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malcolm

malcolm

malcolm Sentence Examples

  • The next earl was Waltheof and after him Uhtred, who defeated Malcolm II., king of the Scots, in io06.

  • What is called the Stone of Mortlach is traditionally believed to have been erected to commemorate the success of Malcolm II.

  • In 1068, after the failure of the first rising of the north, Edgar retired to Scotland, when his sister Margaret married the Scottish king, Malcolm Canmore.

  • 1152), a son of King David I., and became king of Scotland on the death of his brother, Malcolm IV., in December 1165, being crowned at Scone during the same month.

  • I n 945-4 6 Strathclyde was ravaged by King Edmund and given over to the Scottish king Malcolm I.

  • In the 11th century Strathclyde appears to have been finally incorporated in the Scottish kingdom, and the last time we hear of one of its kings is at the battle of Carham in 1018 when the British king Owen fought in alliance with Malcolm II.

  • 975 Malcolm, son of Dyfnwal.

  • Ultimately he surrendered to Sir John Malcolm, and was .,ent as a state pensioner to Bithur, near Cawnpore.

  • 1040) was a son of Crinan or Cronan, lay abbot of Dunkeld, and became king of the Scots in succession to his maternal grandfather, Malcolm II., in 1034, having previously as rex Cumbrorum ruled in Strathclyde.

  • Two of Duncan's sons, Malcolm III.

  • de Las Cases, Memorial de Ste Helene (4 vols., London and Paris, 1823); Lady Malcolm, A Diary of St Helena (London, 1899); W.

  • See Malcolm D.

  • (1084-1153), king of Scotland, the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and (Saint) Margaret, sister of Edgar .Ætheling, was born in 1084.

  • On the 2nd of June a small force, zeribaed under Captain Malcolm McNeill, was attacked by the mullah's followers but repulsed after desperate fighting.

  • The first five volumes appeared between 1771 and 1785, and the sixth, edited and completed by Malcolm Laing, was published three years after the author's death.

  • York was frequently visited by the kings of England on the way to Scotland, and several important parliaments were held there, the first being that of 1175, when Malcolm, king of Scotland, did homage to Henry II.

  • In the meantime the new king, by issuing his famous charter, by recalling Anselm, and by choosing the Anglo-Scottish princess Edith-Matilda, daughter of Malcolm III.,.

  • Its charter, granted by Malcolm Canmore, having been burned, it was renewed by James VI.

  • Of the castle, the oldest building is St Margaret's chapel, believed to be the chapel where Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore, worshipped, and belonging at latest to the reign of her youngest son, David I.

  • In the reign of Malcolm Canmore the castle included the king's palace.

  • Edinburgh was long an exposed frontier town within a territory only ceded to Malcolm II.

  • In 1072 he undertook a campaign against Malcolm, king of Scots, who had married Margaret, the sister of Edgar Atheling, and was inclined to promote English rebellions.

  • The parish of New Monkland, in which Airdrie lies, was formed (with Old Monkland)in 1640 out of the ancient barony of Monkland, so named from the fact that it was part of the lands granted by Malcolm IV.

  • It is a place of great antiquity, its first charter having been granted by Malcolm IV.

  • In 1070 Malcolm Canmore gave it to Cospatric, earl of Northumberland, ancestor of the earls of Dunbar and March.

  • So much information unknown to older disputants such as Goodall, the elder Tytler, Chalmers, and Malcolm Laing, and in certain cases unknown even to Froude and Skelton, has accrued, that the question can now best be studied in The Casket Letters, by T.

  • Its castle, now ruinous, was built as a hunting-lodge for Malcolm Canmore, but of the abbey which it possessed as early as the reign of Alexander II.

  • MALCOLM III.

  • William the Conqueror answered this attack by marching into Scotland in 1072, whereupon Malcolm made peace with the English king at Abernethy and "was his man."

  • Then in 1092 a fresh dispute arose between the two kings, and William summoned Malcolm to his court at Gloucester.

  • Almost at once he invaded Northumbria, and was killed at a place afterwards called Malcolm's Cross, near Alnwick, on the 13th of November 1093.

  • Four of Malcolm's sons, Duncan II., Edgar, Alexander I., and David I., became kings of Scotland; and one of his daughters, Matilda, became the wife of Henry I.

  • Malcolm IV >>

  • Alhazen, quoted by Purchas in his quaint notice of Timur and referred to by Sir John Malcolm, can hardly be accepted as a serious authority.

  • The uncomfortable figure in the Bodleian Library does not give much help. Sir John Malcolm has been at some pains to invest his portrait of Timur with individuality.

  • See also Sir Clements Markham's Clavijo, in the Hakluyt Society's publications; White's edition of Davy's translation of the Institutes (1783); Stewart's translation of the Malfug,t; Malcolm's History of Persia; and Trans.

  • His first conspicuous success was achieved in 1862 with David Elginbrod, the forerunner of a number of popular novels, which include Alec Forbes of Howglen (1865), Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood (1866), Robert Falconer (1868), Malcolm (1875), The Marquis of Lossie (1877), and Donal Grant (1883).

  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.

  • These military operations were followed by the pacification of Central India under the administration of Sir John Malcolm.

  • In olden times it seems to have been known as Hornehuntersland, and to have been mentioned as early as 1159, when a son of Malcolm IV.

  • Some account of the latter is given by Napier Malcolm in his book Five Years in a Persian Town (London,1905), pp. 87-89 and 186.

  • Malcolm of the 93rd Highlanders, Captain Wellby, of the British army, left Leh on the 4th of May 1896.

  • After Macpherson's death, Malcolm Laing, in an appendix to his History of Scotland (1800), propounded the extreme view that the so-called Ossianic poems were altogether modern in origin, and that Macpherson's authorities were practically non-existent.

  • This plan was dropped; but Malcolm of Scotland was forced to restore the northern counties which had been ceded to David; North Wales was invaded in 1157; and in 1159 Henry made an attempt, which was foiled by the intervention of Louis VII., to assert his wife's claims upon Toulouse.

  • Tytler, John Hill Burton, Malcolm Laing and Andrew Lang.

  • SIR WILLIAM WALLACE (c. 1270-1305), the popular national hero of Scotland, is believed to have been the second son of Sir Malcolm Wallace of Elderslie and Auchinbothie, in Renfrewshire.

  • It was inherited by his daughter Maud, who was married first to Simon de St Liz and afterwards to David, son of Malcolm III., king of Scotland, who was created by Henry I.

  • A little to the west lies the bay Of ST Margaret'S Hope, which in 1903 was acquired by the government as the site for the naval base of Rosyth, so named from the neighbouring ruined castle of RoSYTH, once the residence of Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore.

  • Lord Hailes's most important contribution to literature was the Annals of Scotland, of which the first volume, " From the accession of Malcolm III., surnamed Canmore, to the accession of Robert I.," appeared in 1776, and the second, " From the accession of Robert I., surnamed Bruce, to the accession of the house of Stewart," in 1779.

  • In 1054 Siward invaded Scotland in the interests of his kinsman Malcolm Canmore, and he completely routed King Macbeth in a battle in which his son Osbeorn was killed.

  • That Scotland had a considerable trade with foreign countries at a very early period may be inferred from the importation of rich dresses by Malcolm III.

  • Each submission " held not long," and the practical result was that (945) Malcolm acquired northern Strathclyde, " Cumberland, Galloway (?) and other districts," while another Malcolm (1018) took Lothian, the northern part of Northumbria, after winning a great battle at Carham on the Tweed.

  • The English element in the realm of Malcolm II.

  • On looking at the genealogical tree of the Malcolm of dynasty of Kenneth MacAlpine, we see that from the date of his death (859) to the accession of Duncan on the death of Malcolm II.

  • Malcolm II.

  • But Malcolm is accused of putting his legitimate successor out of the way, and thus securing the succession of his own grandson, Duncan, a son of his daughter, Bethoc, and her husband Crinan, protector of the abbey (or lay abbot) of Dunkeld.

  • Malcolm thus set the example of advance to the western system of royal successions, while in Crinan's lay tenure of the abbacy of Dunkeld we see the habit of appropriating ecclesiastical revenues which again became so common about a century before the Reformation.

  • Boedhe, son of Kenneth III., left a daughter, Gruach, who inherited the claims of the unnamed son of Boedhe slain by order of Malcolm.

  • From Lulach descended a line of Celtic pr tendants, and for a century the dynasty violently founded by Malcolm II.

  • Meanwhile the dynasty of Malcolm II.

  • The Malcolm genius of Shakespeare, in his Macbeth, based on Canmore.

  • Duncan left sons, Malcolm, called Canmore (great head), and Donald Ban; and in 1054 Siward, earl of Northumbria, defeated Macbeth, whether acting under the order of Edward the Confessor in favour of the claims of Malcolm Canmore, or merely to punish Macbeth for sheltering Norman fugitives from the Confessor's court.

  • Siward did not dethrone Macbeth, who was defeated and slain by Malcolm in 1057; Lulach fell obscurely in 1058, leaving claimants to his rights, though these did not trouble much the crowned king, Malcolm Canmore.

  • In 1072 William marched north and took a disputed homage of Malcolm at Abernethy, receiving as hostage the king's eldest son (by his first wife, Ingebiorge), named Duncan.

  • As to the nature of Malcolm's homage, whether for Scotland (Freeman), or for manors and a subsidy in England(Robertson), historians disagree.

  • Malcolm subdued " the King of Moray," son of Lulach, who died in far Lochaber, though his family's claims to the crown of Scotland did not lapse.

  • In 1091 William Rufus renewed the treaty of Abernethy with Malcolm and fortified Carlisle, thereby cutting Malcolm off from Cumberland; Malcolm was summoned to meet Rufus at Gloucester; he went, but declined to accept the jurisdiction of the Anglo-Norman peers, or to " do right" to Rufus, except on the frontier of the two realms, wherever he may have supposed that frontier to be.

  • The last Celtic " bishop of Alban " died at this time; and when the dynasty of Malcolm Canmore was established after an interval of turmoil, English ecclesiastics began to oust the Celtic Culdees from St Andrews.

  • Malcolm would have been succeeded by his eldest son by Margaret, Edward, but he fell beside his father at Alnwick, and the succession was disputed between Duncan, son of Malcolm by his first wife; Edmund, eldest surviving son of Malcolm and Margaret; and Donald Ban, brother of Malcolm.

  • The Celts (apart from the claimant of the blood of Lulach and the house of Moray) placed Donald Ban on the throne; England supported Duncan (by primogeniture Malcolm's heir, and a hostage in England); there was division of the kingdom till Duncan was slain, and Edgar, son of Malcolm and Margaret, was restored by Edgar ZEtheling.

  • He put out the eyes of his uncle, Donald Ban, and in unsaintly ways established the dynasty of the English St Margaret and of the Celtic Malcolm.

  • After Donald Ban no Scottish sovereign bears a Gaelic Christian name save Malcolm the Maiden; and perhaps no later king knew Gaelic.

  • The anarchic weakness of the reign of Stephen enabled David to secure his hold of northern England to the Till, but the death of his gallant and gentle son Henry, in June 1152, left the succession to his son, Malcolm the Maiden, then a child of ten, and David's death (24th of May 1153) exposed Scotland to the dangers of a royal minority.

  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

  • Malcolm's brother, William the Lion (1165-1214), initiated the French alliance, fondly ascribed to the time of Charlemagne.

  • The Celtic risings now were made in defence of the royal claims of a descendant of Duncan, son of Malcolm Canmore; there were also MacHeth claimants to the old rights of Lulach; Galloway and the Celtic north were ceaselessly agitated.

  • Now Sir William Wallace came to the front, a younger son of Sir Malcolm Wallace of Elderslie, near Paisley.

  • 2 26), Sir Malcolm Mcllwraith (6 L.Q.R.

  • In 945 Edmund ravaged Strathclyde, and entrusted it all to Malcolm, king of Scotland, "on condition that he should be his fellow-worker by sea and land," the object of this policy being apparently to detach the king of Scots from any possible confederacy such as had been formed in 937.

  • 1245), married Matilda, daughter of Malcolm, earl of Angus, and obtained this Scottish earldom.

  • The first church was built by Malcolm Canmore (d.

  • Sir Charles Metcalfe was the envoy to the court of Ranjit Singh at Lahore; Mountstuart Elphinstone met the shah of Afghanistan at Peshawar; and Sir John Malcolm was despatched to Persia.

  • In both these duties Sir John Malcolm played a prominent part.

  • But the proudest boast of Lord Hastings and Sir John Malcolm was, not that they had advanced the pomoerium, but that they had conferred the blessings of peace and good government upon millions who had suffered unutterable things from Mahratta and Pindari tyranny.

  • SIR JOHN MALCOLM (1769-1833), Anglo-Indian soldier, diplomatist, administrator and author, was born at Burnfoot on the Esk, near Langholm, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, on the 2nd of May 1769.

  • Besides the work mentioned above, Sir John Malcolm published Sketch of the Political History of India since.

  • See Life and Correspondence of Sir John Malcolm, by J.

  • In his dedication to the king he is pleased to state that Veremundus, a Spaniard by birth, was archdeacon of St Andrews, and that he wrote in Latin a history of Scotland from the origin of the nation to the reign of Malcolm III., to whom he inscribed his work.

  • At Dunkeld, Crinan, the grandfather of Malcolm Canmore, was a lay abbot, and tradition says that even the clerical members were married, though like the priests of the Eastern Church, they lived apart from their wives during their term of sacerdotal service.

  • Anders Odel (1718-1773) wrote in 1739 the famous " Song of Malcolm Sinclair," the Sinclairsvisa.

  • Sir John Malcolm speaks of the splendour of his court and of his encouragement of science and learning.

  • The Turkish adjective uzun, ~j~J,t long, applied to I-,Iasan, the Turkoman monarch of Persia (called also by the Arabs Uasanu t-Tawil), is precisely the qualifying Persian word J!j) used in the compound designation of Artaxerxes Longimanus; and Malcolm quotes the statement of a Venetian envoy in evidence that Uzun IJasan was a tall thin man, of a very open and engaging countenance.

  • As Malcolm remarks, the very essence of Sufi-ism is poetry.

  • Malcolm, following the Zubdatu t-tawaribh, relates that Sheikh Haidar was vanquished and slain by the governor of Shirvan.

  • One of the sons here alluded to was Ismail, whom Malcolm makes to have been only seven years of age when he fled to Gilan in 1492.

  • Malcolm infers that he died a natural death, but wheni or where is not stated.

  • I Malcolm.

  • Malcolm says that Gilan was under one of its owr chiefs, Hidaiyat Khan.

  • Beardless and shrivelled, writes Sir John Malcolm, it resembled that of an aged and wrinkled woman, and the expression of his countenance, at no time pleasant, was horrible when clouded, as it very often was, with indignation.

  • A certain Mahdi ~Ali Khan had landed at Bushire, entrusted by the governor of Bombay with a letter to the shah, and Relations he was followed shortly by an English envoy from the with Eng- governor-general, Captain Malcolm of the Madras land, India army.

  • Hence arose the counter-mission of Sir Harford Jones from the British government, which, on arrival at Bombay in April 1808, found that it had been anticipated by a previously sent mission from the governor-general of India, under Malcolm again, then holding the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Sir Harford concluded a treaty with Persia the month after his arrival at the capital; but the government of India were not content to leave matters in his hands: notwithstanding the anomaly of a double mission, Malcolm was in 1810 again despatched as their own particular envoy.

  • There never was such a man a~ Malcolm Sahib.

  • In November 1889 Malcolm Khan, Nizam-ul-Mulk, who had been Persian representative to the court of Great Britain since October 1872, was recalled, and Mirza Mahommed ~Ali Khan, consulgeneral at Tiflis, was appointed in his stead, arriving in London the following March.

  • Malcolm, Five Years in a Persian Town (Yezd) (London, 1905); A.

  • Malcolm, History of Persia (2nd ed., London, 1829); R.

  • (c. 1078-1124), king of Scotland, was the fourth son of Malcolm Canmore by his wife (St) Margaret, grand-niece of Edward the Confessor.

  • This duty was successfully performed until 1863, when, during the temporary absence of Major Malcolm Green, the then political agent, Khodadad Khan was, at the instigation of some of his principal chiefs, attacked while out riding by his cousin, Sher dil Khan, and severely wounded.

  • Pinkerton next collected and printed in 1789 certain Vitae sanctorum scotiae, and, a little later, published his Enquiry into the History of Scotland preceding the Reign of Malcolm III.

  • MALCOLM MACCOLL (c. 1838-1907), British clergyman and publicist, was the son of a Scottish farmer.

  • MALCOLM IV.

  • Sir John Malcolm >>

  • The see of Aberdeen was first founded at Mortlach in Banffshire by Malcolm II.

  • The eight were Kenneth of Scotland, Malcolm of Strathclyde, Maccus of Man, and five Welsh kings.

  • So did the Scottish king Malcolm, and the princes of Wales and Strathclyde.

  • The one weak point in his policy that can be detected is that he left in the hands of Malcolm the Bernician district of Lothian, which the Scot had conquered during the anarchy that followed the death of ~thelred.

  • The battle of Carham (1018) had given this land to the Scots, and Canute consented to draw the border line of England at the Tweed instead of at the Firth of Forth, when Malcolm did him homage.

  • He put down the Scottish usurper Macbeth with the swords of a Northumbrian army, and restored Malcolm III.

  • It is more necessary to point out that he reasserted on at least one occasion (when King Malcolm Canmore did him homage) the old suzerainty of the English kings over Scotland.

  • His foreign policy was successful: he installed a nominee of his own, Edgar, the son of Malcolm Canmore, on the throne of Scotland (1097); he reconquered Maine, which his brother Robert had lost; he made successful war upon King Philip of France.

  • Almost the first and quite the wisest of his inspirations was to wed a princess of the old English lineEdith,1 the niece of Edgar ~theling, the child of his sister Margaret of Scotland and Malcolm Canmore.

  • Malcolm TV., the young king of Scotland.

  • 1094) was a son of Malcolm III.

  • On a gravel bank or spit in the north-west of the lake stood a castle which was sometimes used as a residence by Margaret, queen of Malcolm Canmore.

  • Forfar is at least as old as the time of Malcolm Canmore, for the first parliament after the defeat of Macbeth met in the old castle, which stood on a mound on the northern side of the town.

  • The history of Dunfermline goes back to a remote period, for the early Celtic monks known as Culdees had an establishment here; but its fame and prosperity date from the marriage of Malcolm Canmore and his queen Margaret, which was solemnized in the town in 1070.

  • Within its precincts were buried Queen Margaret and Malcolm Canmore; their sons Edgar and Alexander I., with his queen; David I.

  • and his two queens; Malcolm IV.; Alexander III., with his first wife and their sons David and Alexander; Robert Bruce, with his queen Elizabeth and their daughter Matilda; and Annabella Drummond, wife of Robert III.

  • The tomb of St Margaret and Malcolm, within the ruined walls of the Lady chapel, was restored and enclosed by command of Queen Victoria.

  • From Bombay he set out for Bushire, bearing letters from Sir John Malcolm to men of position there, as also at Shiraz and Isfahan.

  • He lost his earldom and took refuge in Scotland, where Malcolm seems to have provided for him.

  • Nana Sahib had a grievance against the British government because they refused to continue to him the pension of eight lakhs of rupees (-(80,000) which was promised to Baji Rao by Sir John Malcolm on his surrender in 1818.

  • For a time French influence completely replaced that of England at Teheran, and the mission of Sir John Malcolm to that court was not allowed to proceed.

  • Close to the town, on the site of Elderslie House, Somerled, lord of the Isles, was defeated and slain in 1164 by the forces of Malcolm IV., against whom he had rebelled.

  • The verdict Following the 11 week Old Bailey trial, on 6 May 1994, the jury acquitted Malcolm Kennedy of murder.

  • Malcolm was responsible for setting up and now managing Air Southwest the region's own low fare airline.

  • Next to speak was Malcolm Clarke, who is the Co-Chair of the newly amalgamated Football Supporters Federation.

  • Few can forget Malcolm playing on club days in the past and dismissing some high quality batsman.

  • The attached pic shows Malcolm Moss getting breathless for a good cause.

  • Our sound man, Malcolm Macleod, was my diving buddy.

  • The beautifully turned wooden altar candlesticks were also created by Malcolm and presented to the Church.

  • During the evening Malcolm Lee helped raise funds by drawing caricatures of some of the guests.

  • companion volume to the Lone Pine titles written by Malcolm Saville.

  • conquered the province, which in 946 he ceded to Malcolm I, King of Scots who agreed to become his vassal.

  • To paraphrase Malcolm: It's crap and it's getting crapper.

  • cruet set from Malcolm Appleby.

  • Malcolm was denied bail during the jury's deliberations and was ordered to stay in a hotel with his lawyer, Tim Cooke.

  • Dr. Malcolm Law - 7 June 2006 Evaluation of molecular tests for prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities.

  • Here, beneath the towering 8th century peel tower King Malcolm gave fealty to the English king, William the Conqueror.

  • framboise talks to the finalists Malcolm Willstrop in Manchester.. .

  • Malcolm X harbored these racist prejudices until he made the hajj in 1964.

  • Malcolm 27 Nov 2005 The only thing unaffordable in the Turner Pension Report is Gordon, the modern day highwayman.

  • Malcolm Clarke said: " We have no problems about banning violent hooligans.

  • Malcolm sent a been overseeing international is raising no that sort of.

  • Uncle Malcolm and the four grinning loons he calls his sons will only ever make any money if United has a successful team.

  • Malcolm quoted a sample menu - snail soup, fried sole with wood louse sauce, mutton with wireworm sauce, moths on toast.

  • Gareth Southgate today promoted Malcolm Crosby to assistant manager in a backroom overhaul at the Boro.

  • It was a Brit, Malcolm Sayer, a rather portly chap who smoked roll up cigarettes.

  • Malcolm is an academic whizz, Dewey is a musical prodigy who taught himself to play grand piano.

  • Edmund conquered the province, which in 946 he ceded to Malcolm I, King of Scots who agreed to become his vassal.

  • robin's nest has been busy and Malcolm has been trying to find a way of recording the activity around it.

  • Drawing on research by the biographer, Bruce Perry, he revealed Malcolm's teenage and early adult same-sex experiences.

  • sculpted the marble statue Major General Sir John Malcolm (1836) for Old Town Hall, Mumbai.

  • RA Scion humps up and down the stage shouting, engaging, looking like a good natured Malcolm X with ridiculous sideburns.

  • Unfortunately, Malcolm turned his ankle in this section on the treacherously slippery boulder floor.

  • Malcolm Turner Cheshire ' I was speechless, just squeaking!

  • Expect wonderful inventions, an affection for the Victorians and a stuffed stoat called Malcolm.

  • Malcolm pointed to some rotten stumps with holes in, " a good example of Weka work " he muttered.

  • sweating on the fitness of midfielder Bob Malcolm.

  • Malcolm is also beginning the mammoth task of pairing each negative acquired from Alan B Cross with a print.

  • Britain's Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks insists that there is " no immediate threat to gas supplies.

  • This resulted in a three-way tie on four wins between these two and Pierre Beaudry of Dulwich, which was won by Malcolm.

  • Malcolm Wright, 41, said he suffered trauma in the accident in which Richard Jones, 18, of Dyserth, died.

  • With his endearing yet cynical wit, Malcolm navigates his way through the sometimes treacherous, always entertaining waters of childhood.

  • American tycoon, Malcolm Glazer, took control of Manchester United.

  • Some say that Kinser, 33, was a man-about-town, who was having an affair with Malcolm's estranged wife.

  • The next earl was Waltheof and after him Uhtred, who defeated Malcolm II., king of the Scots, in io06.

  • What is called the Stone of Mortlach is traditionally believed to have been erected to commemorate the success of Malcolm II.

  • In 1068, after the failure of the first rising of the north, Edgar retired to Scotland, when his sister Margaret married the Scottish king, Malcolm Canmore.

  • 1152), a son of King David I., and became king of Scotland on the death of his brother, Malcolm IV., in December 1165, being crowned at Scone during the same month.

  • I n 945-4 6 Strathclyde was ravaged by King Edmund and given over to the Scottish king Malcolm I.

  • In the 11th century Strathclyde appears to have been finally incorporated in the Scottish kingdom, and the last time we hear of one of its kings is at the battle of Carham in 1018 when the British king Owen fought in alliance with Malcolm II.

  • 975 Malcolm, son of Dyfnwal.

  • Ultimately he surrendered to Sir John Malcolm, and was .,ent as a state pensioner to Bithur, near Cawnpore.

  • 1040) was a son of Crinan or Cronan, lay abbot of Dunkeld, and became king of the Scots in succession to his maternal grandfather, Malcolm II., in 1034, having previously as rex Cumbrorum ruled in Strathclyde.

  • Two of Duncan's sons, Malcolm III.

  • de Las Cases, Memorial de Ste Helene (4 vols., London and Paris, 1823); Lady Malcolm, A Diary of St Helena (London, 1899); W.

  • See Malcolm D.

  • (1084-1153), king of Scotland, the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and (Saint) Margaret, sister of Edgar .Ætheling, was born in 1084.

  • On the 2nd of June a small force, zeribaed under Captain Malcolm McNeill, was attacked by the mullah's followers but repulsed after desperate fighting.

  • The first five volumes appeared between 1771 and 1785, and the sixth, edited and completed by Malcolm Laing, was published three years after the author's death.

  • York was frequently visited by the kings of England on the way to Scotland, and several important parliaments were held there, the first being that of 1175, when Malcolm, king of Scotland, did homage to Henry II.

  • In the meantime the new king, by issuing his famous charter, by recalling Anselm, and by choosing the Anglo-Scottish princess Edith-Matilda, daughter of Malcolm III.,.

  • Its charter, granted by Malcolm Canmore, having been burned, it was renewed by James VI.

  • Of the castle, the oldest building is St Margaret's chapel, believed to be the chapel where Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore, worshipped, and belonging at latest to the reign of her youngest son, David I.

  • Long after Edwin's conquest the lowland continued to be debatable territory held by uncertain tenure, but at length it was to a large extent settled anew by Anglo-Saxon and Norman colonists under Malcolm Canmore and his sons.

  • In the reign of Malcolm Canmore the castle included the king's palace.

  • Edinburgh was long an exposed frontier town within a territory only ceded to Malcolm II.

  • In 1072 he undertook a campaign against Malcolm, king of Scots, who had married Margaret, the sister of Edgar Atheling, and was inclined to promote English rebellions.

  • P. Malcolm, Londinium Redivivum or an Ancient History and Modern Description of London (1803); David Hughson (E.

  • The parish of New Monkland, in which Airdrie lies, was formed (with Old Monkland)in 1640 out of the ancient barony of Monkland, so named from the fact that it was part of the lands granted by Malcolm IV.

  • It is a place of great antiquity, its first charter having been granted by Malcolm IV.

  • In 1070 Malcolm Canmore gave it to Cospatric, earl of Northumberland, ancestor of the earls of Dunbar and March.

  • So much information unknown to older disputants such as Goodall, the elder Tytler, Chalmers, and Malcolm Laing, and in certain cases unknown even to Froude and Skelton, has accrued, that the question can now best be studied in The Casket Letters, by T.

  • Its castle, now ruinous, was built as a hunting-lodge for Malcolm Canmore, but of the abbey which it possessed as early as the reign of Alexander II.

  • MALCOLM III.

  • William the Conqueror answered this attack by marching into Scotland in 1072, whereupon Malcolm made peace with the English king at Abernethy and "was his man."

  • Then in 1092 a fresh dispute arose between the two kings, and William summoned Malcolm to his court at Gloucester.

  • Almost at once he invaded Northumbria, and was killed at a place afterwards called Malcolm's Cross, near Alnwick, on the 13th of November 1093.

  • Four of Malcolm's sons, Duncan II., Edgar, Alexander I., and David I., became kings of Scotland; and one of his daughters, Matilda, became the wife of Henry I.

  • Malcolm IV >>

  • Alhazen, quoted by Purchas in his quaint notice of Timur and referred to by Sir John Malcolm, can hardly be accepted as a serious authority.

  • The uncomfortable figure in the Bodleian Library does not give much help. Sir John Malcolm has been at some pains to invest his portrait of Timur with individuality.

  • See also Sir Clements Markham's Clavijo, in the Hakluyt Society's publications; White's edition of Davy's translation of the Institutes (1783); Stewart's translation of the Malfug,t; Malcolm's History of Persia; and Trans.

  • His first conspicuous success was achieved in 1862 with David Elginbrod, the forerunner of a number of popular novels, which include Alec Forbes of Howglen (1865), Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood (1866), Robert Falconer (1868), Malcolm (1875), The Marquis of Lossie (1877), and Donal Grant (1883).

  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.

  • These military operations were followed by the pacification of Central India under the administration of Sir John Malcolm.

  • In olden times it seems to have been known as Hornehuntersland, and to have been mentioned as early as 1159, when a son of Malcolm IV.

  • Some account of the latter is given by Napier Malcolm in his book Five Years in a Persian Town (London,1905), pp. 87-89 and 186.

  • Malcolm of the 93rd Highlanders, Captain Wellby, of the British army, left Leh on the 4th of May 1896.

  • He wrote also Ueber die Idee der Universitdten (1835), and Ueber geheime Verbindungen auf Universitdten (1835); works on religious subjects, Karikaturen des Heiligsten (1819-1821); Wie ich weeder Lutheraner wurde and was mir das Luthertum ist (1831); Von der falschen Theologie and dem wahren Glauben (new ed., 1831); poetical works, Die Familien Walseth and Leith (1827); Die vier Norweger (1828); Malcolm (1831), collected in 1837 under the title of Novellen.

  • After Macpherson's death, Malcolm Laing, in an appendix to his History of Scotland (1800), propounded the extreme view that the so-called Ossianic poems were altogether modern in origin, and that Macpherson's authorities were practically non-existent.

  • This plan was dropped; but Malcolm of Scotland was forced to restore the northern counties which had been ceded to David; North Wales was invaded in 1157; and in 1159 Henry made an attempt, which was foiled by the intervention of Louis VII., to assert his wife's claims upon Toulouse.

  • Tytler, John Hill Burton, Malcolm Laing and Andrew Lang.

  • SIR WILLIAM WALLACE (c. 1270-1305), the popular national hero of Scotland, is believed to have been the second son of Sir Malcolm Wallace of Elderslie and Auchinbothie, in Renfrewshire.

  • It was inherited by his daughter Maud, who was married first to Simon de St Liz and afterwards to David, son of Malcolm III., king of Scotland, who was created by Henry I.

  • A little to the west lies the bay Of ST Margaret'S Hope, which in 1903 was acquired by the government as the site for the naval base of Rosyth, so named from the neighbouring ruined castle of RoSYTH, once the residence of Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore.

  • Lord Hailes's most important contribution to literature was the Annals of Scotland, of which the first volume, " From the accession of Malcolm III., surnamed Canmore, to the accession of Robert I.," appeared in 1776, and the second, " From the accession of Robert I., surnamed Bruce, to the accession of the house of Stewart," in 1779.

  • In 1054 Siward invaded Scotland in the interests of his kinsman Malcolm Canmore, and he completely routed King Macbeth in a battle in which his son Osbeorn was killed.

  • That Scotland had a considerable trade with foreign countries at a very early period may be inferred from the importation of rich dresses by Malcolm III.

  • Each submission " held not long," and the practical result was that (945) Malcolm acquired northern Strathclyde, " Cumberland, Galloway (?) and other districts," while another Malcolm (1018) took Lothian, the northern part of Northumbria, after winning a great battle at Carham on the Tweed.

  • The English element in the realm of Malcolm II.

  • On looking at the genealogical tree of the Malcolm of dynasty of Kenneth MacAlpine, we see that from the date of his death (859) to the accession of Duncan on the death of Malcolm II.

  • Malcolm II.

  • But Malcolm is accused of putting his legitimate successor out of the way, and thus securing the succession of his own grandson, Duncan, a son of his daughter, Bethoc, and her husband Crinan, protector of the abbey (or lay abbot) of Dunkeld.

  • Malcolm thus set the example of advance to the western system of royal successions, while in Crinan's lay tenure of the abbacy of Dunkeld we see the habit of appropriating ecclesiastical revenues which again became so common about a century before the Reformation.

  • The innovation of Malcolm II.

  • Boedhe, son of Kenneth III., left a daughter, Gruach, who inherited the claims of the unnamed son of Boedhe slain by order of Malcolm.

  • From Lulach descended a line of Celtic pr tendants, and for a century the dynasty violently founded by Malcolm II.

  • Meanwhile the dynasty of Malcolm II.

  • The Malcolm genius of Shakespeare, in his Macbeth, based on Canmore.

  • Duncan left sons, Malcolm, called Canmore (great head), and Donald Ban; and in 1054 Siward, earl of Northumbria, defeated Macbeth, whether acting under the order of Edward the Confessor in favour of the claims of Malcolm Canmore, or merely to punish Macbeth for sheltering Norman fugitives from the Confessor's court.

  • Siward did not dethrone Macbeth, who was defeated and slain by Malcolm in 1057; Lulach fell obscurely in 1058, leaving claimants to his rights, though these did not trouble much the crowned king, Malcolm Canmore.

  • The anarchic state of Northumberland and Cumberland after the Norman Conquest, which did not soon assimilate them, was Malcolm's opportunity.

  • In 1072 William marched north and took a disputed homage of Malcolm at Abernethy, receiving as hostage the king's eldest son (by his first wife, Ingebiorge), named Duncan.

  • As to the nature of Malcolm's homage, whether for Scotland (Freeman), or for manors and a subsidy in England(Robertson), historians disagree.

  • Malcolm subdued " the King of Moray," son of Lulach, who died in far Lochaber, though his family's claims to the crown of Scotland did not lapse.

  • In 1091 William Rufus renewed the treaty of Abernethy with Malcolm and fortified Carlisle, thereby cutting Malcolm off from Cumberland; Malcolm was summoned to meet Rufus at Gloucester; he went, but declined to accept the jurisdiction of the Anglo-Norman peers, or to " do right" to Rufus, except on the frontier of the two realms, wherever he may have supposed that frontier to be.

  • The last Celtic " bishop of Alban " died at this time; and when the dynasty of Malcolm Canmore was established after an interval of turmoil, English ecclesiastics began to oust the Celtic Culdees from St Andrews.

  • Malcolm would have been succeeded by his eldest son by Margaret, Edward, but he fell beside his father at Alnwick, and the succession was disputed between Duncan, son of Malcolm by his first wife; Edmund, eldest surviving son of Malcolm and Margaret; and Donald Ban, brother of Malcolm.

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