Maitland sentence example

maitland
  • The text is preserved in the Maitland folio MS. in the Pepysian library, Cambridge.
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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.
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  • As Pollock and Maitland (History of English Law) say "on the whole the charter contains little that is absolutely new.
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  • In the 13th centur y Archbishop Peckham, says Maitland (p. 117), as archbishop "asserted for himself and his official (1) a general right to entertain in the first instance complaints made against his suffragans' subjects, and (2) a general right to hear appeals omisso medio."
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  • Bibliography.-Sir Thomas Urquhart's Discovery of a most excellent jewel (1652; reprinted in the Maitland Club's edition of Urquhart's Works in 1834) is written with the express purpose of glorifying Scotland.
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  • Ashley's Economic History, while Vinogradoff's Villenage in England and The Growth of the Manor, as well as Maitland's Domesday Studies, are of great importance to the student of early economic institutions.
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  • In 1554 she took into her service William Maitland of Lethington, who as secretary of state gained very great influence over her.
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  • The strength of her opponents was increased by the defection of Chatelherault and his son Arran; and an even more serious danger was the treachery of her secretary Maitland, who betrayed her plans to the lords of the Congregation.
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  • Meanwhile Maitland of Lethington had been at the English court, and an English fleet under William Winter was sent to the Forth in January 1560 to waylay Elbeuf's fleet, which was, however, driven back by a storm to Calais.
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  • His counsellor, Las Cases, strongly urged that step and made overtures to Captain Maitland of H.M.S.
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  • Under the protection of the hill-fort, a native settlement was established on the ridge running down to the valley at the foot of Salisbury Crags, and another hamlet, according to William Maitland (1693-1757), the earliest historian of Edinburgh, was founded in the area at the northwestern base of the rock, a district that afterwards became the parish of St Cuthbert, the oldest in the city.
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  • The chief authorities for the text of Dunbar's poems are :- (a) the Asloan MS. (c. 1515); (b) the Chepman and Myllar Prints (1508) preserved in the Advocates' library, Edinburgh; (c) Bannatyne MS. (156$) in the same; (d) the Maitland Folio MS. (c. 1570-1590) in the Pepysian library, Magdalene College, Cambridge.
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  • From a comparison of these fragments with the descriptions of Woodward, Maitland and others, who in the early part of the r8th century examined portions of the wall still standing, we learn that the wall was from 9 to 12 ft.
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  • Maitland gives the numbers 18th in 1737 as 725,903.
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  • Of the former, two volumes were published by the Maitland Club in1834-1845and one volume by the New Spalding Club in 1890; the latter was published in four volumes by the Maitland Club in 1842-1843.
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  • Maitland's Domesday Book and Beyond (Cambridge, 1897) is indispensarle; and the same remark applies to his History of English Law before the time of Edward I.
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  • After the Treaty of Paris stability of government developed, and many important reforms were introduced under the strong government of the masterful Sir Thomas Maitland; he acted promptly, without seeking popularity or fearing the reverse, and he ultimately gained more real respect than any other governor, not excepting the marquess of Hastings, who was a brilliant and sympathetic administrator.
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  • Of these Maitland of Lethington was consenting to Darnley's murder; the earl of Morton had, at least, guilty foreknowledge; the regent Moray (Mary's natural brother) had "looked through his fingers" at the crime, and for months remained on intimate terms with the criminals.
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  • - These methods are now generally regarded as unscientific, and call for no further notice here save to mention that the first was upheld by Hengstenberg, Ebrard, Maitland, Elliott, &c.; the second by Kliefoth, Beck, Zahn, and the third by Auberlen, Luthardt, Milligan and Benson.
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  • As Maitland suggests: " We could frame no acceptable definition of a State which would not comprehend the Church.
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  • By many writers sovereignty is regarded as resident not in any one organ, but in the Gesammtperson of the community (Maitland, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, xliii.).
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  • Maitland describes it (Political Theories of the Middle Ages, p. x.), have an essentially "statelike character."
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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law (1898).
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  • In 1820 he was appointed by Sir Peregrine Maitland a member of the legislative council in order that the governor might have a confidential medium through whom to make communication to the council.
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  • James Maxwell of Kirkconnell (c. 1708-1762), the Jacobite, wrote the Narrative of Charles Prince of Wales's Expedition to Scotland in 1745, which was printed for the Maitland Club in 1841.
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  • The vigour of his thought won admiration from Henry James (father of the novelist) and from Emerson, through whom he became known to Carlyle and Froude; and his speculation further attracted Tennyson, the Oliphants and Edward Maitland.
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  • Her half-brother, Lord James Stuart, shared the duties of her chief counsellor with William Maitland of Lethington, the keenest and most liberal thinker in the country.
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  • Du Croc, the French ambassador, obtained permission through the influence of Maitland to convey to the queen the terms proposed by their leaders - that she and Bothwell should part, or that he should meet in single combat a champion chosen from among their number.
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  • Maitland of Lethington, the Achitophel of his day, also deserted the regent; but in November the reformers were driven by the regent and her small band of French soldiers from Edinburgh to Stirling.
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  • Life went on much as usual, and the country, with a merely provisional government, was peaceful enough under the guidance of Moray, Maitland of Lethington, and the other lay Protestant leaders.
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  • The volumes of the book clubs, Bannatyne, Maitland, Abbotsford and Spalding, are full of matter; also those of the Early Scottish Texts Society and the Wodrow Society, with the works of Knox, Calderwood and the History of the Sufferings by Woodrow (edited by the Rev. Robert Burns, 1837-1838).
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  • Our knowledge of this non-Chaucerian material, as of the Chaucerian, is chiefly derived from the MS. collections of Asloan, Bannatyne (q.v.) and Maitland (q.v.), supplemented by the references to " fugitive " and " popular " literature in Dunbar, Douglas, Lyndsay and, in especial, the prose Complaynt of Scotlande.
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  • Sir Thomas Maitland was not slow to exercise the control thus permitted him, though on the whole he did so for the benefit of the islands.
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  • The first lord high commissioner, Sir Thomas Maitland, who as governor of Malta had acquired the sobriquet of "King Tom," was not the man to foster the constitutional liberty of an infant state.
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  • These towns are situated in a valley on the Hunter River, which is liable to sudden floods, to guard against which the river is protected by stone embankments at West Maitland, while there are flood-gates at East Maitland.
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  • Maitland is the centre of the rich agricultural district of the Hunter valley, which produces maize, wheat and other cereals, lucerne, tobacco, fruit and wine; excellent coal also is worked in the vicinity.
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  • East Maitland is the see of a Roman Catholic bishop, whose cathedral (St John's), however, is situated in the larger town.
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  • Besides this, West Maitland contains several handsome public and commercial buildings.
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  • Knox had gone too far in intolerance, and Moray and Maitland of Lethington gradually withdrew their support.
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  • Mary had wearied of her guiding statesmen, Moray and the more pliant Maitland; the Italian secretary David Rizzio, through whom she had corresponded with the pope, now more and more usurped their place; and a weak fancy for her handsome cousin, Henry Darnley, brought about a sudden marriage in 1565 and swept the opposing Protestant lords into exile.
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  • This Historie was published by the Wodrow Society and by the Maitland Club in 1842.
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  • Maitland now became the leader of the remnant which stood by the cause of the imprisoned queen.
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  • The castle surrendered in May 1573 and on the 7th or the 9th of June following Maitland died at Leith, there being very little evidence for the theory that he poisoned himself.
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  • "Secretary Maitland" was a man of great learning with a ready wit and a caustic tongue.
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  • On the Canadian side are Serpent river, Spanish river, French river, draining Lake Nipissing, Muskoka river, Severn river, draining lake Simcoe, and Nottawasaga river, all emptying into Georgian bay and North Channel, and Saugeen and Maitland rivers, flowing into the main lake.
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  • Middle, or Tomago, or East Maitland Coal Measures, containing an aggregate of about 40 ft.
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  • The chief cities are Sydney and suburbs, population in 1906, 535,000; Newcastle and suburbs, 56,000; Broken Hill, 30,000; in 1901, Parramatta, 12,568; Goulburn, 10,610; and Maitland (East and West), 10,085.
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  • Parramatta, Richmond and Windsor had indeed been founded within the first decade of the colony's existence; Newcastle, Maitland and Morpeth, near the coast to the north of Sydney, had been begun during the earlier years of the 19th century; but the towns of the interior, Goulburn, Bathurst and others, were not commenced till about 1835, in which year the site of Melbourne was first occupied by Batman and Fawkner.
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  • Maitland in On the Memoirs of Foxe ascribed to his Son (1841).
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  • The numerous inaccuracies of this life and the frequent errors of Foxe's narrative were exposed by Dr Maitland in a series of tracts (1837-1842), collected (1841-1842) as Notes on the Contributions of the Rev. George Townsend, M.A..
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  • In 1786 he edited Ancient Scottish Poems from the MS. collections of Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington - a genuine reproduction.
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  • He was at Plymouth when Napoleon surrendered and was brought to England in the "Bellerophon" by Captain Maitland (1777-1839).
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  • See Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law, i.
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  • The old tolbooth, in which William Maitland of Lethington, Queen Mary's secretary, poisoned himself in 1573, to avoid execution for adhering to Mary's cause, was demolished in 1819.
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  • The principal of these are Toledo, Sandusky, Huron, Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Erie (a natural harbour), Dunkirk and Buffalo, Rondeau, Port Stanley, Port Burwell, Port Dover, Port Maitland and Port Colborne.
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  • In a vault is a fine monument in alabaster, consisting of the recumbent figures of John, Lord Maitland of Thirlestane (1545-1595), chancellor of Scotland, and his wife.
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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost as dispassionate as Gardiner, but are more definitely committed to particular points of views, while democratic fervour pervades the fascinating pages of J.R.Green, and an intellectual secularism, which is almost religious in its intensity and idealism, inspired the genius of Maitland.
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  • Maitland says "the duty of producing one's neighbour to answer accusations (the duty of the frankpledges) could well be converted into the duty of telling tales against him."
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  • When he returned to England in 1664 he established intimate relations with Sir Robert Moray and with John Maitland, earl and afterwards first duke of Lauderdale, both of whom at that time advocated a tolerant policy towards the Scottish covenanters.
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  • On the "Contestation" on Monastic Studies, see Maitland, Dark Ages, § x.
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  • Browne, Maitland A stone headstone of Gothic design with a delicately carved inscription.
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  • Writer and feminist theologian Sara Maitland is currently exploring mysticism, madness and silence.
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  • It bears the initials of Alexander Galloway, Rector of Kinkell Maitland Grave Methlick A fine example of an 18th century tombstone.
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  • Hence a Christian might be first punished in the civil courts and then put to public penance by the ecclesiastical jurisdiction, or vice versa: an apparently double system of punishment which the medieval Church, when the forum externum had become quite separated from the forum internum, sometimes repudiated (see Maitland, English Canon Law, 138, 1 39, 144).
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  • There were many disputes as to the existence of these primates (see Maitland, Canon Law in the Church of England, p. 121).
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  • " Perplexity " arose where the suffragans " could not owing to the geographical limitations of their competence do full justice " (Maitland, pp. 118-119).
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  • It may mean a state of things such as existed in the middle ages, in which ownership and sovereignty were not clearly separated: when he who was owner had sovereign rights incident thereto, or, as it was sometimes phrased, when sovereignty inhered in the territory, when the king was the supreme landowner (Maine, Ancient Law, p. 106; Figgis, pp. 11, 14); when all political power exhibited proprietary traits, and was incident to the ownership of land (Maitland, Township and Borough, p. 31).
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  • His principal antagonist was John Knox; there were several tussles between them, the most famous, perhaps, being the one in the general assembly of 1564, and on the whole Maitland held his own against the preachers.
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  • On the other hand, it is suggested by, e.g., the late Professor Maitland, that it was not, in fact, the view taken here in the later middle ages - that in those ages there was no theory that " reception " here was necessary to validate papal decrees.
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  • Actress Beth Maitland returns frequently to reprise her role as Tracy Abbott while actor Don Diamont left and returned.
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