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mach

mach

mach Sentence Examples

  • The world was turning at Mach speed and Dean felt himself racing along with the uninformed, totally out of control.

  • ERNST MACH (1838-), Austrian physicist and psychologist, was born on the 18th of February 1838 at Turas in Moravia, and studied at Vienna.

  • Ernst Mach >>

  • Mach, Die.

  • Like Mach, he started from the principle of economy of thinking, and in the Kritik endeavoured to explain pure experience in relation to knowledge and environment.

  • Thus Mach found an amplitude 0 2 cm.

  • Mach (Optisch-akustischen Versuche, 1873).

  • Mach's method is perhaps the most direct.

  • Mach found an excursion of 0 .

  • Mach and J.

  • Among psychologists Helmholtz, Mach, Brentano, Hering, Delboeuf, were all more or less against him.

  • Mach.

  • Ernst Mach is a conspicuous instance of a confusion of physics and psychology ending in a scepticism like that of Hume.

  • It retains some relics of Fechner's influence; first, the theory of identity, according to which the difference between the physical and psychical is not a dualism, but everything is at once both; and secondly, the substitution of mathematical dependence for physical causality, except that, whereas Fechner only denied causality between physical and psychical, Mach rejects the entire distinction between causality and dependence, on the ground that " the law of causality simply asserts that the phenomena of Nature are dependent on one another."

  • If we ask how Mach arrived at this scepticism, which is contained in his well-known scientific work Die ill echanik in ihrer Entwickelung (1883; ed.

  • It is important to understand that Mach had developed this economical view of thought in 1872, more than ten years before the appearance of his work on the history of mechanics as he tells us in the preface, where he adds that at a later date similar views were expressed by Kirchhoff in his V orlesungen fiber mathematische Physik (1874).

  • It is evident that Kirchhoff's descriptive is the same as Mach's economical view.

  • " When I say," says Mach, " that a body A exerts a force on a body B, I mean that B, on coming into contraposition with A, is immediately affected by a certain acceleration with respect to A."

  • In a word, Mach and Kirchhoff agree that force is not a cause, convert Newtonian reciprocal action into mere interdependency, and, in old terminology, reduce mechanics from a natural philosophy of causes to a natural history of mere facts.

  • Now, Mach applies these preconceived opinions to " mechanics in its development," with the result that, though he shows much skill in mathematical mechanics, he misrepresents its development precisely at the critical point of the discovery of Newton's third law of motion.

  • Withdraw this foundation of bodies as inter-resisting forces causing one another in collision to form a joint mass with a common velocity but without penetration, and the evidence of the third law disappears; for in the case of attractive forces we know nothing of their modus operandi except by the analogy of the collision of inter-resisting bodies, which makes us believe that something similar, we know not what, takes place in gravity, magnetism, electricity, &c. Now, Mach, though he occasionally drops hints that the discovery of the law of collision comes first, yet never explains the process of development from it to the third law of motion.

  • But the idealists are only too glad to get any excuse for denying bodily substances and causes; and, while Leibnitz supplied them with the fancied analysis of material into immaterial elements, and Hume with the reduction of bodies to assemblages of sensations, Mach adds the additional argument that bodily forces are not causes at all.

  • In Great Britain Mach's scepticism was welcomed by Karl Pearson to support an idealistic phenomenalism derived from Hume, and by Ward to support a noumenal idealism derived from Lotze.

  • Avenarius held a view of knowledge very like that of Mach's view of the economy of thinking.

  • Nor is there any objection to this economical view of thought, as long as we remember what Avenarius and Mach forget, that the essence of thought is the least action neither more nor less than necessary to the point, which is the reality of things.

  • Again he agrees with the reaction both to Hume and to Kant in limiting knowledge to mental phenomena, and has affinities with Mach as well as with Lange.

  • As with Kant against Hume, so with Wundt against Mach and Avenarius, the world we know will contain something more than mere complexes of sensations, more than pure experience: with Wundt it will be a world of real causes and some substances, constituted partly by experience and partly by logical thinking, or active inner will.

  • Karl Pearson (The Grammar of Science, 1892, 2nd enlarged ed., 1900), starting from Hume's phenomenal idealism, has developed views closely allied to Mach's universal physical phenomenology.

  • At the end of this chapter he says that the only published work from the perusal of which he received any help in working out his views in 1882 and 1884, was Mach's Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwicklung (1883).

  • Mach had begun to put them forward in 1872, and Kirchhoff in 1874.

  • These are the views of Mach and of Pearson, as we read them in the latter's Preface.

  • Nor can we find any difference, except the minute shade that Pearson takes up a position of agnosticism between Clifford's assertion of " mind-stuff " and Mach's denial of things in themselves.

  • James Ward, in Naturalism and Agnosticism (1899), starts from the same phenomenalistic views of Mach and Kirchhoff about mechanics; he proceeds to the hypothesis of duality within experience, which we have traced in James Ward.

  • There can be no doubt that Mach, Schuppe and Wundt drew the right phenomenalistic conclusions from such phenomenalistic data.

  • Mach, Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung historischkritisch dargestellt (1883; 2nd edition (1889 translation) by T.

  • Outside the English-writing world, identical or kindred tendencies are represented in France by Leroy, Poincare, Bergson, Milhaud, Blondel, Duhem, Wilbois, Pradines; in Germany by Mach, Ostwald, Simmel, Jerusalem, Goldscheid, Jacoby; in Italy by Papini, Prezzolini, Vailati, Troiano.

  • The destructive action of floods, however, led to the abandonment of this alignment, and the railway now follows the Mashkaf valley (which debouches into the plains close to Sibi), and is carried from near the head of the Mashkaf to a junction with the Bolan at Mach.

  • Mach, Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung (4th ed., Leipzig, 1901; Eng.

  • Mach has made some interesting observations on this point.

  • The following figures obtained by Mach afford an interesting illustration of these processes At first the sugar in the juice consists entirely of dextrose, but later fructose (laevulose) is formed.

  • Mach.) alcoholic fermentation, ethylic alcohol, water and carbonic acid.

  • The world was turning at Mach speed and Dean felt himself racing along with the uninformed, totally out of control.

  • Co-locating with MACH and going biennial is clearly the future for the drives industry.

  • test diatoms - what you can expect to see even with modest objectives by Martin Mach.

  • Mach suggesting more than 3 dimensions to make things explicable.

  • Aircraft - which can use iridium providing they don't exceed about Mach 2 at which point the orbiting satellites, can get confused!

  • Many are already considering taking space at the next mach in 2004.

  • mach numbers the Center of Pressure was located near the heat shield.

  • spaceship pilot then fires his rocket motor for about 80 seconds, reaching Mach 3 in a vertical climb.

  • ERNST MACH (1838-), Austrian physicist and psychologist, was born on the 18th of February 1838 at Turas in Moravia, and studied at Vienna.

  • Ernst Mach >>

  • Mach, Die.

  • Like Mach, he started from the principle of economy of thinking, and in the Kritik endeavoured to explain pure experience in relation to knowledge and environment.

  • Thus Mach found an amplitude 0 2 cm.

  • Mach (Optisch-akustischen Versuche, 1873).

  • Mach's method is perhaps the most direct.

  • Mach found an excursion of 0 .

  • Mach and J.

  • Among psychologists Helmholtz, Mach, Brentano, Hering, Delboeuf, were all more or less against him.

  • Ernst Mach is a conspicuous instance of a confusion of physics and psychology ending in a scepticism like that of Hume.

  • It retains some relics of Fechner's influence; first, the theory of identity, according to which the difference between the physical and psychical is not a dualism, but everything is at once both; and secondly, the substitution of mathematical dependence for physical causality, except that, whereas Fechner only denied causality between physical and psychical, Mach rejects the entire distinction between causality and dependence, on the ground that " the law of causality simply asserts that the phenomena of Nature are dependent on one another."

  • If we ask how Mach arrived at this scepticism, which is contained in his well-known scientific work Die ill echanik in ihrer Entwickelung (1883; ed.

  • It is important to understand that Mach had developed this economical view of thought in 1872, more than ten years before the appearance of his work on the history of mechanics as he tells us in the preface, where he adds that at a later date similar views were expressed by Kirchhoff in his V orlesungen fiber mathematische Physik (1874).

  • It is evident that Kirchhoff's descriptive is the same as Mach's economical view.

  • " When I say," says Mach, " that a body A exerts a force on a body B, I mean that B, on coming into contraposition with A, is immediately affected by a certain acceleration with respect to A."

  • In a word, Mach and Kirchhoff agree that force is not a cause, convert Newtonian reciprocal action into mere interdependency, and, in old terminology, reduce mechanics from a natural philosophy of causes to a natural history of mere facts.

  • Now, Mach applies these preconceived opinions to " mechanics in its development," with the result that, though he shows much skill in mathematical mechanics, he misrepresents its development precisely at the critical point of the discovery of Newton's third law of motion.

  • Withdraw this foundation of bodies as inter-resisting forces causing one another in collision to form a joint mass with a common velocity but without penetration, and the evidence of the third law disappears; for in the case of attractive forces we know nothing of their modus operandi except by the analogy of the collision of inter-resisting bodies, which makes us believe that something similar, we know not what, takes place in gravity, magnetism, electricity, &c. Now, Mach, though he occasionally drops hints that the discovery of the law of collision comes first, yet never explains the process of development from it to the third law of motion.

  • In the case of this one force we know far more than the interdependence supposed by Mach and Kirchhoff; we know bodies with impenetrable force causing one another to keep apart.

  • But the idealists are only too glad to get any excuse for denying bodily substances and causes; and, while Leibnitz supplied them with the fancied analysis of material into immaterial elements, and Hume with the reduction of bodies to assemblages of sensations, Mach adds the additional argument that bodily forces are not causes at all.

  • In Great Britain Mach's scepticism was welcomed by Karl Pearson to support an idealistic phenomenalism derived from Hume, and by Ward to support a noumenal idealism derived from Lotze.

  • He differs, however, from Kant, not only because he will not allow that the given data are received from things in themselves, but also because, like Mach, he agrees with the nativists that the data already contain a spatial determinacy and a temporal determinacy, which he regards as a posteriori elements of the given, not like Kant, as a priori forms of sense.

  • Avenarius held a view of knowledge very like that of Mach's view of the economy of thinking.

  • Nor is there any objection to this economical view of thought, as long as we remember what Avenarius and Mach forget, that the essence of thought is the least action neither more nor less than necessary to the point, which is the reality of things.

  • Again he agrees with the reaction both to Hume and to Kant in limiting knowledge to mental phenomena, and has affinities with Mach as well as with Lange.

  • As with Kant against Hume, so with Wundt against Mach and Avenarius, the world we know will contain something more than mere complexes of sensations, more than pure experience: with Wundt it will be a world of real causes and some substances, constituted partly by experience and partly by logical thinking, or active inner will.

  • Karl Pearson (The Grammar of Science, 1892, 2nd enlarged ed., 1900), starting from Hume's phenomenal idealism, has developed views closely allied to Mach's universal physical phenomenology.

  • His views, in his chapter on the Laws of Motion, that the physicist forms a conceptional model of the universe by aid of corpuscles, that these corpuscles are only symbols for the component parts of perceptual bodies, and that force is a measure of motion, and not its cause, are the views of Mach.

  • At the end of this chapter he says that the only published work from the perusal of which he received any help in working out his views in 1882 and 1884, was Mach's Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwicklung (1883).

  • Mach had begun to put them forward in 1872, and Kirchhoff in 1874.

  • These are the views of Mach and of Pearson, as we read them in the latter's Preface.

  • Nor can we find any difference, except the minute shade that Pearson takes up a position of agnosticism between Clifford's assertion of " mind-stuff " and Mach's denial of things in themselves.

  • James Ward, in Naturalism and Agnosticism (1899), starts from the same phenomenalistic views of Mach and Kirchhoff about mechanics; he proceeds to the hypothesis of duality within experience, which we have traced in James Ward.

  • Under the first head he attacks mechanics precisely as Mach had done (see above); if this attack had been consistently carried out it would have carried him no further than Mach.

  • There can be no doubt that Mach, Schuppe and Wundt drew the right phenomenalistic conclusions from such phenomenalistic data.

  • Mach, Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung historischkritisch dargestellt (1883; 2nd edition (1889 translation) by T.

  • Outside the English-writing world, identical or kindred tendencies are represented in France by Leroy, Poincare, Bergson, Milhaud, Blondel, Duhem, Wilbois, Pradines; in Germany by Mach, Ostwald, Simmel, Jerusalem, Goldscheid, Jacoby; in Italy by Papini, Prezzolini, Vailati, Troiano.

  • The destructive action of floods, however, led to the abandonment of this alignment, and the railway now follows the Mashkaf valley (which debouches into the plains close to Sibi), and is carried from near the head of the Mashkaf to a junction with the Bolan at Mach.

  • Mach, Die Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung (4th ed., Leipzig, 1901; Eng.

  • Mach has made some interesting observations on this point.

  • The following figures obtained by Mach afford an interesting illustration of these processes At first the sugar in the juice consists entirely of dextrose, but later fructose (laevulose) is formed.

  • Mach.) alcoholic fermentation, ethylic alcohol, water and carbonic acid.

  • Mach published a promising idea, and finally-independently of the researches of his predecessors-Hektor de Grousilliers, in partnership with the Zeiss firm (E.

  • The spaceship pilot then fires his rocket motor for about 80 seconds, reaching Mach 3 in a vertical climb.

  • As of Mach 2010, an adult day pass to Sea World San Diego costs about $70, while admission for kids costs about $60.

  • If the Mach V exceeds your budget, Falcon Northwest also offers their Talon-line of desktops.

  • It was able to survive in 200 degrees Celsius at speeds of Mach 7 for ten seconds in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  • Airboss Mach 8-Special Edition: Paying solemn tribute to aircraft carrier "air bosses", Swiss Army offers supreme precision and a healthy dose of style with the Airboss Mach 8.

  • This monster moth-like creature flies at mach three speeds and creates hurricane force winds from its wings.

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