Maine sentence example

maine
  • The southern part of the state was early opened to railways, the Sullivan County railway (operated by the Boston & Maine) having been opened in 1849; and in 1850 the state had 290 m.
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  • Do you remember Dr. Garcelon, who was Governor of Maine several years ago?
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  • Blaine was made a senator from Maine, the leadership of the House of Representatives passed to Garfield, and he became the Republican candidate for speaker.
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  • (St Louis), and on the death in 1232 of the third son John, count of Anjou and Maine, those fiefs were conferred on Charles.
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  • I did not imagine, when I studied about the forests of Maine, that a strong and beautiful ship would go sailing all over the world, carrying wood from those rich forests, to build pleasant homes and schools and churches in distant countries.
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  • The part played by equity in the development of law is admirably illustrated in the well-known work of Sir Henry Maine on Ancient Law.
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  • And the salons of Mme de Sevigne, of her daughter Mme de Grignan, and of the duchesse de Maine for a while gave the questions of philosophy a place among the topics of polite society, and furnished to Moliere the occasion of his Femmes savantes.
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  • On the right the Loire receives the waters of the Furens, the Arroux, the Nivre, the Maine (formed by the Mayenne and the Sarthe with its affluent the Loir), and the Erdre, which joins the Loire at Nantes; on the left, the Allier (which receives the Dore and the Sioule), the Loiret, the Cher, the Indre, the Vienne with its affluent the Creuse, the Thouet, and the Svre-Nantaise.
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  • On the other side of the river, nearly opposite, is the Maine insane hospital.
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  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
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  • Here goes lumber from the Maine woods, which did not go out to sea in the last freshet, risen four dollars on the thousand because of what did go out or was split up; pine, spruce, cedar--first, second, third, and fourth qualities, so lately all of one quality, to wave over the bear, and moose, and caribou.
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  • Next week Sarah and Connor are going to his parent's house in Maine.
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  • I don't think so.  I'm from Maine.
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  • It became the county-seat in 1799; was chosen by the Maine legislature as the capital of the state in 1827, but was not occupied as such until the completion of the state house in 1831; and was chartered as a city in 1849.
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  • (4,7 2 4,4 00 acres) were included in farms. The percentage of improved farm land, as in Maine, New York and Pennsylvania, increased from 1850 until 1890 and decreased after 1890; and in 1900 out of a total acreage of 4,724,400 acres only 2,126,624 acres (45%) were improved.
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  • In 1841-1843 he was in Europe on behalf of the Tyler administration, and he is said to have been instrumental in causing the appointment of Lord Ashburton to negotiate in Washington concerning the boundary dispute between Maine and Canada.
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  • When, therefore, in 1850, Mr Stowe was elected to a professorship in Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, and removed his family thither, Mrs Stowe was prepared for the great work which came to her, bit by bit, as a religious message which she must deliver.
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  • Elsewhere it is only represented by P. occidentalis, the largest tree of the Atlantic forests from Maine to Oregon, and by P. oriental is in the eastern Mediterranean.
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  • Portland is served by the Maine Central, the Boston & Maine, and the Grand Trunk railways; by steamboat lines to New York, Boston, Bar Harbor, Saint John, N.B., and other coast ports, and, during the winter season, by the Allan and Dominion transatlantic lines.
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  • The Cumberland County Court House, of white Maine granite, occupies the block bounded by Federal, Pearl, Church and Newbury streets; immediately opposite (to the south-west) is the Federal Court building, also of Maine granite.
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  • Longfellow - which was built in1785-1786by General Peleg Wadsworth (1748-1829), a soldier of the War of Independence, a representative in Congress from 1793 to 1807, and the grandfather of the poet; was given by Longfellow's sister, Mrs Anne Longfellow Pierce (1810-1901) to the Maine Historical Society; and contains interesting relics of the Wadsworth and Longfellow families, and especially of the poet himself.
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  • Behind the "Home" is the Library of the Maine Historical Society.
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  • Among the institutions are: The Medical School of Maine, the medical department of Bowdoin College - instruction being given.
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  • In 1658 Massachusetts extended its jurisdiction over this part of Maine.
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  • It is served by the Western Division of the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • In February 1898 Sampson, then a captain, was president of Board of Inquiry as to the cause of destruction of the "Maine."
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  • In the Mountain Region and in the Piedmont Plateau Region the rivers have numerous falls and rapids which afford a total water power unequalled perhaps in any other state than Maine on the Atlantic Coast, the largest being on the Yadkin, Roanoke and Catawba; and in crossing some of the mountains, especially the Unakas, the streams have carved deep narrow gorges that are much admired for their scenery.
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  • This body is not, however, a special board, as in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, but a kind of administrative cabinet as in Iowa, consisting of the secretary of state, the auditor, the treasurer, and the superintendent of 2 The changes made in 1875 were adopted in a convention, were ratified in 1876, and were so numerous that the amended constitution is frequently referred to as the Constitution of 1876.
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  • The M`Leod case' in which the state of New York insisted on trying a British subject, with whose trial the Federal government had no power to interfere, while the British govern - ment had declared that it would consider conviction and execu - tion a casus belli; the exercise of the hateful right of search by British vessels on the coast of Africa; the Maine boundary, as to which the action of a state might at any time bring the Federal government into armed collision with Great Britain - all these at once met the new secretary, and he felt that he had no right to abandon his work for party reasons.
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  • For the history of institutions which, thanks largely to the writings of Sir Henry Maine, has become a new and interesting branch of science, Bentham cared nothing.
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  • Portsmouth is served by the Boston & Maine railway, by electric lines to neighbouring towns, and in summer by a steamboat daily to the Isles of Shoals.
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  • A United States navy yard, officially known as the Portsmouth Navy Yard, is on an island of the Piscataqua but within the township of Kittery, Maine.
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  • Boston is the terminus of the Boston & Albany (New York Central), the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railway systems, each of which controls several minor roads once in dependent.
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  • The two huge steam-railway stations of the Boston & Maine and the Boston & Albany systems also deserve mention.
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  • The young Genevans failed in business, passed a severe winter in the wilds of Maine, and returned to Boston penniless.
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  • It is the eastern terminus of a branch of the Maine Central railway,.
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  • Hoosick Falls is served by the Boston & Maine Railroad, and is connected by electric railway with Bennington, Vermont, about 8 m.
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  • There are no steam railways, but an electric line connects South Hadley and South Hadley Falls with the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways at Holyoke.
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  • The American people had sent food to the reconcentrados; President McKinley, while opposing recognition of the rebels, affirmed the possibility of intervention; Spain resented this attitude; and finally, in February 1898, the United States battleship " Maine " was blown up - by whom will probably never be known - in the harbour of Havana.
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  • After Thoreau's death were also published: The Maine Woods (Boston, 1863); Cape Cod (Boston, 1865); A Yankee in Canada (Boston, 1866).
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine and the Central Vermont railways, and by interurban electric railways to Northampton, Holyoke, Sunderland and Pelham.
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  • It is at the intersection of two branches of the Boston & Maine railway, and is served by several interurban electric lines.
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  • Bangor is served directly by the Maine Central railway, several important branches radiating from the city, and by the Eastern Steamship line; the Maine Central connects near the city with the Bangor & Aroostook railway (whose general offices are here) and with the Washington County railway.
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  • The Eastern Maine Music Festival is held in Bangor in October of each year.
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  • The Eastern Maine State Fair is held here annually.
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  • In 1836 a railway from Bangor to Old Town was completed; this was the first railway in the state; Bangor had, also, the first electric street-railway in Maine (1889), and one of the first iron steamships built in America ran to this port and was named "Bangor."
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  • An instance under the last head occurred in 1831, when it was referred to the king of the Netherlands as sole arbitrator to fix the north-eastern boundary of the state of Maine.
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  • He at once recovered Maine from the Angevins, nominally in the interest of Herbert II., the lawful count, who became his vassal.
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  • In 1062, however, Herbert died and Maine was formally annexed to Normandy.
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  • Of the king's sons Robert, though titular count of Maine, was kept in leading strings; and even William Rufus, who was in constant attendance on his father, never held a public office.
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  • From Scotland the king turned to Maine, which had profited by the troubles of 1069 to expel the Norman garrisons.
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  • In the years1083-1085there was a second rising in Maine which was not laid to rest until William had granted liberal terms to the leader, Hubert of Beaumont.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad and by electric railways to Andover, Boston, Lowell, Haverhill and Salem, Massachusetts, and to Nashua and Salem, New Hampshire.
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  • The city, a summer resort, lies on an undulating hillside, which rises from the water's edge to a height of more than 150 ft., and commands extensive views of the picturesque islands, headlands, and mountains of the Maine coast.
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  • It is served by the Maine Central railway, by steamboat lines to Boston, and by inter-urban electric railway.
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  • He was now introduced to a less questionable and even more distinguished coterie than Vendome's, to the famous "court of Sceaux," the circle of the beautiful and ambitious duchesse du Maine.
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  • He once lay in hiding for two months with the duchesse du Maine at Sceaux, where were produced the comedietta of La Prude and the tragedy of Rome sauvee, and afterwards for a time lived chiefly at Luneville; here Madame du Chatelet had established herself at the court of King Stanislaus, and carried on a liaison with Saint-Lambert, an officer in the king's guard.
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  • His first church was in St Aignan, in the province of Maine.
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  • Chosen to represent the provincial synod of Anjou, Touraine and Maine at the national synod held in 1631 at Charenton, he was appointed as orator to present to the king "The Copy of their Complaints and Grievances for the Infractions and Violations of the Edict of Nantes."
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  • Albany is a terminus of the New York Central & Hudson River, the Delaware & Hudson and the West Shore railways, and is also served by the Boston & Maine railway, by the Erie and Champlain canals (being a terminus of each), by steamboat lines on the Hudson river and by several inter-urban electric railways connecting with neighbouring cities.
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  • It is built of white Maine granite, and cost about $25,000,000.
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  • On his death in 1189, the nobles of Anjou, Maine and Touraine refused to recognize John of England, and did homage to Arthur, who declared himself the vassal of Philip Augustus.
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  • The king of France recognized Arthur's right to Brittany, Anjou, Maine and Poitou.
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  • Bar Harbor is served by the Maine Central railway and by steamship lines to New York, Boston, Portland and other ports.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric railways.
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  • Watertown is served by the Fitchburg division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Cambridge, Newton (immediately adjacent and served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway) and neighbouring towns by electric railways.
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  • He died in Kittery, Maine, on the 6th of July in the same year.
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  • From him Louise received the county of Angouleme, which was erected into a duchy, the duchy of Anjou, and the counties of Maine and Beaufort.
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  • She died in 1531, and Francis reunited to the crown her domains, which comprised the Bourbonnais, Beaujolais, Auvergne, la Marche, Angoumois, Maine and Anjou.
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  • Saint Johnsbury is served by the Boston & Maine and the Saint Johnsbury & Lake Champlain railways.
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  • Settling in Augusta, Maine, in 1854, he became editor of the Kennebec Journal, and subsequently of the Portland Advertiser.
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  • From 1859 to 1869 he was pastor of the Independent Congregational (Unitarian) church at Bangor, Maine.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Maine Central railways.
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  • The city is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by an interurban line.
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  • It is served by the Central Vermont and the Boston & Maine railways.
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  • Biddeford is served by the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected by electric lines with Portland and with Old Orchard Beach, a popular summer resort north of the Saco river.
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  • He had refused the bishopric of Maine when in 1868 he was elected to the diocese of central New York.
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  • It was bounded on the north by the countship of Maine, on the east by that of Touraine, on the south by that of Poitiers and by the Mauges, on the west by the countship of Nantes.
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  • At the same time, continuing in this quarter also the work of his father (who in 1025 took prisoner Herbert Wake-Dog and only set him free on condition of his doing him homage), Geoffrey succeeded in reducing the countship of Maine to complete dependence on himself.
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  • In spite, however, of the concerted attacks of William the Bastard (the Conqueror), duke of Normandy, and Henry I., king of France, he was able in 1051 to force Maine to recognize his authority, though failing to revenge himself on William.
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  • On the other hand, he was successful on the whole in pursuing the policy of Geoffrey Martel in Maine: after destroying La Fleche, by the peace of Blanchelande (1081), he received the homage of Robert "Courteheuse" ("Curthose"), son of William the Conqueror, for Maine.
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  • Later, he upheld Elias, lord of La Fleche, against William Rufus, king of England, and on the recognition of Elias as count of Maine in 1100, obtained for Fulk the Young, his son by Bertrade de Montfort, the hand of Eremburge, Elias's daughter and sole heiress.
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  • William the Aetheling having perished in the wreck of the "White Ship" (25th of November 1120), Fulk, on his return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land (1120-1121), married his second daughter Sibyl, at the instigation of Louis VI., to William Clito, son of Robert Courteheuse, and a claimant to the duchy of Normandy, giving her Maine for a dowry (11 22 or 1123).
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  • In 1139 Geoffrey took Mirebeau, and in 1142 Champtoceaux, but in 1145 a new revolt broke out, this time under the leadership of Elias, the count's own brother, who, again with the assistance of Robert of Sable, laid claim to the countship of Maine.
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  • He therefore set himself up in rivalry with John Lackland, youngest son of Henry II., and supported by Philip Augustus of France, and aided by William des Roches, seneschal of Anjou, he managed to enter Angers (18th of April 1199) and there have himself recognized as count of the three countships of Anjou, Maine and Touraine, for which he did homage to the king of France.
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  • Authorities.-(I) Principal Sources: The history of Anjou may be told partly with the aid of the chroniclers of the neighbouring provinces, especiall y those of Normandy (William of Poitiers, William of Jumieges, Ordericus Vitalis) and of Maine (especially Actus pontificum Cenomannis in urbe degentium).
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  • For many years Massachusetts controlled a vast lumber trade, drawing upon the forests of Maine, but the growth of the west changed the old channels of trade, and Boston carpenters came to make use of western timber.
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  • The shell fisheries are less important than those of Maine.
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  • The province of Maine was also united in the new provincial charter of 1691, and Sir William Phips came over with it, commissioned as the first royal governor.
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  • The scenes of the recurrent wars were mostly distant from Massachusetts proper, either in Maine or on Canadian or Acadian territory, although some savage inroads of the Indians were now and then made on the exposed frontier towns, as, for instance, upon Deerfield in 1704 and upon Haverhill in 1708.
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  • He made a brilliant success of the expedition against Louisburg in 1745, William Pepperell, a Maine officer, being in immediate command.
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  • It is allied to the European species of shad and pilchard, and, like the latter, approaches the coast in immense shoals, which are found throughout the year in some part of the littoral waters between Maine and Florida, the northern shoals retiring into deeper water or to more southern latitudes with the approach of cold weather.
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  • South Portland is served by the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • At Spring Point is Fort Preble, established in 1808 and now a coast artillery station; and at Portland Head is Fort Williams. The city has steel-rolling mills, car shops of the Boston & Maine railway, and ship-building interests, and manufactures marine hardware and varnish.
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  • The township is traversed by the Boston & Maine, and New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.
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  • The village of Athol is on Miller's river, and is served by the Boston & Albany and the Boston & Maine railways.
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  • Its subscribers were found throughout all quarters of the northern half of the Union from Maine to Oregon, large packages going to remote districts beyond the Mississippi or Missouri, whose only connexion with the outside world was through a weekly or semi-weekly mail.
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  • Rather we may say with Maine, "Sovereignty is divisible, but independence is not."
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  • He studied law in Portsmouth, N.H., and practised at Berwick, Maine, and at Durham, N.H.
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  • In 1686 he became governor, with Boston as his capital, of the "Dominion of New England," into which Massachusetts (including Maine), Plymouth, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire were consolidated, and in 1688 his jurisdiction was extended over New York and the Jerseys.
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  • The northern section includes the Shickshock Mountains and Notre Dame Range in Quebec, scattered elevations in Maine, the White Mountains and the Green Mountains; the central comprises, besides various minor groups, the Valley Ridges between the Front of the Allegheny Plateau and the Great Appalachian Valley, the New York-New Jersey Highlands and a large portion of the Blue Ridge; and the southern consists of the prolongation of the Blue Ridge, the Unaka Range, and the Valley Ridges adjoining the Cumberland Plateau, with some lesser ranges.
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  • In Maine four peaks exceed 3000 ft., including Katandin (5200 ft.), Mount Washington, in the White Mountains (6279 ft.), Adams (5805), Jefferson (5725), Clay (5554), Monroe (5390), Madison (5380), Lafayette (5269); and a number of summits rise above 4000 ft.
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  • As early as 1700 it was possible to ride from Portland, Maine, to southern Virginia, sleeping each night at some considerable village.
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  • Lectures delivered by Maine in this capacity were the groundwork of Ancient Law (1861), the book by which his reputation vas made at one stroke.
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  • Within a year of its publication the post of legal member of council in India was offered to Maine, then a junior member of the bar with little practice, few advantages of connexion, and no political or official claims. He declined once, on grounds of health; the very next year the office was again vacant.
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  • This time Maine was persuaded to accept, not that his health had improved, but that he thought India might not make it much worse.
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  • Maine's power of swiftly assimilating new ideas and appreciating modes of thought and conduct remote from modern Western life came into contact with the facts of Indian society at exactly the right time, and his colleagues and other competent observers expressed the highest opinion of his work.
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  • In return Maine brought back from his Indian office a store of knowledge which enriched all his later writings, though he took India by name for his theme only once.
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  • As vice-chancellor of the university of Calcutta, Maine commented, with his usual pregnant ingenuity, on the results produced by the contact of Eastern and Western thought.
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  • The practical side of Maine's experience was not long lost to India; he became a member of the secretary of state's council in 1871, and remained so for the rest of his life.
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  • In 1877 the mastership of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, where Maine had formerly been tutor, became vacant.
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  • There were two strong candidates whose claims were so nearly equal that it was difficult to elect either; the difficulty was solved by a unanimous invitation to Maine to accept the post.
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  • Meanwhile Maine had published in 1885 his one work of speculative politics, a volume of essays on Popular Government, designed to show that democracy is not in itself more stable than any other form of government, and that there is no necessary connexion between democracy and progress.
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  • The article, though necessarily unsigned (in accordance with the rule of the Quarterly as it then stood), was Maine's reply to the M`Lennan brothers' attack on the historical reconstruction of the Indo-European family system put forward in Ancient Law and supplemented in Early Law and Custom.
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  • Maine was generally averse from controversy, but showed on this occasion that it was not for want of controversial power.
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  • Maine's health, which had never been strong, gave way towards the end of 1887.
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  • An excellent summary of Maine's principal writings may be seen in Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff's memoir.
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  • The prompt and full recognition of Maine's genius by continental publicists must not pass unmentioned even in the briefest notice.
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  • Maine warned his countrymen against the insularity which results from ignorance of all law and institutions save one's own; his example has shown the benefit of the contrary habit.
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  • Foreign readers of Maine have perhaps understood even better than English ones that he is not the propounder of a system but the pioneer of a method, and that detailed criticism, profitable as it may be and necessary as in time it must be, will not leave the method itself less valid or diminish the worth of the master's lessons in its use.
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  • The rather small bulk of Maine's published and avowed work may be explained partly by a fine literary sense which would let nothing go out under his name unfinished, partly by the drawbacks incident to precarious health.
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  • Maine's temperament was averse from the labour of minute criticism, and his avoidance of it was no less a matter of prudence.
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  • But it has to be remembered that Maine also wrote much which was never publicly acknowledged.
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  • The practice of such writing probably counted for something in the freedom and clearness of Maine's style and the effectiveness of his dialectic. His books are a model of scientific exposition which never ceases to be literature.
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  • There are numerous articles on the Vendean insurrection of 1793 in the Revue du Bas-Poitou, Revue historique de l'Anjou, Revue de Bretagne, de Vendee et d'Anjou, Revue historique de l'Ouest, Revue historique et archeologique du Maine, and La Vendee historique.
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  • The War of 1812, with the Embargo Acts (1807-1813), which were so destructive of New England's commerce, thoroughly aroused the Federalist leaders in this part of the country against the National government as administered by the Democrats, and in 1814, when the British were not only threatening a general invasion of their territory but had actually occupied a part of the Maine coast, and the National government promised no protection, the legislature of Massachusetts invited the other New England states to join with her in sending delegates to a convention which should meet at Hartford to consider their grievances, means of preserving their resources, measures of protection against the British, and the advisability of taking measures to bring about a convention of delegates from all the United States for the purpose of revising the Federal constitution.
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  • With the exception of a Grand Trunk line in the northern part of the state the several steam railways are owned or leased by the Boston & Maine.
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  • The first steps in railway building were taken in 1835, when the Boston & Maine, the Concord, and the Nashua & Lowell railways were incorporated.
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  • The Boston & Maine was opened from Boston, Mass., to Dover, N.H., in 1842.
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  • Fort Ticonderoga, the key to the passage of Lakes George and Champlain to Canada, was surprised and, taken on the 10th of May by a small band under Colonel Ethan Allen, while Colonel Benedict Arnold headed an expedition through the Maine woods to effect the capture of Quebec, where Sir Guy Carleton commanded.
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  • Meanwhile Mayhew had recognized the jurisdiction of Maine; 2 and though the officials of that province showed no disposition to press their claim, it seems that this technical suzerainty continued until 1664, when the Duke of York received from his brother, Charles II., the charter for governing New York, New Jersey, and other territory, including Martha's Vineyard.
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  • The son graduated in 1824 at Bowdoin College, at Brunswick, Maine, where he formed a friendship with Nathaniel Hawthorne.
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  • The Senate decided to connect the two measures, and passed a bill for the admission of Maine with an amendment enabling the people of Missouri to form a state constitution.
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  • The committee recommended the enactment of two laws, one for the admission of Maine, the other an enabling act for Missouri without any restrictions on slavery but including the Thomas amendment.
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  • The lower coastal parts, from their accessibility and their smaller relief, are more densely populated; the higher and more rugged interior is still largely forested and thinly settled; there are large tracts of unbroken forest in northern Maine, hardly 150 m.
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  • A still larger example is seen in Mt Katahdin (5200 ft.) in north-central Maine, the greatest of several similar isolated mountains that-are scattered over the interior uplands without apparent system.
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  • In Maine lakes of both classes are numerous; the largest is Moosehead Lake, about 35 m.
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  • Hence the coast as a whole is irregular, with numerous embayments, peninsulas and islands; and in Maine this irregularity reaches a disadvantageous climax.
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  • The Arctic or ArcticAlpine zone covers in the United States only the tops of a few mountains which extend above the limit of trees, such as Mt Katahdin in Maine, Mt Washington and neighboring peaks in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and the loftier peaks of the Rocky, Cascade and Sierra Nevada Mountains.
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  • The Canadian zone crosses from Canada into northern and northwestern Maine, northern and central New Hampshire, northern Michigan, and north-eastern Minnesota and North Dakota, covers the Green Mountains, most of the Adirondacks and Catskills, the higher slopes of the mountains in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, the lower slopes of the northern Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the upper slopes of the southern Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a strip along the Pacific coast as far south as Cape Mendocino, interrupted, however, by the Columbia Valley.
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  • The Virginia deer still ranges from Maine to the Gulf states and from the Atlantic coast to the Rocky Mountains.
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  • Only Maine and Massachusetts and a few of the newer states live under original constitutions, and only Massachusetts is under a constitution older than the i9th century.
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  • True executive councils have now disappeared except in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.
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  • Three of the original thirteen have their judges elected by the legislatures, and in five others, together with Maine and Mississippi among the newer states, they are appointed by the governor, subject to the approval of the executive council, the Senate, or (in Connecticut) the General Assembly.
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  • The city is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railroad, and by coast and river freight steamers.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad, and is connected with neighbouring towns and cities by electric lines.
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  • From this eastward to the state of Maine the boundary is an artificial line nearly corresponding to lat.
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  • 45 0; then an irregular line partly determined by watersheds and rivers divides Canada from Maine, coming out on the Bay of Fundy.
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  • Though Halifax and St John are open in winter, much of the winter trade eastwards is done through American harbours, especially Portland, Maine, owing to the shorter railway journey.
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  • Somerville is served by the Boston & Maine railroad and by suburban electric railway lines.
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  • No railway enters this township; the Ledyard Free Bridge (the first free bridge across the Connecticut) connects it with Norwich,Vt., which is served by the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • In many parts all the finer trees have been cut down, but large woods of it still exist in the less accessible districts; it abounds especially near Lake St John, Quebec, and in Newfoundland is the prevalent tree in some of the forest tracts; it is likewise common in Maine and Vermont.
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  • Maine, Vermont and Arkansas keep to September.
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  • He lived at Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) until the Indians destroyed it in 1690, when he removed to Wells.
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  • The name Maine he assumed (some time before 1787) from an estate called Le Maine, near Mouleydier.
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  • After the Reign of Terror Maine de Biran took part in political affairs.
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  • Maine de Biran's philosophical reputation has suffered from two causes - his obscure and laboured style, and the fact that only a few, and these the least characteristic, of his writings appeared during his lifetime.
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  • Maine de Biran's first essays in philosophy were written avowedly from the point of view of Locke and Condillac, but even in them he was brought to signalize the essential fact on which his later speculation turns.
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  • He essayed to answer Locke by Kant, and Kant by Reid, Maine de Biran and Schelling.
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  • In addition to numerous monographs and valuable contributions to Winsor's Narrative and Critical History of America, he published The Pre-Columbian Discovery of America by the Northmen (1868); The Northmen in Maine (1870); The Moabite Stone (1871); The Rector of Roxburgh (1871), a novel under the nom de plume of "William Hickling"; and Verrazano the Explorer; being a Vindication of his Letter and Voyage (1880).
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  • In Chester county, also, is one of the most productive deposits of feldspar, second in importance only to those of Maine.
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  • Rochester is served by four lines of the Boston & Maine railroad.
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  • They apparently dwelt in the basin of the Maine, to the south of the Chatti.
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  • A British occupation of part of the coast of Maine proved to be mere demonstration.
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  • Berlin is served by the Grand Trunk and Boston & Maine railways.
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  • The German Reformed churches in Lunenburg county, Nova Scotia, became Presbyterian in 1837; a German church in Waldoboro, Maine, after a century, became Congregational in 1850.
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  • Winchester is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Arlington, Medford, Stoneham and Woburn by electric lines.
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  • 'JOHN DAVIS LONG (1838-), American lawyer and political leader, was born in Buckfield, Oxford county, Maine, on the 27th of October 1838.
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  • It was, historically, only a personal nickname of Geoffrey, as was " Beauclerc " of his father-in-law (Henry I.) and " Curtmantel " of his son (Henry II.), and was derived from his wearing in his cap a sprig of the broom (genet) plant, "which in early summer makes the open country of Anjou and Maine a blaze of living gold."
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  • Concord is served by the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • The city has various manufactures, including flour and grist mill products, silver ware, cotton and woollen goods, carriages, harnesses and leather belting, furniture, wooden ware, pianos and clothing; the Boston & Maine Railroad has a large repair shop in the city, and there are valuable granite quarries in the vicinity.
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  • Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, was nominated for the vice-presidency.
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  • The Republicans of Maine nominated him for governor in the same year, and having carried the election by a large majority he was inaugurated in this office on the 8th of January 1857.
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  • He died at Bangor, Maine, on the 4th of July 1891.
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  • In1781-1783he was a member of the Continental Congress, which in 1782 made him a judge of the court of appeals for admiralty cases; in 1784 he was one of the commissioners from Massachusetts to settle the boundary line between Massachusetts and New York; in1789-1801he was a judge of the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts; and from 1801 until his death in Roxbury on the 6th of May 1802 he was a justice of the U.S. Circuit Court for the First Circuit (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
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  • Salem is served by the Boston & Maine and by interurban electric railways westward to Peabody, Danvers and Lawrence, eastward to Beverly, and southward to Marblehead, Swampscott, Lynn and Boston.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad, and by inter-urban electric railways.
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  • He was recognized as king in Touraine, Berry and Poitou, in Languedoc and other provinces of southern France; but the English power in the north was presently increased by the provinces of Champagne and Maine, as the result of the victories of Crevant (1423) and Verneuil (1424).
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  • The French contrived to find occasion for extorting a promise to surrender all the English possessions in Anjou and Maine, a concession that was to prove fatal to Suffolk and his policy.
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  • In 1561 it was granted to Louis, duke of BourbonMontpensier, by whose descendants it was held till, in 1682, "Mademoiselle," the duchess of Montpensier, gave it to Louis XIV.'s bastard, the duke of Maine, as part of the price for the release of her lover Lauzun.
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  • The eldest son of the duke of Maine, Louis Auguste de Bourbon (1700-1755), prince of Dombes, served in the army of Prince Eugene against the Turks (1717), took part in the War of the Polish Succession (1733-1734), and in that of the Austrian Succession (1742-1747).
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  • The caution of Gelasius was not long preserved; Gregory of Tours, for example, asserts that the saint's relics actually existed in the French village of Le Maine, where many miracles were wrought by means of them; and Bede, while still explaining that the Gesta Georgii are reckoned apocryphal, commits himself to the statement that the martyr was beheaded under Dacian, king of Persia, whose wife Alexandra, however, adhered to the Christian faith.
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  • Laconia is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railway, which has a very handsome granite passenger station (1892) and repair shops here.
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  • A conspiracy was formed, under the inspiration of Cardinal Alberoni, first minister of Spain, and directed by the prince of Cellamare, Spanish ambassador in France, with the complicity of the duke and duchess of Maine; but in 1718 it was discovered and defeated.
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  • He was a clerk in a store at Strafford in 1825 - 1828, and at Portland, Maine, in 1828-1831, and was a merchant and then a farmer in his native town in 1831-1855.
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  • Somersworth is served by the Boston & Maine railroad, and is connected by electric line with Rochester and Dover.
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  • It is celebrated for its warm sulphurous springs (75° to 111° F.), which first became generally known in 1675 when they were visited by Madame de Maintenon and the duke of Maine, son of Louis XIV.
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  • The destruction of the U.S. battleship "Maine" in the harbour of Havana on the 15th of February 1898 was an influential factor in causing the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, and during the war the city was blockaded by a United States fleet.
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  • He was a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1868-69 and of the state Senate in 1870, was attorney-general of the state in 1870-72, and was city solicitor of Portland in 18 74-77.
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  • This unification was completed (except for Brittany) and the frontiers enlarged by the acquisition, upon the death of Rene of Anjou in 1480, of the duchies of Anjou and Bar, and in 1481 of Maine and Provence upon the death of Charles II., count of Maine.
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  • " Maine " was blown up. On the 15th of March Primo de Spanish- Rivera, learning that theAmerican Commodore George American Dewey was mobilizing his fleet in the harbour of War.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad.
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  • At a conference at Bonmoulins on the 18th of November Richard again abandoned his father, and after a second conference at La Ferte Bernard, Philip invaded Maine and forced Henry II.
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  • But John, joined by William des Roches and other lords of Maine and Poitou, jealous at the increase of Philip's power, defeated and took Arthur prisoner at Mirebeau.
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  • The conquest of Maine, Touraine, Anjou and Poitou in 1204 and 1205 was little more than a military promenade, though the castles of Loches and Chinon held out for a year.
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  • A truce for two years was made on the 26th of October 1206 by which John renounced all claims in Normandy, Maine, Brittany, Touraine and Anjou, but it did not last six months.
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  • Artois, the Amienois, Valois, Vermandois, the greater part of the Beauvaisis, Normandy, Maine, Anjou, Touraine, and an important part of Poitou and Saintonge, were added to the domain during his reign.
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  • The lower division appears on the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and is traceable thence, in a great belt southwest of those points, through Maine and the Hudson-Champlain valley into Alabama, a distance of some 2000 m.; and the rocks are brought up again on the western uplift, in Nevada, Idaho, Utah, western Montana and British Columbia.
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  • His a priori theories should be compared with Maine's historical inquiries (Ancient Law, c. V.).
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  • Lowell is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric lines.
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  • Early in the 17th century trading posts and mission centres were established on the coast of Maine, and during the same century French priests laboured zealously in northern New York, along the entire coast of the Mississippi from Wisconsin to Louisiana, and around the Great Lakes.
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  • During its existence of fifteen years the New England Council made numerous grants of territory, and from three of these grew three of the present states: Massachusetts, from a grant to the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1628; Maine, from the grant to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and John Mason (the two most influential members of the council) in 1622; and New Hampshire, from the grant to John Mason in 1629.
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  • Maine, having passed under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts in 1652, did not regain its independence until 1820.
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  • This done, the home government set to work to organize the royal domain which should be known as New England, or the Dominion of New England, and its plan for this provided for the annulment of the charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut, and the inclusion in the Dominion of these colonies, and New Hampshire, Maine, New York and the Jerseys, thereby restoring to New England all the territory, with the exception of Pennsylvania, that was included in the grant to the New England Council in 1620.
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  • He became professor of natural and revealed religion in Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, in 1852, and in 1855 professor of church history in the Union Theological Seminary in New York, of which he was president in 1880-1887.
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  • He waged continual warfare against the English in Maine until the advent of Joan of Arc. He fought at Jargeau, at Meung-sur-Loire and at Patay (1429).
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  • About this time, also, he had interfered in the affairs of Maine, though without much result, for having sided against Gervais, bishop of Le Mans, who was trying to make himself guardian of the young count of Maine, Hugh, he had been beaten and forced to make terms with Gervais in 1038.
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  • The later years of her power were marked by the promotion of her old pupils, the children of the king and Mme de Montespan, to high dignity between the blood royal and the peers of the realm, and it was doubtless under the influence of her dislike for the duke of Orleans that the king drew up his will, leaving the personal care of his successor to the duke of Maine, and hampering the duke of Orleans by a council of regency.
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  • On or even before her husband's death she retired to St Cyr, and had the chagrin of seeing all her plans for the advancement of the duke of Maine overthrown by means of the parliament of Paris.
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  • The tree is of quick growth and the wood strong and resinous, but it is less durable than Scotch fir, though much employed in ship-building; according to Emerson, trunks exist in Maine 4 ft.
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  • Formerly Maine and Vermont were celebrated for the size of their pines, but few of these great trees now exist in New England.
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  • It is traversed by the Boston & Maine railroad and by the Lowell & Boston electric railway.
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  • Colonel Rowan and Sir Henry Maine, soon lived down the hostility first exhibited, and although one serious and lamentable collision occurred between, the mob and the police in 1833, it was agreed two years later that the unfavourable impression at one time existing against the new police was rapidly diminishing, and that it had fully answered the purpose for which it was formed.
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  • From Lower Maine the insurrection soon spread to Brittany, and throughout the west of France.
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  • He was a member of the conference committee on the bill for the admission of Maine and Missouri, which in its final form embodied what is known as the Missouri Compromise.
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  • It occupies rising ground on both banks of the Maine, which are united by three bridges.
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  • It is traversed by the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • Worcester is served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways, and is connected with Springfield and Boston by interurban electric lines.
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  • In 1832 and in 1840 Fessenden was a representative in the Maine legislature, and in1841-1843was a Whig member of the national House of Representatives.
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  • He died at Portland, Maine, on the 6th of September 1869.
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  • Rene retired to Provence, and in 1474 made a will by which he left Bar to his grandson Rene II., duke of Lorraine; Anjou and Provence to his nephew Charles, count of Le Maine.
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  • The offer was rejected, but further negotiations assured the lapse to the crown of the duchy of Anjou, and the annexation of Provence was only postponed until the death of the count of Le Maine.
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  • The township is served by the Boston & Albany and Boston & Maine railways, and by two interurban electric lines.
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  • In 1686 Marie Jeanne Baptiste, duchess of Nemours and of Aumale, and wife of Charles Emmanuel II., duke of Savoy, sold Aumale to Louis XIV., who gave it to his natural son, the duke of Maine.
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  • Amesbury is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected by electric line with Haverhill and Newburyport, Mass., and with Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, and Salisbury Beach, Mass., two summer resorts.
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  • In 1838 he refused the post of assistant bishop of the eastern diocese (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
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  • He graduated at Union College in 1826, was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, was rector for several months in Saco, Maine, and in 1828-1833 was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut.
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  • Maine attracts more summer visitors than any other state in the Union.
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  • The glacier or ice sheet overran all Maine, irregularly scouring out the bed rock to produce rock basins, damming up many river valleys with glacial deposits and completely disarranging the drainage lines.
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  • This is the origin of the numerous lakes of Maine, which give it some of its most beautiful scenery, and help to make it a holiday resort in summer.
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  • Few other regions have so many large lakes so variously ' This condition results from the fact that Maine and the adjacent region were worn down nearly to sea-level by stream erosion, except certain peaks and ridges inland; then the region was elevated and numerous river valleys were cut down below the general erosion surface formed before.
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  • Maine are exceptionally well adapted; many of them abound in trout, salmon, togue, black bass and pickerel; and near them there is still much game.
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  • The glaciation is also responsible for the poor soil of most of the state, for, although the rocks are the same crystallines which give good soils further south in unglaciated regions, all the decayed portions of the Maine rocks have been removed by glacial erosion, revealing fresh, barren rock over great areas, or depositing the rather sterile hard-pan as a thin coating in other places.
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  • The principal river systems of Maine are the Saint John on the north slope, and the Penobscot, the Kennebec, the Androscoggin, and the Saco on the south slope.
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  • The mean height of the basin of the St John is exceeded only by that of the Androscoggin, but the fall of the St John River through the greater part of its course in Maine is only sufficient to give a sluggish or a gentle current.
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  • The animal life of Maine shows a mixture of northern and southern forms, and very little that is peculiar as compared with surrounding regions.
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  • Maine was formerly covered with forests, principally of white pine and spruce, but mixed with these were some hemlock, tamarack, cedar, and, on the south slope, birch, poplar, oak, maple and beech.
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  • Because of the cold climate, the large areas in which there is little or no good arable land, the growing demand for timber land, and the large and constant supply of waterpower afforded by the principal rivers, agriculture in Maine, as in all the other New England states except Vermont, is a smaller industry than manufacturing; in 1900 there were 87,932 people engaged in manufacturing and only 76,932 engaged in agriculture.
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  • Maine potatoes are of a superior quality, and the acreage of this crop increased from 49,617 in 1889 to 118,000 in 1907.
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  • The state makes large appropriations for preventing and extinguishing forest fires, and in 1903 established a department of forestry in the university of Maine.
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  • Fishing has always been an important industry in Maine.
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  • Herrings are caught in largest quantities (in 1908, according to state reports, 68,210,800 lb, valued at $450,665), and Maine is noted for the canning of the smaller herrings under the name of " sardines."
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  • Maine markets more clams than any other state in the Union, and the catches of cod, hake, haddock, smelt, mackerel, swordfish, shad, pollock, cusk, salmon, alewives, eels and halibut are of importance.
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  • In 1905 Maine held first rank among the states of the Union as a producer of granite, the value of the output being $2,713,795.
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  • In 1907 Maine's granite was valued at $2,146,420, that of Massachusetts at $2,328,777, and that of Vermont at $2,693,889.
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  • In 1907 the quantity of lime burned in Maine was 159,494 tons and its value was $747,947.
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  • Slate is quarried chiefly in Piscataquis county, most of it being used for roofing, but some for blackboards; in 1907 the amount quarried in Maine was valued at $236,106.
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  • About 1896 some remarkably white and pure feldspar began to be quarried in Androscoggin, Oxford and Sagadahoc counties, but afterwards the spar mined in Maine was of less excellent quality; in 1907 the production in Maine was valued at $157,334, the total for the entire country being $499, 06 9.
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  • Although Maine has no coal and only a very small amount of iron ore within her borders for the encouragement of manufacturing, yet the abundance of fine timber and the numerous coves, bays and navigable streams along or near the coast promoted ship-building from the first, and this was the leading industry of the state until about the middle of the 19th century, when wooden ships began to be supplanted by those of iron and steel.
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  • Until about the same time, when the Maine liquor law was passed, the manufacture of rum from molasses, received in exchange for lumber and fish in the West Indies, was also an important industry.
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  • In the value of its manufactures as compared with those of the other states of the Union, in wooden ships and boats, Maine in 1900 and in 1905 was outranked by New York only; in canned and preserved fish by Washington only (the value of fish canned and preserved in Maine in 1900 was 21.7% of the total for the United States, and in 1905 19.2%); in the output of woollen mills by Massachusetts and Pennsylvania only; in the output of paper mills by New York and Massachusetts only.
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  • The principal railway systems are the Maine Central, which enters every county but one, the Boston & Maine, the Bangor & Aroostook, the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific. Lines of steamboats ply regularly between the largest cities of the state and Boston, between Portland and New York, and between Portland and several Canadian ports.
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  • Fish, canned goods, potatoes, granite, lime, paper, and boots and shoes are also exported to foreign countries to some extent, but they are shipped in larger quantities to other states of the Union, from which Maine receives in return cotton, coal, iron, oil, &c. The ports of entry in Maine are Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Wiscasset and York.
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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States, 588,211, or 97.8%, were natives of New England and 560,506 were natives of Maine, and of the foreign-born 67,077, or 71.8%, were natives of Canada (36,169 English and 30,908 French), and 10,159, or 10.8%, were natives of Ireland.
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  • Maine has had but one state constitution; this was ratified in December 1819, about three months before the admission of the state into the Union.
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  • State elections were annual until 1897 when they were made biennial; they are held on the second Monday in September in even numbered years, Maine being one of the few states in the Union in which they are not held in November.
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  • Maine is the only state in the Union that retains what is known as the organized plantation.
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  • Maine has no general law under which cities are chartered, and does not even set a minimum population.
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  • By the laws of Maine the property rights of a wife are approximately equal to those of a husband.
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  • Under the laws of Maine a householder owning and occupying a house and lot may hold the same, or such part of it as does not exceed $500 in value, as a homestead exempt from attachment, except for the satisfaction of liens for labour or material, by filing in the registry of deeds a certificate stating his desire for such an exemption, provided he is not the owner of an exempted lot purchased from the state; and the exemption may be continued during the widowhood of his widow or the minority of his children.
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  • Maine was the first state in the Union to enact a law for prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors.
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  • The death penalty was abolished in Maine in 1876, restored in 1883, and again abolished in 1887.
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  • The charitable institutions maintained by the state are: the military and naval orphan asylum at Bath, the Maine institution for the blind at Portland, the Maine school for the deaf (established in 1876, and taken over by the state in 1897) at Portland, the Maine insane hospital at Augusta, the Eastern Maine insane hospital at Bangor, and a school for the feeble-minded (established in 1907) at West Pownal, each of which is governed by trustees appointed by the governor and council, with the exception of a part of those of the orphan asylum, who are appointed by the corporation.
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  • Besides the strictly state institutions, there are a number of private charitable institutions which are assisted by state funds; among these are the eye and ear infirmary at Portland, the Maine state sanatorium at Hebron for the treatment of tuberculosis, and various hospitals, orphanages, &c. The national government has a branch of the national home for disabled volunteer soldiers at Togus, and a marine hospital at Portland.
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  • The school-district system was established in 1800 while Maine was still a part of Massachusetts and was maintained by the first school law passed, in 1821, by the state legislature; but, beginning in the next year, one town after another received the privilege of abolishing its districts, and in 1893 the system was abolished by act of the legislature.
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  • At the head of the public school system is the university of Maine, near the village of Orono in Orono township (pop. in 1900, 3257), Penobscot county.
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  • During the 16th century and the early part of the 17th, the coast of Maine attracted various explorers, among them Giovanni da Verrazano (1524), Esteban Gomez (1525), Bartholomew Gosnold (1602), Martin Pring (1603), Pierre du Guast, Sieur De Monts (1604), George Weymouth (1605), and John Smith (1614), who explored and mapped the coast and gave to the country the name New England; but no permanent English settlement was established within what are now the borders of the state until some time between 1623 and 1629.
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  • In the same year George Weymouth explored the southwest coast, kidnapped five Indians, and carried them to England, where three of them lived for a time in the family of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who soon became the leader in founding Maine.
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  • The factional quarrels there, together with the Commonwealth government in England, made it easy for Massachusetts to enforce this claim at the time, and between 1652 and 1658 Maine was gradually annexed to Massachusetts.
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  • Ferdinando Gorges, a grandson of the original proprietor, brought before parliament his claim to Maine and in 1664 a committee of that body decided in his favour; but Massachusetts successfully resisted until 1677, when the king in council decided against her.
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  • She then quietly purchased the Gorges claim for £1,250 and held the province as a proprietor until 1691, when by the new Massachusetts charter Maine was extended to the Saint Croix river, and was made an integral part of Massachusetts.
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  • The French still claimed all territory east of the Penobscot, and not only was Maine an exposed frontier and battleground during the long struggle of the English against the Indians and the French, but its citizens bore a conspicuous part in the expeditions beyond its borders.
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  • Port Royal was taken in May 1690 by Sir William Phipps and Louisburg in June 1745 by Sir William Pepperell, both these commanders being from Maine.
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  • These expeditions were such a drain on Maine's population that Massachusetts was called upon to send men to garrison the little forts that protected the homes left defenceless by men who had gone to the front.
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  • The embargo and non-intercourse laws from 1807 to 1812 were a severe blow to Maine's shipping, and in the War of 1812 Eastport, Castine, Hampden, Bangor and Machias fell into the hands of the British.
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  • Maine was in general well governed as a part of Massachusetts, but a geographical separation, a desire to be rid of the burden of a large state debt, and a difference of economic interests as well as of politics (Maine was largely Democratic and Massachusetts was largely Federalist) created a desire for an independent commonwealth.
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  • The want of protection during the War of 1812 revived the question, and in 1816 the General Court in response to a great number of petitions submitted to a vote in the towns and plantations of the District the question: " Shall the legislature be requested to give its consent to the separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts, and the erection of said District into a separate state?
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  • But a large source of opposition to separation was removed in 1819 when Congress, dividing the east coast of the United States into two great districts, did away with the regulation which, making each state a district for entering and clearing vessels, would have required coasting vessels from the ports of Maine as a separate state to enter and clear on every trip to or from Boston; as a consequence, the separation measures were carried by large majorities this year, a constitution was framed by a convention which met at Portland in October, this was ratified by town meetings in December, and Maine applied for admission into the Union.
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  • Owing to the peculiar situation at the time in Congress, arising from the contest over the admission of Missouri, the question of the admission of Maine became an important one in national politics.
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  • By an Act of the 3rd of March 1820, however, Maine was finally admitted into the Union as a separate state, her admission being a part of the Missouri compromise.
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  • The general commissioners met at St Andrews, N.B., in 1816, and in New York City in 1822, only to disagree; and when the king of the Netherlands, chosen as arbitrator in 1829 (under the Convention of 1827) rendered in 1831 a decision against which the state of Maine protested, the Federal Senate withheld its assent to his decision.
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  • In1838-1839the territory in dispute between New Brunswick and Maine became the scene of a border " war," known as the " Aroostook disturbance "; Maine erected forts along the line she claimed, Congress authorized the president to resist any attempt of Great Britain to enforce exclusive jurisdiction over the disputed territory, and an armed conflict seemed imminent.
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  • General Winfield Scott was sent to take command on the Maine frontier, and on the 21st of March 1839 he arranged a truce and a joint occupancy of the territory in dispute until a satisfactory settlement should be reached by the United States and Great Britain.
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  • The Webster-Ashburton treaty of 1842 was a compromise, which allowed Maine about 55 00 sq.
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  • In 1826 the wild lands of Maine were surveyed and divided between the two states; and in 1853 Maine acquired from equal moieties " the sum of $300,000 as compensation for the lands which they had claimed and which under the treaty they were called upon to surrender.
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  • In 1880 the Democrats and Greenbacks united and elected their candidate, but after 1883 Maine was strongly Republican until 1910.
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  • Among them were some of those men of mark who made the backbone of the American character: the sturdy Puritan, Peter Bulkeley, sometime rector of Odell in Bedfordshire, and afterward pastor of the church in the wilderness at Concord, New Hampshire; the zealous evangelist, Father Samuel Moody of Agamenticus in Maine, who pursued graceless sinners even into the alehouse; Joseph Emerson of Malden, "a heroic scholar," who prayed every night that no descendant of his might ever be rich; and William Emerson of Concord, Mass., the patriot preacher, who died while serving in the army of the Revolution.
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  • Eaton returned to the United States, and received a grant of 10,000 acres in Maine from the Massachusetts legislature.
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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.
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  • In referring to this code, Sir Henry Maine spoke of Livingston as "the first legal genius of modern times" (Cambridge Essays, 1856, p.17).
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  • The post-office, completed in 1890, is built of Maine granite.
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  • Pop. (1900), 13,60 9 (3311 were foreign-born); (1910), 14,J79; it is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York New Haven & Hartford railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • There was still another thinker who influenced him at this early period, - Maine de Biran, whom Cousin regarded as the unequalled psychological observer of his time in France.
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  • His foreign policy was successful: he installed a nominee of his own, Edgar, the son of Malcolm Canmore, on the throne of Scotland (1097); he reconquered Maine, which his brother Robert had lost; he made successful war upon King Philip of France.
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  • The king of France announced that he should support them, and allowed Arthur to do him homage for Anjou, Maine and Touraine.
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  • The evacuation of the French fortresses in Maine and elsewhere which Death of was the price paid for the suspension of arms, was flumphmy bitterly resented.
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  • At the beginning of the Civil War he resigned to become colonel of the 3rd Maine volunteer regiment, and at the first battle of Bull Run was in command of a brigade.
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  • The potato crop is large, 26,724,000 bushels being raised in 1909 on 262,000 acres, a crop exceeded only in New York, Michigan and Maine.
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  • Cambridge is entered directly by only one railway, the Boston & Maine.
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  • Royer-Collard himself, Laine, and Maine de Biran had sat in the revolutionary Assemblies.
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  • Some of them, notably Guizot and Maine de Biran,were theorists and commentators on the principles of government.
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  • In 1793 he had begun to build his house, Montpelier, at Thomaston, Maine, where he speculated unsuccessfully in the holdings of the Eastern Land Association; and he lived there until his death on the 25th of October 1806.
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  • On the 19th of March 1692 she married Louis Auguste de Bourbon, duc du Maine, son of Louis XIV.
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  • The duchesse du Maine held a little court at Sceaux, where she gave brilliant entertainments and immersed herself in political intrigues.
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  • See General de Pipape, La Duchesse du Maine (two).
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  • He died on the 13th of October 1890 at Bar Harbor, Maine.
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  • In 1836 the Rev. Elijah P. Lovejoy(1802-1837), a native of Albion, Maine, removed the Observer, a religious (Presbyterian) periodical of which he was the editor, from St Louis to Alton.
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  • Springfield is served by the Springfield division of the New York & New England, the Hartford division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the Connecticut River division of the Boston & Maine, and the Athol division and the main line of the Boston & Albany railways, and by inter-urban electric railway lines.
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  • In its extreme eastern part is the small village of Sixteen Acres; north-west of the main part of the city on the Connecticut river is another village, Brightwood (on the Boston & Maine railway) and on the Chicopee river, north-east of the business part of the city, is the village of Indian Orchard, served by the Athol division of the Boston & Albany railway.
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  • At the end of the 5th century Maine, a relative of the king of Tara, was apportioned a tract of Firbolg territory to the west of the Suck in Connaught, which formed the nucleus of a powerful state known as Hy Maine (in English commonly called the " O'Kelly's country ").
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  • Four of his sons, Loigaire, Conall Crimthand, Fiacc and Maine, settled in Meath and adjoining territories, and their posterity were called the southern Hy Neill.
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  • A few years later Diarmait seized by force the chief of Hy Maine, who had slain his herald and had taken refuge with St Ruadan of Lothra.
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  • The common statement that he derived his surname from Diss in Norfolk is a mere conjecture; Dicetum may equally well be a Latinized form of Dissai, or Dicy, or Dizy, place-names which are found in Maine, Picardy, Burgundy and Champagne.
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  • The state of Maine erected in 1907 a granite memorial to the soldiers from Maine who camped here, and in 1910 Massachusetts appropriated $5000 for a memorial to her troops.
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  • Their disorderly cohorts made an attack upon Italy, which was repulsed by the Lombards, and another on Spain with the same want of success; but beyond the Rhine they embarked upon the conquest of Germany, where Clovis had already reduced to submission the country on the banks of the Maine, later known.
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  • In Anjou, Touraine, Maine and Poitou, lords, towns and abbeys made their submission, won over by Philips bribes despite Pope Innocent III.s attempts at intervention.
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  • Saint-Pol, Nemours, Charles the Bold, his brother the duke of Berry, old Ren of Anjou and his nephew the count of Maine, heir to the riches of Provence and to rights over Naplesthe skeleton hand mowed down all his adversaries as though it too were in his pay; until the day when at Plessisles-Tours it struck a final blow, claimed its just dues from Louis XL, and carried him off despite all his relics on the 3oth of August 1483.
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  • Whilst the Spanish fleet was destroyed before Syracuse by Admiral Byng, the intrigue of the Spanish ambassador Cellamare with the duke of Maine to exclude the family of Orleans from the succession on Louis XV.s death was discovered and repressed; and Marshal Berwick burned the dockyards at Pasajes in Spain.
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  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.
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  • But the blowing up of the American cruiser Maine in the port of Havana added fuel to the agitation in the United States against Spanish rule in Cuba.
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  • In 1602, in command of the "Concord," chartered by Sir Walter Raleigh and others, he crossed the Atlantic; coasted from what is now Maine to Martha's Vineyard, landing at and naming Cape Cod and Elizabeth Island (now Cuttyhunk) and giving the name Martha's Vineyard to the island now called No Man's Land; and returned to England with a cargo of furs, sassafras and other commodities obtained in trade with the Indians about Buzzard's Bay.
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  • He was governor of Maine, commanded an army in Burgundy in 1602, was ambassador extraordinary to England in 1612, and died in 1614.
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  • He graduated from Harvard College in 1769, was a schoolmaster at Falmouth (now Portland), Maine, in 1770-1773, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1774.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railway and by a steamboat line to Boston.
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  • Wakefield is served by three branches of the Boston & Maine railway and by electric interurban railway to neighbouring towns and cities.
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  • Off its western shore opens Passamaquoddy Bay, a magnificent sheet of deep water with good anchorage, receiving the waters of the St Croix river and forming part of the boundary between New Brunswick and the state of Maine.
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  • Under the ancien regime it formed, together with Maine, a gouvernement of which Mortagne was the capital.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railway.
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  • In 1098 there was war between Philip and William Rufus in both Maine and the Vexin.
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  • William came in person from Maine to lead the attack in the Vexin in September, and crossed the Seine, penetrating to within 30 m.
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  • Then he invited me to play a show for his company cookout in Portland, Maine.
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  • He enjoyed the snow and the rain, coping well with his Maine coon type coat.
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  • Follow scenic Loop Road through the park to see the breathtaking fjords of the Maine Coast.
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  • Time to explore outwards provide a at am Maine lobster followed.
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  • Maine prepared television advertisements urging teenagers to postpone sexual activity and to achieve self sufficiency before engaging in sex.
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  • Michele's business fell author victor davis clear blue water Portland maine Sydney.
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  • By Our US Travel Consultant Team Maine is a beautiful city and has an intriguing culture to offer vacationers all over the world.
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  • The point at which the introduction of new principles of equity finally stopped is fixed by Sir Henry Maine in the chancellorship of Lord Eldon, who held that the doctrines of the court ought to be as well settled and made as uniform almost as those of the common law.
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  • Williamstown is served by the Boston & Maine railway and by an interurban electric line to North Adams. It covers an area of about 49 sq.
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  • Troy is served by the Boston & Maine, the New York Central & Hudson River and the Delaware && Hudson railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Saratoga and Lake George on the north, Albany on the south and Schenectady and the cities of the populous Mohawk Valley on the west; it is at the head of river steamboat navigation on the Hudson, and has water communication by means of the Erie and Champlain canals with the Great Lakes and Canada.
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  • In Portland, as in Bangor, the Maine Music Festival (begun in 1897) is held every year in October, three concerts being given by a chorus composed of local choruses trained in different cities of the state for the festival.
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  • Among these may be mentioned Amethyst Mountain, Texas; Yellowstone National Park; Delaware Co., Pennsylvania; Haywood Co., North Carolina; Deer Hill, and Stow, Maine.
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  • Their reluctance to acknowledge a female sovereign was increased when Henry gave her in marriage to Geoffrey Plantagenet, the heir of Anjou and Maine (1129); nor was it removed by the birth of the future Henry II.
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  • When in the following winter money had to be earned to enable Ezekiel to remain in college, Daniel accepted the principalship of the academy at Fryeburg, Maine; but he resumed his law studies in the follow - ing year, and in 1804, with Ezekiel's assistance, he was enabled to go to Boston and conclude his studies under Christopher Gore (1758-1827), later governor of Massachusetts (1809-1810) and a U.S. senator (1813-1816).
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  • The North-east boundary dispute was settled by a compromise which allowed Maine about 5500 sq.
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  • The severity of this measure led to gross abuses and defeated its purpose; the number of abolitionists increased, the operations of the Underground Railroad became more efficient, and new Personal Liberty Laws were enacted in Vermont (1850), Connecticut (1854), Rhode Island (1854), Massachusetts (1855), Michigan (1855), Maine (1855 and 1857), Kansas (1858) and Wisconsin (1858).
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  • Bangor is the seat of three state institutions - the Eastern Maine general hospital, the Eastern Maine insane hospital and the law school of the University of Maine - and of the Bangor Theological Seminary (Congregational), incorporated in 1814, opened at Hampden in 1816, removed to Bangor in 1819, and empowered in 1905 to confer degrees in divinity.
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  • Cousin, whose views varied considerably at different periods of his life, 'not only adopted freely what pleased him in the doctrines of Pierre Laromiguiere, RoyerCollard and Maine de Biran, of Kant, Schelling and Hegel, and of the ancient philosophies, but expressly maintained that the eclectic is the only method now open to the philosopher, whose function thus resolves itself into critical selection and nothing more.
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  • Its crop of potatoes in 1909 was 52,560,000 bushels and that of Maine, the next largest, 29,250,000 bushels; and the state is a large producer of onions, turnips, cabbages, cauliflower, sweet Indian corn, cucumbers, rhubarb, parsnips, carrots, green peas and green beans.
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  • It may mean a state of things such as existed in the middle ages, in which ownership and sovereignty were not clearly separated: when he who was owner had sovereign rights incident thereto, or, as it was sometimes phrased, when sovereignty inhered in the territory, when the king was the supreme landowner (Maine, Ancient Law, p. 106; Figgis, pp. 11, 14); when all political power exhibited proprietary traits, and was incident to the ownership of land (Maitland, Township and Borough, p. 31).
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  • In 1869 Maine was appointed to the chair of historical and comparative jurisprudence newly founded in the university of Oxford by Corpus Christi College.
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  • At other points of the coast the British navy was employed in punitive expeditions against the coast towns - as for example the burning of Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) in October 1775 - which served to exasperate, rather than to weaken the enemy, or the unsuccessful attack on Charleston, S.C., in June 1776.
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