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malaga

malaga

malaga Sentence Examples

  • AGUILAR, or Aguilar De La Frontera, a town of southern Spain, in the province of Cordova; near the small river Cabra, and on the Cordova - Malaga railway.

  • In 1839 he was appointed consul at Rotterdam, and in the following year transferred to Malaga, the place of origin of his mother's family.

  • In 1487 he went with Ferdinand to Malaga and thence to Valladolid, where in the October of 1488 he held another general congregation of the Inquisition and promulgated new laws based on the experience already gained.

  • ALORA, a town of southern Spain in the province of Malaga; 17 m.

  • of Malaga, on the right bank of the river Guadalhorce, and on the Cordova-Malaga railway.

  • There are hot sulphurous springs in the town, which has also a fine climate; and many of the wealthy families from Malaga reside here in summer.

  • ANTEQUERA (the ancient Anticaria), a town of southern Spain, in the province of Malaga; on the Bobadilla-Granada railway.

  • See C. Fernandez, Historia de Antequera, desde su fondacion (Malaga, 1842).

  • On the 13th of August of the same year he attacked the French fleet off Malaga, the battle being drawn.

  • On the invitation of his partisans he landed at Almunecar, to the east of Malaga, in September 755.

  • In 1907 2201 Spanish immigrants from the sugar district about Malaga arrived in Hawaii, and about the same number of Portuguese immigrated in the same year.

  • Andalusia was divided in 1833 into the eight provinces of Almeria, Cadiz, Cordova, Granada, Jaen, Huelva, Malaga and Seville, which are described in separate articles.

  • On the coasts of the Mediterranean about Marbella and Malaga, the sugar-cane is successfully cultivated.

  • The chief towns are Seville (pop. 1900, 148,315), which may be regarded as the capital, Malaga (130,109), Granada (75,900), Cadiz (69,382), Jerez de la Frontera (6 3,473), Cordova (58,275) and Almeria (47,326).

  • Diaz de Escovar (Malaga, 1900); Histoire de la conquete de l'Andalousie, by 0.

  • He was ordained to the curacy of St Thomas's, Dublin, but, being threatened with consumption, went after two years to Malaga.

  • IBN GABIROL [SOLOMON BEN JUDAH}, Jewish poet and philosopher, was born at Malaga, probably about 1021.

  • Malaga, Spain (Province) >>

  • Malaga is a sweet wine (produced in the province of that name) which is little known in England, but enjoys considerable favour on the Continent.

  • It is generally, as exported, a blend made Malaga.

  • Malaga is therefore an interesting example of a composite wine.

  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.

  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.

  • Such a statesman was sure to clash with the doctrinaires, like Salmeron, who wanted to imitate French methods; with Pi y Margall, who wanted a federal republic after purely Spanish ideas of decentralization; and above all with the intransigent and gloomy fanatics who became the leaders of the cantonal insurrections at Cadiz, Seville, Valencia, Malaga and Cartagena in 1873.

  • In less than five weeks a few thousand men properly handled sufficed to quell the cantonal risings in Cordoba, Sevilla, Cadiz and Malaga, and the whole of the south might have been soon pacified, if the federal republican ministers had not once more given way to the pressure of the majority of the Cortes, composed of "Intransigentes" and radical republicans.

  • He was made a member of the king's council, bishop of Malaga, and in 1715 prime minister, and was raised to the dignity of cardinal in 1717.

  • Convents were founded at Medina, Malaga, Valladolid, Toledo, Segovia and Salamanca, and two at Alva under the patronage of the famous duke.

  • Immediately to the west of the last-named sierra is the gorge of the Guadalhorce, which affords a passage for the railway from Malaga to Cordova; and beyond that gorge, to the west and south-west, the Serrania do Ronda, a mountain group difficult of access, stretches out its sierras in all direc~ions.

  • It is said that at Malaga snow falls only about once in twenty-five years.

  • u em zone Malaga - - 75 54 79 70

  • In the maritime parts of Malaga and Granada the vegetation is of almost tropical richness and beauty, while in Murcia, Alicante and Almeria the aspect is truly African, fertile oases appearing in the midst of rocky deserts or barren steppes.

  • Spain within its present limits for that date is Malaga -

  • The vine-growing districts had formerly been mostly in the provinces of Cadiz, Malaga, Barcelona, Aragon and Navarre.

  • The export of wines of the southJerez, Malaga and other fullbodied wines styled generosodid not suffer so much, and England and France continued to take much the same quantities of such wines- There is also a large export of grapes and raisins, especially from Malaga, Valencia, AlmerIa and Alicante.

  • The latter has dune most damage in the provinces of Malaga and Alicante, in Catalonia.

  • Cotton is now cultivated only here and there in the south; but sugar-cane is, with sugar-beet, becoming more and more of a staple Sugar in the provinces of Granada, Malaga and Almeria.

  • On Christmas night, 1884, an earthquake caused much damage and loss of life in the provinces of Granada and Malaga.

  • ANTONIO CANOVAS DEL CASTILLO (1828-1897), Spanish statesman, was born in Malaga on the 8th of February 1828.

  • One of the best Malaga beaches is to the east at Playa de las acacias.

  • elfin forest habitat at Abra Malaga.

  • AGUILAR, or Aguilar De La Frontera, a town of southern Spain, in the province of Cordova; near the small river Cabra, and on the Cordova - Malaga railway.

  • In 1839 he was appointed consul at Rotterdam, and in the following year transferred to Malaga, the place of origin of his mother's family.

  • In 1487 he went with Ferdinand to Malaga and thence to Valladolid, where in the October of 1488 he held another general congregation of the Inquisition and promulgated new laws based on the experience already gained.

  • ALORA, a town of southern Spain in the province of Malaga; 17 m.

  • of Malaga, on the right bank of the river Guadalhorce, and on the Cordova-Malaga railway.

  • There are hot sulphurous springs in the town, which has also a fine climate; and many of the wealthy families from Malaga reside here in summer.

  • ANTEQUERA (the ancient Anticaria), a town of southern Spain, in the province of Malaga; on the Bobadilla-Granada railway.

  • See C. Fernandez, Historia de Antequera, desde su fondacion (Malaga, 1842).

  • On the 13th of August of the same year he attacked the French fleet off Malaga, the battle being drawn.

  • On the invitation of his partisans he landed at Almunecar, to the east of Malaga, in September 755.

  • In 1907 2201 Spanish immigrants from the sugar district about Malaga arrived in Hawaii, and about the same number of Portuguese immigrated in the same year.

  • Andalusia was divided in 1833 into the eight provinces of Almeria, Cadiz, Cordova, Granada, Jaen, Huelva, Malaga and Seville, which are described in separate articles.

  • On the coasts of the Mediterranean about Marbella and Malaga, the sugar-cane is successfully cultivated.

  • The chief towns are Seville (pop. 1900, 148,315), which may be regarded as the capital, Malaga (130,109), Granada (75,900), Cadiz (69,382), Jerez de la Frontera (6 3,473), Cordova (58,275) and Almeria (47,326).

  • The products of the interior were conveyed by the native Iberians to the maritime colonies, such as Abdera (Adra), Calpe (Gibraltar) or Malaca (Malaga), founded by the foreign merchants.

  • Diaz de Escovar (Malaga, 1900); Histoire de la conquete de l'Andalousie, by 0.

  • He was ordained to the curacy of St Thomas's, Dublin, but, being threatened with consumption, went after two years to Malaga.

  • IBN GABIROL [SOLOMON BEN JUDAH}, Jewish poet and philosopher, was born at Malaga, probably about 1021.

  • Malaga, Spain (Province) >>

  • Malaga is a sweet wine (produced in the province of that name) which is little known in England, but enjoys considerable favour on the Continent.

  • It is generally, as exported, a blend made Malaga.

  • Malaga is therefore an interesting example of a composite wine.

  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.

  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.

  • Such a statesman was sure to clash with the doctrinaires, like Salmeron, who wanted to imitate French methods; with Pi y Margall, who wanted a federal republic after purely Spanish ideas of decentralization; and above all with the intransigent and gloomy fanatics who became the leaders of the cantonal insurrections at Cadiz, Seville, Valencia, Malaga and Cartagena in 1873.

  • In less than five weeks a few thousand men properly handled sufficed to quell the cantonal risings in Cordoba, Sevilla, Cadiz and Malaga, and the whole of the south might have been soon pacified, if the federal republican ministers had not once more given way to the pressure of the majority of the Cortes, composed of "Intransigentes" and radical republicans.

  • He was made a member of the king's council, bishop of Malaga, and in 1715 prime minister, and was raised to the dignity of cardinal in 1717.

  • Convents were founded at Medina, Malaga, Valladolid, Toledo, Segovia and Salamanca, and two at Alva under the patronage of the famous duke.

  • Immediately to the west of the last-named sierra is the gorge of the Guadalhorce, which affords a passage for the railway from Malaga to Cordova; and beyond that gorge, to the west and south-west, the Serrania do Ronda, a mountain group difficult of access, stretches out its sierras in all direc~ions.

  • It is said that at Malaga snow falls only about once in twenty-five years.

  • u em zone Malaga - - 75 54 79 70

  • In the maritime parts of Malaga and Granada the vegetation is of almost tropical richness and beauty, while in Murcia, Alicante and Almeria the aspect is truly African, fertile oases appearing in the midst of rocky deserts or barren steppes.

  • Spain within its present limits for that date is Malaga -

  • Among the natural products of the soil of Spain, in regard to quantity, wines come next to cereals, but the only wines which have Wines, a world-wide reputation are those of the south, those of Alicante, of Malaga, and more particularly those which take the name of sherry, from the town of Jerez, in tile neighborhood of which they are grown (see WINE).

  • The vine-growing districts had formerly been mostly in the provinces of Cadiz, Malaga, Barcelona, Aragon and Navarre.

  • The export of wines of the southJerez, Malaga and other fullbodied wines styled generosodid not suffer so much, and England and France continued to take much the same quantities of such wines- There is also a large export of grapes and raisins, especially from Malaga, Valencia, AlmerIa and Alicante.

  • The latter has dune most damage in the provinces of Malaga and Alicante, in Catalonia.

  • Cotton is now cultivated only here and there in the south; but sugar-cane is, with sugar-beet, becoming more and more of a staple Sugar in the provinces of Granada, Malaga and Almeria.

  • On Christmas night, 1884, an earthquake caused much damage and loss of life in the provinces of Granada and Malaga.

  • ANTONIO CANOVAS DEL CASTILLO (1828-1897), Spanish statesman, was born in Malaga on the 8th of February 1828.

  • Eastbound: Leaving from Galveston, Texas, this cruise has ports of call in Ponta Delgada, Azores, Malaga, Cartagena, and Barcelona, Spain.

  • It travels to Cartagena, Malaga, the Canary Islands, and the Bahamas before it docks in New Orleans.

  • American Vegan Society. 56 Dinshah Lane, PO Box 369, Malaga, NJ 08328.

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