Mandibles sentence example

mandibles
  • In most insects that feed by suction the mandibles are modified.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae completely fused.
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  • The abdomen is oval, sandy-grey in hue and beset with warts and bristles; the prothorax forms a mobile neck for the large square head, which carries a pair of long and powerful toothed mandibles.
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  • There are about 600 species in the family, the males being usually larger than the females, and remarkable for the size of their mandibles.
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  • The mandibles are strong, adapted for biting the vegetable substances on which these beetles feed, and the palps of the second maxillae have three segments.
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  • The insects of this order have mandibles adapted for biting, and two pairs of membranous wings are usually present; the first abdominal segment (propodeum) becomes closely associated with the fore-body (thorax), of which it appears to form a part.
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  • The mandibles, which are frequently used for carrying various objects, are situated well to the outside of the maxillae, so that they can be opened and shut without interfering with the latter.
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  • These cocoons, which may often be seen carried between the mandibles of the workers, are the "ants' eggs" prized as food for fish and pheasants.
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  • Sharp to hold the maggots between their mandibles and induce them to spin together the leaves of trees from which they form their shelters, as the adult ants have no silk-producing organs.
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  • Accessory organs are rarely found on the genital ducts, but occur in Paludina, Cyclostoma, Naticidae, Calyptraeidae, &c. Mandibles usually present.
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  • No mandibles, and radula uniserial.
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  • The head of an insect carries usually four pairs of conspicuous appendages - feelers, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae, so that the presence of four primitive somites is immediately evident.
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  • The mandibles often furnish a good example of "secondary sexual characters," being more strongly developed in the male than in the female of the same species.
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  • As previously mentioned, a pair of minute jaws - the maxillulae- are present in the lowest order of insects, between the mandibles and the first maxillae.
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  • In their typical state of development, the first maxillae offer a striking contrast to the mandibles, being composed of a two-segmented basal piece (cardo and stipes, fig.
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  • 2, IV) in which the slender piercers (mandibles and first maxillae) work to and fro.
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  • In front or above the mouth is bounded by the labrum, while the mandibles and first maxillae lie on either side of it.
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  • It has been shown by C. Janet (1889), from careful studies of the musculature, that the greater part of the head-capsule is built up of the four anterior head-segments, the hindmost of which has the mandibles for its appendages, and this conclusion is in the main supported by the recent work on the head skeleton of J.
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  • - A remarkable feature in the embryonic segments of the mandibles and of the first and second maxillae.
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  • Primitively (?) wingless Hexapods with cumacean mandibles, distinct maxillulae, and locomotor abdominal appendages.
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  • Biting mandibles; minute but distinct - maxillulae; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; vestigial maxillulae; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely fused.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely fused; maxilIulae often distinct.
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  • Biting mandibles.
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  • Piercing mandibles, retracted within the head-capsule.
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  • Mandibles and first maxillae modified as piercers; second maxillae fused to form a jointed, grooved rostrum.
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  • Mandibles absent in imago, very exceptionally present in pupa; first maxillae nearly always without laciniae and often without palps, or only with vestigial palps, their galeae elongated and grooved inwardly so as to form a sucking trunk.
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  • Mandibles rarely present, adapted for piercing; first maxillae with palps; second maxillae forming with hypopharynx a suctorial proboscis.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae incompletely or completely fused; often forming a suctorial proboscis.
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  • All these orders agree in the possession of biting mandibles, while their second maxillae have the inner and outer lobes usually distinct.
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  • The Hemiptera, with their piercing mandibles and first maxillae and with their second maxillae fused to form a jointed beak, stand far apart from them.
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  • Specialized as they are in form, development and habit, they retain mandibles for biting, and in their lower sub-order - the Symphyta - the maxillae are hardly more modified than those of the.Orthoptera.
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  • All spiders possess a pair of poison-glands, one in each of the chelicerae or mandibles and opening by means of a duct at the tip of the fang.
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  • The mouth parts are well developed, consisting of an upper lip, powerful mandibles, maxillae with three-jointed palpi, and a deeply quadrifid labium or lower lip with three-jointed labial palpi.
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  • A minute entosternite having the above-described structure is found in the Crustacean Apus between the bases of the mandibles, and also in the Decapoda in a similar position, but in no Crustacean does it attain to any size or importance.
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  • They differ from the Crustacea in that they have only a single pair of prae-oral appendages, the second pair being definitely developed as mandibles.
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  • The segmentation of the prosoma and the form of the appendages bear a homoplastic similarity to the head, pro-, meso-, and meta-thorax of a Hexapod with mandibles, maxillary palps and three pairs of walking legs; while the opistho io i e d c b o a S' S" 2 I VT V S IV III II I Opisthosoma Prosoma FIG.
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  • Tracheae, except in the aquatic species in which they are atrophied, opening by a pair of stigmata situated close to or above the base of the appendages of the 1st pair (mandibles).
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  • The proboscis of tsetse-flies is without the paired piercing stilets (mandibles and maxillae) possessed by other bloodsucking Diptera, such as the female horse-flies and mosquitoes.
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  • Snakes possess teeth in the maxillaries, mandibles, palatine and pterygoid bones, sometimes also in the intermaxillary; they may be absent in one or the ether of the bones mentioned.
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  • Sharp, recurved teeth are carried by the mandibles, the pterygoids, palatines, maxillaries, and in the Pythoninae by the premaxillaries also.
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  • The prefrontal bones are still in contact with the nasals as in the previous families, but the coronoid bones of the mandibles are absent as in the remaining families, and this loss also occurs in the Boine Charina.
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  • Apart from this feature the Trichoptera also differ from the typical Neuroptera in the relatively simple, mostly longitudinal neuration of the wings, the absence or obsolescence of the mandibles and the semi-haustellate nature of the rest of the mouth-parts.
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  • Through this temporary protection the active pupa, which closely resembles the mature insect, subsequently bites a way by means of its strong mandibles, and rising to the surface of the water casts the pupal integument and becomes sexually adult.
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  • C and D, Mandibles.
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  • Fabre states that the lastnamed insect uses a stone for the temporary closing of her burrow, and the Peckhams have seen a female Ammophila take a stone between her mandibles and use it as a hammer for pounding down the earth over her finished nest.
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  • a, Female from above; d, Jaws, more highly magnified b, From beneath, magnified 5 (tips of mandibles and 1st times; maxillae still more highly c, Vestigial wing; magnified).
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  • The mandibles are without palp. The pairs of feet are four to six.
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  • The mandibles are normally five-jointed, with remnants of an outer branch on the second joint, the biting edge varying from strong development to evanescence, the terminal joints or " palp " giving the organ a leg-like appearance and function, which disappears in suctorial genera such as Paracytherois.
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  • Giesbrecht and Hansen have shown that the mouth-organs consist of mandibles, first and second maxillae and maxillipeds; and Claus himself relinquished his long-maintained hypothesis that the last two pairs were the separated exopods and endopods of a single pair of appendages.
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  • Thorell's classification (1859) of Gnathostonta, Poecilostoma, Siphonostoma, based on the mouth-organs, was long followed, though almost at the outset shown by Claus to depend on the erroneous supposition that the Poecilostoma were devoid of mandibles.
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  • Mandibles.
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  • The tenth abdominal segment carries a pair of jointed cerci which are often elongate, and the feelers are always long, while the jaws are usually feeble and membranous, though the typical parts of a mandibulate mouth are present - mandibles, maxillae with inner and outer lobes and palps, and second maxillae (labium) whose lacinae are not fused to form a ligula.
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  • In the absence of cerci the Corrodentia are more specialized than the Isoptera and Plecoptera, but some of them show a more primitive character in the retention of vestigial maxillulae - the minute pair of jaws that are found behind the mandibles in the Aptera.
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  • The larvae are active and well-armoured, upon the whole of the ' ` campodeiform " type, but destitute of cerci; they are predaceous in habit, usually with slender, sickle-shaped mandibles, wherewith they pierce various insects so as to suck their juices.
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  • Some American genera (Corydalis) which belong to this family are gigantic among insects and their males possess enormous mandibles.
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  • They are abundantly distinct from the Neuroptera and Mecaptera, through the absence of mandibles in the imago, the maxillae - both pairs of which possess the typical inner and outer lobes and jointed palps - forming a suctorial apparatus.
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  • It often yawns when disturbed in the daytime, gaping its mandibles in a very grotesque manner.
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  • It is interesting to watch the bird, in a state of freedom, foraging for worms, which constitute its principal food: it moves about with a slow action of the body; and the long, flexible bill is driven into the soft ground, generally home to the very root, and is either immediately withdrawn with a worm held at the extreme tip of the mandibles, or it is gently moved to and fro, by an action of the head and neck, the body of the bird being perfectly steady.
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  • The legs and lower part of the body are dark coloured, but the dorsal surface of the thorax and abdomen is coloured green and is raised so as to form a crest with jagged edges exactly reproducing the irregular margin of a fragment of leaf cut out by the mandibles of the ant.
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  • The larvae are aquatic, active, armed with strong sharp mandibles, and breathe by means of seven pairs of abdominal branchial filaments.
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  • In America there are two genera, Corydalis and Chauliodes, which are remarkable for their relatively gigantic size and for the immense length and sabre-like shape of the mandibles.
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  • 2, a) are divided into "scape" and "flagellum" as in the ants, and the mandibles vary greatly in size and sharpness in different genera.
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  • Finally the parasitic larva attacks the Osmia, and digging its mandibles into its victim's head kills and eats it, taking from one to two days for the completion of the repast.
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  • As though to compensate for the loss of this means of defence, the mandibles are very powerful, and some of the bees construct tubular entrances to the nest with a series of constrictions easy to hold against an enemy.
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  • Of the corresponding pairs of appendages thirteen belong to the head and trunk, two pairs of antennae, one pair of mandibles, two pairs of maxillae, followed by three which may be all maxillipeds or may help to swell the number of trunk-legs to which the next five pairs belong.
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  • In the mandibles and maxillae some of the terminal joints of the stem are invariably wanting.
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  • In addition to the complete absence of wings and of metamorphosis, the Aptera are characterized by peculiar elongate mandibles (figs.
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  • i, Mn.; 4), with toothed apex and sub-apical grinding surface, like those of certain Crustacea; by the presence between the mandibles and maxillae of a pair of appendages (superlinguae or maxil ' x lulae), fig.
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  • In the nauplius larva they lie rather at the sides than in front of the mouth, and their basal portion carries a hook-like masticatory process which assists the similar processes of the mandibles in seizing food.
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  • The mandibles, like the antennae, have, in the nauplius, the form of biramous swimming limbs, with a masticatory process originating from the proximal part of the protopodite.
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  • In parasitic bloodsucking forms the mandibles often have the shape of piercing stylets, and are enclosed in a tubular proboscis formed by the union of the upper lip (labrum) with the lower lip (hypostome or paragnatha).
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  • This arrangement Renfrewshire (these, howis retained in some of the Phyllo ever, may be the toothed poda, but even in that group edges of the mandibles).
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  • 12) has an oval unsegmented body and three pairs of limbs corresponding to the antennules, antennae and mandibles of the adult.
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  • (Fritz Mtiller.) The antennae have a spiniform or hooked masticatory process at the base, and share with the mandibles, which have a similar process, the function of seizing and masticating the food.
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  • The appendages posterior to the mandibles appear as buds on the ventral surface of the somites, and in the most primitive cases they become differentiated, like the somites which bear them, in regular order from before backwards.
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  • All the cephalic appendages are much reduced, the mandibles have no palps, and the maxillulae are vestigial.
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  • In those Copepods in which the palps of the mandibles as well as the antennae are biramous and natatory, the first three pairs of appendages retain throughout life, with little modification, the shape and function which they have in the nauplius stage, and must, in all likelihood, be regarded as approximating to those of the primitive Crustacea.
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  • The eyes were probably stalked, the antennae and mandibles biramous and natatory, and both armed with masticatory processes.
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  • The mouth appendages are small; the mandibles, however, are stout.
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  • The mouth parts consist of two small retractile mandibles, of a pair of short palpi and of the toothed probe above mentioned.
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  • somites invariably has its parapodia modi fied so as to form a pair of hemignaths (mandibles).
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  • that all the Arthropoda are to be traced to a common ancestor resembling a Chaetopod worm, but differing from it in having lost its chaetae and in having a prosthomere in front of the mouth (instead of prostomium only) and a pair of hemignaths (mandibles) on the parapodia of the buccal somite.
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  • 9), and and adjacent region of Peri- act as hemignaths (mandibles).
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  • The fourth somite is that in which the mouth now opens, and which accordingly has its appendages converted into hemignathous mandibles.
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  • The buccal somite, with its mandibles, is in Hexapoda, as in Crustacea, the fourth: they are tetartognathous.
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  • Their appendages are respectively the mandibles and the gnathochilarium.
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  • (b) The paired claws on the ends of the parapodia and the fanglike modifications of these on the first post-oral appendages (mandibles) are the only hard chitinous portions of the integument.
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  • In fact, we have to suppose that the actual somite which in grades 1 and 2 bore the mandibles lost those mandibles, developed their rami as tactile organs, and came to occupy a position in front of the mouth, whilst its previous jaw-bearing function was taken up by the next somite in order, into which the oral aperture had passed.
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  • that the buccal gnathobasic parapodia (the mandibles) were in each of the three grades of prosthomerism only developed after the recession of the mouth and the addition of one, of two, or of three post-oral somites to the prae-oral region had taken place.
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  • Harting informed the present writer that the bird seems to lay its head sideways on the ground, and then, grasping the limpet's shell close to the rock between the mandibles, use them as scissor-blades to cut off the mollusc from its sticking-place.
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  • edentulous lower jaw and can be used to treat most mandibles.
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  • Both upper and lower mandibles contain rows of tiny bony structures called lamellae.
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  • Some have faceted eyes over protruding mandibles and a few even have wings although there are no accounts of any that can fly.
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  • Mandibles with less complete tooth rows were assigned to age groups on the basis of comparison with more complete ageable mandibles with less complete tooth rows were assigned to age groups on the basis of comparison with more complete ageable mandibles from the assemblage.
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  • Considering the high numbers of elderly mandibles and heavily worn loose teeth, this seems an unlikely situation.
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  • In an attempt to categorize them, these were measured and compared to teeth in more complete mandibles.
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  • Abstract A new method was developed in this study for testing excised sheep mandibles as a cantilever.
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  • ramusmine all of bird including under tongue and under rami of mandibles.
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  • The material included five skullcaps, several cranial and facial fragments, eleven mandibles, and 147 isolated teeth.
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  • The Thysanoptera, small insects with firmly chitinized cuticle, are recognized by the combination of imperfectly suctorial jaws - the mandibles acting as piercers and maxillae retaining their palps (see fig.
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  • He therefore regards it as the inner lobe (lacinia) of that maxilla, comparing it with the remarkable " pick " of the maxilla of a book-louse (see Copeognatha in article Neuroptera), The paired piercers, connected by muscles with the base of the maxillae, but attached directly to the head skeleton, into which they can be withdrawn, are regarded by Borner as true mandibles.
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  • beetles are distinguished by the adaptation of the jaws for biting, the mandibles (fig.
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  • The fifth abdominal segment has a pair of strong dorsal hook-like processes, by means of which the larva supports itself in the burrow which it excavates in the earth, the great head blocking the entrance with the mandibles ready to seize on any unwary insect that may venture within reach.
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  • One of the most interesting features of ant-societies is the dimorphism or polymorphism that may often be seen among the workers, the same species being represented by two or more forms. Thus the British " wood ant " (Formica rufa) has a smaller and a larger race of workers (" minor " and " major " forms), while in Ponera we find a blind race of workers and another race provided with eyes, and in Atta, Eciton and other genera, four or five forms of workers are produced, the largest of which, with huge heads and elongate trenchant mandibles, are known as the " soldier " caste.
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  • The mandibles of the Hexapoda are usually strong jaws with one or more teeth at the apex (fig.
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  • Biting mandibles; first maxillae elongate; second maxillae completely fused.
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  • Mandibles fused into a piercer; first maxillae developed as piercers; palps of both pairs of maxillae present; hypopharynx wanting.
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  • (I) The prolongation of the lower lip or labium into a prominent proboscis, which in the female sex contains the full complement of piercing organs found in blood-sucking Diptera, namely paired mandibles, paired maxillae, a tubular hypopharynx (the common outlet of the salivary glands), and an upper lip or labrum.
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  • - I n al l Hymenoptera the mandibles (fig.
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  • a, b, c) represents the mandibles, the other (fig.
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  • The Dermaptera and the Orthoptera agree in having welldeveloped mandibles, so that the jaws are adapted for biting; in the incomplete fusion of the second maxillae (which form the labium) so that the parts of a typical maxilla can be easily made out (see the description and figures of the cockroach' g.
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  • There is, however, good embryological evidence in some Hexapods of the existence of a seventh somite, the supra-lingual, occurring between the somite of the mandibles and the somite of the first maxillae (4).
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  • Examine all of bird including under tongue and under rami of mandibles.
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  • Uzel, with the majority of students, regards the paired organs as mandibles and the unpaired as an epipharynx.
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  • The actual piercing organs are the mandibles, while the upper lip or labrum forms a sucking tube.
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  • The maxillae are not piercing organs, and their function is to protect the mandibles and labrum and separate the hairs or feathers of the host.
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  • The head - carrying feelers, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae - is succeeded by the three thoracic segments, each bearing a pair of strong five-segmented legs, whose feet, like those of the adult, carry two claws.
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  • 2 b) possess slender, curved, hollow mandibles, which are perforated at the tip and at the base, being thus adapted for sucking the juices of victims. Large dyticid larvae often attack small fishes and tadpoles.
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  • mandibles being well adapted for the capture of small insect-victims. The larvae are more specialized than those of other Adephaga, the head and prothorax being very large and broad, the succeeding segments slender and incompletely chitinized.
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  • The noises made by some Ptinidae (Anobium) tapping on the walls of their burrows with their mandibles give rise to the "death tick" that has for long alarmed the superstitious.
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  • The wings are well developed for flight, and there is a tendency in the group, especially among the males, towards an excessive development of the mandibles or the presence of enormous, horn-like processes on the head or pronotum.
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  • The larvae are furnished with large heads, powerful mandibles and well-developed legs, but the body-segments are feebly chitinized, and the tail-end is swollen.
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  • In the same species, however, great variation occurs in the development of the mandibles, and the breadth of the head varies correspondingly, the smallest type of male being but little different in appearance from the female.
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  • Biting mandibles; second maxillae very intimately fused.
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  • Mandibles present in pupa, vestigial in imago; maxillae suctorial without specialization; first maxillae with lacinia, galea and palp. Prothorax small.
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  • The second antennae, mandibles and two pairs of maxillae may also be claimed as of malacostracan type.
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