Madrid sentence example

madrid
  • He was educated there and at Madrid University, where his Radicalism soon got him into trouble, and he narrowly escaped being expelled for his share in student riots and other demonstrations against the governments of Queen Isabella.
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  • The whole work in fifty-one volumes was published at Madrid (1747-1886).
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  • We took Vienna, Berlin, Madrid, Naples, Rome, Warsaw, all the world's capitals....
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  • Florez led a retired, studious and unambitious life, and died at Madrid on the 10th of August 1773.
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  • If not, then his troops could deal with it as Murat had dealt with the men of Madrid on the 2nd of May.
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  • He was still in office when the final rising of the Cubans began in February 1895, and he had to resign in March because he could not find superior officers in the army willing to help him to put down the turbulent and disgraceful demonstrations of the subalterns of Madrid garrison against newspapers which had given offence to the military.
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  • In the beginning of i 556 Ignatius grew very weak and resigned the active government to three fathers, Polanco, Madrid and Natal.
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  • Ignacio de Loyola (Madrid, 1594), based on an early Latin work (Naples, 1572).
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  • As for Ferdinand, the emperor, on hearing the news of a rising in Madrid on the 2nd of May, overwhelmed him with threats, until he resigned the crown into the hands of his father, who had already bargained it away to Napoleon in return for a pension (5th of May 1808).
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  • Shortly afterwards he fell into ill-health, and died at Madrid on the 15th of January 1903.
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  • Having failed to form a rival party against Sagasta, Martos subsided into political insignificance, despite his great talent as an orator and debater, and died in Madrid on the 16th of January 1893.
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  • From Bordeaux there is also a direct line to Bayonne and Irun (for Madrid), and at the other end of the Pyrenees a line leads from Narbonne to Perpignan and Barcelona.
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  • In 1812 his Escuela de los maridos, a translation of Moliere's Ecole des maris, was produced at Madrid, and in 1813 El Medico a Palos (a translation of Le Medecin malgre lui) at Barcelona.
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  • He took part in the revolutionary propaganda that led to the military movement in Madrid on the 22nd of June 1866.
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  • He began his education at Valladolid, and studied law afterwards at Madrid University, where he leaned towards Radicalism in politics.
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  • He gave so much trouble to the Madrid governments that they organized a watch over him with the assistance of the French government and police, especially when it was discovered that the two military movements of August 1883 and September 1886 had been prepared and assisted by him.
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  • During the last two years of his life Ruiz Zorilla became less active; failing health and the loss of his wife had decreased his energies, and the Madrid government allowed him to return to Spain some months before he died at Burgos, on the 1 3 th of June 1895, of heart disease.
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  • From 1848 to 1849 he was minister of France at Madrid.
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  • They resigned their positions as councillors of state, and expressed their grievances personally to Margaret and by letter to the king in Madrid, asking for the dismissal of Granvelle.
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  • The nobles protested, and Egmont was deputed to go to Madrid and try to obtain from the king a mitigation of the edicts and redress of grievances.
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  • A few weeks later his eldest son, Philip William, count of Buren, a student at the university of Louvain, was kidnapped and carried off to Madrid.
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  • Vicent y Portillo (Madrid, 1889, &c.); Fechos y fechas de Cartagena, by I.
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  • In the reign of this pope Francis was released from his prison in Madrid (1526), and Clement hoped that he might still be used in the Italian interest as a counterpoise to Charles.
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  • By complex and secret bargaining with the court of Madrid, Bonaparte procured the cession to France Napoleons of Louisiana, in North America, and Parma; while reorganthe duke of Parma (husband of an infanta of Spain) 1zat1o~ of was promoted by him to the duchy of Tuscany, now 1t8tV.
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  • The new-born idea of Italian unity, strengthened by a national pride revived on many a stricken field from Madrid to Moscow, was a force to be reckoned with.
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  • At Madrid he preached a sermon which pleased Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., and the latter on his accession appointed Frewen one of his chaplains.
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  • The only Latin countries in which conflict has not arisen appear to be the principality of Andorra and the republic of San Marino (Giron y Areas, SituaciOn juridica de la Iglesia Catolica, Madrid, 1905, p. 173 et seq.).
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  • Early in 1850 Ayala removed his name from the university books, and settled in Madrid with the purpose of becoming a professional dramatist.
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  • A complete edition of his dramatic works, edited by his friend and rival Tamayo y Baus, has been published in seven volumes (Madrid, 1881 - 1885).
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  • In 1403 the Spanish king sent a knight of Madrid, Ruy Gonzalez de Clavijo, to the distant court of Timur, at Samarkand.
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  • Having passed some time in the court circle, Sunderland was successively ambassador at Madrid, at Paris and at Cologne; in 1678 he was again ambassador at Paris.
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  • Torquemada went with the sovereigns to Cordova, to Madrid or wherever the states-general were held, to urge on the war; and he obtained from the Holy See the same spiritual favours that had been enjoyed by the Crusaders.
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  • In January 1678 a palace revolution broke out against the queen-regent, who was driven from Madrid, and Valenzuela fled for refuge to the monastery of the Escorial.
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  • (Madrid, 1842, &c.), which contain an artful and well-written defence of himself addressed to King Charles II.
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  • (Madrid, 1899-1900), included in Monumenta historica Societatis Jesu.
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  • He was summoned to Madrid in 1575 by Philip II.
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  • In the same year he was made archbishop of Besancon, but meanwhile he had been stricken with a lingering disease; he was never enthroned, but died at Madrid on the 21st of September 1586.
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  • He had been fortunate in obtaining the aid of Don Pascual de Gayangos, then professor of Arabic literature at Madrid, by whose offices he was enabled to obtain material not only from the public archives of Spain but from the muniment rooms of the great Spanish families.
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  • Entering the diplomatic service at an early age, he was appointed successively to the legations of Madrid, Vienna, Berlin and Versailles, but in 1871 returned to Italy, to devote himself to political and social studies.
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  • During the minority of Otho he was named privy councillor and minister at Madrid and Lisbon.
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  • In Spain there has been of late a more liberal attitude towards the Jews, and there is a small congregation (without a public synagogue) in Madrid.
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  • In 1832 the Registro Trimestre, a literary and scientific journal printed at Mexico, contained a communication by Dr. Pablo de la Llave, describing this species (with which he first became acquainted before 1810, from examining more than a dozen specimens obtained by the natural-history expedition to New Spain and kept in the palace of the Retiro near Madrid) under the name by which it is now known, Pharomacrus mocino.3 Quezal, male and female.
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  • Having completed his studies in the Capranica College' at Rome, and having taken holy orders, he studied diplomacy at the College of Ecclesiastical Nobles, and in 1875 was appointed councillor to the papal nunciature at Madrid.
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  • Consecrated titular archbishop of Heraclea in 1885, he returned to Madrid as nuncio, but was shortly afterwards created cardinal and appointed to the papal secretaryship of state.
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  • After occupying the positions of procurator of the Jesuits at Rome and censor (calificador) of the Inquisition at Madrid, Acuna returned to South America, where he died, probably soon after 1675.
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  • Seeing that Godoy, the all-powerful minister at Madrid, had given mortal offence to Napoleon early in the Prussian campaign of 1806 by calling on Spain to arm on behalf of her independence, it passes belief how he could have placed his country at the mercy of Napoleon at the end of the year 1807.
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  • He allowed the prince to hope for such a union, and thus enhanced the popularity of the French party at Madrid.
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  • Godoy, having the prospect of the Algarve before him, likewise offered no opposition to the advance of Napoleon's troops to the capital; and so it came about that Murat, named by Napoleon his Lieutenant in Spain, was able to enter Madrid in force and without opposition from that usually clannish populace.
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  • After spending a short time in Paris in order to supervise the transfer of his forces from Germany to the Pyrenees, he journeyed swiftly southwards, burst upon the Spaniards, and on the 3rd of December received the surrender of Madrid.
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  • For this feat he was made a baron, and in 1808 he was promoted general of division by Napoleon on the field of battle in front of Madrid.
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  • Its surrender in 1625, after a ten months' siege, to the Spaniards under Spinola is the subject of the famous picture by Velasquez in the Museo del Prado in Madrid.
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  • Paul Hippolyte de Beauvillier, comte de Montresor, afterwards duc de Saint Aignan, was ambassador at Madrid from 1715 to 1718 and at Rome in 1731, and a member of the council of regency in 1719.
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  • According to Pierre Bayle, he was almost killed by some Englishmen at Madrid in 1614, and again fearing for his life he left Germany for Italy in 1617, afterwards taking part in an attack upon the Jesuits.
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  • Coleccion de informes, memorias, proyectos y antecedentes sobre el gobierno de la isla de Cuba (Madrid, 1875); Vicente Vasquez Queipo, Informe fiscal sobre fomento de la poblacion blanca (Madrid, 1845); Informacion sobre reformas en Cuba y Puerto Rico celebrada en Madrid en 1866 y 67 por los representantes de ambas islas (2 tom., New York, 1867; 2nd ed., New York, 1877); and the Diccionario of Pezuela.
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  • Galiano, Cuba en 1858 (Madrid, 1859); Jose de la Concha, twice Captain-General of Cuba, Memorias sobre el estado politico, gobierno y administracion de.
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  • Many of those that are movable have been transferred to Madrid, and many others have perished by fire or sack.
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  • Lorencio el Real del Escurial (Madrid, 1589); Jose de Siguenza, Historia de la orden de San Geronyno, &c. (Madrid, 1590).
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  • ' Reduced from a large plan of the Escorial in the British Museum, Monasterio del Escorial, published at Madrid in 1876.
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  • Marshal Moncey with a corps occupied Biscay and Navarre; Duhesme with a division entered Catalonia; and a little later Bessieres with another corps had been brought up. There were now about ioo,000 French soldiers in Spain, and Murat, grand duke of Berg, as "lieutenant for the emperor," entered Madrid.
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  • The Spanish people, in an outburst of fury against the king and Godoy, forced the former to abdicate in favour of his son Ferdinand; but the inhabitants of Madrid having (May 2,18°8) risen against the French, Napoleon refused to recognize Ferdinand; both he and the king were compelled to renounce their rights to the throne, and a mercenary council of regency having been induced to desire the French emperor to make his brother, Joseph Bonaparte, king, he acceded to their request.2 The mask was now completely thrown off, and Spain and Portugal rose against the French.
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  • Before it landed, the French under Dupont, Moncey and Marshal Bessieres (75,000) had occupied parts of Biscay, Navarre, Aragon and the Castiles, holding Madrid and Toledo, while General Duhesme (14,000) was in Catalonia.
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  • Moncey (7000) had marched towards the city of Valencia, but been repulsed in attempting to storm it (June 28); Bessieres had defeated the Spanish general Joachim Blake at Medina de Rio Seco (June 14, 1808) and Dupont (13,000) had been detached (May 24) from Madrid to reduce Seville and Cadiz in Andalusia.
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  • Bilbao; Count de Belvedere (ii,000) near Burgos; reserves (57,000) were assembling about Segovia, Talavera and Cordova; Catalonia was held by 23,000, and Madrid had been reoccupied.
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  • For these reasons he marched by land; and as the roads north of the Tagus were deemed impassable for guns, while transport and supplies for a large force were also difficult to procure, he sent Sir John Hope, with the artillery, cavalry and reserve ammunition column, south of the river, through Badajoz to Almaraz, to move thence through Talavera, Madrid and the Escurial Pass, involving a considerable detour; while he himself with the infantry, marching by successive divisions, took the shorter roads north of the Tagus through Coimbra and Almeida, and also by Alcantara and Coria to Ciudad Rodrigo and Salamanca.
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  • But these were soon changed, and he now took the important resolution of striking a blow for Spain, and for the defenders of Madrid, by attacking Napoleon's communications with France.
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  • Napoleon, directly he realized Moore's proximity, had ordered Soult to Astorga to cut him off from Galicia; recalled his other troops from their march towards Lisbon and Andalusia, and, with 50,000 men and 150 guns, had left Madrid himself (Dec. 22).
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  • News having been received that Napoleon had suffered a serious check at the battle of Aspern, near Vienna (May 22, 1809), Wellesley next determined - leaving Beresford (20,000) near Ciudad Rodrigo - to move with 22,000 men, in conjunction with Cuesta's Spanish army (40,000) towards Madrid against Victor, who, with 25,000 supported by King Joseph (50,000) covering the capital, was near Talavera.
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  • Sir Robert Wilson with 4000 Portuguese from Salamanca, and a Spanish force under Venegas (25,000) from Carolina, were to co-operate and occupy Joseph, by closing upon Madrid.
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  • Cuesta, during the advance up the valley of the Tagus, was to occupy the pass of Banos on the left flank; the Spanish authorities were to supply provisions, and Venegas was to be at Arganda, near Madrid, by the 22nd or 23rd of July; but none of these arrangements were duly carried out, and it was on this that the remainder of the campaign turned.
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  • Writing to Soult from Austria, Napoleon had placed the corps of Ney and Mortier under his orders, and said: "Wellesley will most likely advance by the Tagus against Madrid; in that case, pass the mountains, fall on his flank and rear, and crush him."
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  • The battle lasted for two days, and ended in the defeat of the French, who fell back towards Madrid.'
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  • The French, still numbering nearly 200,000, now held the following positions: the Army of the North - Dorsenne (48,000) - was about the Pisuerga, in the Asturias, and along the northern coast; the Army of Portugal - Marmont (50,000) - mainly in the valley of the Tagus, but ordered to Salamanca; the Army of the South - Soult (55,000) - in Andalusia; the Army of the Centre - Joseph (ig,000) - about Madrid.
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  • Wellington then brought up Hill to Madrid.
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  • Wellington had insufficient siege equipment and transport for heavy guns; five assaults failed, and Soult (having left Suchet in Valencia) and also the Army of Portugal were both approaching, so Wellington withdrew on the night of the Retreat 21st of October, and, directing the evacuation of from Madrid, commenced the "Retreat from Burgos."
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  • In addition to the decisive victory of Salamanca, Madrid had been occupied, the siege of Cadiz raised, Andalusia freed, and Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajoz stormed.
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  • Of these about 60,000 under Joseph were more immediately opposed to Wellington, and posted, in scattered detachments, from Toledo and Madrid behind the Tormes to the Douro, and along that river to the Esla.
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  • The men are well known all over Spain and Portugal as hardy, honest and industrious, but for the most part somewhat unskilled, labourers; indeed the word Gallego has come to be almost a synonym in Madrid for a "hewer of wood and drawer of water."
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  • He was ambassador at Madrid from 1897 to 1902.
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  • Livingston, the resident minister, in obtaining by purchase the territory at the mouth of the Mississippi, including the island of New Orleans, and at the same time authorized him to co-operate with Charles Pinckney, the minister at Madrid, in securing from Spain the cession of East and West Florida.
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  • In July 1803 Monroe left Paris and entered upon his duties in London; and in the autumn of 1804 he proceeded to Madrid to assist Pinckney in his efforts to secure the definition of the Louisiana boundaries and the acquisition of the Floridas.
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  • After the removal of the university to Madrid in 1836 the town rapidly declined, and the government turned most of the principal buildings erected by Cardinal Jimenes in the 16th century into a depot for the archives of various state departments.
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  • It was not till the 30th of March 1845 that the independence of the republic was recognized by Spain in the treaty of Madrid.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Madrid discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • If Zumalacarregui had been allowed to follow his own plans, which were to concentrate his forces and march on Madrid, he might well have put Don Carlos in possession of the capital.
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  • He became minister plenipotentiary at Madrid and at Lisbon, but the revolution of 1848 caused him to withdraw into private life, from which he did not emerge until in 1871 he was elected deputy to the National Assembly by the Gironde.
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  • In 1772 important glass works were established at Recuenco in the province of Cuenca, mainly to supply Madrid.
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  • Nard, Guia de Aranjuez, su historia y description (Madrid, 1851), (illustrated); Alvarez de Quindos, Descripcion historica del real bosque y casa de Aranjuez (Madrid, 1804).
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  • Examples of his attempted historical writing are Histoire du siecle d'Alexandre le Grand (Amsterdam, 1762), and Histoire impartiale des Jesuites (Madrid, 1768), the latter condemned to be burned.
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  • At the end of the year, when Marshal Serrano left Madrid to take command of the northern army, General Martinez Campos, who had long been working more or less openly for the king, carried off some battalions of the central army to Sagunto, rallied to his own flag the troops sent against him, and entered Valencia in the king's name.
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  • In the course of a few days the king arrived at Madrid, passing through Barcelona and Valencia, and was received everywhere with acclamation (1875).
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  • Towards the end of the same year a young workman of Tarragona, Oliva Marcousi, fired at the king in Madrid.
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  • During the honeymoon a pastrycook named Otero fired at the young sovereigns as they 'were driving in Madrid.
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  • His expectations of the cardinalate were disappointed by Pius V.'s death in 1572, and Sanders spent the next few years at Madrid trying to embroil Philip II., who gave him a pension of 300 ducats, in open war with Elizabeth.
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  • He retired from parliament in 1869, on being sent as envoy extraordinary to Madrid.
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  • He returned to Naples as captain on Massena's staff to fight the Bourbons and the Austrians in 1806, and subsequently went to Spain, where he followed Jerome Bonaparte in his retreat from Madrid.
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  • He settled at Madrid in 1626, and died there on the 28th of July 1631 in such poverty that his funeral expenses were defrayed by charity.
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  • He probably made the acquaintance of Lope de Vega at the festivals (1620-1622) held to commemorate the beatification and canonization of St Isidore, the patron saint of Madrid.
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  • From Madrid he was suddenly summoned to the governorship of Brittany, and in 1787 was appointed by the king to succeed Vergennes in the ministry of foreign affairs.
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  • He fell ill at Madrid and was on the point of death.
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  • But this was too great a demand upon his fortitude, and he finally yielded and signed the treaty of Madrid, after having drawn up a secret protest.
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  • After Madrid he wavered unceasingly between two courses, either that of continuing hostilities, or the policy favoured by Montmorency of peace and understanding with the emperor.
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  • Hartzenbusch, Periodicos de Madrid (1876); Lapeyre, Catalogo-tarifa de los periodicos, revistas, y ilustraciones en Espana (1882); Georges le Gentil, Les Revues litteraires de l'Espagne pendant la premiere moitie du XIX e siecle (Paris, 1909).
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  • Toledo is close to Madrid, and the correspondence was easily maintained.
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  • In 1814 Escoiquiz published at Madrid his Idea Sencilla de las razones que motivaron el viage del Rey Fernando VII.
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  • When Ferdinand was released in 1814 he came back to Madrid in the hope that his ambition would now be satisfied, but the king was tired of him, and was moreover resolved never to be subjected by any favourite.
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  • He died at Madrid, on the 17th of February 1624.
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  • He escaped to France in February 1813, and returned to Spain in 1814, but was not allowed to reside at Madrid till 1816.
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  • Bolivar was sent to Europe to prosecute his studies, and resided at Madrid for several years.
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  • There are lives by Larrazabal (New York, 1866); Rojas (Madrid, 1883); and Ducoudray-Holstein (Paris, 1831).
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  • The main sources for the political history are the Documentos Ineditos para la historia de Espana (Madrid, 1842, &c.), vols.
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  • In 1876 a statue of Servetus was erected by Don Pedro Gonsalez de Velasco in front of his Instituto Antropologico at Madrid; in 1903 an expiatory block was erected at Champel; in 1907 a statue was erected in Paris (Place de la Mairie du XIV e Arrondissement); another is at Aramnese; another was prepared (1910) for erection at Vienne.
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  • When, nearer the end of the century (1481-1495), King pitch, and brand themselves with the sign of the cross in token of their baptism "(Libro del conocimiento de todos reynos, &c., printed at Madrid, 1877).
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  • In the hope of repressing their encroachments, Jansen was sent twice to Madrid, in 1624 and 1626; the second time he narrowly escaped the Inquisition.
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  • The Mars gallicus did not do much to help Jansen's friends in France, but it more than appeased the wrath of Madrid with Jansen himself; in 1636 he was appointed bishop of Ypres.
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  • Franklin, besides, was constantly called upon to meet the indebtedness of Lee and of Ralph Izard (1742-1804), and of John Jay, who in Madrid was being drawn on by the American Congress.
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  • This success turned the tide of war against Don Carlos, who vainly attempted a raid towards Madrid.
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  • During the last three years of the war Espartero, who had been elected a deputy, exercised from his distant headquarters such influence over Madrid politics that he twice hastened the fall of the cabinet, and obtained office for his own friends.
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  • At the close of the war the queen regent and her ministers attempted to elbow out Espartero and his followers, but a pronunciamiento ensued in Madrid and other large towns which culminated in the marshal's accepting the post of prime minister.
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  • The latter was shot in Madrid.
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  • Espartero crushed with much energy a revolutionary rising in Barcelona, but on his return to Madrid was so coldly welcomed that he perceived that his prestige was on the wane.
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  • The rebels declared Queen Isabel of age, and, led by General Narvaez, marched upon Madrid.
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  • The Restoration raised a statue to him near the gate of the Retiro Park in Madrid.
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  • There he discredited himself by his vanity, and shocked even the populace of Madrid by appearing drunk at the theatre.
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  • He was hanged at Madrid in the Plaza de la Cebada on the 7th of November 1823.
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  • At Madrid there is preserved the crown of Svintilla, king of the Visigoths, 621-631.
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  • Railways from Madrid to the French frontier, and from Saragossa to Bilbao, cross the province.
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  • On the 16th of November 1870 he was proclaimed king of Spain by the Cortes; but, before he could arrive at Madrid, Marshal Prim, chief promoter of his candidature, was assassinated.
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  • Undeterred by rumours of a plot against his own life, Amedeo entered Madrid alone, riding at some distance from his suite to the church where Marshal Prim's body lay in state.
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  • Though warned of a plot against his life (August 18, 1872) he refused to take precautions, and, while returning from Buen Retiro to Madrid in company with the queen, was repeatedly shot at in Via Avenal.
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  • In July of the following year he died at Madrid, whither he had gone to urge (and with success) the necessity of restoring a court of justice which had been suppressed in Guatemala.
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  • Don Enrique de Villena took from Les Prouesses his prose Los Doze Trabajos de Hercules (Zamora, 1483 and 1499), and Fernandez de Heredia wrote Trabajos y afanes de Hercules (Madrid, 1682), which belies its title, being a collection of adages and allegories.
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  • He warned Buckingham and Prince Charles of the perils of their project for the Spanish marriage, and after their return from Madrid he encountered their resentment by opposing war with Spain.
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  • Adolfo Bonilla y San Martin's Luis Vives y la filosofia del renacimiento (Madrid, 1903) is a valuable and interesting study which includes an exhaustive bibliography of Vives's writings and a critical estimate of previous monographs.
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  • A Viennese notice of his appointment as Oberka pellmeister spoke of him as " the darling of our nation," his works were reprinted or performed in every capital from Madrid to St Petersburg.
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  • Revolutions broke out in Paris, Vienna, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Naples, Venice, Munich, Dresden and Budapest.
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  • In order to soften the blow, Napoleon appointed him ambassador to the court of Madrid (November 1800).
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  • See Historia del Reinado de Carlos IV., by General Gomez de Arteche (3 vols.), in the Historia General de Espana de la Real Academia de la Historia (Madrid, 1892, &c.).
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  • Next, at the instance of Charles IV., he went to Spain, where he taught chemistry first at the artillery school of Segovia, and then at Salamanca, finally becoming in 1789 director of the royal laboratory at Madrid.
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  • (JEAN JOSEPH CHARLES) LOUIS BLANC (1811-1882), French politician and historian, was born on the 29th of October 1811 at Madrid, where his father held the post of inspector-general of finance under Joseph Bonaparte.
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  • Hydrated sulphates occur at several localities in the province of Madrid and in other provinces of Spain, and at Miihlingen in Aargau, and copious deposits of glauberite, the double sulphate of sodium and calcium, are met with in the salt-mines of Villarrubia in Spain, at Stassfurt, and in the province of Tarapaca, Chile, &c. A native nitrate of soda is obtained in great abundance in the district of Atacama and the province of Tarapaca, and is imported into Europe in enormous quantities as cubic nitre for the preparation of saltpetre.
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  • The left flank, even after the evacuation of Columbus, was exposed, and the Missouri divisions under Pope quickly seized New Madrid.
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  • In 1886 he became French ambassador to Madrid; was transferred to Constantinople in 1890, and in 1898 to London.
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  • He was transferred in 1902 to Madrid, and in 1907 to Berlin.
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  • He saw some service against the Carlists; was elected deputy to the Cortes of 1836; took part for Espartero, and then against him; was imprisoned in 1843; went into exile and returned; was governor of Barcelona in 1854, and minister of finance in 1855; had a large share in secularizing the Church lands; and after the revolution of 1868 was governor of Madrid.
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  • Madoz was distinguished from most of the politicians of his generation by the fact that in middle life he compiled what is still a book of value - a geographical, statistical and historical dictionary of Spain and its possessions oversea, Diccionario geogra Pico, estadistico y historico de Espana, y sus posesiones de Ultramar (Madrid, 1848-1850).
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  • He was removed to Madrid, took a prominent part in political life, and in 1867 emigrated to Provence.
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    0
  • He died at Madrid on the 14th of January 1901.
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    0
  • He retired from the army in 1770, and was subsequently elected secretary of the Royal Academy of History at Madrid.
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    0
  • The 2nd Baron Grantham (1738-1786), ambassador at Madrid, and foreign secretary under Lord Shelburne, had two sons.
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    0
  • The railway from Madrid to Albacete passes south-westward to Chinchilla, where it bifurcates, one line going to Murcia, and the other to Alicante.
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    0
  • The Chronicle of Alvaro de Luna (Madrid, 1784), written by some loyal follower who survived him, is a panegyric and largely a romance.
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    0
  • By the treaty of Madrid, in 1795, Spain ceded to the United States her claims to the lands east of the Mississippi between 31° and 32° 28'; and three years later (1798) this district was organized by Congress as the Mississippi Territory.
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    0
  • He drove the French out of Oporto by a singularly bold and fortunate attack, and then prepared to march against Madrid by the valley of the Tagus.
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    0
  • Wellesley, unconscious of Soult's presence in force on his flank, advanced against Madrid, and defeated his immediate opponent, King Joseph, at Talavera de la Reina on the 27th-28th of July.
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    0
  • King Joseph retired, and the English entered Madrid in triumph.
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    0
  • Moreover, Soult, raising the siege of Cadiz, and gathering other forces to his own, pressed on towards Madrid.
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  • After his return to Spain his reputation as a strong and ambitious soldier made him one of those who in case of any constitutional disturbance might be expected to play an important role, and his political position was nationally affected by this consideration; his appointment in 1900 as captain-general of Madrid resulted indeed in more than one ministerial crisis.
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  • In 1897 he became military attache at the American legation in Madrid.
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    0
  • In 1785 he became commissary of the Holy Office at Logrono, and in 1789 its general secretary at Madrid.
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  • He died at Madrid on the 5th of February 1823.
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  • Llorente also wrote Memorias Para la historia de la revolution espanola (Paris, 1814-1816), translated into French (Paris, 1815-1819); Noticias historicas sobre las tres provincial va congadas (Madrid, 1806-1808); an autobiography, Noticia biografica (Paris, 1818), and other works.
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  • In 1833 Old Castile was divided into the provinces of Avila, Burgos, Logrono, Palencia, Santander, Segovia, Soria and Valladolid; while New Castile was similarly divided into Ciudad Real, Cuenca, Guadalajara, Madrid and Toledo.
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  • For the history, see in addition to the works cited under Spain (section History), Cronicas de los reyes de Castilla, by C. Rosell (Madrid, 1875-1877, 2 vols.); Coleccion de las cronicas y memorias de los reyes de Castilla (Madrid, 1 7791787, 7 vols.); and Historia de las communidades de Castilla (Madrid, 1897).
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  • He next took to medicine, which he studied at the universities of Valencia and Barcelona with such success that the local authorities of the latter city made him a grant to enable him to follow his studies at Madrid and Paris, preparatory to appointing him professor.
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  • Gil Maestre, in his El Anarquismo en Espana, y el especial de Barcelona (Madrid, 1897), and in his La Criminalidad en Barcelona (Barcelona, 1886).
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    0
  • By the will of the prince he was endowed for life with the post of Regidor, or legal representative of the king in the municipality of Madrid.
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  • He began to disobey orders from Madrid and became entangled in intrigues to manage or even to coerce the king.
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  • According to an old tradition the murder took place outside the church of St Maria in Madrid, which was pulled down in 1868.
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  • In March-April he co-operated in the capture of New Madrid and Island No.
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  • Three others - "Valladolid" of about 1035, "Madrid" of 1047, and "London" of 1109 - are derivatives of the "Valcavado-Ashburnham" of 970; the eighth, "Paris II," is connected, though not very intimately, with "St Sever," otherwise "Paris I"; the ninth and tenth, "Gerona" and "Paris III," belong to the Turin group of Beatus maps.
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  • There is only one complete edition of the text, that by Florez (Madrid, 1770).
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    0
  • Hay was secretary of the U.S. legation at Paris in 1865-1867, at Vienna in1867-1869and at Madrid in 1869-1870.
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  • "GEORGE SANTAYANA (1863-), American philosopher and writer, was born in Madrid, Spain, Dec. 16 1863.
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  • By the treaty of peace concluded at Madrid, in 1617, it was arranged that the Uskoks should be disbanded, and their ships destroyed.
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    0
  • A mythology reminiscent of Italy is the "Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds" in the Germanic Museum at Nuremberg, founded directly upon the "Hercules and Centaur Nessus" of Pollaiuolo, now at New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A. Of portraits, besides that of his father already mentioned as done in 1497, there is his own of 1498 at Madrid.
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    0
  • Except the brilliant existences of Raphael at Rome and of Rubens at Antwerp and Madrid, the annals of art present the spectacle of few more honoured or more fortunate careers.
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    0
  • Two versions of the picture exist, one in Florence at the Pitti palace, the other, which is generally allowed to be the original, at Madrid.
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  • Accord ' This " manifesto," which was bitterly attacked in the North, was agreed upon (October 18, 1854) by the three ministers after several meetings at Ostend and at Aix-la-Chapelle, arranged in pursuance of instructions to them from President Pierce to " corn-, pare opinions, and to adopt measures for perfect concert of action in aid of the negotiations at Madrid " on the subject of reparations demanded from Spain by the United States for alleged injuries to American commerce with Cuba.
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  • See also Rafael Contreras, La Alhambra, El Alcdzar, y la gran Mezquita de Occidente (Madrid, 1885); The Alhambra, by Washington Irving, was written in 1832, and rewritten in 1857, when it had already become widely celebrated for its picturesque and humorous descriptions.
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  • In 1891 he made some brief continental visits, one to Madrid, and in October he saw through the press his little monograph upon William Pitt, in the Twelve English Statesmen Series, of which it may be said that it competes in interest with Viscount Morley's Walpole.
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  • See Karl Borinski, Baltasar Gracidn and die Hoflitteratur in Deutschland (Halle, 1894); Benedetto Croce, I Trattatisti italiani del "concettismo" e Baltasar Gracidn (Napoli, 1899); Narciso Jose Linan y Heredia, Baltasar Gracidn (Madrid, 1902).
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  • Abteilung, pp. 216-226 and 440-442; Ludwig Braunfels, Kritischer Versuch fiber den Roman Amadis von Gallien (Leipzig, 1876); Theophilo Braga, Historia das novelas portuguezas de cavalleria (Porto, 1873), Curso de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa, 1881), and Questoes de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa,1885); Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo, Origenes de la novela (Madrid, 1905); Eugene Baret, De l'Amadis de Gaule et de son influence sur les me urs et la litterature au X VI e et au X VII e siecle (Paris, 1873).
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  • Abandoning his intention of taking orders, he found employment at Madrid in 1788 as tutor to the sons of the countess-duchess de Benavente, and devoted himself to the study of archaeology.
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    0
  • In 1807 he became editor of the Gaceta de Madrid, and in the following year was condemned to death by Murat for publishing a patriotic article; he fled to Cadiz, and under the Junta Central held various posts from which he was dismissed by the reactionary government of 1814.
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    0
  • Similarly, the surprising damascening by Messrs Zuluaga of Madrid in the monument to General Prim, and that of Alvarez of Toledo, give hope that the Spanish craftsman only needs to be properly directed.
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    0
  • Some spurious letters bear the name of Severus; also in a MS. at Madrid is a work falsely professing to be an epitome of the Chronica of Severus, and going down to 511.
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    0
  • Owing to the encroachments of the Mississippi river, the site of the first permanent settlement of New Madrid is said to lie now about 12 m.
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    0
  • This settlement was made in 1788, on an elaborately laid out town site, and was named New Madrid by its founder, Colonel George Morgan (1742-1810), 1 who, late in 1787, had received a grant of a large tract of land on the right bank of the Mississippi river, below the mouth of the Ohio, from Don Diego de Gardoqui, Spanish minister to the United States.
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    0
  • Pillow, on the 28th of July 1861, and after the surrender of Fort Donelson (February 16, 1862) the troops previously at Columbus, forming the Confederate left flank, were withdrawn to New Madrid and Island No.
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    0
  • Foote proceeded against these positions; New Madrid, then in command of General John P. McGown, was evacuated on the 14th; (Admiral) Henry Walke (1808-1896), commanding the "Carondelet," ran past the batteries of Island No.
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  • He was then sent to Europe to complete his studies, first in Madrid, where he became a doctor of medicine, and later in Germany, where he received the degree of Ph.D.
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    0
  • With every change of ministry in Madrid came a new lot of hungry politicians anxious to fill even the more humble colonial offices.
    0
    0
  • The Madrid government refused to confirm the terms of peace, and the peace rejoicings in Manila were followed by the persecution of all those who were known to have sympathized with the movement.
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  • Du Cane, Punishment and Prevention of Crime (1885); Braco, Estudos penitenciarios e criminaes (Lisbon, 1888); Garofalo, Studio sul delitto, sulle sui cause e sui mezzi di repressione (1890); Adolphe Guillot, Les Prisons de Paris (1890); Tallack, Preventive and Penological Principles (1896); Salillas, Vida penal en Espana (Madrid).
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  • 1 This account of the conquest is based partly on the researches of Dozy, but mainly on those of Saavedra in his Estudio sobre la Invasion de los Arabes en Espana (Madrid, 1892).
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  • He was in Congress during the final stages of the War of Independence, and in 1780 drafted instructions to Jay, then representing the United States at Madrid, that in negotiations with Spain he should insist upon the free navigation of the Mississippi and upon the principle that the United States succeeded to British rights affirmed by the treaty of Paris of 1763.
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  • The meeting of the Cortes summoned by him at Madrid in 1394 marked a great epoch in the establishment of a practically despotic royal authority, based on the consent of the commons, who looked to the crown to protect them against the excesses of the nobles.
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  • The greatest of these internal improvements is the St Francis levee, from New Madrid, Missouri, to the mouth of the St Francis, 212 m.
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  • The name " California " was taken from Ordonez de Montalvo's romance of chivalry Las Sergas de Esplandian (Madrid, 15 ro), in which is told of black Amazons ruling an island of this name " to the right of the Indies, very near the quarter of the terrestrial paradise."
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  • He possessed great influence in Mexico and Madrid.
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  • Her commercial policy was one of most irrational and intolerable restriction and repression; and till the end of Spanish rule on the American continent, the whole political power was retained by the court at Madrid, and administered in the colonies by an oligarchy of home-bred Spaniards.
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    0
  • With the king's full cognisance, accordingly, Perez, after several unsuccessful attempts to poison Escovedo, succeeded in procuring his assassination in a street of Madrid on the 31st of March 1578.
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  • Neither at this city, however, nor at Madrid and Rome, was any countenance given to Lobo's plan.
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  • During the eight years following he was' T heard at all the principal centres - including London, Leipzig, Berlin, Copenhagen, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Constantinople, Lisbon and Madrid.
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  • The principal mountain chains are the Guadarrama, separating this province from Madrid; the Paramera and Sierra de Avila, west of the Guadarrama; and the vast wall of the Sierra de Gredos along the southern frontier, where its outstanding peaks rise to 6000 or even 8000 ft.
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  • Valladolid and Madrid; but in many parts of the province the means of communication are defective.
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  • But Madrid and Vienna were the official champions of the papacy; hence to make war on them was indirectly to make war on the pope.
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  • In 1848 he began to study law in Madrid, but soon elected to compete for admittance at the school of philosophy and letters, where he took the degree of doctor in 1853.
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  • At the same time he resumed the professorship of history at the Madrid university.
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  • The adversaries of the executive were prompted by the captain-general of Madrid, Pavia, who promised the co-operation of the garrison of the capital.
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  • Warnings came in plenty, and no less a personage than the man he had made captain-general of Madrid, General Pavia, suggested that, if a conflict arose between Castelar and the majority of the Cortes, not only the garrison of Madrid and its chief, but all the armies in the field and their generals, were disposed to stand by the president.
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    0
  • Castelar kept apart from active politics during the twelve months that Serrano acted as president of the republic. Another pronunciamiento finally put an end to it in the last week of December 1874, when Generals Campos at Sagunto, Jovellar at Valencia, Primo de Rivera at Madrid, and Laserna at Logrono, proclaimed Alphonso XII.
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  • His funeral at Madrid was an imposing demonstration of the sympathy and respect of all classes and parties.
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  • At last, on the 6th of February 1715, nearly two years after the treaty of Utrecht, peace between Spain and Portugal was concluded at Madrid.
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  • 1 797 a secret convention for the partition of Portugal was signed by the French ambassador in Madrid, General Perignon, and by the Spanish minister Godoy.
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  • A Spanish translation by his brother Carlos appeared at Madrid between 1784 and 1806, and an abridgment in French (1838-1846) was compiled by the Jesuit Alexis Nerbonne.
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  • The boundary line between Bolivia and Brazil has its origin in the limits between the Spanish and Portuguese colonies determined by the treaties of Madrid and San Ildefonso (1750 and 1777), which were modified by the treaties of 1867 and 1903.
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  • He studied at the university of Leiden, and entered the Dutch diplomatic service, being appointed to the legation at Madrid.
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  • Henry died at Madrid on the 12th of December 1474.
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  • He died at Madrid on the 31st of March 1621.
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  • (1786), give the most available general account of his reign; see also the continuation of Mariana's History of Spain by Miflana (Madrid, 1817-1822).
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  • From this post he was called, at the end of twenty years, to the chair of moral theology in Madrid, where he died on the 12th of October 1600.
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    0
  • (1830-1904), queen of Spain, was born in Madrid on the 10th of October 1830.
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  • On the occasion of one of her visits to Madrid during Alphonso XII.'s reign she began to intrigue with the politicians of the capital, and was peremptorily requested to go abroad again.
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  • Here he became the friend and favourite of Cardinal Rampolla who, on being sent in 1883 as papal nuncio to Madrid, took Mgr.
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  • Unfortunately these differences, growing out of the opposite policies of the two countries at the court of Madrid, increased in each succeeding year; and a constant but sterile rivalry was kept up, which ended in results more or less humiliating and injurious to both nations.
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  • The main line from Madrid to Almeria conveys much ore from Granada and Jaen to the sea; while the railway from Baza to Lorca skirts the Almanzora valley and transports the mineral products of eastern Almeria by a branch line from Huercal-Overa to the Murcian port of Aguilas.
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  • He began by compelling the people of Madrid to give up emptying their slops out of the windows, and when they objected he said they were like children who cried when their faces were washed.
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  • According to his own statement he disapproved, but he gave Winter a recommendation to Father Creswell, an influential person at Madrid.
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  • Guevara, whose influence upon the Spanish prose of the 16th century was considerable, also wrote Libro de los inventores del arte de marear (Valladolid, 1539, and Madrid, 1895).
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  • Not merely in Spain, but in every land where Spanish is spoken, and in cities as remote from Madrid as Munich and Stockholm, he has met with an appreciation incomparably beyond that accorded to any other Spanish dramatist of recent years.
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  • "He carrieth himself," writes Salisbury to Sir Charles Cornwallis, ambassador at Madrid, "without any feare or perturbation ...; under all this action he is noe more dismayed, nay scarce any more troubled than if he was taken for a poor robbery upon the highway," declaring "that he is ready to die, and rather wisheth 10,000 deaths, than willingly to accuse his master or any other."
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  • 4 In1812-1813a remarkable earthquake devastated the region about New Madrid.
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  • Among his early schemes was one to unite the Atlantic and the Pacific by a canal, and another to construct a canal from Madrid to the sea.
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  • Collectio canonum Ecclesiae Hispanae (Madrid, 1808); reproduced in Migne, P.L.
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  • His Tácito espanol ilustrado con aforismos (Madrid, 1614) is the only work which bears his name, but he is probably the author of the Discurso del gobierno ascribed to Perez.
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    0
  • The ill-considered journey to Madrid, in which Prince Charles, accompanied by Buckingham, hoped to wring from the Spanish statesmen a promise to restore the Palatinate in compliment for his marriage with the infanta, ended also in total failure.
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  • In 1623 he was sent to join Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., at Madrid, and was knighted on the 23rd of October of that year.
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  • It is the termini of railways from Madrid and Murcia.
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  • Important lines radiate from the city of Barcelona north-east along the coast to Gerona and to Perpignan in France; south-west along the coast to Tarragona and Valencia; and west to Saragossa and Madrid.
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  • >> 0'1, r: -?-:w ry See de Prado, Recuerdos de Africa; historia de la plaza de Ceuta (Madrid, 1859-1860); Budgett Meakin, The Land of the Moors (London, 1901), chap. xix., where many works dealing with Spanish Morocco are cited.
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  • On his arrival at Madrid he found the princesse des Ursins all but omnipotent with the king, and for a time he judged it expedient to use her influence in carrying out his plans.
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  • The first part of his life was devoted to mercantile and financial pursuits at Cadiz and then in Madrid, where he managed the affairs of and liquidated a mercantile and industrial society to the satisfaction and profit of the shareholders.
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  • He died in Madrid on the 23rd of January 1896.
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  • Violence, however, was prevented, and the matter was referred to the council of state at Madrid.
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    0
  • The proceedings were necessarily of enormous length, and the commissioners did not report until the 13th of February 1890, but the question of the letters was decided just twelve months earlier, Richard Pigott, who shot himself at Madrid, having confessed to the forgeries.
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  • The Ebro Valley railway, which traverses southern Navarre and skirts the western frontier, sends out a branch line from Castejon to Pamplona and Alsasua junction, where it connects with the Northern railways from Madrid to France.
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    0
  • Thus did France, menaced with disruption, embark upon a course of action imposed upon her by the harsh conditions of the treaty of Madrid otherwise little respectedand later by those of Cambrai (1529); but it was not till later, too late indeed, that it was defined and became a national policy.
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  • Thus Villeroy thought fit to add still further to the price already paid to triumphant Madrid and Vienna by disbanding the army, breaking the treaty of Brusol, and abandoning the Protestant princes beyond the Rhine and the XIII~ trans-Pyrenean Moriscos.
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    0
  • Turin, the capital of Piedmont, was taken by Henri de Lorraine, comte dHarcourt; the alliance with rebellious portugal facilitated the occupation of Roussillon and almost the whole of Catalonia, and Spain was reduced to defending herself; while the embarrassments of the Habsburgs at Madrid made those of Vienna more tractable.
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  • To reduce Spanish resistance Napoleon had in his turn to come to terms with the tsar Alexander at Erfurt; so that abandoning his designs in the East, he could maka the Grand Army evacuate Prussia and returnin force to Madrid.
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  • On the north-east, by far the most important communication with the Ebro valley is formed by the valley of the Jalon, which has thus always formed a military route of the highest consequence, and is now traversed by the railway from Madrid to Saragossa.
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  • Farther south the mountains clustered on the east of the table-land (Sierra de Albarracin, Serrania de Cuenca) long rendered direct communication between Valencia and Madrid extremely difficult, and the principal communications with the east and south-east are effected where the southern table-land of La Mancha merges in the hill country which connects the interior of Spain with the Sierra Nevada.
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  • In the south the descent from the table-land to the valley of the Guadalquivir is again comparatively gradual, but even here in the eastern half of the Sierra Morena the passes are few, the most important being the Puerto de Despeflaperros, where the Rio Magana, a sub-tributary of the Guadalimar, has cut for itself a deep gorge through which the railway ascends from Andalusia to Madrid.
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    0
  • It is the Montes Carpetani of the ancients, and a portion of it (due north of Madrid) still bears the name of Carpetanos Composed almost entirely of granite, it has an aspect when seen from a distance highly characteristic of the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula in general, presenting the appearance of a saw-like ridge (sierra) broken up into numerous sections.
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  • The railway from Madrid to Segovia passes through a tunnel close to the Guatlarrama Pass; and the railway from Madrid to Avila traverses the south-western portion of the range through a remarkable series of tunnels and cuttings.
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  • The largest tract of them is to be seen to the south of the Cantabrian chain; but another, of hardly inferior extent, flanks the Sierra de Guadarrama, and spreads out over the great plain from Madrid to Cceres.
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    0
  • More than 350 species of butterilies, many of them endemic, have been counted in the province of Madrid alone.
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    0
  • Gloves are made in Seville and Madrid, shoes in the Balearic Isles, chiefly for Cuba and Porto Rico.
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    0
  • There is in Madrid a Supreme Court, which is modelled upon the French Cour de Cassation, to rule on points of law when appeals are made from the decisions of inferior courts, or when conflicts arise between civil and military jurisdiction.
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    0
  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.
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    0
  • The same rule applies to their schools, which are, however, numerously attended, in Madrid, Seville, Barcelona and other towns, by children of Protestant families and of many Roman Catholics also.
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    0
  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.
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    0
  • The military academies are Toledo for infantry, Segovia for artillery, Valladolid for cavalry, Avila for commissariat, Escorial for carabineers, Getafe for civil guards, besides a staff college styled Escuela Superior de Guerra at Madrid.
    0
    0
  • Valuable information can be obtained from the Bolelins of the Madrid Geographical Society.
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    0
  • Lowell, Impressions of Spain (London, 1900, written 1877f 880 when Lowell was American minister to the court of Spain); P.Gotor de Burbhguena, Nuestras cosiumbres (Madrid, 1900);
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    0
  • Alenda y Mira, Relaciones de solemnidades y fiestas publicas de Espana (Madrid, 1903); Madrazo, El Pueblo espaOol ha muerto?
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    0
  • Gomez Herrero, Diccionario-gwta legislativo espanol (5 vols., Madrid, 1901-1903); Estadistica de la administracidn de justicia en to criminal durante; Boleiin mensual de estadistica demo grdfica-sanitaria de la peninsula y islas adjacenies (Madrid, monthly); Estado general de la armada para el ao; C. Fernandez Duro, Armada espanola desde la union de los reinos de Castilla y de Leon (9 vols., Madrid, 1895I 903); Boletin oficial del minisierio de marina.
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    0
  • The capture of the French king at Pavia and his imprisonment at Madrid gratified the pride of the Spaniards, and did much to reconcile them to the sacrifices which the policy of the emperor imposed on them.
    0
    0
  • The first reforms undertaken had provoked a disturbance in Madrid directed against the kings favorite minister, the Sicilian marquis of Squillacci.
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    0
  • The terms were unexpectedly favorable, and so great was the joy excited in Madrid that popular acclamation greeted the bestowal upon Godoy of the title of Prince of the Peace.
    0
    0
  • In the preliminary treaty with Great Britain he ceded the Spanish colony of Trinidad without even consulting the court of Madrid, while he sold Louisiana to the United States in spite of his promire not to alienate it except to Spain.
    0
    0
  • He entered into secret relations with Eugene Beauharnais, Napoleons envoy at Madrid, and went so far as to demand the hand of a Bonaparte princess.
    0
    0
  • The news of this intention, however, excited a popular rising at Aranjuez, whither the king and queen had gone from Madrid.
    0
    0
  • On the 13th of I~Iay Murat announced to an improvised junta of regency at Madrid that Napoleon desired them to accept Joseph Bonaparte as their king.
    0
    0
  • Madrid was easily taken, but the Spaniards showed great capacity for the guerrilla warfare in the provinces.
    0
    0
  • The Spaniards now advanced upon Madrid and drove Joseph from the capital, which he had just entered.
    0
    0
  • In less than a week the Spanish army was broken through and scattered, and Napoleon restored his brother in Madrid.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon, who bad suffered a crushing defeat at Leipzig, hastened to recognize the impossibility of retaining Spain by releasing Ferdinand VII., who returned to Madrid in March 18I4.
    0
    0
  • The court of Madrid was rent by the intrigues of the French and the English factions; the former planning an.
    0
    0
  • Hereupon General Pavia, the governor of Madrid, turned the Cortes into the streets, to the relief of all sane men in the country.
    0
    0
  • The political as well as the administrative life of the country was absolutely in the hands of the wire-pullers in Madrid; and their local agents, the governors, the mayors and the electoral potentates styled los Caciques, were all creatures of the minister of the interior at the head of Castilian centralization.
    0
    0
  • This desire to exercise a preponderant influence in the affairs of Morocco culminated in the Madrid conference of 1880.
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    0
  • The chief of the exiles, Don Manuel Ruiz Zorilla, who had retired to Paris since the Restoration, organized a military conspiracy, which was sprung upon the Madrid gcvernment at Badajoz, at Seo de Urgel, and at Santo Domingo in the Ebro valley.
    0
    0
  • The Madrid foreign office welcomed most readily a clever move of Prince Bismarcks to estrange Spain from France and to flatter the young king of Spain.
    0
    0
  • The French people resented the act, and the Madrid government was sorely embarrassed, as the king had announced his intention of visiting Paris on his way back from Germany.
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    0
  • Prince Bismarck looked upon the rights of Spain over the Caroline Islands in the Pacific as so shadowy that he sent some German war-ships to take possession of a port in the largest island of the group. The action of Germany caused great indignation in Spain, which led, in Madrid, to imposing demonstrations.
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    0
  • After his return to Madrid the king showed himself in public less than usual, but it was clear to all who came in contact Death of with him that he was dying.
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    0
  • Nevertheless, in Aiphonso Madrid, Canovas would not allow the press to say Xii.
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  • The Dynastic, Liberal and Independent press, the illustrated papers and the satirical weeklies fared no better than the Republicans, Socialists and Carlists, and in 60 days 1260 prosecutions were ordered against Madrid and provincial papers.
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  • On the 17th of May 1886, six months after the death of Alphonso XII., his posthumous son, Aiphonso XIII., was born at the palace of Madrid.
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  • He laid most stress upon this axiom when, in September 1886, Ruiz Zorilla suddenly sprang upon Sagasta a military and revolutionary movement in the streets and barracks of Madrid.
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  • The Madrid government used an authorization.
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  • The latter and a strong and influential body of Conservatives, chiefly young politicians, dissented from the easy-going views of Romero Robledo and of Canovas on the expediency of reforms to correct the notorious and old-standing abuses and corruption of the municipalities, especially of Madrid.
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  • In the place of Maura he found a more pliant minister for the colonies, Seor Abarzuza, who framed a Cuban Reform Bill so much short of what his predecessor had thought an irreducible minimum of concessions, that it was censured in Havana by all the colonial Liberals and home rulers, and by their representatives in Madrid.
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  • The subalterns of the Madrid garrison took offence at some articles published by Radical newspapers, and they attacked the editorial offices.
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  • Canovas so fully comprehended the necessity of averting American intervention that he listened to the pressing demands of secretary Olney and of the American minister in Madrid, Hannis Taylor, an.d laid before the Cortes a bill introducing home rule in Cuba on a more liberal scale than Maura, Abarzuza and Sagasta had dared to suggest two years before.
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  • The queen-regent appointed General Azcarraga, the war minister, as successor to Canovas; and a few weeks later President McKinley sent General Woodford as representative of the United States at the court of Madrid.
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  • All through the winter of1897-1898the Madrid giuernment took steps to propitiate the president and his government, even offering them a treaty of commerce which would have allowed American commerce to compete on equal terms with Spanish imports in the West Indies and defeat all European competition.
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  • He had to proclaim not only such important provinces as Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao, but even the capital of Spain itself, in order to check a widespread agitation which had assumed formidable proportions under the direction of the chambers of commerce, industry, navigation and agriculture, combined with, about 300 middle-class corporations and associations, and supported by the majority of the gilds and syndicates of taxpayers in Madrid and the large towns.
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  • At Barcelona the university had to be closed to stop the revolutionary agitation of the students; in April there were serious riots at Salamanca, Barcelona and Madrid.
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  • His personal popularity, too, due partly to his youth and genial manners, was at this time greatly increased by the cool courage he had shown after the dastardly bomb attack made upon him and his young wife, during the wedding procession at Madrid, by the anarchist Matteo Morales.1 Whatever his qualities, the growing entanglement of parliamentary affairs was soon to put them to the test.
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  • In 1851 the Royal Academy of History of Madrid began the publication of its Memorial histrica espanol, a collection of documents, &c. See also Dionisio Hidalgo, Diccionario general de bibliografia espanola, 7 vols.
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  • Both ancient and later times are dealt with in the Historia general de Espaa, escrita por individuos de la real academia de la historia (Madrid, 1892 sqq.)a series of studies by different hands; that on the reign of Charles III., by Seor Manuel Danvila, is very valuable for the later 18th century.
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  • He joined the Jesuits on the 29th of September 1745 and in course of time became successively professor of philosophy and humanities at the seminaries of Madrid and Murcia.
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  • Educated in his native town, he went to Madrid in 1845, bent upon finding means to complete his literary and philosophical studies.
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  • His uncle, Don Serafin Estebanez Calderon, found him a situation as clerk in the Madrid-Aranjuez railway, but Canovas soon took to journalism and literature, earning enough to support himself and pay for his law studies at the Madrid University.
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  • Sagasta thereupon caused Canovas to be arrested(30thof December 1874); but the next day the Madrid garrison also proclaimed Alphonso XII.
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  • He again became premier in 1883, and remained in office until November 1885; but he grew very unpopular, and nearly endangered the monarchy in 1885 by his violent repression of popular and press demonstrations, and of student riots in Madrid and the provinces.
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  • Canovas resumed office in March 1895 immediately after the outbreak of the Cuban insurrection, and devoted most of his time and efforts, with characteristic determination, to the preparation of ways and means for sending 200,000 men to the West Indies to carry out his stern and unflinching policy of no surrender, no concessions and no reforms. He was making up his mind for another effort to enable General Weyler to enforce the reforms that had been wrung from the Madrid government, more by American diplomacy than from a sense of the inevitable, when the bullet of an anarchist, in August 1897, at the baths of Santa Agueda, cut short his career.
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  • He was not only a politician but also a man of the world, a writer of considerable merit, a scholar well versed in social, economic and philosophical questions, a great debater, a clever lecturer, a member of all the Madrid academies and a patron of art and letters.
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  • He managed to escape, and after hiding in Madrid, joined General Daban at Sagunto on the 29th of December 1874, where he proclaimed Alphonso XII.
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  • And, sad to report, you can hear the odd monkey chant from the Madrid fans.
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  • March Multiple bombs were simultaneously detonated on packed commuter trains in Madrid killing nearly 200 people and injuring nearly 2000.
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  • Ten bombs exploded on trains in Madrid on 11 March 2004.
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  • It was a similar position to his complete fluke for Real Madrid against United in April 2003.
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  • Fashion row: Madrid fashion week opens with doctors on hand to check that models register at least 18 on the body mass index.
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  • Shows scheduled and charter, but not low-cost carriers, so was unable to find the cheapest Madrid flight that day on easyJet.
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  • Valdepeñas An outcrop of gently hilly land in the flat, arid plains of central Spain, south of Madrid.
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  • The Commission met for its second plenary in Madrid, Spain, in January 1992.
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  • The British Methodist Church shares the widespread revulsion at the March 11 th bombings in Madrid, and unequivocally condemns them.
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  • Milan and Madrid maybe but they still have to have the odd year where they do n't splurge.
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  • She was taking the early morning train from her home in an outlying suburb to get to her school in Madrid.
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  • Maybe now Real Madrid can become a football team once more.
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  • Is this some hitherto unknown incident in Scottish History in which King James VI reigned in Madrid as well as Edinburgh?
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  • Melbourne, which stands in latitude 37° 50' S., has a mean temperature of 57'3°, and therefore corresponds with Washington in the United States, Madrid, Lisbon and Messina.
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  • But the restored governments in their terror of revolution would not realize that the late rgime had wafted a breath of new life over the country and left ineffaceable traces in the way of improved laws, efficient administration, good roads and the sweeping away of old abuses; while the new-born idea of Italian unity, strengthened by a national pride revived on many a stricken field from Madrid to Moscow, was a force to be reckoned with.
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