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malthus

malthus

malthus Sentence Examples

  • Like Malthus, Ricardo owes his reputation very largely to the theory associated with his name, though it has long ceased to be stated precisely in the terms he employed.

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  • A note in his diary, dated the 7th of November 1749, shows that he had then 4 Malthus quoted Franklin in his first edition, but it was not until the second that he introduced the theory of the " preventive check."

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  • Franklin noted the phenomenon with disapproval in his advocacy of increased population; Malthus with approval in his search for means to decrease population.

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  • By the end of the century, however, owing to a great extent to the publication of the essays of Malthus, the pendulum had swung far in the opposite direction, it was thought desirable to possess the means of judging from time to time the relations between an increasing population and the means of subsistence.

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  • Malthus expressed the opinion that only in such a land of unlimited means of living could population.

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  • THOMAS ROBERT MALTHUS (1766-1834), English economist, was born in 1766 at the Rookery, near Guildford, Surrey, a small estate owned by his father, Daniel Malthus, a gentleman of good family and independent fortune, of considerable culture, the friend and correspondent of Rousseau and one of his executors.

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  • Young Malthus was never sent to a public school, but received his education from private tutors.

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  • In 1805 Malthus married happily, and not long after was appointed professor of modern history and political economy in the East India Company's College at Haileybury.

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  • Malthus was one of the most amiable, candid and cultured of men.

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  • The first desideratum here mentioned - the want, namely, of an accurate statement of the relation between the increase of population and food - Malthus doubtless supposed to have been supplied by the celebrated proposition that "population increases in a geometrical, food in an arithmetical ratio."

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  • It is only when such obvious truths are clothed in the technical terminology of "positive" and "preventive checks" that they appear novel and profound; and yet they appear to contain the whole message of Malthus to mankind.

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  • It is, in fact, the confluence of the Malthusian ideas with the theories of Ricardo, especially with the corollaries which the latter deduced from the doctrine of rent (though these were not accepted by Malthus), that has led to the introduction of population as an element in the discussion of so many economic questions in modern times.

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  • Malthus had undoubtedly the great merit of having called public attention in a striking and impressive way to a subject which had neither theoretically nor practically been sufficiently considered.

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  • To bring the result nearer to the just standard, a higher measure of popular 1 Malthus himself said, "It is probable that, having found the bow bent too much one way, I was induced to bend it too much the other in order to make it straight."

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  • It can scarcely be doubted that the favour which was at once accorded to the views of Malthus in certain circles was due in part to an impression, very welcome to the higher ranks of society, that they tended to relieve the rich and powerful of responsibility for the condition of the working classes, by showing that the latter had chiefly themselves to blame, and not either the negligence of their superiors or the institutions of the country.

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  • Malthus has in more modern times derived a certain degree of reflected lustre from the rise and wide acceptance of the Dar, winian hypothesis.

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  • Its author himself, in tracing its filiation, points to the phrase "struggle for existence" used by Malthus in relation to the social competition.

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  • Besides his great work, Malthus wrote Observations on the Effect of the Corn Laws; An Inquiry into the Nature and Progress of Rent; Principles of Political Economy; and Definitions in Political Economy.

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  • For his life see Memoir by his friend Dr Otter, bishop of Chichester (prefixed to 2nd ed., 1836, of the Principles of Political Economy), and Malthus and his Work, by J.

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  • Practically every treatise on economics deals with Malthus and his essay, but the following special works may be referred to: Soetbeer, Die Stellung der Sozialisten zur Malthusschen Bevälkerungslehre (Berlin, 1886); G.

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  • de Molinari, Malthus, essai sur le Principe de population (Paris, 1889); Cossa, Il Principio di popolazione di T.

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  • Malthus (Milan, 1895); and Ricardo, Letters to Malthus, ed.

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  • Godwin's more important works are - The Inquiry concerning Political Justice, and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (1793); Things as they are, or the Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794); The Inquirer, a series of Essays (1797); Memoirs of the Author of the Rights of Woman (1798); St Leon, a Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799); Antonio, a Tragedy (1800); The Life of Chaucer (1803); Fleetwood, a Novel (1805); Faulkner, a Tragedy (1807); Essay on Sepulchres (1809); Lives of Edward and John Philips, the Nephews of Milton (1815); Mandeville, a Tale of the Times of Cromwell (1817); Of Population, an answer to Malthus (1820); History of the Commonwealth (1824-1828); Cloudesley, a Novel (1830); Thoughts on Man, a series of Essays (1831); Lives of the Necromancers (1834).

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  • He considered that a struggle for existence was the inevitable result of the operation of the principle of Malthus in the animal and vegetable worlds.

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  • In 1832 Doubleday published an Essay on Mundane Moral Government, and in 1842 he attacked some of the principles of Malthus in his True Law of Population.

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  • This explanation of the decline is supported by the almost unanimous opinion of the medical profession in the countries in question, and substantial evidence can be found everywhere of the extensive prevalence of the doctrine and practice of what has been termed, in further derogation of the repute of the "much misrepresented Malthus," Neomalthusianism.

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  • Farr, Vital Statistics (1885); Coghlan, Report on Decline in Birthrate, New South Wales (1903), and report of Royal Commission on that decline (1904); Bonar, Malthus and his Work (1885); Bertillon, Elements de demographie; Gamier, Du Principe de population; de Molinari, Ralentissement du mouvement de la population; Bertheau, Essai sur les lois de la population; Starkenburg, Die BevolkerungsWissenschaft; Stieda, Das sexual Verhdltniss der Geborenen; Rubin and Westergaard, Statistik der Ehen; Westergaard, Die Lehre von der Mortalitdt and Morbilitdt, and Die Grundaage der Theorie der Statistik; Gonnard, L'Emigration europeenne.

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  • This was directed against a recent tract by Malthus entitled Grounds of an Opinion on the Policy of Restraining the Free Importation of Foreign Corn.

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  • "In all that I have said concerning the origin and progress of rent I have briefly repeated, and endeavoured to elucidate, the principles which Malthus has so ably laid down on the same subject in his Inquiry into the Nature and Progress of Rent."

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  • We now know that the theory had been fully stated, before the time of Malthus, by Anderson; it is in any case clear that it was no discovery of Ricardo.

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  • Malthus, ed.

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  • (1847) of the Collection des principaux economistes, where they are accompanied by the notes of Say, Malthus, Sismondi, Rossi, &c. The Principles was first "naturalized" in Germany, says Roscher (though another version by Von Schmid had previously appeared), by Edward Baumstark in his David Ricardo's Grundgesetze der Volkswirthschaft and der Besteuerung iibersetzt and erletutert (1837), which Roscher highly commends, not only for the excellence of the rendering, but for the value of the explanations and criticisms which are added.

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  • A note in his diary, dated the 7th of November 1749, shows that he had then 4 Malthus quoted Franklin in his first edition, but it was not until the second that he introduced the theory of the " preventive check."

    1
    1
  • By the end of the century, however, owing to a great extent to the publication of the essays of Malthus, the pendulum had swung far in the opposite direction, it was thought desirable to possess the means of judging from time to time the relations between an increasing population and the means of subsistence.

    1
    1
  • Malthus expressed the opinion that only in such a land of unlimited means of living could population.

    1
    1
  • THOMAS ROBERT MALTHUS (1766-1834), English economist, was born in 1766 at the Rookery, near Guildford, Surrey, a small estate owned by his father, Daniel Malthus, a gentleman of good family and independent fortune, of considerable culture, the friend and correspondent of Rousseau and one of his executors.

    1
    1
  • Malthus was one of the most amiable, candid and cultured of men.

    1
    1
  • It is, in fact, the confluence of the Malthusian ideas with the theories of Ricardo, especially with the corollaries which the latter deduced from the doctrine of rent (though these were not accepted by Malthus), that has led to the introduction of population as an element in the discussion of so many economic questions in modern times.

    1
    1
  • Malthus had undoubtedly the great merit of having called public attention in a striking and impressive way to a subject which had neither theoretically nor practically been sufficiently considered.

    1
    1
  • Besides his great work, Malthus wrote Observations on the Effect of the Corn Laws; An Inquiry into the Nature and Progress of Rent; Principles of Political Economy; and Definitions in Political Economy.

    1
    1
  • For his life see Memoir by his friend Dr Otter, bishop of Chichester (prefixed to 2nd ed., 1836, of the Principles of Political Economy), and Malthus and his Work, by J.

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  • de Molinari, Malthus, essai sur le Principe de population (Paris, 1889); Cossa, Il Principio di popolazione di T.

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  • Malthus (Milan, 1895); and Ricardo, Letters to Malthus, ed.

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  • In 1832 Doubleday published an Essay on Mundane Moral Government, and in 1842 he attacked some of the principles of Malthus in his True Law of Population.

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  • Malthus, ed.

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  • (1847) of the Collection des principaux economistes, where they are accompanied by the notes of Say, Malthus, Sismondi, Rossi, &c. The Principles was first "naturalized" in Germany, says Roscher (though another version by Von Schmid had previously appeared), by Edward Baumstark in his David Ricardo's Grundgesetze der Volkswirthschaft and der Besteuerung iibersetzt and erletutert (1837), which Roscher highly commends, not only for the excellence of the rendering, but for the value of the explanations and criticisms which are added.

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  • As Britain was then at war with France, only the northern countries of Europe were quite open to his research at that time; but during the brief Peace of Amiens Malthus continued his investigations in France and Switzerland.

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  • Moreover, modern economists, while accepting in the main the general tenor of Malthus's theory of population, would not agree with his statement of it.

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  • Malthus's Essay on Population grew out of some discussions which he had with his father respecting the perfectibility of society.

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  • In fact, the way in which abundance, increase of numbers, want, increase of deaths, succeed each other in the natural economy, when reason does not intervene, had been fully explained by Joseph Townsend in his Dissertation on the Poor Laws (1786) which was known to Malthus.

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  • It would seem, then, that what has been ambitiously called Malthus's theory of population, instead of being a great discovery as some have represented it, or a poisonous novelty, as others have considered it, is no more than a formal enunciation of obvious, though sometimes neglected, facts.

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  • Finally, in February 1858, when he was lying muffled in blankets in the cold fit of a severe attack of intermittent fever at Ternate, in the Moluccas, he began to think of Malthus's Essay on Population, and, to use his own words, "there suddenly flashed upon me the idea of the survival of the fittest."

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  • This new Worldwatch Paper marks the bicentennial of Thomas Malthus ' essay on the tendency for population to grow more rapidly than food supply.

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  • eighteenth century philosopher Thomas Malthus was one of the first to do this.

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  • Conquest of Poverty We can commend Malthus for his sober methodological individualism.

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  • His Cours d'economie politique (1838-54) gave in classic form an exposition of the doctrines of Say, Malthus and Ricardo.

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  • Malthus is already an author whose name is probably more widely known than that of any other economist, but whose works are rarely read, and studied only by a small proportion of The old text-book and learnt like the multiplication table, it political p economy."

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  • Moreover, modern economists, while accepting in the main the general tenor of Malthus's theory of population, would not agree with his statement of it.

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  • Like Malthus, Ricardo owes his reputation very largely to the theory associated with his name, though it has long ceased to be stated precisely in the terms he employed.

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  • But there are very few people in the world who have made a careful study of his works; and although his theory of rent has a wide and increasing application in economics, it is not comparable in general scientific importance with Malthus's theory of population.

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  • After the British Act of 1750 forbidding the erection or the operating of iron or steel mills in the colonies, Franklin wrote Observations concerning the Increase of Mankind and the Peopling of Countries (1751); its thesis was that manufactures come to be common only with a high degree of social development and with great density of population, and that Great Britain need not, therefore, fear the industrial competition of the colonies, but it is better known for the estimate (adopted by Adam Smith) that the population of the colonies would double every quarter-century; and for the likeness to Malthus's 4 " preventive check " of its statement: " The greater the common fashionable expense of any rank of people the more cautious they are of marriage."

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  • Franklin noted the phenomenon with disapproval in his advocacy of increased population; Malthus with approval in his search for means to decrease population.

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  • Among them are, in addition to those already mentioned, Catechisme d'economie politique (1815); Petit Volume contenant quelques aperqus des hommes et de la societe, lettres a Malthus sur differens sujets d'economie politique (1820); Epitome des principes de l'economie politique (1831).

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  • An English version of the Lettres a Malthus appears in vol.

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  • Young Malthus was never sent to a public school, but received his education from private tutors.

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  • As Britain was then at war with France, only the northern countries of Europe were quite open to his research at that time; but during the brief Peace of Amiens Malthus continued his investigations in France and Switzerland.

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  • In 1805 Malthus married happily, and not long after was appointed professor of modern history and political economy in the East India Company's College at Haileybury.

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  • Malthus's Essay on Population grew out of some discussions which he had with his father respecting the perfectibility of society.

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  • Thus it will be seen that both historically and philosophically the doctrine of Malthus was a corrective reaction against the superficial optimism diffused by the school of Rousseau.

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  • The project of a formal and detailed treatise on population was an afterthought of Malthus.

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  • The first desideratum here mentioned - the want, namely, of an accurate statement of the relation between the increase of population and food - Malthus doubtless supposed to have been supplied by the celebrated proposition that "population increases in a geometrical, food in an arithmetical ratio."

    0
    0
  • In fact, the way in which abundance, increase of numbers, want, increase of deaths, succeed each other in the natural economy, when reason does not intervene, had been fully explained by Joseph Townsend in his Dissertation on the Poor Laws (1786) which was known to Malthus.

    0
    0
  • It is only when such obvious truths are clothed in the technical terminology of "positive" and "preventive checks" that they appear novel and profound; and yet they appear to contain the whole message of Malthus to mankind.

    0
    0
  • It would seem, then, that what has been ambitiously called Malthus's theory of population, instead of being a great discovery as some have represented it, or a poisonous novelty, as others have considered it, is no more than a formal enunciation of obvious, though sometimes neglected, facts.

    0
    0
  • To bring the result nearer to the just standard, a higher measure of popular 1 Malthus himself said, "It is probable that, having found the bow bent too much one way, I was induced to bend it too much the other in order to make it straight."

    0
    0
  • It can scarcely be doubted that the favour which was at once accorded to the views of Malthus in certain circles was due in part to an impression, very welcome to the higher ranks of society, that they tended to relieve the rich and powerful of responsibility for the condition of the working classes, by showing that the latter had chiefly themselves to blame, and not either the negligence of their superiors or the institutions of the country.

    0
    0
  • Malthus has in more modern times derived a certain degree of reflected lustre from the rise and wide acceptance of the Dar, winian hypothesis.

    0
    0
  • Its author himself, in tracing its filiation, points to the phrase "struggle for existence" used by Malthus in relation to the social competition.

    0
    0
  • Practically every treatise on economics deals with Malthus and his essay, but the following special works may be referred to: Soetbeer, Die Stellung der Sozialisten zur Malthusschen BevÃlkerungslehre (Berlin, 1886); G.

    0
    0
  • Godwin's more important works are - The Inquiry concerning Political Justice, and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (1793); Things as they are, or the Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794); The Inquirer, a series of Essays (1797); Memoirs of the Author of the Rights of Woman (1798); St Leon, a Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799); Antonio, a Tragedy (1800); The Life of Chaucer (1803); Fleetwood, a Novel (1805); Faulkner, a Tragedy (1807); Essay on Sepulchres (1809); Lives of Edward and John Philips, the Nephews of Milton (1815); Mandeville, a Tale of the Times of Cromwell (1817); Of Population, an answer to Malthus (1820); History of the Commonwealth (1824-1828); Cloudesley, a Novel (1830); Thoughts on Man, a series of Essays (1831); Lives of the Necromancers (1834).

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  • He considered that a struggle for existence was the inevitable result of the operation of the principle of Malthus in the animal and vegetable worlds.

    0
    0
  • This explanation of the decline is supported by the almost unanimous opinion of the medical profession in the countries in question, and substantial evidence can be found everywhere of the extensive prevalence of the doctrine and practice of what has been termed, in further derogation of the repute of the "much misrepresented Malthus," Neomalthusianism.

    0
    0
  • Farr, Vital Statistics (1885); Coghlan, Report on Decline in Birthrate, New South Wales (1903), and report of Royal Commission on that decline (1904); Bonar, Malthus and his Work (1885); Bertillon, Elements de demographie; Gamier, Du Principe de population; de Molinari, Ralentissement du mouvement de la population; Bertheau, Essai sur les lois de la population; Starkenburg, Die BevolkerungsWissenschaft; Stieda, Das sexual Verhdltniss der Geborenen; Rubin and Westergaard, Statistik der Ehen; Westergaard, Die Lehre von der Mortalitdt and Morbilitdt, and Die Grundaage der Theorie der Statistik; Gonnard, L'Emigration europeenne.

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  • This was directed against a recent tract by Malthus entitled Grounds of an Opinion on the Policy of Restraining the Free Importation of Foreign Corn.

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  • "In all that I have said concerning the origin and progress of rent I have briefly repeated, and endeavoured to elucidate, the principles which Malthus has so ably laid down on the same subject in his Inquiry into the Nature and Progress of Rent."

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    0
  • We now know that the theory had been fully stated, before the time of Malthus, by Anderson; it is in any case clear that it was no discovery of Ricardo.

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    0
  • Finally, in February 1858, when he was lying muffled in blankets in the cold fit of a severe attack of intermittent fever at Ternate, in the Moluccas, he began to think of Malthus's Essay on Population, and, to use his own words, "there suddenly flashed upon me the idea of the survival of the fittest."

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