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madeira

madeira

madeira Sentence Examples

  • Chandless (1862-1869) and of the Rio Madeira by Colonel G.

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  • Careful study of insular faunas, such as that of Madeira by T.

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  • Newfoundland, the West Indies, and the Falklands, and the chief oceanic islands are the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, the Cape Verde Islands, Ascension, St Helena, Tristan da Cunha and Bouvet Island.

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  • China has 66 species of Quercus, 35 of Vitis, 2 of Aesculus, 42 of Acer, 33 Magnoliaceae (including two species of Liriodendron), 12 Anonaceae, 71 Ternstroemiaceae (including the tea-plant), and 4 of Clethra, which has a solitary western representative in Madeira.

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  • Madeira has also its peculiar golden-crested wren (Regulus maderensis), and its peculiar pigeon (Columba trocaz), while two allied forms of the latter (C. laurivora and C. bollii) are found only in the Canaries.

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  • A very old tradition suggests that the idea of such an earthly paradise was a reminiscence of some unrecorded voyage to Madeira and the Canaries, which are sometimes named Fortunatae Insulae by medieval map-makers.

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  • It is known as a winter visitant to Egypt and Abyssinia, and is abundant at all seasons in Barbary, as well as in the Canaries and Madeira.

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  • The whole of this line, however, was subject to future adjustments, Peru claiming all that part of the Amazon valley extending eastward to the Madeira and lying between the Beni and the east and west boundary line agreed upon by Spain and Portugal in 1750 and 1777, which is near the 7th parallel.

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  • He adopted a plan which had been organiza- found to succeed well in Madeira and the Azores, tion in dividing the country into hereditary captaincies, and Sao Vicente Piratininga, in the present province of Sao Paulo.

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  • Cattle and the sugar-cane were at an early period introduced from Madeira, and here the other captaincies supplied themselves with both.

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  • Evans, " The Rocks of the Cataracts of the River Madeira and the adjoining Portions of the Beni and Mamore," Quart.

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  • That such inferiority may be expected to disappear is suggested by the success of vine-culture in Madeira and the Canary Islands.

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  • The disease was first noticed in England in 1845; in 1848 it appeared at Versailles; by 1851 it had spread through all the wine-producing countries of Europe, being specially virulent in the lands bordering on the Mediterranean; and in the following year it made its appearance in Madeira.

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  • Dom Enrique, Infante of Portugal, surnamed the Navigator (1394-1460) transported it about 1420, from Cyprus and Sicily to Madeira, whence it was taken to the Canaries in 1503, and thence to Brazil and Hayti early in the 16th century, whence it spread to Mexico, Cuba, Guadeloupe and Martinique, and later to Bourbon.

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  • In the age of discovery the Portuguese and Spaniards became the great disseminators of the cultivation of sugar; the cane was planted in Madeira in 1420; it was carried to San Domingo in 1494; and it spread over the occupied portions of the West Indies and South America early in the 16th century.

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  • Leaving Hampton Roads on the 18th of August 1838, it Mopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Paumotu group of the Low Archipelago, the Samoan islands and New South Wales; from Sydney sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny islands; visited the Fiji and the Hawaiian islands in 1840, explored the west coast of the United States, including the Columbia river, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento river, in 1841, and returned by way of the Philippine islands, the Sulu archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope, reaching New York on the 10th of June 1842.

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  • 6° 52' 15" S., which is half the distance between the mouth of the Mamore and the mouth of the Madeira, divides the Spanish and Portuguese possessions in this part of South America, according to the provisions of the treaty of San Ildefonso of 1777.

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  • This line has been twice modified by treaties between Bolivia and Brazil, but without the consent of Peru, which claimed all the territory eastward to the Madeira between the above-mentioned line and the Beni-Madidi rivers, the line of demarcation following the Pablo-bamba, a small tributary of the Madidi, to its source, and thence in a straight line to the village of Conima, on Lake Titicaca.

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  • The southern half of the montana is watered by streams flowing from the eastern Andes, which go to form the river Madre de Dios or Amaru mayu, the principal branch of the river Beni, which falls into the Madeira.

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  • Of the rivers farther south, which discharge into the Amazon through the Madeira, the Madre de Dios alone offers an extended navigable channel, together with some of its larger tributaries, such as the Heath and Chandless.

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  • In the North Atlantic a strong submarine current flowing outward from the Mediterranean leaves the Strait of Gibraltar with a salinity of 38 per mille, and can be traced as far as Madeira and the Bay of Biscay in depths of from 600 to 2800 fathoms, still with a salinity of 35.6 per mille, whereas off the Azores at equal depths the salinity is from 0.5 to 0.7 per mille less.

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  • between Madeira and the Biscay Shelf, i.e.

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  • Sempervivum has about so species in the mountains of central and southern Europe, in the Himalayas, Abyssinia, and the Canaries and Madeira; S.

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  • As a straggler it has occurred within the Arctic Circle (as on the Varanger Fjord in Norway), as well as in Iceland and even Greenland; while it not unfrequently appears in Madeira and the Azores.

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  • It is a native of the Canary Islands and Madeira, where it occurs abundantly in the wild state, and is of a greyish-brown colour, slightly varied with brighter hues, although never attaining the beautiful plumage of the domestic bird.

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  • An event which is thought to have greatly influenced Hancock's subsequent career was the seizure of the sloop "Liberty" in 1768 by the customs officers for discharging, without paying the duties, a cargo of Madeira wine consigned to Hancock.

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  • In 1877 arrangements were made for the importation of Portuguese families from the Azores and Madeira, and during the next ten years about 7000 of these people were brought to the islands; in 1906-1907 there was a second immigration from the Azores and Madeira of 1325 people.

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  • Promoted rear-admiral a few days after this action, Hood was in 1807 entrusted with the operations against Madeira, which he brought to a successful conclusion, and a year later went to the Baltic, with his flag in the "Centaur," to take part in the war between Russia and Sweden.

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  • (3) The region of indigenous trees, including various species of laurel, an Ardisia, Ilex, Rhamnus, Olea, Myrica, and other trees found wild also at Madeira.

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  • Until 1853 wine was the staple product, and although even the finest brand (known as Vidonia) never equalled the best Madeira vintages, it was largely consumed abroad, especially in England.

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  • Proust (Paris, 1909); Madeira and the Canary Islands, by A.

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  • His change of plan was announced to the world at Madeira in Sept., and on Jan.

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  • Among his publications are A Winter in Madeira and a Summer in Spain and Florence (1850), and Speeches and Occasional Addresses (1864).

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  • As far as the United Kingdom is concerned, the Madeira wine industry is mainly of interest in that it was largely developed by and is still chiefly in the hands of British merchants.

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  • This falling away in the taste for Madeira is partly ascribable to fashion and partly to the temporary devastation of the vineyards by the phylloxera in the middle of last century.

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  • The output in 1906 amounted to 10,000 pipes (Madeira pipe =92 gallons) and the export to 6010 pipes, of which quantity 1951 pipes went to Germany, 1680 pipes to France, 796 pipes to Russia and 755 pipes to the United Kingdom.

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  • Madeira, like sherry and port, is a fortified wine.

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  • Much of the characteristic flavour of Madeira is due to this practice, which hastens the mellowing of the wine and also tends to check secondary fermentation inasmuch as it is, in effect, a mild kind of pasteurization.

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  • It is somewhat similar in character to the wines of Madeira, but its character also recalls some of the sherry types.

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  • He adduced the example of vines taken to the West Indies from Madeira, which have been found to succeed better than those taken directly from France.

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  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.

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  • Such patients are apt to suffer much from cough and laryngeal irritation in the cold, dry air of the Alps, whereas they live in comparative comfort on the Riviera, in the Canary Islands, Madeira or at Capri.

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  • These totals do not include the inhabitants and area of the Azores and Madeira Islands, which are officially regarded as parts of continental Portugal.

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  • These totals include the inhabitants of the Azores and Madeira, which together amounted to 406,865 in 1900.

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  • The following table shows the value for five years of the exports, and of all imports not reexported (exclusive of coin and bullion): - In 1910 the principal exports, in order of value, were wine (chiefly port, common wines and Madeira), raw and manufactured cork, preserved fish, fruits and vegetables, cottons and yarn, copper ore, timber, olive oil, skins, grain and flour, tobacco and wool.

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  • The House of Commons was composed of 148 members, representing the 26 electoral divisions of Portugal, the Azores and Madeira, which returned 113 elected members and 35 representatives of minorities, and of 7 members representing the colonies.

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  • In 1910 the Azores comprised three districts and Madeira formed one.

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  • His province includes Madeira, the Azores and the West African colonies.

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  • Meanwhile colonization progressed in the Azores and Madeira, where sugar and wine were produced; above all, the gold brought home from Guinea stimulated the commercial energy of the Portuguese.

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  • diverse nature - protectorates such as Hormuz and Ternate in the Moluccas, colonies such as Goa and Madeira, captaincies under military rule such as Malacca, tributary states Rich as Kilwa, fortified factories as at Colombo and Cochin.

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  • The demand for " Port " and " Madeira" was thus artificially stimulated to such an extent that almost the whole productive energy of Portugal was concentrated upon the wine and cork trades.

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  • This is a part of the original colonial frontier, which extended down the Madeira to a point midway between the Beni and the Amazon, and then ran due W.

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  • to form the Madeira.

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  • North of the Beni, the Abuna flows into the Madeira.

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  • The south-east drainage basin, which is smaller and economically less important than that of the Madeira, discharges into the Paraguay and extends from the Sierras de Chiquitos south to the Argentine frontier, and from the Cordillera Oriental east to the Paraguay.

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  • Brazil agreed to construct a railway around the falls of the Madeira (about 180 m.

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  • The loss of her maritime department has left Bolivia with no other ports than those of Lake Titicaca (especially Guaqui, or Huaqui, which trades with the Peruvian port of Puno), and those of the Madeira and Paraguay rivers and their affluents.

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  • Since then Bolivia's outlet to the Amazon is restricted to the Madeira river, the navigation of which is interrupted by a series of falls before Bolivian territory is reached.

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  • The Bolivian port of entry for this trade, Villa Bella, is situated above the falls of the Madeira at the confluence of the Beni and Mamore, and is reached from the lower river by a long and costly portage.

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  • Mathews, Up the Amazon and Madeira Rivers, through Bolivia and Peru (London, 1879); Carlos Matzenauer, Bolivia in historischer, geographischer and cultureller Hinsicht (Vienna, 18 97); M.

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  • In 1876 Clifford, a man of high-strung and athletic, but not robust, physique, began to fall into ill-health, and after two voyages to the South, died during the third of pulmonary consumption at Madeira, on the 3rd of March 1879, leaving his widow with two daughters.

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  • from London via Madeira and 7785 via Suez, 823 m.

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  • Four children were born of the marriage - a son who died in his father's lifetime, and was lamented by him in very touching verse; another a captain in the navy, drowned at Madeira in 1827; a third son, Charles, afterwards created Earl Canning; and a daughter Harriet, who married the marquess of Clanricarde in 1825.

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  • The parish church of North Leith, in Madeira Street, with a spire 158 ft.

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  • The Madeira has its junction with the Amazon 870 m.

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  • According to the treaty of San Ildefonso, the Madeira begins at the confluence of the Guapore with the Mamore.

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  • San Antonio is the first of a formidable series of cataracts and rapids, nineteen in number, which, for a river distance of 263 m., obstruct the upper course of the Madeira until the last rapid called Guajara Merim (or Small Pebble), is reached, a little below the union of the Guapore with the Mamore.

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  • The junction of the great river Beni with the Madeira is at the Madeira Fall, a vast and grand display of reefs, whirlpools and boiling torrents.

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  • Between Guajara-Merim and this fall, inclusive, the Madeira receives the drainage of the northeastern slopes of the Andes, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra to Cuzco, the whole of the south-western slope of Brazilian Matto Grosso, and the northern one of the Chiquitos sierras, an area about Scale, z:2z,50o.000 English Miles 0 5 o zoo 200 390 equal to that of France and Spain.

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  • The waters find their way to the falls of the Madeira by many great rivers, the principal of which, if we enumerate them from east to west, are the Guapore or Itenez, the Baures and Blanco, the Itonama or San Miguel, the Mamore, Beni, and Mayutata or Madre de Dios, all of which are reinforced by numerous secondary but powerful affluents.

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  • The PUxus, a very sluggish river, enters the Amazon west of the Madeira, which it parallels as far south as the falls of the latter stream.

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  • It runs through a continuous forest at the bottom of the great depression lying between the Madeira river, which skirts the edge of the Brazilian sandstone plateau, and the Ucayali which hugs the base of the Andes.

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  • It is navigable for a period of about five months of the year, when the Purus valley is inundated; and, for the remaining seven months, only canoes can ascend it sufficiently high to communicate overland with the settlements in the great indiarubber districts of the Mayutata and lower Beni; thus these regions are forced to seek a canoe outlet for their rich products by the very dangerous, costly and laborious route of the falls of the Madeira.

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  • north of Lake Titicaca, is the most interesting branch of the Amazon next to the Madeira.

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  • According to Bates, the Madeira " rises and sinks " two months earlier than the Amazon.

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  • On the south side, from the Tapajos to the river Madeira, the banks are usually low, although two or three hills break the general monotony.

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  • Oxycedrus, from the Mediterranean district and Madeira, yields cedar-oil which is official in most of the European pharmacopoeias, but not in that of Britain.

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  • Beni, a river of Bolivia, a tributary of the Madeira, rising in the elevated Cordilleras near the city of La Paz and at first known as the Rio de La Paz, and flowing east, and north-east, to a junction with the Mamore at 10 20' S.

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  • It is only occasionally found near the shore; its real home is the Atlantic, especially near Madeira and the Azores, but many captures are recorded from Great Britain, Ireland and Scandinavia; it strays as far north as Iceland and Newfoundland, and probably southwards to the latitudes of the coast of Guinea.

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  • There was no discovery here, for the whole Canarian archipelago was now pretty well known to French and Spanish mariners, especially since the conquest of 1402-06 by French adventurers under Castilian overlordship; but in 1418 Henry's captain, Joao Goncalvez Zarco rediscovered Porto Santo, and in 1420 Madeira, the chief members of an island group which had originally been discovered (probably by Genoese pioneers) before 1351 or perhaps even before 1339, but had rather faded from Christian knowledge since.

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  • The story of the rediscovery of Madeira by the Englishman Robert Machim or Machin, eloping from Bristol with his lady-love, Anne d'Arfet, in the reign of Edward III.

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  • In 1424-1425 Prince Henry attempted to purchase the Canaries, and began the colonization of the Madeira group, both in Madeira itself and in Porto Santo; to aid this latter movement he procured the famous charters of 1430 and 1433 from the Portuguese crown.

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  • After this the chief matters worth notice in Dom Henry's life are, first, the progress of discovery and colonization in the Azores - where Terceira was discovered before 1450, perhaps in 1445, and apparently by a Fleming, called "Jacques de Bruges" in the prince's charter of the 2nd of March 1450 (by this charter Jacques receives the captaincy of this isle as its intending colonizer); secondly, the rapid progress of civilization in Madeira, evidenced by its timber trade to Portugal, by its sugar, corn and honey, and above all by its wine, produced from the Malvoisie or Malmsey grape, introduced from Crete; and thirdly, the explorations o Cadamosto and Diogo Gomez.

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  • for his work, and on which he bestowed many privileges in the new-won lands - the tithes of St Michael in the Azores and onehalf of its sugar revenues, the tithe of all merchandise from Guinea, the ecclesiastical dues of Madeira, &c. As "protector of Portuguese studies," Dom Henry is credited with having founded a professorship of theology, and perhaps also chairs of mathematics and medicine, in Lisbon - where also, in 1431, he is said to have provided house-room for the university teachers and students.

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  • Blandy of Madeira.

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  • We are unaware of previous breeding in the Madeira archipelago.

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  • In addition, Portugal includes two archipelagos in the Atlantic, Azores and Madeira Islands.

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  • While the terrine is baking, make the Madeira aspic.

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  • Pour the Madeira aspic through the funnel, and leave the terrine to set in the fridge.

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  • curry with rice main course and madeira cake for dessert.

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  • After soaking, the prunes are lifted from the madeira and then quickly enrobed in good dark chocolate to seal in the goodness.

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  • creamy garlic and mascarpone mushrooms laced with Madeira couldnât be a more tempting starter.

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  • This guidebook includes a rich and varied selection of walks on Madeira, and also covers the neighboring island of Porta Santo.

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  • Madeira is known for excellent deep-sea fishing, particularly blue marlin.

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  • marrowbone stock, red wine, and Madeira.

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  • scabbard fish are known from further south off Portugal and Madeira where they are commercially exploited.

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  • Madeira vine, American ground nut, Chinese yam and Kiwi fruit are all starting to grow well.

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  • The crystalline floor is exposed in the valleys of the Madeira, Xingu, &c. Some of the rocks thus exposed are, however, eruptive (e.g.

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  • 7° I' 17" S., a line running 6 ° eastward to the Madeira in lat.

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  • 6° 52' 15" S., which is half the distance between the mouth of the Mamore and the mouth of the Madeira, divides the Spanish and Portuguese possessions in this part of South America, according to the provisions of the treaty of San Ildefonso of 1777.

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  • Thus it appeared in Austria-Hungary in 1868; in Italy, in spite of the frantic efforts made - as in other countries - to keep it out by strict legislation against the import of vines, in 1879; in Russia in 1880; in Germany, on the Rhine and Moselle, and in Switzerland in 1872; in Madeira, Spain and Portugal, about 1876.

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  • 1577), author of the Commentaires, had a son, Pierre Bertrand, called the Capitaine Peyrot, who perished in an expedition to Madeira in 1566, and another son, Fabien de Monluc, whose granddaughter, Jeanne de Monluc (d.

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  • The density of population is greatest in Madeira (479.5 per sq.

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  • The line follows the Verde, Guapore, 1Vlamore and Madeira rivers down to the mouth of the Abuna, in about lat.

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  • The first includes the rivers flowing directly and indirectly into the Madeira, one of the great tributaries of the Amazon, together with some small tributaries of the Acre and Purus in the north, all of which form a drainage basin covering more than one-half of the republic. The two principal rivers of this system are the Mamore and Beni, which unite in lat.

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  • All of the upper branches of the river Madeira find their way to the falls across the open, almost level Mojos and Beni plains, 35,000 sq.

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  • These latter the butler thrust mysteriously forward, wrapped in a napkin, from behind the next man's shoulders and whispered: "Dry Madeira"...

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  • More than once they had beaten him, and more than once they had made him drunk on champagne and Madeira, which he loved; and he knew more than one thing about each of them which would long ago have sent an ordinary man to Siberia.

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  • Have a drink! said Anatole, and filled a large glass of Madeira for him.

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  • Spawning scabbard fish are known from further south off Portugal and Madeira where they are commercially exploited.

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  • And then there are the fortified wines: Madeira, port, sherry and vermouth.

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  • Madeira Vine (Boussingaultia) - B. baselloides is a luxuriant trailing plant of the Spinach order with shoots 16 to 20 feet long, flowering late in autumn, the flowers small, white, fragrant, and becoming black as they fade.

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  • Melanoselinum Decipiens - An umbelliferous shrub from Madeira, with a round simple stem, bare below, and large, spreading compound leaves.

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  • America; W. japonica and W. orientalis, from Japan; and W. radicans from Madeira.

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  • Madeira is a bright pink floral collection with pale green accents.

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  • Crocs Madeira: The playful wedge sandal with sleek styling slip on as easily as original Crocs.

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  • Crocs Madeira also comes with circulation nubs on the foot bed to stimulate blood flow.

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  • DMC and Coats and Clark manufacture thread that can be used for needlepoint; other companies that make thread for needlepoint supply include Madeira and Caron.

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  • The islands of the Canaries, Madeira and the Azores belong to the Mediterranean province, and offer some peculiarities of great interest.

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  • Joao Fernandes Vieyra, a native of Madeira, organized the insurrection which broke out in 1645.

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