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madame

madame

madame Sentence Examples

  • I never knew any Madame Jacquot.

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  • Madame Roland's Memoires, first printed in 1820, have been edited among others by P. Faugere (Paris, 1864), by C. A.

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  • In 1602 he made his second visit to the French capital, when his transcendent qualities brought him into the closest relations with the court of Henry IV., and made him the spiritual father of that circle of select souls who centred round Madame Acarie.

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  • GEORGE SAND (1804-1876), the pseudonym of Madame Amandine Lucile Aurore Dudevant, née Dupin, the most prolific authoress in the history of literature, and unapproached among the women novelists of France.

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  • He first visited Paris, where he saw a good deal of d'Alembert, Diderot, Barthelemy, Raynal, Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach and others of that circle, and was often a welcome guest in the saloons of Madame Geoffrin and Madame du Deffand.

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  • He first visited Paris, where he saw a good deal of d'Alembert, Diderot, Barthelemy, Raynal, Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach and others of that circle, and was often a welcome guest in the saloons of Madame Geoffrin and Madame du Deffand.

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  • "Madame, your sister.s car has just entered the property," Kris.s personal secretary said.

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  • See Memoires de Madame de Motteville; Victor Cousin, Madame de Hautefort (Paris, 1868); L'Abbe Sorin, Louise-Angele de La Fayette (Paris, 1893).

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  • De Seze was a middle-aged lawyer with a philosophic turn of mind, and Madame Dudevant for two years kept up with him an intimate correspondence.

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  • The royal party included, beside the king and queen, their daughter Marie Therese Charlotte (Madame Royale), the king's sister Madame Elisabeth, the valet Clery and others.

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  • It reads more like a chapter from the life of Ste Therese or Madame Guyon than of the author of Lelia.

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  • They were from the pen of Madame Roland and were signed by her husband.

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  • Madame Roland took an active part in the political discussions in these reunions.

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  • In person Madame Roland was attractive though not beautiful; her ideas were clear and far-reaching, her manner calm, and her power of observation extremely acute.

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  • A letter was penned by Madame Roland and addressed by her husband to Louis.

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  • Her letters to her friend Madame Calandrini contain much interesting information with regard to contemporary celebrities, especially on Mme.

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  • The most important are those on Madame de Montausier (1672), which gained him the membership of the Academy, the duchesse d'Aiguillon (1675), and, above all, Marshal Turenne (1676).

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  • Friedrich Schlegel's wife, Dorothea, was the author of an unfinished romance, Florentin (1801), a Sammlung romantischer Dichtungen des Mittelalters (2 vols., 1804), a version of Lother and Mauler (1805), and a translation of Madame de Stael's.

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  • The words were constantly altered and added to during the Terror and later; thus the well-known lines, "Madame Veto avait promis De faire egorger tout Paris On lui coupa la tete," &c., were added after the execution of Marie Antoinette.

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  • In 1781 he married Manon Jeanne Phlipon (1754-1793), and the name of Madame Roland is famous in history.

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  • Madame Swetchine >>

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  • of the Revue encyclopedique; a paper on Jordan and Madame de Stael, by C. A.

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  • It afterwards became known that he was the illegitimate son of the chevalier Destouches and Madame de Tencin.

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  • His later years were saddened by circumstances connected with a romantic attachment he had formed for Mademoiselle de Lespinasse, whose acquaintance he made at the house of Madame du Deffand, a noted resort of literary men and savants.

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  • His later years were saddened by circumstances connected with a romantic attachment he had formed for Mademoiselle de Lespinasse, whose acquaintance he made at the house of Madame du Deffand, a noted resort of literary men and savants.

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  • de Beauchesne, Vie de Madame Elisabeth (1869); La comtesse d'Armaille, Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1886); Madame d'Arvor, Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1898); and Hon.

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  • "Oui, madame," replied he, looking around him.

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  • The chief authority for Madame de Longueville's life is a little book in two volumes by Villefore the Jansenist, published in 1738.

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  • The work was completed in August 1843, the five years' labour having been broken by the composition of reviews of Lockhart's Life of Scott (1838), Kenyon's Poems (1839), Chateaubriand (1839), Bancroft's United States (1841), Mariotti's Italy (1842), and Madame Calderon's Life in Mexico (1843), and by the preparation of an abridgment of his Ferdinand and Isabella in anticipation of its threatened abridgment by another hand.

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  • Lanne, La Sceur de Louis XVII., and the articles on "Madame Royale," on the "Captivite de la famille royale au Temple" and on the "Mise en liberte de Madame" in M.

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  • He seemed to be thinking only of the convenience and pleasure of his guests, not as a rule of artificial breeding as from Chesterfield or Madame Geniis, but from innate feeling.

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  • ELIZABETH [Elisabeth Philippine Marie Helene of] (1764-1794), commonly called Madame Elizabeth, daughter of Louis the Dauphin and Marie Josephine of Saxony, and sister of Louis XVI., was born at Versailles on the 3rd of May 1764.

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  • By the execution of the king and the removal of Marie Antoinette to the Conciergerie, Madame Elizabeth was deprived of her companions in the Temple prison, and on the 9th of May 1 794 she was herself transferred to the Conciergerie, and haled before the revolutionary tribunal.

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  • The Memoires de Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1858), by F.

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  • C. Ferrand, E loge historique de Madame Elisabeth (1814, containing 94 letters; 2nd ed., 1861, containing additional letters, but correspondence mutilated); Du Fresne de Beaucourt, Etude sur Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1864); A.

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  • Mrs Maxwell-Scott, Madame Elizabeth of France (1908).

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  • Temminck, whose father's aid to Le Vaillant has already been noticed, brought out at Paris a Histoire naturelle des pigeons illustrated by Madame Knip, who had drawn the plates for Desmarest's volume.3 Since we have begun by considering these large illustrated works in which the text is made subservient to the coloured plates, it may be convenient to continue our notice of such others of similar character as it may be expedient to mention here, though thereby we shall be led somewhat far afield.

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  • Among his friends were Madame Vernet, the duchess de Broglie, the younger Mdme de Stael, M.

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  • Madame (Nellie Porter Armstrong Melba) >>

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  • Hauterive was enriched for a time by his marriage with a widow, Madame de Marchais, but was ruined by the Revolution.

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  • He completed it, however, and in 1842 it was produced at Dresden, where, with Madame Schroeder Devrient and Herr Tichatschek in the principal parts, it achieved a success which went far to make him famous.

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  • Though she denied that she had ever written directly to Madame de Pompadour, it is certain that she allowed her ministers to make use of the favourite's influence over the French king.

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  • The process was developed by Madame Lefebre in 1859; by Meissner in 1863, who found that moist gases gave a better result; and by Prim in 1882, who sparked the gases under pressure; it was also used by Lord Rayleigh in his isolation of argon.

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  • MADAME DE.

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  • They remained in a Tirolese prison until December 1795, when there was an exchange of prisoners on the release of Madame Royale, daughter of Louis XVI., from the Temple.

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  • those of Madame de Motteville, Mathieu Mole, De Brienne, and Bassompierre.

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  • The Parisian jewellers Boehmer and Bassenge had spent some years collecting stones for a necklace which they hoped to sell to Madame Du Barry, the favourite of Louis XV., and after his death to Marie Antoinette.

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  • Madame de Lamotte had told the cardinal that Marie Antoinette would make him a sign to indicate her thanks, and Rohan believed that she did make him a sign.

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  • The waxwork exhibition named after Madame Tussaud, who founded it in Paris in 1780, occupies large buildings in Marylebone Road.

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  • One of the chief authorities for the last years of Retz is Madame de Sevigne, whose connexion he was by marriage.

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  • They are addressed in the form of narrative to a lady who is not known, though guesses have been made at her identity, some even suggesting Madame de Sevigne herself.

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  • Gaullieur in the same review in 1857, and all the available material is utilized in a monograph on her and her work by P. Godet, Madame de Charriere et ses amis (2 vols., Geneva, 1906).

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  • Madame de Stael was dead; Chateaubriand, though alive, was something of a classic, and had not effected a full revolution.

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  • He availed himself of the reviving interest in legitimism and Catholicism which was represented by Bonald and Joseph de Maistre, of the nature worship of Rousseau and Bernardin de Saint Pierre, of the sentimentalism of Madame de Stael, of the medievalism and the romance of Chateaubriand and Scott, of the maladie du siecle of Chateaubriand and Byron.

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  • Procuring an introduction he discovered her to be a protegee of Madame de Sillery, comtesse de Geniis.

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  • The parentage of the girl, whose name was Pamela (?1776-1831), is uncertain; but although there is some evidence to support the story of Madame de Geniis that Pamela was born in Newfoundland of parents called Seymour or Sims, the common belief that she was the daughter of Madame de Geniis herself by Philippe (Egalite), duke of Orleans, was probably well founded.

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  • For particulars of Pamela, and especially as to the question of her parentage, see Gerald Campbell, Edward and Pamela Fitzgerald (London, 1904); Memoirs of Madame de Genlis (London, 1825); Georgette Ducrest, Chroniques populaires (Paris, 1855) Thomas Moore, Memoirs of the Life of R.

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  • His visiting espionage, as unkind critics put it - his secret diplomatic mission, as he would have liked to have it put himself - began in the summer of 1722, and he set out for it in company with a certain Madame de Rupelmonde, to whom he as usual made love, taught deism and served as an amusing travelling companion.

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  • The principal literary results of his early years here were the Discours en vers sur l'homme, the play of Alzire and L'Enfant prodigue (1736), and a long treatise on the Newtonian system which he and Madame du Chatelet wrote together.

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  • The best-known accounts of Cirey life, those of Madame de Grafigny, date from the winter of 1738-39; they are somewhat spiteful but very amusing, depicting the frequent quarrels between Madame du Chatelet and Voltaire, his intense suffering under criticism, his constant dread of the surreptitious publication of the Pucelle (which nevertheless he could not keep his hands from writing or his tongue from reciting to his visitors), and so forth.

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  • Frederick, now king of Prussia, made not a few efforts to get Voltaire away from Madame du Chatelet, but unsuccessfully, and the king earned the lady's cordial hatred by persistently refusing or omitting to invite her.

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  • He was much employed, owing to Richelieu's influence, in the fetes of the dauphin's marriage, and was rewarded through the influence of Madame de Pompadour on New Year's Day 1745 by the appointment to the post of historiographer-royal, once jointly held by Racine and Boileau.

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  • He once lay in hiding for two months with the duchesse du Maine at Sceaux, where were produced the comedietta of La Prude and the tragedy of Rome sauvee, and afterwards for a time lived chiefly at Luneville; here Madame du Chatelet had established herself at the court of King Stanislaus, and carried on a liaison with Saint-Lambert, an officer in the king's guard.

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  • The death of Madame du Chatelet is another turning-point in the history of Voltaire.

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  • For some time, however, after Madame du Chatelet's death he was in a state of pitiable unsettlement.

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  • He engaged in a foolish and undignified struggle with Crebillon (not fils), a rival set up against him by Madame de Pompadour, but a dramatist who, in part of one play, Rhadamiste et Zenobie, has struck a note of tragedy in the grand Cornelian strain, which Voltaire could never hope to echo.

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  • He pressed him to remain; he gave him (the words are Voltaire's own) one of his orders, twenty thousand francs a year, and four thousand additional for his niece, Madame Denis, in case she would come and keep house for her uncle.

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  • The resident, Freytag, was not a very wise person (though he probably did not, as Voltaire would have it, spell "poesie" "poeshie"); constant references to Frederick were necessary; and the affair was prolonged so that Madame Denis had time to join her uncle.

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  • It is doubtful whether his last and fatal visit to Paris was due to his own wish or to the instigation of his niece, Madame Denis; but this lady - a woman of disagreeable temper, especially to her inferiors - appears to have been rather hardly treated by Voltaire's earlier, and sometimes by his later, biographers.

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  • His heart, taken from the body when it was embalmed, and given to Madame Denis and by her to Madame de Villette, was preserved in a silver case, and when it was proposed (in 1864) to restore it to the other remains, the sarcophagus at Sainte Genevieve (the Pantheon) was opened and found to be empty.

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  • His second wife, Madame de Montesson, whom he married secretly in 1773, was a clever woman and an authoress of some repute.

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  • Among other popular places of entertainment may be mentioned the exhibition grounds and buildings at Earl's Court; similar grounds at Shepherd's Bush, where a Franco-British Exhibition was held in 1908, an Imperial Exhibition in 1909, and an Anglo-Japanese in 1910; the great Olympia hall, West Kensington; the celebrated wax-work exhibition of Madame Tussaud in Marylebone Roan, the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill, an institution resembling the Crystal Palace; and the Agricultural Hall, Islington, where agricultural and other exhibitions are held.

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  • Madame Tallien also tired of him, and became the mistress of the rich banker Ouvrard.

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  • On Madame Tallien see Arsene Houssaye, Notre Dame de Thermidor (Paris, 1866); J.

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  • Madame Comte conceived a dislike to the circle she found there, and this was the too early beginning of disputes which lasted for the remainder of their union.

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  • Lamennais, then in the height of his Catholic exaltation, persuaded Comte's mother to insist on her son being married with the religious ceremony, and as the younger Madame Comte apparently did not resist, the rite was duly performed, in spite of the fact that Comte was at the time raving mad.

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  • In spite of one or two disadvantageous facts in her career, Madame Comte seems to have uniformly comported herself towards her husband with an honourable solicitude for his well-being.

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  • In 1845 Comte made the acquaintance of Madame Clotilde de Vaux, a lady whose husband had been sent to the galleys for life.

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  • Madame de Vaux's letters speak well for her good sense and good feeling, and it would have been better for Comte's later work if she had survived to exert a wholesome restraint on his exaltation.

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  • Comte was as inconsolable after Madame de Vaux's death as D'Alembert after the death of Mademoiselle L'Espinasse.

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  • Valat, pp. 84-87.) His friendship with Madame de Vaux had deepened the impression, and in the reconstructed society women are to play a highly important part.

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  • She was then given the title of "Madame."

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  • Although not himself a courtier, he was backed at court by Sosthenes de la Rochefoucauld and Madame du Cayla, and in 1822 Louis XVIII.

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  • Madame de Stael >>

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  • But some of her great successes during the 'eighties and early 'nineties - the days of her chief triumphs - were in Italian versions of such plays as La Dame aux camelias, in which Sarah Bernhardt was already famous; and Madame Duse's reputation as an actress was founded less on her "creations" than on her magnificent individuality.

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  • Ill-health kept Madame Duse off the stage for some time; but though, after 1900, it was no longer possible for her to avoid "make-up," her rank among the great actresses of history remained indisputable.

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  • Born at Turin, he lost his father in 1675, and spent his youth under the regency of his mother, known as "Madama Reale" (madame royale), an able but ambitious and overbearing woman.

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  • Mademoiselle de la Valliere held the position from 1662 to 1670; she was then ousted by Madame de Montespan, who had fiercely intrigued for it, and whose proud and ambitious temper offered a great contrast to her rival.

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  • She held her position from 1670 to 1679 and then gave place to the still more famous Madame de Maintenon, who ruled, however, not as mistress but as wife.

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  • Madame de Maintenon was the widow of the dramatist Scarron, and first came into relationship with the king as governess to his illegitimate children.

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  • Through her influence the king was reconciled to his wife, and, when Maria Theresa died in 1683, Madame de Maintenon shortly afterwards (in 1684) became the king's wife, though this was never officially declared.

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  • The chief are Madame de Motteville's memoirs for the period of the Fronde, and the letters of Madame de Sevigne and the memoirs of Saint-Simon for the later period.

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  • His private life is revealed in the letters of Madame de Maintenon and in those of Madame, Duchesse d'Orleans.

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  • One of his children was the famous Madame Dacier.

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  • Lancashire 1059 3474 Sacre Madame, Charleroi.

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  • Madame du Barry, whose influence over Louis XV.

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  • Thus for the benefit of Madame de Lamballe the queen revived the superfluous and expensive office of superintendent of her household, which led constant disagreements and jealousies among her ladies and offended many important families.

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  • 4 This had reflected discredit on the queen, Madame de Guemenee having been one of her intimate friends.

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  • She had already been separated from her son, the sight of whose ill-treatment added terribly to her sufferings; she was now parted from her daughter and Madame Elizabeth, and removed on the 1st of August 1793 to the Conciergerie.

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  • The jury decided unanimously in the affirmative, and on the 16th of October 1793 Marie Antoinette was led to the guillotine, leaving behind her a touching letter to Madame Elizabeth, known as her "Testament."

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  • Feuillet des Conches Louis X VI., Marie Antoinette et Madame Elisabeth, lettres et documents inedits (6 vols., Paris, 1864-1873), while most of the works on Marie Antoinette published before the appearance of Arneth's publications (1865, &c.) are based partly on these forgeries.

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  • those of the prince de Ligne, Choiseul, Segur, Bouille, Dumouriez, &c. Some, such as those of Madame Campan, Weber, Clery, Mme de Tourzel, are prejudiced in her favour; others, such as those of Besenval, Lauzun, Soulavie, are equally prejudiced against her.

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  • 4to), which includes his extensive Foreign Correspondence with distinguished French men and women, and the notices of him in the memoirs of Cumberland, Hannah More and Madame D'Arblay, and above all in Boswell's Life of Johnson, bear testimony to his many attractive qualities as a companion and to his fidelity as a friend.

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  • During his life at Paris he had opportunities of mixing in the circles of the philosophers and of others who frequented the salon of Madame de Geniis, and he there formed those ideas in favour of political and social reform which he retained through life.

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  • After a time marked by some pecuniary embarrassment, he was recommended by Madame de Stael to the Director Barras for the post of minister of foreign affairs..

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  • Talleyrand refused to clear himself of the charges made against him as his friends (especially Madame de Stael) urged him to do; and the incident probably told against his chances of admission into the Directory, which were discussed in the summer of 1798.

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  • On the 10th of September 1803, owing to pressure put on him by Bonaparte, he married Madame Grand, a divorcee with whom he had long been living.

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  • He had been separated from the former Madame Grand in 1815 and left no heir.

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  • There is a statue of Madame Desbordes Valmore, the poet (d.

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  • His pictures are magnificent in their composition and their draughtsmanship; and his keen observation and insight into character are evident, especially in his portraits, notably of Madame Recamier, of the Conventional Gerard and of Boissy d'Anglas.

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  • Some articles which Fauriel published in the Decade philosophique (1800) on a work of Madame de Stael's - De la litterature consideree dans ses rapports avec les institutions sociales - led to an intimate friendship with her.

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  • About 1802 he contracted with Madame de Condorcet a liaison which lasted till her death (1822).

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  • Fauriel was introduced by Madame de Stael to the literary circle of Auteuil, which gathered round Destutt de Tracy.

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  • Those who enjoyed his closest intimacy were the physiologist Cabanis (Madame de Condorcet's brother-in-law), the poet 1Vlanzoni, the publicist Benjamin Constant, and Guizot.

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  • After his death his friend Mary Clarke (afterwards Madame J.

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  • He was an intelligent and honest man, although he seems to have profited by the sale of the possessions of the clergy, but he had a stubborn, unyielding temperament, was incapable of making concessions, and was dominated by Madame Roland, who imparted to him her hatred of Danton and the Montagnards.

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  • He first fell in with some proselytizers of the Roman faith at Confignon in Savoy, and by them he was sent to Madame de Warens at Annecy, a young and pretty widow who was herself a convert.

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  • He wandered about in Turin for some time, and at last established himself as footman to a Madame de Vercellis.

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  • But, though he kept his place by this piece of cowardice, Madame de Vercellis died not long afterwards and he was turned off.

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  • Then he resolved to return to Madame de Warens at Annecy.

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  • In one of his incomprehensible freaks he set off for Lyons, and, after abandoning his companion in an epileptic fit, returned to Annecy to find Madame de Warens gone.

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  • Then he became, or says he became, secretary to a Greek archimandrite who was travelling in Switzerland to collect subscriptions for the rebuilding of the Holy Sepulchre; then he went to Paris, and, with recommendations from the French ambassador at Soleure, saw something of good society; then he returned on foot through Lyons to Savoy, hearing that Madame de Warens was at Chambery.

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  • In 1736 Madame de Warens, partly for Rousseau's health, took a country house, Les Charmettes, a, short distance from Chambery.

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  • By his own account this journey to Montpellier was in reality a voyage a Cythere in company with a certain Madame de Larnage.

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  • This being so, he could hardly complain when on returning he found that his official position in Madame de Warens's household had been taken by a person named Vintzenried.

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  • Madame Dupin, however, to whose house he had obtained the entry, procured him the honourable if not very lucrative post of secretary to M.

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  • He had an opera, Les Muses galantes, privately represented; he copied music for money, and received from Madame Dupin and her son-in-law M.

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  • He formed new musical projects, and he was introduced by degrees to many people of rank and influence, among them Madame d'Epinay (q.v.), to whom in 1747 he was introduced by her lover M.

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  • During a visit to Geneva in 1754 Rousseau saw his old friend and love Madame de Warens (now reduced in circumstances and having lost all her charms), while after abjuring his abjuration of Protestantism he was enabled to take up his freedom as citizen of Geneva, to which his birth entitled him and of which he was proud.

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  • Shortly afterwards, returning to Paris, he accepted a cottage near Montmorency (the celebrated Hermitage) which Madame d'Epinay had fitted up for him, and established himself there in April 1756.

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  • Here he wrote La Nouvelle Heloise; here he indulged in the passion which that novel partly represents, his love for Madame d'Huodetot, sister-in-law of Madame d'Epinay, a lady young and amiable, but plain, who had a husband and a lover (St Lambert), and whom Rousseau's devotion seems to have partly pleased and partly annoyed.

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  • That most favourable to him is that he was expected to lend himself in a more or less complaisant manner to assist and cover Madame d'Epinay's adulterous affection for Grimm.

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  • The quarrel with Madame d'Epinay, with Diderot, and through them with the philosophe party reversed this.

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  • On June r 1, 1762, Emile was condemned by the parlement of Paris, and two days previously Madame de Luxembourg and the prince de Conti gave the author information that he would be arrested if he did not fly.

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  • There is little doubt that for the last ten or fifteen years of his life, if, not from the time of his quarrel with Diderot and Madame d'Epinay, Rousseau was not wholly sane - the combined influence of late and unexpected literary fame and of constant solitude and discomfort acting upon his excitable temperament so as to overthrow the balance, never very stable, of his fine and acute but unrobust intellect.

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  • Yet Mademoiselle de la Fayette and Madame d'Hautefort and others are said to have been his mistresses.

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  • She never accommodated herself to the part she was called on to play during the Empire, and, though endowed with immense wealth and distinguished by the title of Madame Mere, lived mainly in retirement, and in the exercise of a strict domestic economy which her early privations had made a second nature to her, but which rendered her very unpopular in France and was displeasing to Napoleon.

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  • Larrey, Madame Mere (2 vols., Paris, 1892); Clara Tschudi, Napoleons Mutter: aus dem Norwegischen iibersetzt von H.

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  • Nevertheless in 1814 she repaired with "Madame Mere" to Elba, and is said to have expressed a wish to share Napoleon's exile in St Helena.

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  • Nevertheless Jerome was forced by his brother to separate himself from his wife, whom he had brought to Europe, and after a stay in England Madame Patterson, or Madame Bonaparte, as she was usually called, returned to Baltimore.

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  • 7, by Madame Riimker Oct.

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  • 1873); Ducos, Les Trois Girondines (Madame Roland, Charlotte Corday, Madame Bouquey) et les Girondins (ib.

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  • Barbaroux, Petion, Louvet, Madame Roland.

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  • For further particulars as to his life and doctrines see Grimm's Correspondance litteraire, &c. (1813); Rousseau's Confessions; Morellet's Memoires (1, 821); Madame de Geniis, Les Diners du Baron Holbach; Madame d'Epinay's Memoires; Avezac-Lavigne, Diderot et la societe du Baron d'Holbach (1875), and Morley's Diderot (1878).

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  • Louis made Bourbon recall the tutor, who on the 11 th of July 1726 took affairs into his own hands, and secured the exile from court of Bourbon and of his mistress Madame de Prie.

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  • Madame Tallien, daughter of Dr Cabarrus, the Lady of Thermidor, married as her second husband the prince de Chimay, and held her little court here down to her death in 1835.

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  • The world was startled, however, on the 30th of September 1891 by hearing that he had committed suicide in a cemetery at Brussels by blowing out his brains on the grave of his mistress, Madame de Bonnemains (née Marguerite Crouzet), who had died in the preceding July.

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  • Solovyov's Modern Priestess of Isis, translated by Walter Leaf (1895), in Arthur Lillie's Madame Blavatsk y and Her Theosophy (1895), and in the report made to the Society for Psychical Research by the Cambridge graduate despatched to investigate her doings in India.

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  • Novels Are Not Yet Much In Vogue; Though Madame Conan'S L'Oublie (1902) Has Been Crowned By The Academy; While Dr Choquette'S Les Ribaud (1898) Is A Good Dramatic Story, And His Claude Paysan (1899) Is An Admirably Simple Idyllic Tale Of The Hopeless Love Of A Soil Bound Habitant, Told With Intense Natural Feeling And Fine Artistic Reserve.

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  • The influence of Edmond de Pressense, a pastor and large-minded theologian, and of Madame de Pressense, a woman of superior intellect and refined feeling, who devoted her life to educational works and charity, made a great impression on him.

    0
    0
  • He returned to Switzerland in 1786, and in the next year visited Paris, where he met Madame de Charriere, a Dutchwoman who had married into a Swiss family with which his own was connected.

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    0
  • Madame de Charriere, although twentyseven years older than Constant, became his mistress, and the liaison, an affair possibly more of the intellect than of the heart, lasted until 1796, when Constant became intimate with Madame de Stael.

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    0
  • Constant, who had met Madame de Stael at Lausanne in 1794, followed her in the next year to Paris, where he rapidly became a personage in the moderate republican circle which met in her salon; and by 1796 he had established with her intimate relations, which, in spite of many storms, endured for ten years.

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  • de Stael's death in 1802, there was no longer any obstacle to their marriage, but Madame de Stael was apparently unwilling to change her name.

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  • His relations with Madame de Stael became more and more difficult, and in 1808 he secretly married Charlotte von Hardenberg, whom he had known at Brunswick, and whose divorce from her second husband, General Dutertre, he had secured.

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  • of Russia, and resumed his old place in the Liberal salon of Madame de Stael.

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  • Attracted by Madame Recamier, he soon returned, and after an interview with Napoleon on the 10th of April, he became a supporter of his government and drew up the Acte constitutionnel.

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  • It had been written in 1807, and is intrinsically autobiographical; that Adolphe represents Constant himself there is no dispute, but Ellenore probably owes something both to Madame de Charriere and Madame de Stael.

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    0
  • After the death, in 1817, of Madame de Stael, whom he continued to visit daily until the end, he had ceased to go into society, giving himself up to his passion for play.

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    0
  • Constant's political career was spoiled by his liaison with Madame de Stael, and at the Restoration was further disturbed by his unreturned passion for Madame Recamier.

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  • Melegari in 1895; the semi-autobiographical Adolphe; his letters to Madame de Charriere; to Madame Recamier, edited by Madame Lenormant in 1882.

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    0
  • His ordinary diary has disappeared, with his letters to his wife and to Madame de Stael.

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  • When in difficulty he ran to her and flattered her with the name of Madame La Ressource - Madame Quick Wit - which did not prevent him from insulting and even kicking her when the immediate need of her help was over.

    0
    0
  • The ingenuity of Madame Grotius at length devised a mode of escape.

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    0
  • Madame Grotius, perceiving this, prevailed on her husband to allow himself to be shut up in it at the usual time.

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    0
  • "There are indeed," said Madame Grotius, "Arminian books in it."

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  • Women have been decorated, notably Rosa Bonheur, Madame Curie and Madame Bartet.

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    0
  • Keenly interested in the education of women, she made friends with Miss Emily Davies, Madame Bodichon, Miss Buss and others.

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  • He was extremely popular at court, and in 1783, on the death of Archbishop Cornwallis, the king pressed him to accept the primacy, but Hurd, who was known, says Madame d'Arblay, as "The Beauty of Holiness," declined it as a charge not suited to his temper and talents, and much too heavy for him to sustain.

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  • and Madame de Montespan.

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  • and Queen Marie Antoinette; his governess was the famous Madame de Geniis, to whose influence he doubtless owed many of the qualities which later distinguished him: his wide, if superficial knowledge, his orderliness, and perhaps his parsimony.

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    0
  • He went first, with his sister Madame Adelaide, to Switzerland where he obtained a situation for a few months as professor in the college of Reichenau under an assumed name,' mainly in order to escape from the fury of the emigres.

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    0
  • Madame de Prie first suggested the Polish princess as a bride for Louis duke of Bourbon, but she was soon betrothed not to him but to Louis XV., a step which was the outcome of the jealousies of the houses of Conde and Orleans, and was everywhere regarded as a mesalliance for the French king.

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    0
  • Marie's one attempt to interfere in politics, an effort to prevent the disgrace of the duke of Bourbon, was the beginning of her husband's alienation from her; and after the birth of her seventh child Louise, Marie was practically deserted by Louis, who openly avowed his liaison with Louise de Nesle, comtesse de Mailly, who was replaced in turn by her sisters Pauline marquise de Vintimille, and Marie Anne, duchess de Chateauroux, and these by Madame de Pompadour.

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    0
  • Favras was generally regarded as a martyr to his refusal to implicate the count of Provence, and Madame de Favras was pensioned by Louis XVI.

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    0
  • Although Conti did not secure the Polish throne he remained in the confidence of Louis until 1755, when his influence was destroyed by the intrigues of Madame de Pompadour; so that when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756 he was refused the command of the army of the Rhine, and began the opposition to the administration which caused Louis to refer to him as "my cousin the advocate."

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  • Encouraged by his mother, and under the influence of his governess Madame de Roucoulle, and of his first tutor Duhan, a French refugee, he acquired an excellent knowledge of French and a taste for literature and music. He even received secret lessons in Latin, which his father invested with all the charms of forbidden fruit.

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  • In plays by contemporary authors she created the characters of Judith and Cleopatra in the tragedies of Madame de Girardin, but perhaps her most successful appearance was in 1849 in Scribe and Legouve's Adrienne Lecouvreur, which was written for her.

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  • Madame de Kriidener, and her colleague, the evangelist Empaytaz, became the confidants of the emperor's most secret thoughts; and during the campaign that ended in the occupation of Paris the imperial prayer-meetings were the oracle on whose revelations hung the fate of the world.

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    0
  • For Madame de Kriidener was not the only influence behind the throne; and, though Alexander had declared war against the Revolution, Laharpe was once more at his elbow, and the catchwords of the gospel of humanity were still on his lips.

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    0
  • Towards the close of his life their reconciliation was completed by the wise charity of the empress in sympathizing deeply with him over the death of his beloved daughter by Madame Narishkine.

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    0
  • Madame Agnesi also wrote a commentary on the Traite analytique des sections coniques of the marquis de 1'Hopital, which, though highly praised by those who saw it in manuscript, was never published.

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    0
  • In 1538 James married a lady whom Henry desired to add to his list of wives, Mary of Guise, at this moment a young widow, Madame de Longueville.

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  • Other notable trials in which he was concerned were the prosecution of Emile Zola for libel (1898), which arose out of the Dreyfus case; the Humbert affair (1902); and the trial of Madame Caillaux for the murder of M.

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    0
  • It is celebrated for its warm sulphurous springs (75° to 111° F.), which first became generally known in 1675 when they were visited by Madame de Maintenon and the duke of Maine, son of Louis XIV.

    0
    0
  • This society was founded in the United States of America in the year 1875 by Madame H.

    0
    0
  • From time to time Madame Blavatsky's numerous friends and associates were allowed to witness the manifestations of "occult phenomena," which she averred were the outcome of her connexion with these "Mahatmas."

    0
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  • There are, moreover, numerous passages in the sacred books of the East, especially those of the Buddhists, which warn the student against the assumption that "magical" performances of any kind are to be regarded as proving the truth of the performer's teaching; and indeed it must be owned in justice to the theosophists that similar warnings are to be found scattered throughout their writings; while even Madame Blavatsky herself was wont to expatiate on the folly of accepting her "phenomena" as the mark of spiritual truth.

    0
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  • If theosophy were to be judged solely by the published revelations of this "Secret Doctrine" it would hardly be deserving of serious consideration; for, as suggested in the separate article on Madame Blavatsky, the revelations themselves appear to have been no more than a crude compilation of vague, contradictory and garbled extracts from various periodicals, books and translations.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the death of Madame Blavatsky a split in the society was brought about by Mr Wm.

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    0
  • The confessor united his influence with that of Madame de Maintenon to induce the king to abandon his liaison with Madame de Montespan.

    0
    0
  • With the fall of Madame de Montespan and the ascendancy of Madame de Maintenon his influence vastly increased.

    0
    0
  • and Madame de Maintenon was celebrated in his presence at Versailles, but there is no reason for supposing that the subsequent coolness between him and Madame de Maintenon arose from his insistence on secrecy in this matter.

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  • To the second volume he appended a critical study on Marie Antoinette et Louis XVI apocryphes, in which he proved, by evidence drawn from documents in the private archives of the emperor of Austria, that the letters published by Feuillet de Conches (Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette et Madame Elisabeth, 1864-1873) and Hunolstein (Corresp. inedite de Marie Antoinette, 1864) are forgeries.

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  • In the interval he wrote Madame de Maintenon d'apres sa correspondance authentique (2 vols., 1887), in which he displayed his penetrating critical faculty in discriminating between authentic documents and the additions and corrections of arrangers like La Beaumelle and Lavallee.

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  • Five years (1835-1840) were spent in Switzerland and Italy, in semi-retirement in the company of Madame la comtesse d'Agoult (George Sand's friend and would-be rival, known in literary circles as " Daniel Stern," by whom Liszt had three children, one of them afterwards Frau Cosima Wagner): these years were devoted to further study in playing and composition, and were interrupted only by occasional appearances at Geneva, Milan, Florence and Rome, and by annual visits to Paris, when a famous contest with Thalberg took place in 1837.

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  • They are now included, together with articles on Schumann and Schubert, and the elaborate and rather highflown essays on Chopin and Des Bohemiens et de leur musique en Hongrie (the latter certainly, and the former probably, written in collaboration with Madame de Wittgenstein), in his Gesammelte Schriften (6 vols., Leipzig).

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  • These ideas, in a very modified form, were introduced into France by the great devotional writer, St Francis of Sales; in the latter half of the 17th century they were pushed to the extravagant length known as Quietism by Fenelon, and especially by Madame Guyon and Michel de Molinos.

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  • This research opened a way of approach to the phenomena of radioactivity, and the history of the steps by' hich P. Curie and Madame Curie were finally led to the discovery of radium is one of the most fascinating chapters in the history of science.

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    0
  • Madame de Sevigne called him "the North."

    0
    0
  • He devoted himself to an examination of the nature of society and his work brought him into connexion with the literary circle of Chateaubriand and Madame Recamier.

    0
    0
  • The duchess of Chateauroux died in the same year, but her place was taken in 1745 by Madame de Pompadour.

    0
    0
  • She had many rivals during her lifetime and on her death in 1764 she was succeeded by Madame du Barry.

    0
    0
  • The intrigues of Madame de Pompadour played in this change an important though not a decisive part.

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    0
  • Boutaric, Correspondance secrete de Louis X V.; Madame de Pompadour's Correspondance published by P. Malassi; Dietric, Les Mattresses de Louis X V.; and Fleury, Louis XV.

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  • la Beaumelle published the Lettres de Madame de Maintenon, but much garbled, in 2 vols.

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  • He also, in 1755, published Memoires de Madame de Maintenon, in 6 vols., which caused him to be imprisoned in the Bastille.

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  • (1888), which latter must, however, be read with the knowledge of many forged letters, noticed in P. Grimblot's Faux autographes de Madame de Maintenon.

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    0
  • See also Mademoiselle d'Aumale's Souvenirs sur Madame de Maintenon, published by the Comte d'Haussonville and G.

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  • Geffroy, Madame de Maintenon d'apres sa correspondance authentique (Paris, 2 vols., 1887); P. de Noailles, Histoire de Madame de Maintenon et des principaux evenements du regne de Louis XIV.

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    0
  • Pilastre, Vie et caractere de Madame de Maintenon d'apres les oeuvres du duc de Saint-Simon et des documents anciens ou recents 0907); A.

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    0
  • Rosset, Madame de Maintenon et la revocation de l'edit de Nantes (1897).

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    0
  • Masson, Fenelon et Madame Guyon (1907).

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  • de Haricourt, Madame de Souza et sa famille (1907).

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  • de Goncourt, La du Barry (Paris, 1880); C. Vatel, Histoire de Madame du Barry (1882-1883), based on sources; R.

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  • Douglas, The Life and Times of Madame du Barry (London, 1896).

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  • In Paris he frequented the salons of Madame de la Fayette and of the marquise de Lambert.

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  • In the same year he gained a footing at court as almoner to Madame.

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  • At this time Madame Kovalevsky was at Stockholm, where Gustaf Mittag Leffler, also a pupil of Weierstrass, who had been recently appointed to the chair of mathematics at the newly founded university, had procured for her a post as lecturer.

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  • Unfortunately Madame Kovalevsky did not live to reap the full reward of her labours, for she died just as she had attained the height of her fame and had won recognition even in her own country by election to membership of the St Petersburg Academy of Science.

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  • See Madame Rattazzi, Rattazzi et son temps (Paris, 1881); Bolton King, History of Italian Unity (London, 1899).

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  • He was intimate with the comtesse de Tesse, sister of the duc de Choiseul, and in 1781 met Madame de Crequy, then sixty-seven years of age, and began a long friendship with her.

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  • de Lescure in 1862; Lettres inedites de Madame de Crequi a Senac de Meilhan (1856), edited by Edouard Fournier; Louis Legrand, Senac de Meilhan et l'intendance du Hainaut et du Cambresis (1868); and the notice by Fernand Caussy prefixed to his edition (1905) of the Considerations sur l'esprit et les mceurs.

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    0
  • Bourasse, Miracles de Madame Sainte Katherine de Fierbois (1858, trans.

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  • The good offices of Madame de Combalet, to whom the Cid had been dedicated, and perhaps the satisfaction of the cardinal's literary jealousy, had healed what breach there may have been, and indeed the poet was in no position to quarrel with his patron.

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  • Heinrich Ritter's Geschichte der Philosophie (1861); La Philosophie individualiste: etude sur Guillaume de Humboldt (1864); and an edition of the works of Madame d'Epinay (1869).

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  • He has sketched Jacqueline Pascal (1844), Madame de Longueville (18J3), the marquise de Sable (1854), the duchesse de Chevreuse (1856), Madame de Hautefort (1856).

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  • Madame Modjeska was also the Polish interpretress of the most prominent plays of Legouve, Dumas, father and son, Augier, Alfred de Musset, Octave Feuillet and Sardou.

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  • This new career, however, proved a failure, and Madame Modieska returned to the stage.

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  • Late in life he married his niece, Madame Zinoveva, but left no children.

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    0
  • Twenty-one Girondin deputies were next brought to the bar and, with the exception of Valaze who stabbed himself, were beheaded on the last day of October, Madame Roland and other Girondins of note suffered later.

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    0
  • For the Legislative Assembly and the Convention the memoirs of Madame Roland, of Bertrand de Molleville, of Barbaroux, of Buzot, of Louvet, of Dumouriez are instructive.

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    0
  • In 1 777, on Voltaire's advice, Villette married Mademoiselle de Varicourt, but the marriage was unhappy, and his wife was subsequently adopted by Voltaire's niece, Madame Denis.

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  • Guiffrey, Lettres inedites de Diane de Poytiers (Paris, 1866) and Proces criminel de Jehan de Poytiers (Paris, 1867); Capefigue, Diane de Poitiers (Paris, 1860); Hay, Madame Dianne de Poytiers (London, 1goo).

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  • It is beautifully situated in the midst of green wooded hills, and still justifies Madame de Stael's description of it as "a basket of flowers."

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  • Bossuet, Louis XIV.s mouthpiece, triumphed in his turn over the quietism of Madame Guyon, a mystic who recognized neither definite dogmas nor formal prayers, but abandoned herself to the torrent of the forces of God.

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  • Disease and famine; crushing imposts and extortions; official debasement of the currency; bankruptcy; state prisons; religious and political inquisition; suppression of all institutions for the safe-guarding of rights; tyranny by the intendants; royal, feudal and clerical oppression burdening every faculty and every necessary of life; monstrous and incurable luxury; the horrible drama of poison; the twofold adultery of Madame de Montespan; and the narrow bigotry of Madame de Maintenon-~--all concurred to make the end of the reign a sad contrast with the splendour of its beginning.

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  • pegency will delegated all the power of the government to a (1715 council on which the duke of Maine, his legitimated son, had the first, but Madame de Maintenon and the Jesuits the predominant place.

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  • Hardly had a catastrophe snatched her away in the zenith of her power when complete corruption and the flagrant triumph of egoism supervened with the accession to power of Madame de the marquise de Pompadour, and for nearly twenty dow~.

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  • From 1749 to 1757 the party of religious devotees grouped round the queen and the kings daughters, with the dauphin as cluef and the comte D,Argenson and Machault dArnouville, keeper of the seals, as lieutenants, had worked against Madame de Pompadour (who leant for supporl upon the parlements, the jansenists and the philosophers)

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  • Th~ army, which DArgenson (likewise dismissed by Madame de Pompadour) had been from 1743 to 1747 trying to restore by useful reforms, wa~ riddled by cabals.

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  • Neither the witty and lucid form in which the philosophers clothed their ideas in their satires, romances, stage-plays and treatises, nor the salons of Madame du Deffand, Madame Geoffrin and Mademoiselle de Lespinasse, could possibly have been sufficiently far-reaching or active centres of political propaganda.

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  • Flattered and adored at the outset, she very soon furnished a sinister illustration to Beaumarchais Basile; for evil tongues began to calumniate the queen: those of her brothers-in-law, the duc dAiguillon (protector of Madame du Barry and dismissed from the ministry), and the Cardinal de Rohan, recalled from his embassy in Vienna.

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  • A great responsibility for this defeat of the liberal and republican bourgeoisie, whom they represented, is to be laid upon Madame Roland, the Egeria of the party.

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  • These muscadins and incroyables, led by Frron, Tallien and Barrasformer revolutionists who had become aristocratsprofited by the restored liberty of the press to prepare for days of battle in the salons of the merveilleuses Madame Tallien, Madame de Stael and Madame Rca.mier, as the sans-culottes had formerly done in the clubs.

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  • The pomp and luxury of the nouveaux riches were displayed in the salons of the good Josephine, the beautiful Madame Tallien, and the divine Juliette Rcamier.

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  • In the formidable machinery of state, above all in the creation of the Legion of Honor, the Concordat, and the restoration of indirect taxes, they saw the rout of the Revolution: But the expulsion of persons like Benjamin Constant and Madame de Stael sufficed to quell this Fronde of the salons.

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  • On being appointed assistant tutor to the Dauphin in 1670, he edited with the assistance of Anne Lefevre, afterwards Madame Dacier, the well-known edition of the Delphin Classics.

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  • He was promoted to the rank of colonel in the regiment of Normandy in 1643, and three years later, after distinguishing himself at the siege of Orbitello, where he had an arm broken, he was made marechal de camp. His service seems to have been continuous until the conclusion of the peace of Westphalia in 1648, when he returned to his father's house in Paris and married, without the consent of her parents, Anne de la Grange-Trianon, a girl of great beauty, who later became the friend and confidante of Madame de Montpensier.

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  • During the lifetime of his cousin, Madame de Longueville, the great protectress of the Jansenists, Louis stayed his hand; on her death (1679) the reign of severity began.

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    0
  • In 1763 Necker fell in love with Madame de Vermenou, the widow of a French officer.

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  • But while on a visit to Geneva, Madame de Vermenou met Suzanne Curchod, the daughter of a pastor near Lausanne, to whom Gibbon had been engaged, and brought her back as her companion to Paris in 1764.

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  • Madame Necker entertained the chief leaders of the political, financial and literary worlds of Paris, and her Fridays became as greatly frequented as the Mondays of Madame Geoffrin, or the Tuesdays of Madame Helvetius.

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  • In retirement he occupied himself with literature, and with his only child, his daughter, who in 1786 married the ambassador of Sweden and became Madame de Stael.

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  • In 1788 the country, which had at the bidding of the literary guests of Madame Necker come to believe that Necker was the only minister who could "stop the deficit," as they said, demanded Necker's recall, and in September 1788 he became once more director-general of the finances.

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  • Here he occupied himself with literature, but Madame Necker pined for her Paris salon and died in 1794.

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  • He continued to live on at Coppet, under the care of his daughter, Madame de Stael, and his niece, Madame Necker de Saussure, but his time was past, and his books had no political influence.

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  • Necker (Paris and London, 1818), by his daughter, Madame de Stael-Holstein, and the Notice sur la vie de M.

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  • See also Le Salon de Madame Necker, by the Vicomte d'Haussonville (2 vols., 1882), compiled from the papers at Coppet; Ch.

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    0
  • At Mittau was realized his cherished plan of marrying Madame Royale, daughter of Louis XVI., to the duc d'Angouleme, elder son of the comte d'Artois.

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  • In the absence of Decazes a new favourite was found to amuse the king's old age, Madame du Cayla (Zoe Talon, comtesse du Cayla), a protegee of the vicomte Sosthene de la Rochefoucauld and consequently a creature of the Ultras.

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  • Voltaire said that it was full of commonplaces, and that what was original was false or problematical; Rousseau declared that the very benevolence of the author gave the lie to his principles; Grimm thought that all the ideas in the book were borrowed from Diderot; according to Madame du Deffand, Helvetius had raised such a storm by saying openly what every one thought in secret; Madame de Graffigny averred that all the good things in the book had been picked up in her own salon.

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  • Guillois, Le Salon de Madame Helvetius (1894); A.

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  • Madame Renan joined them in January 1861, returning to France in July.

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  • "Madame, your sister.s car has just entered the property," Kris.s personal secretary said.

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  • announced at a dinner to be held at Madame Tussauds in London on the 16th March.

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  • attractions as madame Tussauds, London Planetarium, Sherlock Holmes Museum and Oxford Street.

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  • brothel madame, Virginia OâKane.

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  • In Caliste: Que ne puis-je, Madame, vous peindre toute sa douceur, et le charme inexprimable de cette aimable fille!

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  • governess of these offspring was Madame de Maintenon, who subsequently entered into a morganatic marriage with the monarch.

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  • Madame Souza and her faithful hound Bruno leave to track them down.

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  • madame d'Albémar herself.

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  • Upon their return to Larkhall, the Julies are surprised when they bump into their old employer, wealthy brothel madame, Virginia OâKane.

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  • When Flaubert wrote Madame Bovary, I believe he thought chiefly of a somewhat morbid realism; and behold!

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  • NSTC describes the French original as ' By Madame de *** ' .

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  • Madame du Rumain performed the ceremonies with all the dignity of an ancient priestess of Baal.

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  • He wants consolation, I know: Madame does not console: she only remonstrates.

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  • He had two sous, " said Madame Adolphe, looking at Madame Marmus with an accusing air.

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  • By the corpse is a hat labeled ' Madame Rita ', real name the rather staid Mrs Grant.

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  • Other news: Elsewhere in today's tabloids are several condemnations of Madame Tussauds ' new Kylie waxwork.

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  • They formed the basis for a small booklet to which was given the title " Madame Blavatsky on how to study theosophy " .

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  • QUO'S RICK PARFITT and FRANCIS ROSSI saw double during 1991 when they unveiled waxworks of themselves at Madame Tussauds Rock Circus wax museum.

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  • waxworks at Madame Tussauds.

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  • An old waxwork from Madame Tussaud's: greasy, chipped, caked in paint, smiling glassy-eyed back at you in close-up.

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  • Prince Harry looked dashing and had women all over him in central London - as his new waxwork was unveiled at Madame Tussauds.

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  • waxwork displays of Madame Tussauds, where you can watch, and hear, the Earl of Warwicks preparations for battle.

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  • GEORGE SAND (1804-1876), the pseudonym of Madame Amandine Lucile Aurore Dudevant, née Dupin, the most prolific authoress in the history of literature, and unapproached among the women novelists of France.

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  • It reads more like a chapter from the life of Ste Therese or Madame Guyon than of the author of Lelia.

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  • De Seze was a middle-aged lawyer with a philosophic turn of mind, and Madame Dudevant for two years kept up with him an intimate correspondence.

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  • The words were constantly altered and added to during the Terror and later; thus the well-known lines, "Madame Veto avait promis De faire egorger tout Paris On lui coupa la tete," &c., were added after the execution of Marie Antoinette.

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  • C. R(ousselet), Correspondance de Louis-Philippe Joseph d'Orleans avec Louis XVI (Paris, 1800); Rivarol, Portrait du duc d'Orleans et de Madame de Geniis; Tournois, Histoire du Louis Philippe Joseph duc d'Orleans (Paris, 1842).

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  • In 1781 he married Manon Jeanne Phlipon (1754-1793), and the name of Madame Roland is famous in history.

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  • They were from the pen of Madame Roland and were signed by her husband.

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  • Madame Roland took an active part in the political discussions in these reunions.

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  • They had made many and influential friends in advance, and Madame Roland's salon soon became the rendezvous of Brissot, Petion, Robespierre and other leaders of the popular movement, above all of Buzot, whom she loved with platonic enthusiasm.

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  • In person Madame Roland was attractive though not beautiful; her ideas were clear and far-reaching, her manner calm, and her power of observation extremely acute.

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  • A letter was penned by Madame Roland and addressed by her husband to Louis.

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  • Once Madame Roland appeared personally in the Assembly to repel the falsehoods of an accuser, and her ease and dignity evoked enthusiasm and compelled acquittal.

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  • Madame Roland's Memoires, first printed in 1820, have been edited among others by P. Faugere (Paris, 1864), by C. A.

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  • Dauban, Etude sur Madame Roland et son temps (Paris, 1864); V.

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  • Lamy, Deux femmes celebres, Madame Roland et Charlotte Corday (Paris, 1884).; C. Bader, Madame Roland, d'apres des lettres et des manuscrits inedits (Paris, 1892); A.

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  • Lambert, Le mariage de Madame Roland, trois annees de correspondence amoureuse (Paris, 1896) Austin Dobson, Four Frenchwomen (London, 1890); and articles by C. Perroud in the review La Revolution francaise (1896-99).

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  • Her letters to her friend Madame Calandrini contain much interesting information with regard to contemporary celebrities, especially on Mme.

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  • The most important are those on Madame de Montausier (1672), which gained him the membership of the Academy, the duchesse d'Aiguillon (1675), and, above all, Marshal Turenne (1676).

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  • The chief authority for Madame de Longueville's life is a little book in two volumes by Villefore the Jansenist, published in 1738.

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  • Friedrich Schlegel's wife, Dorothea, was the author of an unfinished romance, Florentin (1801), a Sammlung romantischer Dichtungen des Mittelalters (2 vols., 1804), a version of Lother and Mauler (1805), and a translation of Madame de Stael's.

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  • In 1602 he made his second visit to the French capital, when his transcendent qualities brought him into the closest relations with the court of Henry IV., and made him the spiritual father of that circle of select souls who centred round Madame Acarie.

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  • Madame Swetchine >>

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  • of the Revue encyclopedique; a paper on Jordan and Madame de Stael, by C. A.

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  • It afterwards became known that he was the illegitimate son of the chevalier Destouches and Madame de Tencin.

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  • The work was completed in August 1843, the five years' labour having been broken by the composition of reviews of Lockhart's Life of Scott (1838), Kenyon's Poems (1839), Chateaubriand (1839), Bancroft's United States (1841), Mariotti's Italy (1842), and Madame Calderon's Life in Mexico (1843), and by the preparation of an abridgment of his Ferdinand and Isabella in anticipation of its threatened abridgment by another hand.

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  • See Memoires de Madame de Motteville; Victor Cousin, Madame de Hautefort (Paris, 1868); L'Abbe Sorin, Louise-Angele de La Fayette (Paris, 1893).

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  • The royal party included, beside the king and queen, their daughter Marie Therese Charlotte (Madame Royale), the king's sister Madame Elisabeth, the valet Clery and others.

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  • Madame Royale's own account of the captivity of the Temple was first printed with additions and suppressions in 1817, and often subsequently, the best edition being that from her autograph text by G.

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  • Lanne, La Sceur de Louis XVII., and the articles on "Madame Royale," on the "Captivite de la famille royale au Temple" and on the "Mise en liberte de Madame" in M.

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  • He seemed to be thinking only of the convenience and pleasure of his guests, not as a rule of artificial breeding as from Chesterfield or Madame Geniis, but from innate feeling.

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  • ELIZABETH [Elisabeth Philippine Marie Helene of] (1764-1794), commonly called Madame Elizabeth, daughter of Louis the Dauphin and Marie Josephine of Saxony, and sister of Louis XVI., was born at Versailles on the 3rd of May 1764.

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  • Left an orphan at the age of three, she was brought up by Madame de Mackau, and had a residence at Montreuil, where she gave many proofs of her benevolent character.

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  • By the execution of the king and the removal of Marie Antoinette to the Conciergerie, Madame Elizabeth was deprived of her companions in the Temple prison, and on the 9th of May 1 794 she was herself transferred to the Conciergerie, and haled before the revolutionary tribunal.

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  • The Memoires de Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1858), by F.

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  • C. Ferrand, E loge historique de Madame Elisabeth (1814, containing 94 letters; 2nd ed., 1861, containing additional letters, but correspondence mutilated); Du Fresne de Beaucourt, Etude sur Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1864); A.

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  • de Beauchesne, Vie de Madame Elisabeth (1869); La comtesse d'Armaille, Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1886); Madame d'Arvor, Madame Elisabeth (Paris, 1898); and Hon.

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  • Mrs Maxwell-Scott, Madame Elizabeth of France (1908).

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  • "People are full of mirth" (wrote Madame Reinhard, wife of the minister for Foreign Affairs, four days later) "believing that they have regained liberty."

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  • Temminck, whose father's aid to Le Vaillant has already been noticed, brought out at Paris a Histoire naturelle des pigeons illustrated by Madame Knip, who had drawn the plates for Desmarest's volume.3 Since we have begun by considering these large illustrated works in which the text is made subservient to the coloured plates, it may be convenient to continue our notice of such others of similar character as it may be expedient to mention here, though thereby we shall be led somewhat far afield.

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  • Among his friends were Madame Vernet, the duchess de Broglie, the younger Mdme de Stael, M.

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  • Madame (Nellie Porter Armstrong Melba) >>

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  • Hauterive was enriched for a time by his marriage with a widow, Madame de Marchais, but was ruined by the Revolution.

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  • He completed it, however, and in 1842 it was produced at Dresden, where, with Madame Schroeder Devrient and Herr Tichatschek in the principal parts, it achieved a success which went far to make him famous.

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  • Though she denied that she had ever written directly to Madame de Pompadour, it is certain that she allowed her ministers to make use of the favourite's influence over the French king.

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  • to Madame de Maintenon, by whom additions were made; the aqueduct (17th century) in the park was designed to carry the water of the Eure to Versailles, but was not completed.

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  • The process was developed by Madame Lefebre in 1859; by Meissner in 1863, who found that moist gases gave a better result; and by Prim in 1882, who sparked the gases under pressure; it was also used by Lord Rayleigh in his isolation of argon.

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  • MADAME DE.

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  • They remained in a Tirolese prison until December 1795, when there was an exchange of prisoners on the release of Madame Royale, daughter of Louis XVI., from the Temple.

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  • those of Madame de Motteville, Mathieu Mole, De Brienne, and Bassompierre.

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  • The Parisian jewellers Boehmer and Bassenge had spent some years collecting stones for a necklace which they hoped to sell to Madame Du Barry, the favourite of Louis XV., and after his death to Marie Antoinette.

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  • Madame de Lamotte had told the cardinal that Marie Antoinette would make him a sign to indicate her thanks, and Rohan believed that she did make him a sign.

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  • The waxwork exhibition named after Madame Tussaud, who founded it in Paris in 1780, occupies large buildings in Marylebone Road.

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  • One of the chief authorities for the last years of Retz is Madame de Sevigne, whose connexion he was by marriage.

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  • They are addressed in the form of narrative to a lady who is not known, though guesses have been made at her identity, some even suggesting Madame de Sevigne herself.

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  • Gaullieur in the same review in 1857, and all the available material is utilized in a monograph on her and her work by P. Godet, Madame de Charriere et ses amis (2 vols., Geneva, 1906).

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  • Madame de Stael was dead; Chateaubriand, though alive, was something of a classic, and had not effected a full revolution.

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  • He availed himself of the reviving interest in legitimism and Catholicism which was represented by Bonald and Joseph de Maistre, of the nature worship of Rousseau and Bernardin de Saint Pierre, of the sentimentalism of Madame de Stael, of the medievalism and the romance of Chateaubriand and Scott, of the maladie du siecle of Chateaubriand and Byron.

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  • Procuring an introduction he discovered her to be a protegee of Madame de Sillery, comtesse de Geniis.

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  • The parentage of the girl, whose name was Pamela (?1776-1831), is uncertain; but although there is some evidence to support the story of Madame de Geniis that Pamela was born in Newfoundland of parents called Seymour or Sims, the common belief that she was the daughter of Madame de Geniis herself by Philippe (Egalite), duke of Orleans, was probably well founded.

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  • For particulars of Pamela, and especially as to the question of her parentage, see Gerald Campbell, Edward and Pamela Fitzgerald (London, 1904); Memoirs of Madame de Genlis (London, 1825); Georgette Ducrest, Chroniques populaires (Paris, 1855) Thomas Moore, Memoirs of the Life of R.

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  • His visiting espionage, as unkind critics put it - his secret diplomatic mission, as he would have liked to have it put himself - began in the summer of 1722, and he set out for it in company with a certain Madame de Rupelmonde, to whom he as usual made love, taught deism and served as an amusing travelling companion.

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  • The principal literary results of his early years here were the Discours en vers sur l'homme, the play of Alzire and L'Enfant prodigue (1736), and a long treatise on the Newtonian system which he and Madame du Chatelet wrote together.

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  • The best-known accounts of Cirey life, those of Madame de Grafigny, date from the winter of 1738-39; they are somewhat spiteful but very amusing, depicting the frequent quarrels between Madame du Chatelet and Voltaire, his intense suffering under criticism, his constant dread of the surreptitious publication of the Pucelle (which nevertheless he could not keep his hands from writing or his tongue from reciting to his visitors), and so forth.

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  • Frederick, now king of Prussia, made not a few efforts to get Voltaire away from Madame du Chatelet, but unsuccessfully, and the king earned the lady's cordial hatred by persistently refusing or omitting to invite her.

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  • He was much employed, owing to Richelieu's influence, in the fetes of the dauphin's marriage, and was rewarded through the influence of Madame de Pompadour on New Year's Day 1745 by the appointment to the post of historiographer-royal, once jointly held by Racine and Boileau.

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  • He once lay in hiding for two months with the duchesse du Maine at Sceaux, where were produced the comedietta of La Prude and the tragedy of Rome sauvee, and afterwards for a time lived chiefly at Luneville; here Madame du Chatelet had established herself at the court of King Stanislaus, and carried on a liaison with Saint-Lambert, an officer in the king's guard.

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  • The death of Madame du Chatelet is another turning-point in the history of Voltaire.

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  • For some time, however, after Madame du Chatelet's death he was in a state of pitiable unsettlement.

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  • He engaged in a foolish and undignified struggle with Crebillon (not fils), a rival set up against him by Madame de Pompadour, but a dramatist who, in part of one play, Rhadamiste et Zenobie, has struck a note of tragedy in the grand Cornelian strain, which Voltaire could never hope to echo.

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  • He pressed him to remain; he gave him (the words are Voltaire's own) one of his orders, twenty thousand francs a year, and four thousand additional for his niece, Madame Denis, in case she would come and keep house for her uncle.

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  • The resident, Freytag, was not a very wise person (though he probably did not, as Voltaire would have it, spell "poesie" "poeshie"); constant references to Frederick were necessary; and the affair was prolonged so that Madame Denis had time to join her uncle.

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  • It is doubtful whether his last and fatal visit to Paris was due to his own wish or to the instigation of his niece, Madame Denis; but this lady - a woman of disagreeable temper, especially to her inferiors - appears to have been rather hardly treated by Voltaire's earlier, and sometimes by his later, biographers.

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  • His heart, taken from the body when it was embalmed, and given to Madame Denis and by her to Madame de Villette, was preserved in a silver case, and when it was proposed (in 1864) to restore it to the other remains, the sarcophagus at Sainte Genevieve (the Pantheon) was opened and found to be empty.

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  • His second wife, Madame de Montesson, whom he married secretly in 1773, was a clever woman and an authoress of some repute.

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  • Among other popular places of entertainment may be mentioned the exhibition grounds and buildings at Earl's Court; similar grounds at Shepherd's Bush, where a Franco-British Exhibition was held in 1908, an Imperial Exhibition in 1909, and an Anglo-Japanese in 1910; the great Olympia hall, West Kensington; the celebrated wax-work exhibition of Madame Tussaud in Marylebone Roan, the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill, an institution resembling the Crystal Palace; and the Agricultural Hall, Islington, where agricultural and other exhibitions are held.

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  • Madame Tallien also tired of him, and became the mistress of the rich banker Ouvrard.

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  • On Madame Tallien see Arsene Houssaye, Notre Dame de Thermidor (Paris, 1866); J.

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  • Madame Comte conceived a dislike to the circle she found there, and this was the too early beginning of disputes which lasted for the remainder of their union.

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  • Lamennais, then in the height of his Catholic exaltation, persuaded Comte's mother to insist on her son being married with the religious ceremony, and as the younger Madame Comte apparently did not resist, the rite was duly performed, in spite of the fact that Comte was at the time raving mad.

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  • In spite of one or two disadvantageous facts in her career, Madame Comte seems to have uniformly comported herself towards her husband with an honourable solicitude for his well-being.

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  • In 1845 Comte made the acquaintance of Madame Clotilde de Vaux, a lady whose husband had been sent to the galleys for life.

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  • Madame de Vaux's letters speak well for her good sense and good feeling, and it would have been better for Comte's later work if she had survived to exert a wholesome restraint on his exaltation.

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  • Comte was as inconsolable after Madame de Vaux's death as D'Alembert after the death of Mademoiselle L'Espinasse.

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  • Valat, pp. 84-87.) His friendship with Madame de Vaux had deepened the impression, and in the reconstructed society women are to play a highly important part.

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  • She was then given the title of "Madame."

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  • Although not himself a courtier, he was backed at court by Sosthenes de la Rochefoucauld and Madame du Cayla, and in 1822 Louis XVIII.

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  • Madame de Stael >>

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  • But some of her great successes during the 'eighties and early 'nineties - the days of her chief triumphs - were in Italian versions of such plays as La Dame aux camelias, in which Sarah Bernhardt was already famous; and Madame Duse's reputation as an actress was founded less on her "creations" than on her magnificent individuality.

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  • Ill-health kept Madame Duse off the stage for some time; but though, after 1900, it was no longer possible for her to avoid "make-up," her rank among the great actresses of history remained indisputable.

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  • Born at Turin, he lost his father in 1675, and spent his youth under the regency of his mother, known as "Madama Reale" (madame royale), an able but ambitious and overbearing woman.

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  • Mademoiselle de la Valliere held the position from 1662 to 1670; she was then ousted by Madame de Montespan, who had fiercely intrigued for it, and whose proud and ambitious temper offered a great contrast to her rival.

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  • She held her position from 1670 to 1679 and then gave place to the still more famous Madame de Maintenon, who ruled, however, not as mistress but as wife.

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  • Madame de Maintenon was the widow of the dramatist Scarron, and first came into relationship with the king as governess to his illegitimate children.

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  • Through her influence the king was reconciled to his wife, and, when Maria Theresa died in 1683, Madame de Maintenon shortly afterwards (in 1684) became the king's wife, though this was never officially declared.

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  • The chief are Madame de Motteville's memoirs for the period of the Fronde, and the letters of Madame de Sevigne and the memoirs of Saint-Simon for the later period.

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  • His private life is revealed in the letters of Madame de Maintenon and in those of Madame, Duchesse d'Orleans.

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  • One of his children was the famous Madame Dacier.

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  • Lancashire 1059 3474 Sacre Madame, Charleroi.

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  • Madame du Barry, whose influence over Louis XV.

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  • Thus for the benefit of Madame de Lamballe the queen revived the superfluous and expensive office of superintendent of her household, which led constant disagreements and jealousies among her ladies and offended many important families.

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  • It was Madame de Polignac who obtained the appointment of Calonne as controller-general of the finances,' and who succeeded Madame de Guemenee as "governess of the children of France" after the bankruptcy of the prince de Guemenee in 1782.4 Again, in response to Mercy and Joseph II.'s urgent representations, Marie Antoinette exerted herself on behalf of Austria in the affairs of the opening of the Scheldt (1783-1784) and the exchange of Bavaria (1785), in which, though she failed to provoke active interference on the part of France, she succeeded in obtaining the payment of considerable indemnities to Austria, a fact which led to the popular legend of her having sent millions to Austria, and aroused much indignation against her.

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  • 4 This had reflected discredit on the queen, Madame de Guemenee having been one of her intimate friends.

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  • She had already been separated from her son, the sight of whose ill-treatment added terribly to her sufferings; she was now parted from her daughter and Madame Elizabeth, and removed on the 1st of August 1793 to the Conciergerie.

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  • The jury decided unanimously in the affirmative, and on the 16th of October 1793 Marie Antoinette was led to the guillotine, leaving behind her a touching letter to Madame Elizabeth, known as her "Testament."

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  • Feuillet des Conches Louis X VI., Marie Antoinette et Madame Elisabeth, lettres et documents inedits (6 vols., Paris, 1864-1873), while most of the works on Marie Antoinette published before the appearance of Arneth's publications (1865, &c.) are based partly on these forgeries.

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  • those of the prince de Ligne, Choiseul, Segur, Bouille, Dumouriez, &c. Some, such as those of Madame Campan, Weber, Clery, Mme de Tourzel, are prejudiced in her favour; others, such as those of Besenval, Lauzun, Soulavie, are equally prejudiced against her.

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  • 4to), which includes his extensive Foreign Correspondence with distinguished French men and women, and the notices of him in the memoirs of Cumberland, Hannah More and Madame D'Arblay, and above all in Boswell's Life of Johnson, bear testimony to his many attractive qualities as a companion and to his fidelity as a friend.

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  • During his life at Paris he had opportunities of mixing in the circles of the philosophers and of others who frequented the salon of Madame de Geniis, and he there formed those ideas in favour of political and social reform which he retained through life.

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  • Landing at Hamburg in the January following, he spent some time there in the company of his friends Madame de Geniis and Reinhard; and when party rancour continued to abate at Paris, he returned thither in September.

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  • After a time marked by some pecuniary embarrassment, he was recommended by Madame de Stael to the Director Barras for the post of minister of foreign affairs..

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  • Talleyrand refused to clear himself of the charges made against him as his friends (especially Madame de Stael) urged him to do; and the incident probably told against his chances of admission into the Directory, which were discussed in the summer of 1798.

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  • On the 10th of September 1803, owing to pressure put on him by Bonaparte, he married Madame Grand, a divorcee with whom he had long been living.

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  • He had been separated from the former Madame Grand in 1815 and left no heir.

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  • There is a statue of Madame Desbordes Valmore, the poet (d.

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  • His pictures are magnificent in their composition and their draughtsmanship; and his keen observation and insight into character are evident, especially in his portraits, notably of Madame Recamier, of the Conventional Gerard and of Boissy d'Anglas.

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  • His principal works are: Poemes de prison (1875), written during his detention, Soirs de bataille (1883); Jours de combat (1883); and Le Travail (1889); the novels, Madame Phaeton (1885) and Monsieur le gendarme (1891); and the dramas, Une etoile (1888) and Le sommeil de Danton (1888).

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  • Some articles which Fauriel published in the Decade philosophique (1800) on a work of Madame de Stael's - De la litterature consideree dans ses rapports avec les institutions sociales - led to an intimate friendship with her.

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  • About 1802 he contracted with Madame de Condorcet a liaison which lasted till her death (1822).

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  • Fauriel was introduced by Madame de Stael to the literary circle of Auteuil, which gathered round Destutt de Tracy.

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  • Those who enjoyed his closest intimacy were the physiologist Cabanis (Madame de Condorcet's brother-in-law), the poet 1Vlanzoni, the publicist Benjamin Constant, and Guizot.

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  • After his death his friend Mary Clarke (afterwards Madame J.

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  • He was an intelligent and honest man, although he seems to have profited by the sale of the possessions of the clergy, but he had a stubborn, unyielding temperament, was incapable of making concessions, and was dominated by Madame Roland, who imparted to him her hatred of Danton and the Montagnards.

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  • He first fell in with some proselytizers of the Roman faith at Confignon in Savoy, and by them he was sent to Madame de Warens at Annecy, a young and pretty widow who was herself a convert.

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  • He wandered about in Turin for some time, and at last established himself as footman to a Madame de Vercellis.

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  • But, though he kept his place by this piece of cowardice, Madame de Vercellis died not long afterwards and he was turned off.

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  • Then he resolved to return to Madame de Warens at Annecy.

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  • In one of his incomprehensible freaks he set off for Lyons, and, after abandoning his companion in an epileptic fit, returned to Annecy to find Madame de Warens gone.

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  • Then he became, or says he became, secretary to a Greek archimandrite who was travelling in Switzerland to collect subscriptions for the rebuilding of the Holy Sepulchre; then he went to Paris, and, with recommendations from the French ambassador at Soleure, saw something of good society; then he returned on foot through Lyons to Savoy, hearing that Madame de Warens was at Chambery.

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  • This was in 1732, and Rousseau, who for a time had unimportant employments in the service of the Sardinian crown, was shortly in- stalled by Madame de Warens, whom he still called Maman, as amant en titre in her singular household, wherein she diverted herself with him, with music and with chemistry.

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  • In 1736 Madame de Warens, partly for Rousseau's health, took a country house, Les Charmettes, a, short distance from Chambery.

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  • By his own account this journey to Montpellier was in reality a voyage a Cythere in company with a certain Madame de Larnage.

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  • This being so, he could hardly complain when on returning he found that his official position in Madame de Warens's household had been taken by a person named Vintzenried.

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  • Madame Dupin, however, to whose house he had obtained the entry, procured him the honourable if not very lucrative post of secretary to M.

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  • He had an opera, Les Muses galantes, privately represented; he copied music for money, and received from Madame Dupin and her son-in-law M.

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  • He formed new musical projects, and he was introduced by degrees to many people of rank and influence, among them Madame d'Epinay (q.v.), to whom in 1747 he was introduced by her lover M.

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  • During a visit to Geneva in 1754 Rousseau saw his old friend and love Madame de Warens (now reduced in circumstances and having lost all her charms), while after abjuring his abjuration of Protestantism he was enabled to take up his freedom as citizen of Geneva, to which his birth entitled him and of which he was proud.

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  • Shortly afterwards, returning to Paris, he accepted a cottage near Montmorency (the celebrated Hermitage) which Madame d'Epinay had fitted up for him, and established himself there in April 1756.

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  • Here he wrote La Nouvelle Heloise; here he indulged in the passion which that novel partly represents, his love for Madame d'Huodetot, sister-in-law of Madame d'Epinay, a lady young and amiable, but plain, who had a husband and a lover (St Lambert), and whom Rousseau's devotion seems to have partly pleased and partly annoyed.

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  • That most favourable to him is that he was expected to lend himself in a more or less complaisant manner to assist and cover Madame d'Epinay's adulterous affection for Grimm.

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  • The quarrel with Madame d'Epinay, with Diderot, and through them with the philosophe party reversed this.

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  • On June r 1, 1762, Emile was condemned by the parlement of Paris, and two days previously Madame de Luxembourg and the prince de Conti gave the author information that he would be arrested if he did not fly.

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  • There is little doubt that for the last ten or fifteen years of his life, if, not from the time of his quarrel with Diderot and Madame d'Epinay, Rousseau was not wholly sane - the combined influence of late and unexpected literary fame and of constant solitude and discomfort acting upon his excitable temperament so as to overthrow the balance, never very stable, of his fine and acute but unrobust intellect.

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  • Yet Mademoiselle de la Fayette and Madame d'Hautefort and others are said to have been his mistresses.

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  • She never accommodated herself to the part she was called on to play during the Empire, and, though endowed with immense wealth and distinguished by the title of Madame Mere, lived mainly in retirement, and in the exercise of a strict domestic economy which her early privations had made a second nature to her, but which rendered her very unpopular in France and was displeasing to Napoleon.

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  • Larrey, Madame Mere (2 vols., Paris, 1892); Clara Tschudi, Napoleons Mutter: aus dem Norwegischen iibersetzt von H.

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  • Nevertheless in 1814 she repaired with "Madame Mere" to Elba, and is said to have expressed a wish to share Napoleon's exile in St Helena.

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  • Nevertheless Jerome was forced by his brother to separate himself from his wife, whom he had brought to Europe, and after a stay in England Madame Patterson, or Madame Bonaparte, as she was usually called, returned to Baltimore.

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  • 7, by Madame Riimker Oct.

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  • On the spirit and policy of the Girondists Madame Roland, whose salon became their gathering-place, exercised a powerful influence (see Roland); but such party cohesion as they possessed they owed to the energy of Brissot (q.v.), who came to be regarded as their mouthpiece in the Assembly and the Jacobin Club.

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  • 1873); Ducos, Les Trois Girondines (Madame Roland, Charlotte Corday, Madame Bouquey) et les Girondins (ib.

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  • Barbaroux, Petion, Louvet, Madame Roland.

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  • For further particulars as to his life and doctrines see Grimm's Correspondance litteraire, &c. (1813); Rousseau's Confessions; Morellet's Memoires (1, 821); Madame de Geniis, Les Diners du Baron Holbach; Madame d'Epinay's Memoires; Avezac-Lavigne, Diderot et la societe du Baron d'Holbach (1875), and Morley's Diderot (1878).

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  • Louis made Bourbon recall the tutor, who on the 11 th of July 1726 took affairs into his own hands, and secured the exile from court of Bourbon and of his mistress Madame de Prie.

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  • Madame Tallien, daughter of Dr Cabarrus, the Lady of Thermidor, married as her second husband the prince de Chimay, and held her little court here down to her death in 1835.

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  • The world was startled, however, on the 30th of September 1891 by hearing that he had committed suicide in a cemetery at Brussels by blowing out his brains on the grave of his mistress, Madame de Bonnemains (née Marguerite Crouzet), who had died in the preceding July.

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  • In France, Madame de Pompadour was their enemy because they had refused her absolution while she remained the king's mistress; but the immediate cause of their ruin was the bankruptcy of Father Lavalette, the Jesuit superior in Martinique, a daring speculator, who failed, after trading for some years, for 2,400,000 francs and brought ruin upon some French commercial houses of note.

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  • Solovyov's Modern Priestess of Isis, translated by Walter Leaf (1895), in Arthur Lillie's Madame Blavatsk y and Her Theosophy (1895), and in the report made to the Society for Psychical Research by the Cambridge graduate despatched to investigate her doings in India.

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  • Novels Are Not Yet Much In Vogue; Though Madame Conan'S L'Oublie (1902) Has Been Crowned By The Academy; While Dr Choquette'S Les Ribaud (1898) Is A Good Dramatic Story, And His Claude Paysan (1899) Is An Admirably Simple Idyllic Tale Of The Hopeless Love Of A Soil Bound Habitant, Told With Intense Natural Feeling And Fine Artistic Reserve.

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  • The influence of Edmond de Pressense, a pastor and large-minded theologian, and of Madame de Pressense, a woman of superior intellect and refined feeling, who devoted her life to educational works and charity, made a great impression on him.

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  • Gautier de Biblesworth wrote such a treatise et Madame Dyonise de Mountechensi pur aprise de langage (Wright, A Volume of Vocabularies; P. Meyer, Rec. d'anc. textes, p. 3 60 and Romania xxxii, 22); Orthographia gallica (Stiirzinger, Altfr.

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  • He returned to Switzerland in 1786, and in the next year visited Paris, where he met Madame de Charriere, a Dutchwoman who had married into a Swiss family with which his own was connected.

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  • Madame de Charriere, although twentyseven years older than Constant, became his mistress, and the liaison, an affair possibly more of the intellect than of the heart, lasted until 1796, when Constant became intimate with Madame de Stael.

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  • Constant, who had met Madame de Stael at Lausanne in 1794, followed her in the next year to Paris, where he rapidly became a personage in the moderate republican circle which met in her salon; and by 1796 he had established with her intimate relations, which, in spite of many storms, endured for ten years.

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  • His incessant opposition was attributed partly to his association with Madame de Stael, whose salon was a centre for those disaffected from the Napoleonic regime, and in 1803 he followed her into exile.

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  • de Stael's death in 1802, there was no longer any obstacle to their marriage, but Madame de Stael was apparently unwilling to change her name.

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  • His relations with Madame de Stael became more and more difficult, and in 1808 he secretly married Charlotte von Hardenberg, whom he had known at Brunswick, and whose divorce from her second husband, General Dutertre, he had secured.

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  • of Russia, and resumed his old place in the Liberal salon of Madame de Stael.

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  • At this point began the second great attachment of his life, his unfortunate infatuation for Madame Recamier, under whose influence he committed the worst blunder of his political career.

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  • Attracted by Madame Recamier, he soon returned, and after an interview with Napoleon on the 10th of April, he became a supporter of his government and drew up the Acte constitutionnel.

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  • It had been written in 1807, and is intrinsically autobiographical; that Adolphe represents Constant himself there is no dispute, but Ellenore probably owes something both to Madame de Charriere and Madame de Stael.

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  • After the death, in 1817, of Madame de Stael, whom he continued to visit daily until the end, he had ceased to go into society, giving himself up to his passion for play.

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  • Constant's political career was spoiled by his liaison with Madame de Stael, and at the Restoration was further disturbed by his unreturned passion for Madame Recamier.

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  • Melegari in 1895; the semi-autobiographical Adolphe; his letters to Madame de Charriere; to Madame Recamier, edited by Madame Lenormant in 1882.

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  • His ordinary diary has disappeared, with his letters to his wife and to Madame de Stael.

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  • Herriot, Madame de Recamier et ses amis (1904); Sainte-Beuve in Derniers portraits litteraires (B.

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  • Constant and Madame de Charriere), Causeries du lundi (vol.

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  • Faguet, Politiques et moralistes du XIX e siecle (1 ere serie, 1891); P. Godet, Madame de Charriere et ses amis (Geneva, 1905); L.

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  • When in difficulty he ran to her and flattered her with the name of Madame La Ressource - Madame Quick Wit - which did not prevent him from insulting and even kicking her when the immediate need of her help was over.

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  • The ingenuity of Madame Grotius at length devised a mode of escape.

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  • Madame Grotius, perceiving this, prevailed on her husband to allow himself to be shut up in it at the usual time.

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  • "There are indeed," said Madame Grotius, "Arminian books in it."

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  • Women have been decorated, notably Rosa Bonheur, Madame Curie and Madame Bartet.

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  • Keenly interested in the education of women, she made friends with Miss Emily Davies, Madame Bodichon, Miss Buss and others.

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  • He was extremely popular at court, and in 1783, on the death of Archbishop Cornwallis, the king pressed him to accept the primacy, but Hurd, who was known, says Madame d'Arblay, as "The Beauty of Holiness," declined it as a charge not suited to his temper and talents, and much too heavy for him to sustain.

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  • and Madame de Montespan.

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  • and Queen Marie Antoinette; his governess was the famous Madame de Geniis, to whose influence he doubtless owed many of the qualities which later distinguished him: his wide, if superficial knowledge, his orderliness, and perhaps his parsimony.

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  • He went first, with his sister Madame Adelaide, to Switzerland where he obtained a situation for a few months as professor in the college of Reichenau under an assumed name,' mainly in order to escape from the fury of the emigres.

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  • Madame de Prie first suggested the Polish princess as a bride for Louis duke of Bourbon, but she was soon betrothed not to him but to Louis XV., a step which was the outcome of the jealousies of the houses of Conde and Orleans, and was everywhere regarded as a mesalliance for the French king.

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  • Marie's one attempt to interfere in politics, an effort to prevent the disgrace of the duke of Bourbon, was the beginning of her husband's alienation from her; and after the birth of her seventh child Louise, Marie was practically deserted by Louis, who openly avowed his liaison with Louise de Nesle, comtesse de Mailly, who was replaced in turn by her sisters Pauline marquise de Vintimille, and Marie Anne, duchess de Chateauroux, and these by Madame de Pompadour.

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  • Favras was generally regarded as a martyr to his refusal to implicate the count of Provence, and Madame de Favras was pensioned by Louis XVI.

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  • Although Conti did not secure the Polish throne he remained in the confidence of Louis until 1755, when his influence was destroyed by the intrigues of Madame de Pompadour; so that when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756 he was refused the command of the army of the Rhine, and began the opposition to the administration which caused Louis to refer to him as "my cousin the advocate."

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  • Encouraged by his mother, and under the influence of his governess Madame de Roucoulle, and of his first tutor Duhan, a French refugee, he acquired an excellent knowledge of French and a taste for literature and music. He even received secret lessons in Latin, which his father invested with all the charms of forbidden fruit.

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  • In plays by contemporary authors she created the characters of Judith and Cleopatra in the tragedies of Madame de Girardin, but perhaps her most successful appearance was in 1849 in Scribe and Legouve's Adrienne Lecouvreur, which was written for her.

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  • Madame de Kriidener, and her colleague, the evangelist Empaytaz, became the confidants of the emperor's most secret thoughts; and during the campaign that ended in the occupation of Paris the imperial prayer-meetings were the oracle on whose revelations hung the fate of the world.

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  • For Madame de Kriidener was not the only influence behind the throne; and, though Alexander had declared war against the Revolution, Laharpe was once more at his elbow, and the catchwords of the gospel of humanity were still on his lips.

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  • Towards the close of his life their reconciliation was completed by the wise charity of the empress in sympathizing deeply with him over the death of his beloved daughter by Madame Narishkine.

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  • Madame Agnesi also wrote a commentary on the Traite analytique des sections coniques of the marquis de 1'Hopital, which, though highly praised by those who saw it in manuscript, was never published.

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  • In 1538 James married a lady whom Henry desired to add to his list of wives, Mary of Guise, at this moment a young widow, Madame de Longueville.

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  • Other notable trials in which he was concerned were the prosecution of Emile Zola for libel (1898), which arose out of the Dreyfus case; the Humbert affair (1902); and the trial of Madame Caillaux for the murder of M.

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  • It is celebrated for its warm sulphurous springs (75° to 111° F.), which first became generally known in 1675 when they were visited by Madame de Maintenon and the duke of Maine, son of Louis XIV.

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  • This society was founded in the United States of America in the year 1875 by Madame H.

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  • Now, in order to discern this underlying truth in the various and apparently conflicting world creeds, appeal was made to a "Secret Doctrine," and "Esoteric Teaching," which Madame Blavatsky proclaimed had been held for ages as a sacred possession and trust by certain mysterious adepts in occultism, or "Mahatmas," with whom she said she was in psychical as well as in direct physical communication.

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  • From time to time Madame Blavatsky's numerous friends and associates were allowed to witness the manifestations of "occult phenomena," which she averred were the outcome of her connexion with these "Mahatmas."

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  • There are, moreover, numerous passages in the sacred books of the East, especially those of the Buddhists, which warn the student against the assumption that "magical" performances of any kind are to be regarded as proving the truth of the performer's teaching; and indeed it must be owned in justice to the theosophists that similar warnings are to be found scattered throughout their writings; while even Madame Blavatsky herself was wont to expatiate on the folly of accepting her "phenomena" as the mark of spiritual truth.

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  • If theosophy were to be judged solely by the published revelations of this "Secret Doctrine" it would hardly be deserving of serious consideration; for, as suggested in the separate article on Madame Blavatsky, the revelations themselves appear to have been no more than a crude compilation of vague, contradictory and garbled extracts from various periodicals, books and translations.

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  • Soon after the death of Madame Blavatsky a split in the society was brought about by Mr Wm.

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  • The confessor united his influence with that of Madame de Maintenon to induce the king to abandon his liaison with Madame de Montespan.

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  • With the fall of Madame de Montespan and the ascendancy of Madame de Maintenon his influence vastly increased.

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  • and Madame de Maintenon was celebrated in his presence at Versailles, but there is no reason for supposing that the subsequent coolness between him and Madame de Maintenon arose from his insistence on secrecy in this matter.

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  • To the second volume he appended a critical study on Marie Antoinette et Louis XVI apocryphes, in which he proved, by evidence drawn from documents in the private archives of the emperor of Austria, that the letters published by Feuillet de Conches (Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette et Madame Elisabeth, 1864-1873) and Hunolstein (Corresp. inedite de Marie Antoinette, 1864) are forgeries.

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  • In the interval he wrote Madame de Maintenon d'apres sa correspondance authentique (2 vols., 1887), in which he displayed his penetrating critical faculty in discriminating between authentic documents and the additions and corrections of arrangers like La Beaumelle and Lavallee.

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  • Five years (1835-1840) were spent in Switzerland and Italy, in semi-retirement in the company of Madame la comtesse d'Agoult (George Sand's friend and would-be rival, known in literary circles as " Daniel Stern," by whom Liszt had three children, one of them afterwards Frau Cosima Wagner): these years were devoted to further study in playing and composition, and were interrupted only by occasional appearances at Geneva, Milan, Florence and Rome, and by annual visits to Paris, when a famous contest with Thalberg took place in 1837.

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  • They are now included, together with articles on Schumann and Schubert, and the elaborate and rather highflown essays on Chopin and Des Bohemiens et de leur musique en Hongrie (the latter certainly, and the former probably, written in collaboration with Madame de Wittgenstein), in his Gesammelte Schriften (6 vols., Leipzig).

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  • These ideas, in a very modified form, were introduced into France by the great devotional writer, St Francis of Sales; in the latter half of the 17th century they were pushed to the extravagant length known as Quietism by Fenelon, and especially by Madame Guyon and Michel de Molinos.

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