximum daily range of temperature at Manila varies from 13.8° in June to 17.7° in December.

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  • At Manila the monthly average of relative humidity ranges from 70.7° in April to 85.5° in September, and the annual average is 79.4°.

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  • In the famous typhoon of the 10th of October 1882, the vortex of which passed over Manila, an immense amount of damage was done in the city.

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  • The natives care little for the garden vegetables common to Europe and America, but in the vicinity of Manila and other large centres of population the Chinese grow many of these for consumption by European and American inhabitants.

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  • There are many goats but only a few sheep. In one district near Manila duck-raising is of considerable importance, but the principal branch of the poultry industry consists in the raising of game-cocks for cock-fighting, which is the national sport.

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  • The first railway in the Philippines was the line from Manila to Dagupan (120 m.) which was built by an English corporation under a guaranty of the Spanish government and was opened in 1892.

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  • With this assistance the Manila Railroad Company, organized under the laws of the state of New Jersey, agreed to construct about 600 m.

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  • Manila is the principal port of entry, and since the American occupation Manila harbour has been made accessible to vessels drawing 30 ft.

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  • Cebu in Cebu and Iloilo in Panay are ports of entry second and third in rank, although small in comparison with Manila; there are others of minor importance.

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  • The foreign commerce of the Philippines consists chiefly in the exportation of Manila hemp, dried coco-nut meat (copra), sugar and tobacco, both in the leaf and in cigars and cigarettes; and in the importation of cotton goods, rice, wheat-flour, fresh beef, boots and shoes, iron and steel, illuminating oil, liquors, paper and paper goods.

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  • Most of the Ilocanos are in the western half of north Luzon; most of the Bicols in south Luzon; most of the Pangasinans in the province of Pangasinan, which borders on the Gulf of Lingayen; most of the Pampangans in the province of Pampanga, which borders the north shore of Manila Bay; and most of the Cagayans in the valley of the Cagayan river.

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  • Laoag in north Luzon with a population of 19,699, Iloilo in Panay with a population of 19,054, Cebu with a population of 18,330, and Nueva Caceres in south Luzon (r0,201), were the only towns with a population exceeding ro,000; and Manila (219,928) was the only city.

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  • On the 1st of September 1900 this body assumed the legislative functions of the central government at Manila; on the 4th of July 1901 the executive authority was, by order of the president, transferred from the military governor to Judge Taft, whom he had appointed civil governor; on the 6th of September 1901 the Philippine Commission, by authority of the president, established the four executive departments, of interior, commerce -and police, finance and justice, and public instruction; and on the 29th of October 1901 the president appointed a vice-governor.

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  • The first popular assembly, of 80 members, was opened at Manila on the 16th of October 1907, and since then the legislature has been composed of two branches, the Philippine Commission (five Americans and four, formerly three, Filipinos), and the Philippine Assembly.

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  • Besides the elementary schools there are at Manila the Philippine Normal School, the Philippine School of Arts and Trades, the Philippine School of Commerce and the school for the instruction of the deaf and blind, and in 1908 the Philippine legislature passed an act for the establishment of a university of the Philippines.

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  • In 1571 the city of Manila was founded and became the insular capital.

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  • After a bombardment, Manila fell and on the 5th of October the British entered the city.

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  • Anda proclaimed himself governor-general and practically succeeded in confining the British to Manila.

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  • Manila was evacuated in March 1764.

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  • The passenger fare from Manila to Acapulco, at the end of the 18th century, was $1 000.

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  • Five hundred such works were printed and distributed in Manila alone before 1800.

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  • This measure was really aimed at the political and economic supremacy of the Spanish-born friars, who had by this time acquired 400,000 acres of agricultural land, more than half of it in the vicinity of Manila.

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  • Born in Calainha, in the province of Luzon, of pure Tagalog parentage, he attended the newly reopened Jesuit university in Manila.

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  • In 1856 foreign trade, hitherto confined to Manila, was permitted to enter the port of Iloilo, and foreign traders were allowed to open branch houses outside of the capital.

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  • In 1601 the Jesuits had opened a college in Manila for the education of Spanish youth.

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  • Four of their chiefs were taken prisoners and executed in Manila.

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  • Ten days after the plot was discovered Manila and five other provinces were officially proclaimed in a state of siege.

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  • After attending the Tagalog school at Cavite he entered the Jesuit College in Manila but did not graduate.

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  • Before Blanco left he had released Rizal and allowed him to go to Spain, but the friars caused his arrest and he was sent back to Manila, where he was executed by Polavieja's orders in December 1896.

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  • The Madrid government refused to confirm the terms of peace, and the peace rejoicings in Manila were followed by the persecution of all those who were known to have sympathized with the movement.

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  • Before suitable defences could be made, word came from Hongkong that Dewey had started for Manila and Montojo hurriedly sailed from Subig Bay to Cavite, barely in time to anchor before Dewey arrived.

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  • Commodore Dewey arrived in the Bay of Manila on the 1st of May, and totally destroyed or disabled the Spanish fleet.

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  • The battle of Manila Bay and the defeat of the Spanish fleet destroyed the prestige of Spain throughout the islands.

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  • With the approval of Commodore Dewey, who allowed arms to be supplied him, Aguinaldo successfully renewed his campaign against the Spaniards until practically all Luzon, except the city of Manila and suburbs, was in his control.

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  • Reinforcements arrived, and on the 13th of August Manila was taken by the Americans, under General Wesley Merritt (b.

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  • The refusal of General Merritt to permit Aguinaldo's troops to enter Manila created resentment on the part of the Filipinos.

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  • 1838), following up the enemy, drove Revolt them out of Malolos and then withdrew to against the Manila to await reinforcements, which brought Americans.

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  • It next provided for the improvement of Manila harbour, which involved an expenditure of $3,000,000.

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  • Department of the Interior (Manila, 1904 sqq.); Reports of the Philippine Commission (Washington, 1901 sqq.); Sir John Bowring, A Visit to the Philippine Islands (London, 1859); D.

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  • Hamm, Manila and the Philippines (London, 1898); J.

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  • Montero y Vidal, Historia general de Filipinas (3 vols., Madrid, 1887-1895); Juan de la Concepcion (1724-1787), Historia general de Philipinas (14 vols., Manila, 1788-1792), Gaspar de San Agustin (1650-1724), Conquistas de las islas Philipinas (2 vols., Valladolid, 1890); Le Gentil, Voyage dans les mers de l'Inde (Paris, 1781); F.

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  • Delgado, Historia general sacro-profana, politica y natural des Islas del Poniente, llamadas Filipinas (Manila, 1892); E.

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  • Pellicena y Lopez, La Verdad sobre Filipinas (Manila, 1900)..

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  • In the United Kingdom, under the name of "coir" matting, a large amount of a coarse kind of carpet is made from coco-nut fibre; and the same material, as well as strips of cane, Manila hemp, various grasses and rushes, is largely employed in various forms for making door mats.

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  • Because of these explorations, and also the long-felt need of a refitting point on the California coast for the galleons from Manila, San Diego was occupied in 1769 and Monterey in 1770 as a result of urgent orders from Charles III.

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  • Two days before the ratification of the peace treaty, a conflict took place between armed Filipinos under the leadership of Emilio Aguinaldo and the American forces that were in possession of Manila.

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  • Taft, had been appointed and sent to Manila.

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  • A sheet of some hard paper, such as manila, is then placed over it to form, as it were, a foundation.

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  • Thus a Tagala (Philippine) translation was brought out at Manila in 1712.

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  • A railway to connect the town with Manila was under construction in 1908.

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  • Hogs and horses are raised for the Manila market.

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  • Malolos is served by the Manila & Dagupan railway, and is a trade centre of considerable importance.

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  • No attempt was made, during the decade which followed the Spanish-American War, to replace the squadrons destroyed at Manila and Santiago de Cuba.

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  • He made war on England in 1761, with disastrous results to Spain, which for the time lost both Havana and Manila.

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  • The Spanish fleet in the Far East was defeated in Manila Bay by Admiral Dewey.

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  • In the meantime Manila and its garrison had surrendered to the Americans.

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  • against the clerical coterie that surrounded the king, and had not influence enough to prevent the appointment of Monsignor Nozaleda, formerly archbishop of Manila and a prelate of notoriously reactionary views, to the Important Ann.

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  • inland from the shore of Manila Bay and 3 m.

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  • of the city of Manila, with which it is connected by an electric tramway.

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  • He was director of decorations at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, and in 1898 he went to Manila as war correspondent for The Times and for Harper's Weekly.

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  • The latter gradually advanced eastwards, and approaching the important city of Shanghai, alarmed the European inhabitants, who subscribed to raise a mixed force of Europeans and Manila men for the defence of the town.

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  • Sunn hemp, Manila hemp, Sisal hemp, and Phormium (New Zealand flax, which is neither flax nor hemp) are treated separately.

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  • bombard the city of Manila.

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  • The fragrance raw material known as elemi oil is prepared by steam distillation of Manila elemi oil is prepared by steam distillation of Manila elemi.

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  • Easy Spot Handle Wraps Manila envelope Pack a large manila envelope on the bottom of your suitcase.

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  • Manila envelopes to be dealt with at home.

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  • Manila folders.

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  • Manila line of equal size.

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  • A governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, attorneygeneral, controller, treasurer, superintendent of public instruc 1 An interesting application of this provision was made in 1898, when Nevada soldiers on their way to Manila were allowed to vote at sea.

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  • In northern China, at Peking, it is 55°, reduced to 30° at Canton, and to 20° at Manila.

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  • On the 1st of May he overwhelmingly defeated the Spanish fleet under Admiral Montojo in Manila Bay, a victory won without the loss of a man on the American ships (see Spanish-American War).

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  • In 1572 and 1578, however, Drake took abundant and Organi- vengeance, and in 1587 Cavendish captured the Manila galleon - a success repeated in the next century.

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  • shore of Manila Bay, at the mouth of the Pasig river, in lat.

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  • There are several Spanish hospitals in Manila, in two of which the city's indigent sick are cared for at its expense; in connexion with another a reform school is maintained; and there are a general hospital, built by the government, a government hospital for contagious diseases, a government hospital for government employees, a government hospital for lepers, an army hospital, a free dispensary and hospital supported by American philanthropists, St Paul's hospital (Roman Catholic), University hospital (Protestant Episcopal), and the Mary Johnson hospital (Methodist Episcopal).

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  • On the 1st of May an American fleet under Commodore George Dewey destroyed the Spanish fleet stationed in Manila Bay (see Spanish-American War).

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  • D Catanduanes Environs of Manila Scale, 26° F PA NA C u !1

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  • At Manila the mean annual temperature is about 80° F., the range of mean monthly temperature 6.48°, from 77° in January to 83.48° in May; and the range of extremes (during the period from 1881 to 1902) 39.96° from 60.08° in January 1881 to Ioo 04° in May 1889.

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  • The maximum daily range of temperature at Manila varies from 13.8° in June to 17.7° in December.

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  • At Manila the monthly average of relative humidity ranges from 70.7° in April to 85.5° in September, and the annual average is 79.4°.

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  • Take 1 oz of Manila copal crystals and 1/2 oz of orange shellac flakes and grind to a fine powder.

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  • Simply using manila file folders and magic markers to create big flashcards with each letter can lead to all kinds of fun games.

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  • Crying Ladies (2003)-A comedy about three professional mourners searching for more lucrative money opportunities in Manila's Chinatown.

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  • Using folded cardstock or a manila folder, draw the silhouette of a dog with his back along the fold.

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  • Natori left Manila to study economics in New York and after graduating from college, she went on to become the first female vice president of investment banking at Merrill Lynch.

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  • The drilling tools are suspended by an untarred manila rope, 2 in.

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  • Congress, in a joint resolution, tendered its thanks to Commodore Dewey, and to the officers and men under his command, and authorized "the secretary of the navy to present a sword of honor to Commodore George Dewey, and cause to be struck bronze medals commemorating the battle of Manila Bay, and to distribute such medals to the officers and men of the ships of the Asiatic squadron of the United States."

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