Malory sentence example

malory
  • We hear some ' One may recall, in this connexion, Caxton's very interesting prologue to Malory's Morte d'Arthur and his remarks on the permanent value of the " histories " of this British hero.
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  • English readers, who know the story only through the medium of Malory's noble prose and Tennyson's melodious verse, carry away an impression entirely foreign to that produced by a study of the original literature.
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  • The Books devoted by Malory to Lancelot are also drawn from this latter section of the romance; there is no sign that the English translator had any of the earlier part before him.
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  • Malory's version of the Charrette adventure differs in many respects from any other extant form, and the source of this special section of his work is still a question of debate among scholars.
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  • Unfortunately, Dr Sommer, in his study on the Sources of Malory, omitted to consult these texts, with the result that the sections dealing with Lancelot and Queste urgently require revision.
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  • In fact, it does for the Robin Hood cycle what a few years before Sir Thomas Malory had done for the Arthurian romances - what in the 6th century B.C. Peisistratus is said to have done for the Homeric poems.
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  • Sir Thomas Malory paraphrased and arranged the best episodes of these romances in English prose.
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  • Most unfortunately our English version of the romances, Malory's Morte Arthur, being derived from these later forms (though his treatment of Gawain is by no means uniformly consistent), this unfavourable aspect is that under which the hero has become known to the modern reader.
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  • Tennyson, who only knew the Arthurian story through the medium of Malory, has, by exaggeration, largely contributed to this misunderstanding.
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  • To the majority of English readers Guenevere is best known in connexion with her liaison with Lancelot, a story which, in the hands of Malory and Tennyson, has assumed a form widely different from the original conception, and at once more picturesque and more convincing.
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  • It is mainly, if not wholly, known to English readers through the medium of Malory's translation of the Erench Quete du Saint Graal, where it is the cup or chalice of the Last Supper, in which the blood which flowed from the wounds of the crucified Saviour has been miraculously preserved.
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  • Quete du Saint Graal can best be studied in Malory's somewhat abridged translation, books xiii.-xviii.
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  • Reference to Malory is alluded to in TH White's novel tetralogy The Once and Future King.
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  • The English Arthurian poems regard him as the type and model of chivalrous courtesy, "the fine father of nurture," and as Professor Maynadier has well remarked, "previous to the appearance of Malory's compilation it was Gawain rather than Arthur, who was the typical English hero."
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  • Reference to Malory is alluded to in TH White 's novel tetralogy The Once and Future King.
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  • La Morte D'Arthur, Thomas Malory's compilation of Arthur legends in the 15th century, includes both versions, and he further compounds confusion by calling both swords Excalibur.
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