This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

malady

malady

malady Sentence Examples

  • She found the maestro towards the end of 1837 dispirited by a temporary eclipse of popularity and in the first stage of his fatal malady, and carried him off to winter with her in the south.

  • Congo for maternity cases and cases of curable Ubangi-Chad illness; (2) the hospice, where the aged Madagascar poor, cases of incurable malady, orphans, Nossi-be Island foundlings and other children without Ste Marie Island means of support, and in some cases Comoro Islands lunatics, are received; (3) the bureau de Somali Coast bien-faisance, charged with the provision 9f Reunion out-door relief (secours a domicile) in money st Paul 1 or in kind, to the aged poor or those who, Amsterdam though capable of working, are prevented Kerguelen.

  • But little time was lost by the elder Gibbon in the formation of a new plan of education for his son, and in devising some method which if possible might effect the cure of his "spiritual malady."

  • He was educated for the army, and entered the artillery of the Guards as an officer in 1860, but a malady of the knee, which crippled him, forced him to quit the service in 1865.

  • The malady causing the greatest number of deaths is that of pulmonary consumption; but better housing accommodation has of late years reduced the mortality from this disease very considerably.

  • Towards the close of 1828 he felt the approach of a fatal malady - a tumour in the brain - and devoted his last days to a careful revisal of his unpublished researches and industrial processes, dictating several papers on these subjects, which were afterwards published in the Philosophical Transactions.

  • The original malady being thus got rid of, the vital force would easily be able to cope with and extinguish the slighter disturbance caused by the remedy.

  • The only mode of combating the malady seems to be to uproot the plants and burn them.

  • On the 11th of March 1868 Talal, smitten with an incurable malady, fell by his own hand and was succeeded by his brother Matab; after a brief reign he was murdered by his nephews, the elder of whom, Bandar, became amir.

  • In his history of the Arietidae Hyatt points out that toward the close of the Cretaceous this entire group of ammonites appears to have been affected with some malady; the unrolled forms multiply, the septa are simplified, the ornamentation becomes heavy, thick, and finally disappears in the adult; the entire group ends by dying out and leaving no descendants.

  • Nabarro (4) that they are the true cause of that dreadful malady.

  • Great difference of opinion exists among foresters as to the cause of this destructive malady; but it is probably the direct result of unsuitable soil, especially soil containing insufficient nourishment.

  • Among the most fatal and disastrous of these diseases with which the cultivator had long to grapple was " muscardine," a malady due to the development of a fungus, Botrytis bassiana, in the body of the caterpillar.

  • The malady, moreover, spread eastward with alarming rapidity, and, although it was found to be less disastrous and fatal in Oriental countries than in Europe, the sources of healthy graine became fewer and fewer, till only Japan was left as an uninfected source of European graine supply.

  • In 1865 Pasteur undertook a Government commission for the investigation of the malady.

  • Pasteur brought out the fact that the malady had existed from remote periods and in many unsuspected localities.

  • Thus he came to the conclusion that the malady had been inherent in many successive generations of the silkworm, and that the epidemic condition was only an exaggeration of a normal state brought about by the method of cultivation and production of graine pursued.

  • In Fors, which was continued month by month for seven years, Ruskin poured out his thoughts, proposals and rebukes on society and persons with inexhaustible fancy, wit, eloquence and freedom, until he was attacked with a violent brain malady in the spring of 1878 (aet.

  • He wore a sharp shirt of hair next his skin, scourged himself every Friday and other fasting days, lay upon the bare ground with a log under his head, and allowed himself but four or five hours' sleep. This access of the ascetic malady lasted but a short time, and More recovered to all outward appearance his balance of mind.

  • The boy's features, which were originally noble and not irregular, were distorted by his malady.

  • Before the young man left the university, his hereditary malady had broken forth in a singularly cruel form.

  • On the death of Alexander (1503) he returned to Italy and supported the election of Pius III., who was then suffering from an incurable malady, of which he died shortly afterwards.

  • of writing a letter or a report on a particular subject with a particular object in view, of translating from or into a foreign language, of solving a mathematical problem, of criticizing a passage from a literary work, of writing an essay on an historical or literary subject with the aid of books in a library, of diagnosing the malady of a patient, of analysing a chemical mixture or compound; and (the highest form under the rubric) of making an original contribution to learning or science as the result of personal investigation or experiment.

  • While not directly causing death, morphinism so lowers the bodily powers that the patient is easily carried off by some intercurrent malady.

  • On the journey he was attacked by an internal malady, which carried him off, ten months after his departure from Bagdad, A.H.

  • In 1853 Dr Francis and Dr Pearson were appointed a commission to inquire into the malady.

  • " It is impossible," writes Sir Richard Thorne (Local Government Board Report, 1898-1899), " to read the medical history of this disease in almost every part of the world without being impressed with the frequency with which recognized plague has been preceded by ailments of such slight severity, involving some bubonic enlargement of glands and some rise in body-temperature, as to mask the real nature of the malady."

  • It appears to the author, however, that where such methods are employed merely with a view to overcoming a specific malady and there is no intention of increasing the quantity of the wine for purposes of gain, or of giving it a fictitious appearance of quality, these operations are perfectly justifiable and may be compared to the modifications of procedure which are forced upon the brewer or distiller who has to deal with somewhat abnormal raw material.

  • Recovering from his malady, he had returned to his intrigues when an event happened which materially affected the fortunes of the Reformation.

  • His father, Heinrich Floris Schopenhauer, the youngest of a family to which the mother had brought the germs of mental malady, was a man of strong will and originality, and so proud of the independence of his native town that when Danzig in 1793 surrendered to the Prussians he and his whole establishment withdrew to Hamburg.

  • In the autumn of 1848 the shah was seized with the malady, or combination of maladies, which caused his death.

  • In the treatment of all forms of neuralgia it is of first importance to ascertain if possible whether any constitutional morbid condition is associated with the malady.

  • In 1788 he was appointed solicitor-general, and was knighted, and at the close of this year he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III., who then laboured under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority.

  • In 1872 grief for the death of his mother occasioned a mental malady, which led to the resignation of his professorship. After his complete and permanent recovery he built himself a villa on the bank of his native river, the Astichello, and lived there in tranquillity until his death on the 17th of May 1888.

  • The instantaneous revulsion of public feeling was somewhat unreasonable, for Pitt's health seems now to have been beyond doubt so shattered by his hereditary malady, that he was already in old age though only fifty-eight.

  • It has been insinuated both by contemporary and by later critics that being disappointed at his loss of popularity, and convinced of the impossibility of co-operating with his colleagues, he exaggerated his malady as a pretext for the inaction that was forced upon him by circumstances.

  • The same year symptoms of a fatal malady appeared, and death followed on the 8th of February 1874.

  • In September of the same year his physical malady reached a crisis, from which he emerged a helpless wreck, with faculties paralysed rather than destroyed - "He never talked nonsense or said a foolish thing."

  • TARANTULA, strictly speaking, a large spider (Lycosa tarantula), which takes its name from the town of Taranto, (Tarentum) in Apulia, near which it occurs and where it was formerly believed to be the cause of the malady known as "tarantism."

  • Of the progress of the malady, and the circumstances attending the death of Mirabeau, Cabanis drew up a detailed narrative, intended as a justification of his treatment of the case.

  • The mysterious malady continued, and Disraeli set out with William Meredith, who was to have married Sarah Disraeli, for Travel.

  • The evils to be cured were different phases of one malady.

  • The malady was of an obscure character, but its cause has been under investigation by the British Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, and by European bacteriologists in 1908.

  • With your malady cured you'll live anew, nor will a deer be more active.

  • The malady is cured by remove enchantment or cure heavy wounds or dispel magic in the meantime.

  • The malady is cured by remove enchantment or cure heavy wounds or dispel magic in the meantime.

  • malady cured you'll live anew, nor will a deer be more active.

  • And if it goes up and turns around and causes a blockage, here too because of its porosity it causes a malady.

  • malady known to mankind Minnie Banister: Oooooh!

  • He was again in the grip of his mysterious malady.

  • Assuming the cause is not some physical malady, Scripture contains the only reliable remedy.

  • The Germans suffered from the same malady of too many parties during the Weimarer Republic.

  • Such vigilant monitoring is a conditio sine qua non for any physician who wishes to cure the patient of her malady.

  • strike consequence of this malady the monk was struck dumb, but was miraculously restored to health by Aelred.

  • She found the maestro towards the end of 1837 dispirited by a temporary eclipse of popularity and in the first stage of his fatal malady, and carried him off to winter with her in the south.

  • Leo was deemed fortunate by his contemporaries, but an incurable malady, wars, enemies, a conspiracy of cardinals, and the loss of all his nearest relations darkened his days; and he failed entirely in his general policy of expelling foreigners from Italy, of restoring peace throughout Europe, and of prosecuting war against the Turks.

  • Congo for maternity cases and cases of curable Ubangi-Chad illness; (2) the hospice, where the aged Madagascar poor, cases of incurable malady, orphans, Nossi-be Island foundlings and other children without Ste Marie Island means of support, and in some cases Comoro Islands lunatics, are received; (3) the bureau de Somali Coast bien-faisance, charged with the provision 9f Reunion out-door relief (secours a domicile) in money st Paul 1 or in kind, to the aged poor or those who, Amsterdam though capable of working, are prevented Kerguelen.

  • But little time was lost by the elder Gibbon in the formation of a new plan of education for his son, and in devising some method which if possible might effect the cure of his "spiritual malady."

  • To begin with, Pasteur, in studying the malady in dogs, came to the conclusion that the virus had its seat in the nerve centres, and he proved that the injection of a portion of the matter of the spinal column of a rabid dog into the body of a healthy one produces in the latter with certainty the symptoms of rabies.

  • He was educated for the army, and entered the artillery of the Guards as an officer in 1860, but a malady of the knee, which crippled him, forced him to quit the service in 1865.

  • The malady causing the greatest number of deaths is that of pulmonary consumption; but better housing accommodation has of late years reduced the mortality from this disease very considerably.

  • Towards the close of 1828 he felt the approach of a fatal malady - a tumour in the brain - and devoted his last days to a careful revisal of his unpublished researches and industrial processes, dictating several papers on these subjects, which were afterwards published in the Philosophical Transactions.

  • The original malady being thus got rid of, the vital force would easily be able to cope with and extinguish the slighter disturbance caused by the remedy.

  • The only mode of combating the malady seems to be to uproot the plants and burn them.

  • On the 11th of March 1868 Talal, smitten with an incurable malady, fell by his own hand and was succeeded by his brother Matab; after a brief reign he was murdered by his nephews, the elder of whom, Bandar, became amir.

  • On a return of the malady in r810 the act of 51 Geo.

  • His state of universal doubt he describes as a " malady " or as " philosophical melancholy and delirium."

  • In his history of the Arietidae Hyatt points out that toward the close of the Cretaceous this entire group of ammonites appears to have been affected with some malady; the unrolled forms multiply, the septa are simplified, the ornamentation becomes heavy, thick, and finally disappears in the adult; the entire group ends by dying out and leaving no descendants.

  • Nabarro (4) that they are the true cause of that dreadful malady.

  • Great difference of opinion exists among foresters as to the cause of this destructive malady; but it is probably the direct result of unsuitable soil, especially soil containing insufficient nourishment.

  • Among the most fatal and disastrous of these diseases with which the cultivator had long to grapple was " muscardine," a malady due to the development of a fungus, Botrytis bassiana, in the body of the caterpillar.

  • The malady, moreover, spread eastward with alarming rapidity, and, although it was found to be less disastrous and fatal in Oriental countries than in Europe, the sources of healthy graine became fewer and fewer, till only Japan was left as an uninfected source of European graine supply.

  • In 1865 Pasteur undertook a Government commission for the investigation of the malady.

  • Pasteur brought out the fact that the malady had existed from remote periods and in many unsuspected localities.

  • Thus he came to the conclusion that the malady had been inherent in many successive generations of the silkworm, and that the epidemic condition was only an exaggeration of a normal state brought about by the method of cultivation and production of graine pursued.

  • In Fors, which was continued month by month for seven years, Ruskin poured out his thoughts, proposals and rebukes on society and persons with inexhaustible fancy, wit, eloquence and freedom, until he was attacked with a violent brain malady in the spring of 1878 (aet.

  • He was again attacked with the same mental malady in 1885, which henceforth left him fit only for occasional letters and notes.

  • He wore a sharp shirt of hair next his skin, scourged himself every Friday and other fasting days, lay upon the bare ground with a log under his head, and allowed himself but four or five hours' sleep. This access of the ascetic malady lasted but a short time, and More recovered to all outward appearance his balance of mind.

  • The boy's features, which were originally noble and not irregular, were distorted by his malady.

  • Before the young man left the university, his hereditary malady had broken forth in a singularly cruel form.

  • On the death of Alexander (1503) he returned to Italy and supported the election of Pius III., who was then suffering from an incurable malady, of which he died shortly afterwards.

  • of writing a letter or a report on a particular subject with a particular object in view, of translating from or into a foreign language, of solving a mathematical problem, of criticizing a passage from a literary work, of writing an essay on an historical or literary subject with the aid of books in a library, of diagnosing the malady of a patient, of analysing a chemical mixture or compound; and (the highest form under the rubric) of making an original contribution to learning or science as the result of personal investigation or experiment.

  • While not directly causing death, morphinism so lowers the bodily powers that the patient is easily carried off by some intercurrent malady.

  • On the journey he was attacked by an internal malady, which carried him off, ten months after his departure from Bagdad, A.H.

  • In 1853 Dr Francis and Dr Pearson were appointed a commission to inquire into the malady.

  • " It is impossible," writes Sir Richard Thorne (Local Government Board Report, 1898-1899), " to read the medical history of this disease in almost every part of the world without being impressed with the frequency with which recognized plague has been preceded by ailments of such slight severity, involving some bubonic enlargement of glands and some rise in body-temperature, as to mask the real nature of the malady."

  • It appears to the author, however, that where such methods are employed merely with a view to overcoming a specific malady and there is no intention of increasing the quantity of the wine for purposes of gain, or of giving it a fictitious appearance of quality, these operations are perfectly justifiable and may be compared to the modifications of procedure which are forced upon the brewer or distiller who has to deal with somewhat abnormal raw material.

  • Recovering from his malady, he had returned to his intrigues when an event happened which materially affected the fortunes of the Reformation.

  • His father, Heinrich Floris Schopenhauer, the youngest of a family to which the mother had brought the germs of mental malady, was a man of strong will and originality, and so proud of the independence of his native town that when Danzig in 1793 surrendered to the Prussians he and his whole establishment withdrew to Hamburg.

  • In the autumn of 1848 the shah was seized with the malady, or combination of maladies, which caused his death.

  • In the treatment of all forms of neuralgia it is of first importance to ascertain if possible whether any constitutional morbid condition is associated with the malady.

  • In 1788 he was appointed solicitor-general, and was knighted, and at the close of this year he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III., who then laboured under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority.

  • In 1872 grief for the death of his mother occasioned a mental malady, which led to the resignation of his professorship. After his complete and permanent recovery he built himself a villa on the bank of his native river, the Astichello, and lived there in tranquillity until his death on the 17th of May 1888.

  • The instantaneous revulsion of public feeling was somewhat unreasonable, for Pitt's health seems now to have been beyond doubt so shattered by his hereditary malady, that he was already in old age though only fifty-eight.

  • It has been insinuated both by contemporary and by later critics that being disappointed at his loss of popularity, and convinced of the impossibility of co-operating with his colleagues, he exaggerated his malady as a pretext for the inaction that was forced upon him by circumstances.

  • Bad generalship, which is sufficiently obvious, unwholesome food - it was Lent, and they ate the Nile fish which had been feasting on the carcases of the slain - and Greek fire did the rest, and personal valour was of little avail,not merely against superior numbers and better generals,but against dysentery and a certain "mal de l'ost" which attacked the mouth and the legs, a curious human version of a well-known bestial malady.

  • The same year symptoms of a fatal malady appeared, and death followed on the 8th of February 1874.

  • In September of the same year his physical malady reached a crisis, from which he emerged a helpless wreck, with faculties paralysed rather than destroyed - "He never talked nonsense or said a foolish thing."

  • TARANTULA, strictly speaking, a large spider (Lycosa tarantula), which takes its name from the town of Taranto, (Tarentum) in Apulia, near which it occurs and where it was formerly believed to be the cause of the malady known as "tarantism."

  • Of the progress of the malady, and the circumstances attending the death of Mirabeau, Cabanis drew up a detailed narrative, intended as a justification of his treatment of the case.

  • The mysterious malady continued, and Disraeli set out with William Meredith, who was to have married Sarah Disraeli, for Travel.

  • The evils to be cured were different phases of one malady.

  • The malady was of an obscure character, but its cause has been under investigation by the British Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, and by European bacteriologists in 1908.

  • But at times in history, left-handedness was thought to be a malady in need of curing (and in some parts of the world still is).

  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.

  • But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but...

  • Such vigilant monitoring is a conditio sine qua non for any physician who wishes to cure the patient of her malady.

  • As a consequence of this malady the monk was struck dumb, but was miraculously restored to health by Aelred.

  • Hemobartonellosis or feline hemotropic mycoplasmosis are also names for this malady that affects cats all over the world.

  • Variegate porphyria (VP) is also known as porphyria variegata, protocoproporphyria, South African genetic porphyria, and Royal malady (supposedly King George III of England and Mary, Queen of Scots, suffered from VP).

  • Itchiness is usually the most common complain associated with a mosquito bite, so it should come as no surprise to learn that there are so many remedies designed to treat this uncomfortable malady.

Browse other sentences examples →