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malarial

malarial Sentence Examples

  • The climate of the plains is hot and malarial, and the rainfall heavy.

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    1
  • It is believed that his disease was a malarial form of recurrent quinsy acting upon an extremely neurotic system.

    1
    1
  • In 1557, however, a great flood caused the Tiber to change its course, so that it no longer flowed under the walls of the castle, but some half a mile farther west; and its old bed (Fiume Morto) has ever since then served as a breeding ground for the malarial mosquito (Anopheles claviger).

    0
    0
  • In the north, however, the hot lowlands are malarial and unsuited to north European settlement, while the dry, elevated plateaus are celebrated for their healthiness, those of Catamarca having an excellent reputation as a sanatorium for sufferers from pulmonary and bronchial diseases.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers make their appearance in places where the forest has been recently felled, or where the surface earth has been disturbed.

    0
    0
  • The Chinese immigrants suffer chiefly from fever of a malarial type, from beri-beri, a species of tropical dropsy, and from dysentery.

    0
    0
  • Part of the state on the Atlantic coast and along the lower Parnahyba is low, swampy and malarial.

    0
    0
  • The valley regions are tropical, and malarial fevers are common.

    0
    0
  • The absence or extreme paucity of mosquitoes no doubt accounts for the infrequency of malarial fever in the interior.

    0
    0
  • Remittent is a not unusual form of the malarial process in tropical and subtropical countries, and in some localities or in some seasons it is more common than intermittent.

    0
    0
  • Milder cases of malarial fever are apt to become dangerous from the complications of dysentery, bronchitis or pneumonia.

    0
    0
  • Of the mortality due to malarial disease a small part only is referable to the direct attack of intermittent, and chiefly to the fever in its pernicious form.

    0
    0
  • But probably the greater part of the enormous total of deaths set down to malaria is due to the malarial cachexia.

    0
    0
  • The malarial cachexia that follows definite attacks of ague consists in a state of ill-defined suffering, associated with a sallow skin, enlarged spleen and liver, and sometimes.

    0
    0
  • From the time of Hippocrates onwards the malarial or periodical fevers have engaged the attention of innumerable observers, who have suggested various theories of causation, and have sometimes anticipated - vaguely, indeed, but with surprising accuracy - the results of modern research; but the true nature of the disease remained in doubt until the closing years of the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of November in that year he plainly saw the living parasites under the microscope in the blood of a malarial patient, and he shortly afterwards communicated his observations to the Paris Academie de Medecine.

    0
    0
  • The labours of Golgi, Marchiafava, Celli and others established the nature of the parasite and its behaviour in the blood; they proved the fact, guessed by Rasori so far back as 1846, that the periodical febrile paroxysm corresponds with the development of the organisms; and they showed that the different forms of malarial fever have their distinct parasites, and consequently fall into distinct groups,.

    0
    0
  • Following up this line of investigation, Major Ronald Ross in 1895 found that if a mosquito sucked blood containing the parasites they soon began to throw out flagellae, which broke away and became free; and in 1897 he discovered peculiar pigmented cells, which afterwards turned out to be the parasites of aestivo-autumnal malaria in an early stage of development, within the stomachwall of mosquitoes which had been fed on malarial blood.

    0
    0
  • For instance, the swampy character of malarial areas is explained by their breeding in stagnant water; the effect of drainage, and the general immunity of high-lying, dry localities, by the lack of breeding facilities; the danger of the night air, by their nocturnal habits; the comparative immunity of the upper storeys of houses, by the fact that they fly low; the confinement of malaria to well-marked areas and the diminution of danger with distance, by their habit of clinging to the breeding-grounds and not flying far.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the converse is more feasible in some circumstances - that is to say, preventing mosquitoes from having access to malarial persons, and so propagating the parasite in themsevles.

    0
    0
  • Koch has suggested that the disinfection of malarial persons by quinine would have the desired effect, but other authorities of greater experience do not consider it practicable.

    0
    0
  • long and has no ports or towns of importance, the slopes of the Sierra Madre del Pacifico being precipitous and heavily wooded and the coastbelt sandy, hot and malarial.

    0
    0
  • There are undrained, swampy districts in Campeche, in the vicinity of the Terminos Lagoon, where malarial diseases are prevalent, and the same conditions prevail along the coast where mangrove swamps are found.

    0
    0
  • The rainfall is abundant, and the climate hot, damp and malarial.

    0
    0
  • But while the province in many parts presents a landscape of luxuriant beauty, it is a prey to the ravages of disease, principally malarial fevers due to the extensive swamps formed by waters stagnating in the forests, and to the frequent incursions of the Goklan and Yomut Turkomans, who have their camping-grounds in the northern part of the province, and until about 1890 plundered caravans sometimes at the very gates of Astarabad city, and carried people off into slavery and bondage.

    0
    0
  • Other flies act as diseasecarriers, including the mosquitoes (Anopheles), which not only carry malarial germs, but also form a secondary host for these parasites.

    0
    0
  • In the autumn months malarial fever is prevalent in all thickly forested tracts and also in the rice country; but on the whole the province is considered to be healthy, and as the rains break fairly regularly in June and produce an immediate fall in the temperature, severe heat is only experienced for a period of from two to three months.

    0
    0
  • There are the usual malarial, bilious and intermittent fevers, and liver, stomach and intestinal complaints prevalent in tropical countries; but unhygienic living is, in Cuba as elsewhere, mainly responsible for their existence.

    0
    0
  • The climate is hot, humid and malarial on the coast, but is pleasant on the more elevated lands of the interior.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is not prevalent, and it is interesting to note that there are no swamps or standing waters on the island.

    0
    0
  • The valleys and coast belt, though practically free from malarial fever, are hot and humid, and fires in dwelling houses are seldom required even in the coolest months; the lower plateaus are cool and the air dry; the uplands are bracing and often very cold, with snow on the ground in winter.

    0
    0
  • Horsesickness, a kind of malarial fever, which takes an epidemic form in very wet seasons, causes considerable loss.

    0
    0
  • The banken veld district is also generally healthy though hotter than the plateaus, and malarial fever prevails in the lower valleys.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is also prevalent throughout the low veld, but above 3000 ft.

    0
    0
  • It is situated on the Bay of Calvi, in a malarial region, and is the port in Corsica nearest to France, being 109 m.

    0
    0
  • Although it had long been suspected that these insects were in some way connected with malaria and other diseases, while that the species now called Stegomyia calopus was the carrier of yellow fever had been asserted by Finlay as early as 1881, it was not until the closing years of the 19th century that the brilliant researches of Ross in India, and of Grassi and others in Italy, directed the attention of the whole civilized world to mosquitoes as the exclusive agents in the dissemination of malarial fever.

    0
    0
  • Since the beginning of the 10th century strenuous efforts have been made to improve the sanitary condition by a new system of drainage, a better water service, the filling up of marshes wherein the malarial mosquito breeds, and in other directions.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the difficulties of communication with the interior, and the malarial marshes which surround the town, it has become important for the export of grain (chiefly maize).

    0
    0
  • Malarial diseases are rather frequent, more so on the coast than farther inland.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the coastal zone and deeper valleys is hot, humid and unhealthy, malarial fevers being prevalent.

    0
    0
  • Among the mosquitoes, which are extraordinarily numerous in some of the hot lowland districts, are the species credited with the spread of malarial and yellow fevers.

    0
    0
  • The climate is healthy and bracing, except in the lower valleys along the river banks and in the marsh land, where malarial fever is prevalent.

    0
    0
  • The climate is healthy, except on the coasts, where malarial fever is prevalent.

    0
    0
  • While on another journey in South Arabia (1896-1897), Bent was seized with malarial fever, and died in London on the 5th of May 1897, a few days after his return.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers are also common, and diseases of the digestive organs, in great part easily preventible, figure among the principal causes of death.

    0
    0
  • Among the deaths 2789 were from tuberculosis, 1200 from smallpox, 77 8 from malarial diseases, 331 from la grippe, and 106 from beri-beri.

    0
    0
  • It has, however, an evil name for malarial fever.

    0
    0
  • When they fell into desuetude, malaria gained the upper hand, the lack of drainage providing breeding-places for the malarial mosquito.

    0
    0
  • These efforts have not been without success, though it cannot be affirmed that the malarial Campagna is anything like healthy yet.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is frequent, and even the Africans, especially those coming from other countries, suffer from it.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the coast-lands is moist and hot, and extremely unhealthy, malarial fever being prevalent and deadly.

    0
    0
  • Upper Egypt is healthier than Lower Egypt, where, especially near the coast, malarial fevers and diseases of the respiratory organs are not uncommon.

    0
    0
  • They are usually shallow and malarial.

    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

    0
    0
  • Should a person be infected with latent malaria, heat exposure is very likely to induce an acute malarial attack and the combination is almost certain to lead to hyperpyrexia.

    0
    0
  • On this account malarial subjects living in the Persian Gulf should take especial care to have an effective course of treatment in order to eradicate the disease as far as possible.

    0
    0
  • In the case of white people exposure to heat of itself frequently causes heat-stroke, but probably in almost all cases of heat hyperpyrexia amongst natives the malarial complication is the exciting cause and therefore with them quinine treatment is all-important.

    0
    0
  • The climate is now less healthy than it was, severe epidemics of malarial fever having frequently occurred, so that malaria now appears to be endemic among the non-European population.

    0
    0
  • In 1854 cholera caused the death of 17,000 persons; in 1867 over 30,000 people died of malarial fever; in 1892 a hurricane of terrific violence caused immense destruction of property and serious loss of life; in 1893 great part of Port Louis was destroyed by fire.

    0
    0
  • In this zone malarial fevers prevail in winter.

    0
    0
  • Among the native races the prevailing diseases, apart from those of a malarial origin, are chiefly such as arise from bad and insufficient food, from intemperance, and from want of cleanliness.

    0
    0
  • The army diseases of the Civil Wars were chiefly typhus and malarial fevers, but plague was not unknown among them, as at Wallingford Castle (Willis, " Of Feavers," Works, ed.

    0
    0
  • In the marshy localities malarial fever occurs but is rarely (in modern times) of a severe type.

    0
    0
  • The diseases for which it was chiefly taken were malarial fever, dysentery, diarrhoea, spitting of blood, rheumatism and elephantiasis.

    0
    0
  • Until far on in the 18th century the malarial jungle and paddy fields closely hemmed in the European mansions; the vast plain (maiddn), now covered with gardens and promenades, was then a swamp during three months of each year; the spacious quadrangle known as Wellington Square was built upon a filthy creek.

    0
    0
  • The action of quinine on the blood itself - quite apart from its action on malarial blood - is of great complexity and importance.

    0
    0
  • There is therefore no purpose to be served by administering quinine during a malarial paroxysm.

    0
    0
  • It has a very sinuous channel which is navigable for small steamers for some distance, but there is no good port at its outlet, and a considerable part of the region through which it flows is malarial and sparsely settled.

    0
    0
  • The larger part of the inhabited and productive districts of the republic is situated in the mountainous departments of the interior, and is separated from the coast by low, swampy, malarial plains, and by very difficult mountain chains.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is practically non-existent in Cape Colony, and diseases of the chest are rare.

    0
    0
  • Cholera occurs in the native city every summer, malarial fever exists and dysentery is apt to become chronic in spring and autumn on account of the sudden changes of temperature - a fall of 20° to 30° taking place in a few hours - and the moisture-laden atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • But the coasts are much hotter, especially on the western side, as is also the interior west of the highland region; and from the large amount of marsh and lagoon on the coasts, malarial fever is common and frequently fatal, both to Europeans and to natives from the interior.

    0
    0
  • Measures for the extermination of the malarial mosquito are carried on with good effect.

    0
    0
  • This is especially the case in the lower and moister regions, such as the west coast, where malarial fever is very prevalent and deadly; the most unfavourable factors being humidity with absence of climatic variation (daily or seasonal).

    0
    0
  • Districts which had been notoriously deadly to Europeans were rendered comparatively healthy after the discovery, in 1899, of the species of mosquito which propagates malarial fever, and the measures thereafter taken for its destruction and the filling up of swamps.

    0
    0
  • inhibitors of the malarial protease.

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  • interfere with DNA replication within the malarial parasite.

    0
    0
  • Crucially, thanks to the low oxygen content of the local waters, the malarial mosquito is absent, too.

    0
    0
  • Funding: Monkey malaria 13 March 2006 Researchers in Malaysia are aiming to discover whether malarial parasites are being transmitted from monkeys to humans.

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    0
  • You should seek medical advice on the best malarial prophylactics to take for the areas you will be visiting.

    0
    0
  • see more about the malarial life cycle.

    0
    0
  • In 1557, however, a great flood caused the Tiber to change its course, so that it no longer flowed under the walls of the castle, but some half a mile farther west; and its old bed (Fiume Morto) has ever since then served as a breeding ground for the malarial mosquito (Anopheles claviger).

    0
    0
  • In the north, however, the hot lowlands are malarial and unsuited to north European settlement, while the dry, elevated plateaus are celebrated for their healthiness, those of Catamarca having an excellent reputation as a sanatorium for sufferers from pulmonary and bronchial diseases.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers make their appearance in places where the forest has been recently felled, or where the surface earth has been disturbed.

    0
    0
  • The Chinese immigrants suffer chiefly from fever of a malarial type, from beri-beri, a species of tropical dropsy, and from dysentery.

    0
    0
  • The greatest mortality was caused by virulent malarial fever, which raged during the autumn months of 'coo and the early months of 1901.

    0
    0
  • Part of the state on the Atlantic coast and along the lower Parnahyba is low, swampy and malarial.

    0
    0
  • The valley regions are tropical, and malarial fevers are common.

    0
    0
  • The absence or extreme paucity of mosquitoes no doubt accounts for the infrequency of malarial fever in the interior.

    0
    0
  • Remittent is a not unusual form of the malarial process in tropical and subtropical countries, and in some localities or in some seasons it is more common than intermittent.

    0
    0
  • Milder cases of malarial fever are apt to become dangerous from the complications of dysentery, bronchitis or pneumonia.

    0
    0
  • Of the mortality due to malarial disease a small part only is referable to the direct attack of intermittent, and chiefly to the fever in its pernicious form.

    0
    0
  • But probably the greater part of the enormous total of deaths set down to malaria is due to the malarial cachexia.

    0
    0
  • The malarial cachexia that follows definite attacks of ague consists in a state of ill-defined suffering, associated with a sallow skin, enlarged spleen and liver, and sometimes.

    0
    0
  • From the time of Hippocrates onwards the malarial or periodical fevers have engaged the attention of innumerable observers, who have suggested various theories of causation, and have sometimes anticipated - vaguely, indeed, but with surprising accuracy - the results of modern research; but the true nature of the disease remained in doubt until the closing years of the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of November in that year he plainly saw the living parasites under the microscope in the blood of a malarial patient, and he shortly afterwards communicated his observations to the Paris Academie de Medecine.

    0
    0
  • The labours of Golgi, Marchiafava, Celli and others established the nature of the parasite and its behaviour in the blood; they proved the fact, guessed by Rasori so far back as 1846, that the periodical febrile paroxysm corresponds with the development of the organisms; and they showed that the different forms of malarial fever have their distinct parasites, and consequently fall into distinct groups,.

    0
    0
  • In 1894, however, Sir Patrick Manson, arguing with greater precision by analogy from his own discovery of the cause of filariasis and the part played by mosquitoes, suggested that the malarial parasite had a similar intermediate host outside the human body, and that a suctorial insect, which would probably be found to be a particular mosquito, was required for its development.

    0
    0
  • Following up this line of investigation, Major Ronald Ross in 1895 found that if a mosquito sucked blood containing the parasites they soon began to throw out flagellae, which broke away and became free; and in 1897 he discovered peculiar pigmented cells, which afterwards turned out to be the parasites of aestivo-autumnal malaria in an early stage of development, within the stomachwall of mosquitoes which had been fed on malarial blood.

    0
    0
  • For instance, the swampy character of malarial areas is explained by their breeding in stagnant water; the effect of drainage, and the general immunity of high-lying, dry localities, by the lack of breeding facilities; the danger of the night air, by their nocturnal habits; the comparative immunity of the upper storeys of houses, by the fact that they fly low; the confinement of malaria to well-marked areas and the diminution of danger with distance, by their habit of clinging to the breeding-grounds and not flying far.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the converse is more feasible in some circumstances - that is to say, preventing mosquitoes from having access to malarial persons, and so propagating the parasite in themsevles.

    0
    0
  • Koch has suggested that the disinfection of malarial persons by quinine would have the desired effect, but other authorities of greater experience do not consider it practicable.

    0
    0
  • long and has no ports or towns of importance, the slopes of the Sierra Madre del Pacifico being precipitous and heavily wooded and the coastbelt sandy, hot and malarial.

    0
    0
  • There are undrained, swampy districts in Campeche, in the vicinity of the Terminos Lagoon, where malarial diseases are prevalent, and the same conditions prevail along the coast where mangrove swamps are found.

    0
    0
  • The rainfall is abundant, and the climate hot, damp and malarial.

    0
    0
  • But while the province in many parts presents a landscape of luxuriant beauty, it is a prey to the ravages of disease, principally malarial fevers due to the extensive swamps formed by waters stagnating in the forests, and to the frequent incursions of the Goklan and Yomut Turkomans, who have their camping-grounds in the northern part of the province, and until about 1890 plundered caravans sometimes at the very gates of Astarabad city, and carried people off into slavery and bondage.

    0
    0
  • Other flies act as diseasecarriers, including the mosquitoes (Anopheles), which not only carry malarial germs, but also form a secondary host for these parasites.

    0
    0
  • In the autumn months malarial fever is prevalent in all thickly forested tracts and also in the rice country; but on the whole the province is considered to be healthy, and as the rains break fairly regularly in June and produce an immediate fall in the temperature, severe heat is only experienced for a period of from two to three months.

    0
    0
  • There are the usual malarial, bilious and intermittent fevers, and liver, stomach and intestinal complaints prevalent in tropical countries; but unhygienic living is, in Cuba as elsewhere, mainly responsible for their existence.

    0
    0
  • The climate is hot, humid and malarial on the coast, but is pleasant on the more elevated lands of the interior.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is not prevalent, and it is interesting to note that there are no swamps or standing waters on the island.

    0
    0
  • The valleys and coast belt, though practically free from malarial fever, are hot and humid, and fires in dwelling houses are seldom required even in the coolest months; the lower plateaus are cool and the air dry; the uplands are bracing and often very cold, with snow on the ground in winter.

    0
    0
  • Horsesickness, a kind of malarial fever, which takes an epidemic form in very wet seasons, causes considerable loss.

    0
    0
  • The banken veld district is also generally healthy though hotter than the plateaus, and malarial fever prevails in the lower valleys.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is also prevalent throughout the low veld, but above 3000 ft.

    0
    0
  • Sheltered places in the lowlands, especially near streams and lagoons, are malarial and enervating, and at some points on the coast are subject to dangerous fevers.

    0
    0
  • It is situated on the Bay of Calvi, in a malarial region, and is the port in Corsica nearest to France, being 109 m.

    0
    0
  • Although it had long been suspected that these insects were in some way connected with malaria and other diseases, while that the species now called Stegomyia calopus was the carrier of yellow fever had been asserted by Finlay as early as 1881, it was not until the closing years of the 19th century that the brilliant researches of Ross in India, and of Grassi and others in Italy, directed the attention of the whole civilized world to mosquitoes as the exclusive agents in the dissemination of malarial fever.

    0
    0
  • Since the beginning of the 10th century strenuous efforts have been made to improve the sanitary condition by a new system of drainage, a better water service, the filling up of marshes wherein the malarial mosquito breeds, and in other directions.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the difficulties of communication with the interior, and the malarial marshes which surround the town, it has become important for the export of grain (chiefly maize).

    0
    0
  • Malarial diseases are rather frequent, more so on the coast than farther inland.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the coastal zone and deeper valleys is hot, humid and unhealthy, malarial fevers being prevalent.

    0
    0
  • Among the mosquitoes, which are extraordinarily numerous in some of the hot lowland districts, are the species credited with the spread of malarial and yellow fevers.

    0
    0
  • The climate is healthy and bracing, except in the lower valleys along the river banks and in the marsh land, where malarial fever is prevalent.

    0
    0
  • The climate is healthy, except on the coasts, where malarial fever is prevalent.

    0
    0
  • While on another journey in South Arabia (1896-1897), Bent was seized with malarial fever, and died in London on the 5th of May 1897, a few days after his return.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers are also common, and diseases of the digestive organs, in great part easily preventible, figure among the principal causes of death.

    0
    0
  • Among the deaths 2789 were from tuberculosis, 1200 from smallpox, 77 8 from malarial diseases, 331 from la grippe, and 106 from beri-beri.

    0
    0
  • It has, however, an evil name for malarial fever.

    0
    0
  • When they fell into desuetude, malaria gained the upper hand, the lack of drainage providing breeding-places for the malarial mosquito.

    0
    0
  • These efforts have not been without success, though it cannot be affirmed that the malarial Campagna is anything like healthy yet.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is frequent, and even the Africans, especially those coming from other countries, suffer from it.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the coast-lands is moist and hot, and extremely unhealthy, malarial fever being prevalent and deadly.

    0
    0
  • Upper Egypt is healthier than Lower Egypt, where, especially near the coast, malarial fevers and diseases of the respiratory organs are not uncommon.

    0
    0
  • They are usually shallow and malarial.

    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

    0
    0
  • Should a person be infected with latent malaria, heat exposure is very likely to induce an acute malarial attack and the combination is almost certain to lead to hyperpyrexia.

    0
    0
  • On this account malarial subjects living in the Persian Gulf should take especial care to have an effective course of treatment in order to eradicate the disease as far as possible.

    0
    0
  • In the case of white people exposure to heat of itself frequently causes heat-stroke, but probably in almost all cases of heat hyperpyrexia amongst natives the malarial complication is the exciting cause and therefore with them quinine treatment is all-important.

    0
    0
  • The climate is now less healthy than it was, severe epidemics of malarial fever having frequently occurred, so that malaria now appears to be endemic among the non-European population.

    0
    0
  • In 1854 cholera caused the death of 17,000 persons; in 1867 over 30,000 people died of malarial fever; in 1892 a hurricane of terrific violence caused immense destruction of property and serious loss of life; in 1893 great part of Port Louis was destroyed by fire.

    0
    0
  • In this zone malarial fevers prevail in winter.

    0
    0
  • Among the native races the prevailing diseases, apart from those of a malarial origin, are chiefly such as arise from bad and insufficient food, from intemperance, and from want of cleanliness.

    0
    0
  • The army diseases of the Civil Wars were chiefly typhus and malarial fevers, but plague was not unknown among them, as at Wallingford Castle (Willis, " Of Feavers," Works, ed.

    0
    0
  • In the marshy localities malarial fever occurs but is rarely (in modern times) of a severe type.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the plains is hot and malarial, and the rainfall heavy.

    0
    0
  • The diseases for which it was chiefly taken were malarial fever, dysentery, diarrhoea, spitting of blood, rheumatism and elephantiasis.

    0
    0
  • Until far on in the 18th century the malarial jungle and paddy fields closely hemmed in the European mansions; the vast plain (maiddn), now covered with gardens and promenades, was then a swamp during three months of each year; the spacious quadrangle known as Wellington Square was built upon a filthy creek.

    0
    0
  • The action of quinine on the blood itself - quite apart from its action on malarial blood - is of great complexity and importance.

    0
    0
  • The influence of quinine upon a malarial temperature is due to an entirely different cause (see below).

    0
    0
  • There is therefore no purpose to be served by administering quinine during a malarial paroxysm.

    0
    0
  • It is believed that his disease was a malarial form of recurrent quinsy acting upon an extremely neurotic system.

    0
    0
  • It has a very sinuous channel which is navigable for small steamers for some distance, but there is no good port at its outlet, and a considerable part of the region through which it flows is malarial and sparsely settled.

    0
    0
  • The larger part of the inhabited and productive districts of the republic is situated in the mountainous departments of the interior, and is separated from the coast by low, swampy, malarial plains, and by very difficult mountain chains.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fever is practically non-existent in Cape Colony, and diseases of the chest are rare.

    0
    0
  • Cholera occurs in the native city every summer, malarial fever exists and dysentery is apt to become chronic in spring and autumn on account of the sudden changes of temperature - a fall of 20° to 30° taking place in a few hours - and the moisture-laden atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • But the coasts are much hotter, especially on the western side, as is also the interior west of the highland region; and from the large amount of marsh and lagoon on the coasts, malarial fever is common and frequently fatal, both to Europeans and to natives from the interior.

    0
    0
  • Measures for the extermination of the malarial mosquito are carried on with good effect.

    0
    0
  • This is especially the case in the lower and moister regions, such as the west coast, where malarial fever is very prevalent and deadly; the most unfavourable factors being humidity with absence of climatic variation (daily or seasonal).

    0
    0
  • Districts which had been notoriously deadly to Europeans were rendered comparatively healthy after the discovery, in 1899, of the species of mosquito which propagates malarial fever, and the measures thereafter taken for its destruction and the filling up of swamps.

    0
    0
  • Click here to see more about the malarial life cycle.

    0
    0
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