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macdonald

macdonald

macdonald Sentence Examples

  • Macdonald at Edinburgh in 1889, and that there is appended to this edition a complete catalogue of all Napier's writings, and their various editions and translations, English and foreign, all the works being carefully collated, and references being added to the various public libraries in which they are to be found.

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  • Macdonald's translation of the Canonis Constructio (1889) is complete and valuable.

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  • After a few months' rest it started on the return journey, following Sturt Creek until its termination in Gregory's Salt Sea, and then keeping parallel with the South Australian border as far as Lake Macdonald.

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  • Macdonald, Electric Waves (Cambridge, 1901); H.

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  • There he awaited the arrival of Macdonald with the an y of Naples.

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  • Meanwhile Macdonald, after struggling through central Italy, had defeated an Austrian force at Modena (June 12, 1799), but Suvarov was able by swift movements utterly to overthrow him at the Trebbia (June 1719).

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  • Ten days earlier, namely on the 4th of June, Massna had been compelled by hunger to capitulate at Genoa; but the success at Marengo, followed up by that of Macdonald in north Italy, and Moreat~ at Hohenlinden (December 2, 1800), brought the emperor Francis to sue for peace which was finally concluded -.

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  • In 1907 he took a prominent part in advocating the ending, rather than the mending, of the House of Lords; and in 1908 he was elected chairman of the party, a post which he held for two years and to which he was reelected in the autumn of 1914 when the then chairman, Mr. Ramsay Macdonald, had to resign owing to his pacifist views.

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  • Mr. Henderson visited Paris in the company of Mr. Ramsay Macdonald to discuss the situation with Labour over there, but found that neither French, nor Belgian, nor Italian, nor American Labour was disposed to join.

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  • Macdonald, "Early Seleucid Portraits," Journ.

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  • Sackett's Harbor was the starting-point of a force of 700 men under a Pole named von Schultz, who in November 1838, during the uprising in Upper Canada (Ontario) attempted to invade Canada, was taken prisoner near Prescott, was tried at Kingston, being defended by Sir John Macdonald, and with nine of his followers was executed in Kingston in December.

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  • Cyr, who had relieved Macdonald on his extreme left, had only 17,000 men left under arms against upwards of 40,000 Russians under Witgenstein; and to the south Tschitschagov's army, being no longer detained on the Turkish frontier, peace having been made, was marching to join Tormassov about Brest-Litewski with forces which would bring the total of the two well over ioo,000 men.

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  • At length becoming impatient he advanced a portion of his army towards Blucher, who fell back to draw him into a trap. Then the news reached him that Schwarzenberg was pressing down the valley of the Elbe, and, leaving Macdonald to observe Blucher, he hurried back to Bautzen to dispose his troops to cross the Bohemian mountains in the general direction of KOnigstein, a blow which must have had decisive results.

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  • In spite of this misfortune, Napoleon could claim a brilliant success for himself, but almost at the same moment news reached him that Oudinot at Grossbeeren near Berlin, and Macdonald on the Katzbach opposed to Blucher, had both been severely defeated.

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  • From these reveries he was at length awakened by news which indicated that the consequences of Macdonald's defeat had been far more serious to the moral of that command than he had imagined.

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  • Macdonald also retook Figueras which the Spaniards had taken on the 9th of April 1811 (Aug.

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  • The fiery enthusiasm of the Gordons and other clans often carried the day, but Montrose relied more upon the disciplined infantry which had followed Alastair Macdonald from Ireland.

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  • Frederick Schwatka, U.S. navy; and Sir Hector Macdonald, " Fighting Mac " of Omdurman.

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  • Macdonald (1885); J.

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  • Zahn's reasoned argument stands in contrast to the blind reliance on tradition shown by Macdonald, The Symbol of the Apostles, and the fanciful reconstruction of the primitive creed by Baeumer, Harnack or Seeberg.

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  • C. Macdonald's Chronologies and Calendars (1897).

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  • On the fall of the Brown-Dorion administration in 1858 he was called on to form a ministry, but declined the task, and became finance minister under Sir John Macdonald and Sir George Cartier on condition that the federation of the British North American provinces should become a part of their programme.

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  • To his diplomacy was due the coalition in 1864 between Macdonald, Brown and Cartier, which carried the federation of the British North American provinces, and throughout the three years of negotiation which followed his was one of the chief influences.

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  • After his retirement he gave to the administration of Sir John Macdonald a support which grew more and more fitful, and advocated independence as the final destiny of Canada.

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  • "JAMES RAMSAY MACDONALD (1866-), British politician, was born at Lossiemouth, and educated at a board school.

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  • Mr. Macdonald published several works on socialism and labour, besides a couple of books on India, which he visited in 1913 as a member of the Public Services Commission.

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  • Sir John Hay Athole Macdonald >>

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  • Macdonald in the Jewish Encyclopaedia).

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  • Macdonald, who had been in charge of a railway survey to Uganda, was directed to inquire into the claims put forward by France for compensation for the priests.

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  • He departed after two and a half months' residence, leaving Macdonald in charge.

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  • During Macdonald's administration the Sudanese under Selim Bey began to conspire against the British control.

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  • Colonel Trevor Ternan was acting commissioner, and Macdonald had returned to East Africa in command of an exploring expedition, for which Ternan had been ordered to supply 300 Sudanese.

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  • After Colonel Ternan's departure on leave the three companies who had joined Macdonald broke out into revolt in the Nandi district (East Africa) and set off to Uganda, looting the countries they passed through.

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  • Macdonald and Jackson followed with a force of Zanzibaris.

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  • On the 19th of October a battle was fought between the mutineers and Macdonald's force, in which the former were defeated.

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  • A large Protestant army now went to the assistance of Macdonald, and from the 19th of October to the 9th of January the siege of Luba's continued, with constant skirmishes, among the killed being the Rev. G.

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  • Early in January Mwanga escaped from the Germans, and, declaring himself a Mahommedan, reached Buddu with a large force, which Major Macdonald defeated with the aid of the Baganda army.

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  • Leaving a small column to deal with Mwanga's force in the south, and another with Kabarega, Macdonald pursued the mutineers, overtook them in the swamps of Lake Kioga, and after a couple of successful skirmishes returned to Kampala, leaving Captain (afterwards Colonel) E.

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  • Austin, who had come up to Uganda in 1897 with Macdonald and had fought through the mutiny operations, revealed the regions north of Mt Elgon.

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  • Austin, With Macdonald in Uganda (1903) and Among Swamps and Giants in Equatorial Africa (1902); Winston Churchill, My African Journey (1908); Bishop Tucker, Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa (1908); articles on ethnology by the Rev. H.

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  • At the age of fifteen Macdonald entered a law office; he was called to the bar in 1836, and began practice in Kingston, with immediate success.

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  • Macdonald entered upon his active career at a critical period in the history of Canada, and the circumstances of the time were calculated to stimulate political thought.

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  • It was the year before the rebellion of 1837; the condition of the whole country was very unsettled; and it seemed well-nigh impossible to reconcile differences arising from racial and political antagonisms. During the rebellion young Macdonald volunteered for active service, but his military career never went farther than drilling and marching.

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  • In 1844 Sir Charles Metcalfe, in his contest with the Reform party led by Baldwin and Lafontaine, appealed to the electors, and Macdonald was elected to the provincial assembly as Conservative member for Kingston.

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  • Although the government of which he thus became a member held office for only ten months, being placed in a hopeless minority on making an appeal to the country, Macdonald from this time forward took a position of constantly increasing weight in his party.

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  • The assent of Lord Elgin to the bill provoked in Montreal a riot which ended in the burning of the houses of parliament, and so great was the indignation of the hitherto ultra-loyal Conservative party that many of its most prominent members signed a document favouring annexation to the United States; Macdonald on the other hand took steps, in conjunction with others, to form a British-American league, having for its object the confederation of all the provinces, the strengthening of the connexion with the mother country, and the adoption of a national commercial policy.

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  • The two great political issues of the time were the secularization of the clergy reserves in Ontario, and the abolition of seigniorial tenure in Quebec. Both of these reforms Macdonald long opposed, but when successive elections had proved that they were sup ported by public opinion, he brought about a coalition of Conservatives and moderate reformers for the purpose of carrying them.

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  • Out of this coalition was gradually developed the Liberalconservative party, of which until his death Macdonald continued to be the most considerable figure, and which for more than forty years largely moulded the history of Canada.

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  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.

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  • Macdonald, at the head of a representative delegation from Ontario and Quebec, met the public men of the maritime provinces in conference at Charlottetown in 1864, and the outline of confederation then agreed upon was filled out in detail at a conference held at Quebec soon afterwards.

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  • Macdonald took the leading part in all these discussions, and he thus naturally became the first premier of the Dominion.

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  • The people of Nova Scotia in particular, dissatisfied with the way in which their province had been drawn into the Union, maintained a fierce opposition to the Ottawa government, until their leader, Joseph Howe, fearing an armed rising, came to an agreement with Macdonald and accepted a seat in his cabinet.

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  • The career of Sir John Macdonald must be considered in connexion with the political history of Canada and the conditions of its government during the latter half of the 19th century.

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  • Such a man Macdonald proved himself to be.

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  • In unveiling that memorial Lord Rosebery fitly epitomized the meaning of his life and work when he said: "We recognize only this, that Sir John Macdonald had grasped the central idea that the British Empire is the greatest secular agency for good now known to mankind; that that was the secret of his success; and that he determined to die under it, and strove that Canada should live under it."

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  • Macdonald became a member of the Imperial Privy Council in 1879, and in 1884 he received the Grand Cross of the Bath.

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  • Hugh John Macdonald, at one time premier of the province of Manitoba.

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  • By his second marriage, to Miss Bernard in 1867, Macdonald left an only daughter.

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  • On his death in 1891 his widow was created Baroness Macdonald of Earnscliffe.

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  • Macdonald is one written by his private secretary, Joseph Pope.

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  • John Sandfield Macdonald >>

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  • Rousseau, however, never saw any of the alleged children; and Mrs Macdonald has shown good cause for believing that their existence was a myth, an imposition on Rousseau's credulity, invented by Therese and her mother to make the tie more binding.

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  • Mrs Frederika Macdonald, in her Jean Jacques Rousseau (1906), makes out a good case for regarding Mme.

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  • In 1882 he became Conservative member for King's County, N.B., in the Dominion parliament, and in 1885 entered the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as minister of marine and fisheries; in 1888 he became minister of finance, which position he held till the defeat of his party in 1896.

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  • .," which contains reprints of Napier's Descriptio of 1614, Kepler's writings on logarithms (1624-1625), &c. In 1889 a translation of Napier's Constructio of 1619 was published by Walter Rae Macdonald.

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  • 760 seq.; Macdonald, Development of Muslim Theology, 80, 147 seq.; Dhahabi Tadhkira (edit.

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  • John Macdonald of Islay, who died about 1386, was the first to adopt the title of Lord of the Isles.

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  • The French were in possession of the place in 1797 and again in 1805; and in 1809 Marshal Macdonald having, in accordance with the terms of the peace of Vienna, entered the citadel which he had vainly besieged, blew it all up with the exception of the belltower and the citizens' or clock tower.

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  • Greene (1904), of Maine by William MacDonald (1902), of Michigan by W.

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  • GEORGE MACDONALD (1824-1905), Scottish novelist and poet, was born at Huntly, Aberdeenshire.

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  • Macdonald's youth was passed in his native town, under the immediate influence of the Congregational Church, and in an atmosphere strongly impregnated with Calvinism.

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  • Both as preacher and as lecturer on literary topics George Macdonald's sincerity and moral enthusiasm exercised great influence upon thoughtful minds.

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  • Sir Hector Archibald Macdonald >>

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  • The Macdonald Institute at Guelph, Ontario, the buildings and equipment of which Sir William provided at a cost of $182,500, and the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue, 20 m.

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  • The property of the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue comprises 561 acres, of which 74 acres are devoted to campus and field-research plots, ioo acres to a petite culture farm and 387 acres to a live-stock and grain farm.

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  • The land, buildings and equipment of the college, which cost over $2,500,000, were presented by Sir William Macdonald, who in addition has provided for the future maintenance of the work by a trust fund of over $2,000,000.

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  • Since the beginning of the 10th century agricultural education and rural training in Canada have been greatly stimulated by the munificence of Sir William C. Macdonald of Montreal.

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  • John Alexander Macdonald under took the formation of an administration.

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  • The prime minister of the Dominion, Sir John Macdonald, was asked to act as one of the imperial commissioners in carrying on these negotiations.

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  • While Sir John Macdonald's administration was supported in Nova Scotia, it was weakened in Ontario on account of the clemency shown to Riel, and in Quebec by the refusal to grant a general amnesty to all who had taken part in the rebellion.

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  • Macdonald, while asserting his own innocence, felt compelled to resign without waiting for the vote of parliament.

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  • Macdonald brought forward a proposal to adopt what was called a " national policy," or, in other words, a system of protection for Canadian industries.

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  • After some years of fierce discussion in parliament and throughout the country the question was brought to an issue in 1878, when, with a large majority of followers pledged to carry out protection, Sir John Macdonald was restored to power.

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  • Macdonald continuing from that time without a break until his death in 1891, while his party remained in power till 1896» This long-continued Conservative supremacy was apparently due to the policy of bold and rapid development which it had adopted, and which appealed to a young and ambitious country more strongly than the more cautious proposals of the Liberal leaders.

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  • The general election of 1882 turned chiefly upon endorsement of the national policy of protection; in that of 1887 the electoral test was again applied to the same issue, while Sir John Macdonald also asked for approval of the government's action in exacting from Riel the full penalty of his guilt.

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  • upheld by the electors, and Macdonald was continued in power with a large parliamentary majority.

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  • The question after long and vehement discussion was brought to a final issue in the election of 1891, and Sir John Macdonald's government was again sustained.

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  • Soon after the election of 1891 Sir John Macdonald (q.v.) died, after an active political career of more than forty years.

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  • During the years which succeeded the death of Sir John Macdonald a succession of losses weakened the position of the Conservative party which had held power so long.

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  • Senate, became prime minister on Macdonald's death in 1891, but in 1892 was compelled by ill-health to resign, and in 1893 he died.

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  • Sir William Macdonald in 1908 built and endowed, at an expenditure of at least J;700,000, an agricultural college and normal school at St Anne's, near Montreal.

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  • The creation of a supreme court engaged the attention of Sir John Macdonald in the early years after federation, but was only finally accomplished in 1876, during the premiership of Alexander Mackenzie.

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  • The Best Of These Are Joseph Pope'S Memoirs Of Sir John Macdonald (1894), W.

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  • Macdonald (1883); " Canadian Literature," By J.

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  • Sir John Macdonald, then in opposition, had committed his party to a protectionist policy, and Laurier, notwithstanding that the Liberal party stood for a low tariff, avowed himself to be "a moderate protectionist."

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  • In 1878 his party went out of office and Sir John Macdonald entered upon a long term of power, with protection as the chief feature of his policy, to which was afterwards added the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway.

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  • He was associated with Blake in his sustained opposition to high tariff, and to the Conservative plan for the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, and was a conspicuous figure in the long struggle between Sir John Macdonald and the leaders of the Liberal party to settle the territorial limits of the province of Ontario and the legislative rights of the provinces under the constitution.

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  • But from the first he won great popularity even in the English-speaking provinces, and showed unusual capacity for leadership. His party was beaten in the first general election held after he became leader (1891), but even with its policy of unrestricted reciprocity with the United States, and with Sir John Macdonald still at the head of the Conservative party, it was beaten by only a small majority.

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  • His strong facial resemblance both to Lord Beaconsfield and to Sir John Macdonald marked him out in the public eye, and he captured attention by his charm of manner, fine command of scholarly English and genuine eloquence.

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  • Macdonald.

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  • Macdonald, Bar Hill (reprint, Glasgow, 1906).

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  • Macdonald, Roman Stones in Hunterian Mus.

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  • Colonel Younghusband again accompanied the mission, and the troops were commanded by General Ronald Macdonald.

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  • Receiving, however, but a cool reception from Macdonald of Boisdale, he set sail again and arrived at the bay of Lochnanuagh on the west coast of Inverness-shire.

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  • Disguised in female attire and aided by a passport obtained by the devoted Flora Macdonald, he passed through Skye and parted from his gallant conductress at Portree.

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  • Macdonald's Muslim Theology (London, 1903), especially the creed of Ash`ari in Appendix iii.

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  • On the other side the road avoids the old path through the dreaded Cardinello gorge (here passed Macdonald's army in December, 1800) in order to descend by zigzags to Pianazzo.

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  • Macdonald and George Brown.

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  • The first provincial government, formed on coalition lines by John Sandfield Macdonald, was thrifty and not unprogressive, but in 1871 was defeated by a reorganized liberal party, which held power from 1871 to 1905, and on the whole worthily.

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  • In 1893, when the title Oil Rivers Protectorate was changed to that of Niger Coast Protectorate, a regular administration was established (subject to the Foreign Office in London) under Sir Claude Macdonald, who was succeeded as commissioner and consul-general in 1896 by Sir Ralph Moor (1860-1909).

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  • His force consisted of Gatacres British brigade (1st Warwicks, Lincoins, Seaforths and Camerons) and Hunters Egyptian division (3 brigades under Colonels Maxwell, MacDonald and Lewis respectively), Broadwoods cavalry, Tudways camel corps and Longs artillery.

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  • Lyttelton (1st Northumberlands and Grenadier Guards, 2nd Lancashire and Rifle Brigade); Egyptian division, under Major-General Hunter, consisting of four brigades, commanded by Colonels MacDonald, Maxwell, Lewis and, Collinson; mounted troops2Ist Lancers, camel corps, and Egyptian cavalry; artillery, under Colonel Long, 2 British batteries, 5 Egyptian batteries, and 20 machine guns; detachment of Royal Engineers.

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  • MacDonald distinguished himself by his tactics, and completely repulsed the enemy.

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  • Macdonald, Muslim Theology (London, 1903); the Hidaya (trans.

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  • Macdonald, Trans.

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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

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  • Sir Nial Campbell of Lochow, founder of the house of Argyll, secured shipping for him, and he reached a castle of Macdonald of Islay (Angus Og), his ally, at Dunaverty in Kintyre.

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  • The Macdonald tradition is that their clan was on the right wing, under Angus Og; the old accounts place them with Bruce's reserves.

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  • As the Celts marched south the earl of Ross slew Ronald Macdonald, whose inheritance was claimed by John of the Isles.

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  • He was rewarded by five or six months of dangerous and distressful wanderings, and would certainly have been taken at one juncture but for the courageous and wise assistance of Flora Macdonald, while on all hands the highlanders displayed the most devoted loyalty.

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  • His first portrait to attract attention, from its fine quality, was that of George Macdonald, the poet and novelist, now the property of the university of Aberdeen.

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  • Meanwhile Mrs. MacDonald, one of the women taken captive, aided by her native servant, escaped, and barefoot and in her nightdress ran through the jungle to another planter's house.

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  • Though his eloquence had done more than anything else to make practicable a union of the British North American provinces, he opposed confederation, largely owing to wounded vanity; but on finding it impossible to obtain from the imperial authorities the repeal of the British North America Act, he refused to join his associates in the extreme measures which were advocated, and on the promise from the Canadian government of better financial terms to his native province, entered (on the 30th of January 1869) the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as president of the council.

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  • The Guard and other general reserves were in rear of Macdonald and Marmont.

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  • To a heavy counterstroke against Oudinot, which completely drove that marshal from the ground won on the 20th, the emperor paid no more heed than to order Macdonald to support the XII corps.

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  • From 1878 till 1891 he was minister of customs in the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald; then minister of militia; and under the premiership of Sir John Thompson, minister of trade and commerce.

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  • Briefly, after successive gains and losses, not only Erivan was taken from Persia but Tabriz also, and finally, through the intervention of Sir John Macdonald, the English envoy, a new treaty was concluded at Turkmanchai, laying down the boundary between Russia and Persia.

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  • 175 sqq.; Macdonald, Muslim Theology, eec., 99 sqq.

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  • command of a division, he took part in the battles of Liitzen and Bautzen and the operations of Marshal Macdonald, and at the battle of Leipzig (in which he commanded the XI.

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  • Macdonald's "Life of al-Ghazzali," in Journal of American Oriental Society, vol.

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  • Steele, Canoe and Camera, a Two Hundred Mile Tour through the Maine Forests (New York, 1882); William MacDonald, The Government of Maine, Its History and Administration (New York, 1902); Maine Historical Society Collections (Portland, 1831-); W.

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  • Macdonald, the great protectionist prime minister of Canada, in a conversation with the presen writer in 1882, avowed without hesitation that protectionist taxation in Canada was indefensible on economic grounds, and he defended it exclusively for political reasons.

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  • JOHN SANDFIELD MACDONALD (1812-1872), Canadian statesman, was born at St Raphael, Glengarry county, Ontario, on the 12th of December 1812.

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  • Lawrence Macdonald >>

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  • In 1873 the attack on Sir John Macdonald's ministry with regard to the Pacific Railway charter resulted in its defeat, and Mackenzie formed a new government, taking the portfolio of public works and becoming the first liberal premier of Canada.

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  • He remained in power till 1878, when industrial depression enabled Macdonald to return to office on a protectionist programme.

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  • The Art Gallery and Museum at Schoolhill, built in the Italian Renaissance style of red and brown granite, contains an excellent collection of pictures, the Macdonald Hall of portraits of contemporary artists by themselves being of altogether exceptional interest and unique of its kind in Great Britain.

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  • 44 ff.; Macdonald, Development of Muslim Theology, I10, 157, index.

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  • by the "Pleiad" expedition, and in 1889 to 131° E., and the Kebbi to Bifara by Major (afterwards Sir Claude) Macdonald, further progress towards the Tuburi marsh being prevented by the shallowness of the water.

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  • Mockler Ferryman, Up the Niger; Narrative of Major Claude Macdonald's Mission to the Niger and Benue Rivers ...

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  • In the campaign of 1809 Eugene commanded the army of Italy, with General (afterwards Marshal) Macdonald as his adlatus.

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  • The battle of Sacile, where he fought against the Austrian army of the Archduke John, did not yield proofs of military talent on the part of Eugene or of Macdonald; but on the retreat of the enemy into Austrian territory (owing to the disasters of their main army on the Danube) Eugene's forces pressed them vigorously and finally won an important victory at Raab in the heart of the Austrian empire.

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  • Then, joining the main army under Napoleon, in the island of Lobau in the Danube, near Vienna, Eugene and Macdonald acquitted themselves most creditably in the great battle of Wagram (6th July 1809).

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  • of Africa (London, 1895); Leroy-Beaulieu, De la colonisation chez les peuples modernes (Paris, 1898); Les Nouvelles Societes anglo-saxonnes (Paris, 1897); MacDonald, Select Charters illustrative of American History, 1606-1775 (New York, 18 99); B.

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  • Macdonald on the question of separate schools for New Brunswick.

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  • Have the cricket reporters in Australia forgotten Gregory and Macdonald bowling ferocious bouncers in Armstrong's Australian team of 1921?

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  • In July 1644, a small band of Irish confederates, led by Alasdair MacColla MacDonald, landed on the west coast of Scotland.

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  • Mount Macdonald is a shallow crater about ten miles across.

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  • Cooking demonstrations During certain dates during the year, Claire Macdonald will be doing a series of Cooking Demonstrations.

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  • By Hali Edison & Ronald MacDonald Recently proposals for introducing greater exchange rate fixity into the behavior of key exchange rates have become fashionable.

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  • forethought given to the whole business of cooking à la Macdonald.

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  • In 1692 40 of the resident MacDonald clan were massacred in cold blood by the Campbells for not forswearing the Jacobite cause.

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  • Perhaps his drawings of quartz from Swiss glaciers might even interest Professor Macdonald FRSE.

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  • How to survive them all By Diane MacDonald Y ou can probably remember visiting the greengrocer with your mom when you were four.

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  • It can't even walk into a MacDonald's on the high street to order a hamburger.

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  • idolized by the theorists in the movement, did not have the appeal to European and American Socialists that MacDonald had.

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  • On the other hand Macdonald frequently mentions poverty and material immiseration as important elements of the context of suicide.

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  • The death of Donald Archie MacDonald is a tragic loss to Gaelic scholarship and a blow keenly felt by the Society.

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  • MacDonald, RS Dr. (1990 ): An open controlled assessment of osteopathic manipulation in non specific low back pain.

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  • Journal of the American Dental Association 87(6):1234-1236 [Pubmed citation only] Macdonald DG, MacFarlane TW (1972) forensic odontology.

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  • Mac Macdonald was a one armed magic pitchman and the trick was first credited to him around 40 years ago by Vernon and Ganson.

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  • transport supremo Gus MacDonald's vision is to improve public transport to the extent that drivers leave their cars at home.

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  • The former bishop of the Highland vicariate, Ranald MacDonald, became the first vicar-apostolic of the western vicariate.

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  • On the defeat of John Sandfield Macdonald's government in 1871 Blake became prime minister of Ontario, but resigned this office the same year in consequence of the abolition of dual representation.

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  • He declined the leadership of the Liberal party in the Dominion parliament, but, having taken an active part in bringing about the overthrow of Sir John Macdonald's ministry in 1873, joined the Liberal cabinet of Alexander Mackenzie, though without portfolio or salary.

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  • Macdonald at Edinburgh in 1889, and that there is appended to this edition a complete catalogue of all Napier's writings, and their various editions and translations, English and foreign, all the works being carefully collated, and references being added to the various public libraries in which they are to be found.

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  • Macdonald's translation of the Canonis Constructio (1889) is complete and valuable.

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  • After a few months' rest it started on the return journey, following Sturt Creek until its termination in Gregory's Salt Sea, and then keeping parallel with the South Australian border as far as Lake Macdonald.

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  • Macdonald, Electric Waves (Cambridge, 1901); H.

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  • There he awaited the arrival of Macdonald with the an y of Naples.

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  • Meanwhile Macdonald, after struggling through central Italy, had defeated an Austrian force at Modena (June 12, 1799), but Suvarov was able by swift movements utterly to overthrow him at the Trebbia (June 1719).

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  • Ten days earlier, namely on the 4th of June, Massna had been compelled by hunger to capitulate at Genoa; but the success at Marengo, followed up by that of Macdonald in north Italy, and Moreat~ at Hohenlinden (December 2, 1800), brought the emperor Francis to sue for peace which was finally concluded -.

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  • In 1907 he took a prominent part in advocating the ending, rather than the mending, of the House of Lords; and in 1908 he was elected chairman of the party, a post which he held for two years and to which he was reelected in the autumn of 1914 when the then chairman, Mr. Ramsay Macdonald, had to resign owing to his pacifist views.

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  • Mr. Henderson visited Paris in the company of Mr. Ramsay Macdonald to discuss the situation with Labour over there, but found that neither French, nor Belgian, nor Italian, nor American Labour was disposed to join.

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  • Macdonald, "Early Seleucid Portraits," Journ.

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  • Sackett's Harbor was the starting-point of a force of 700 men under a Pole named von Schultz, who in November 1838, during the uprising in Upper Canada (Ontario) attempted to invade Canada, was taken prisoner near Prescott, was tried at Kingston, being defended by Sir John Macdonald, and with nine of his followers was executed in Kingston in December.

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  • Cyr, who had relieved Macdonald on his extreme left, had only 17,000 men left under arms against upwards of 40,000 Russians under Witgenstein; and to the south Tschitschagov's army, being no longer detained on the Turkish frontier, peace having been made, was marching to join Tormassov about Brest-Litewski with forces which would bring the total of the two well over ioo,000 men.

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  • and the Prussian contingent, which under Yorck (see Yorck Von Wartenburg) formed part of Macdonald's command about Riga, had entered into a convention with the Russians at Tauroggen (December 30) which deprived the French of their last support upon their left.

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  • Eugene, with Lauriston's, Macdonald's and Regnier's corps, on the lower Saale, Ney in front of Weimar, holding the defile of Kdsen; the Guard at Erfurt, Marmont at Gotha, Bertrand at Saalfeld, and Oudinot at Coburg, and during the next few days the whole were set in motion towards Merseburg and Leipzig, in the now stereotyped Napoleonic order, a strong advanced guard of all arms leading, the remainder - about twothirds of the whole - following as " masse de manoeuvre," this time, owing to the cover afforded by the Elbe on the left, to the right rear of the advanced guard.

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  • At length becoming impatient he advanced a portion of his army towards Blucher, who fell back to draw him into a trap. Then the news reached him that Schwarzenberg was pressing down the valley of the Elbe, and, leaving Macdonald to observe Blucher, he hurried back to Bautzen to dispose his troops to cross the Bohemian mountains in the general direction of KOnigstein, a blow which must have had decisive results.

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  • In spite of this misfortune, Napoleon could claim a brilliant success for himself, but almost at the same moment news reached him that Oudinot at Grossbeeren near Berlin, and Macdonald on the Katzbach opposed to Blucher, had both been severely defeated.

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  • From these reveries he was at length awakened by news which indicated that the consequences of Macdonald's defeat had been far more serious to the moral of that command than he had imagined.

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  • Macdonald also retook Figueras which the Spaniards had taken on the 9th of April 1811 (Aug.

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  • The Life by George Bancroft (New York, 1889) is highly eulogistic. Von Hoist's United States, MacDonald's Jacksonian Democracy, Garrison's Westward Extension and T.

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  • The fiery enthusiasm of the Gordons and other clans often carried the day, but Montrose relied more upon the disciplined infantry which had followed Alastair Macdonald from Ireland.

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  • Frederick Schwatka, U.S. navy; and Sir Hector Macdonald, " Fighting Mac " of Omdurman.

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  • Macdonald (1885); J.

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  • Zahn's reasoned argument stands in contrast to the blind reliance on tradition shown by Macdonald, The Symbol of the Apostles, and the fanciful reconstruction of the primitive creed by Baeumer, Harnack or Seeberg.

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  • C. Macdonald's Chronologies and Calendars (1897).

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  • On the fall of the Brown-Dorion administration in 1858 he was called on to form a ministry, but declined the task, and became finance minister under Sir John Macdonald and Sir George Cartier on condition that the federation of the British North American provinces should become a part of their programme.

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  • To his diplomacy was due the coalition in 1864 between Macdonald, Brown and Cartier, which carried the federation of the British North American provinces, and throughout the three years of negotiation which followed his was one of the chief influences.

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  • After his retirement he gave to the administration of Sir John Macdonald a support which grew more and more fitful, and advocated independence as the final destiny of Canada.

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  • "JAMES RAMSAY MACDONALD (1866-), British politician, was born at Lossiemouth, and educated at a board school.

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  • Mr. Macdonald published several works on socialism and labour, besides a couple of books on India, which he visited in 1913 as a member of the Public Services Commission.

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  • Sir John Hay Athole Macdonald >>

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  • Macdonald in the Jewish Encyclopaedia).

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  • Macdonald, who had been in charge of a railway survey to Uganda, was directed to inquire into the claims put forward by France for compensation for the priests.

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  • He departed after two and a half months' residence, leaving Macdonald in charge.

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  • During Macdonald's administration the Sudanese under Selim Bey began to conspire against the British control.

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  • Colonel Trevor Ternan was acting commissioner, and Macdonald had returned to East Africa in command of an exploring expedition, for which Ternan had been ordered to supply 300 Sudanese.

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  • disaffection of his men, now sent three companies to Macdonald, selecting those who had been continuously fighting in Unyoro, Nandi and Buddu.

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  • After Colonel Ternan's departure on leave the three companies who had joined Macdonald broke out into revolt in the Nandi district (East Africa) and set off to Uganda, looting the countries they passed through.

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  • Macdonald and Jackson followed with a force of Zanzibaris.

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  • On the 19th of October a battle was fought between the mutineers and Macdonald's force, in which the former were defeated.

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  • A large Protestant army now went to the assistance of Macdonald, and from the 19th of October to the 9th of January the siege of Luba's continued, with constant skirmishes, among the killed being the Rev. G.

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  • Early in January Mwanga escaped from the Germans, and, declaring himself a Mahommedan, reached Buddu with a large force, which Major Macdonald defeated with the aid of the Baganda army.

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  • Leaving a small column to deal with Mwanga's force in the south, and another with Kabarega, Macdonald pursued the mutineers, overtook them in the swamps of Lake Kioga, and after a couple of successful skirmishes returned to Kampala, leaving Captain (afterwards Colonel) E.

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  • Austin, who had come up to Uganda in 1897 with Macdonald and had fought through the mutiny operations, revealed the regions north of Mt Elgon.

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  • Austin, With Macdonald in Uganda (1903) and Among Swamps and Giants in Equatorial Africa (1902); Winston Churchill, My African Journey (1908); Bishop Tucker, Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa (1908); articles on ethnology by the Rev. H.

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  • SIR JOHN ALEXANDER MACDONALD (1815-1891), first premier of the dominion of Canada, was born in Glasgow on the 11 th of January 1815, the third child of Hugh Macdonald (d.

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  • At the age of fifteen Macdonald entered a law office; he was called to the bar in 1836, and began practice in Kingston, with immediate success.

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  • Macdonald entered upon his active career at a critical period in the history of Canada, and the circumstances of the time were calculated to stimulate political thought.

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  • It was the year before the rebellion of 1837; the condition of the whole country was very unsettled; and it seemed well-nigh impossible to reconcile differences arising from racial and political antagonisms. During the rebellion young Macdonald volunteered for active service, but his military career never went farther than drilling and marching.

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  • Macdonald made his first acquaintance with public business as an alderman of Kingston.

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  • In 1844 Sir Charles Metcalfe, in his contest with the Reform party led by Baldwin and Lafontaine, appealed to the electors, and Macdonald was elected to the provincial assembly as Conservative member for Kingston.

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  • Although the government of which he thus became a member held office for only ten months, being placed in a hopeless minority on making an appeal to the country, Macdonald from this time forward took a position of constantly increasing weight in his party.

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  • One of the first acts of the Reform government which succeeded that of which Macdonald was a member was to pass the Rebellion Losses Bill, made famous in colonial history by the fact that it brought to a crucial test the principle of responsible government.

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  • The assent of Lord Elgin to the bill provoked in Montreal a riot which ended in the burning of the houses of parliament, and so great was the indignation of the hitherto ultra-loyal Conservative party that many of its most prominent members signed a document favouring annexation to the United States; Macdonald on the other hand took steps, in conjunction with others, to form a British-American league, having for its object the confederation of all the provinces, the strengthening of the connexion with the mother country, and the adoption of a national commercial policy.

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  • The two great political issues of the time were the secularization of the clergy reserves in Ontario, and the abolition of seigniorial tenure in Quebec. Both of these reforms Macdonald long opposed, but when successive elections had proved that they were sup ported by public opinion, he brought about a coalition of Conservatives and moderate reformers for the purpose of carrying them.

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  • Out of this coalition was gradually developed the Liberalconservative party, of which until his death Macdonald continued to be the most considerable figure, and which for more than forty years largely moulded the history of Canada.

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  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.

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  • Macdonald, at the head of a representative delegation from Ontario and Quebec, met the public men of the maritime provinces in conference at Charlottetown in 1864, and the outline of confederation then agreed upon was filled out in detail at a conference held at Quebec soon afterwards.

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  • Macdonald took the leading part in all these discussions, and he thus naturally became the first premier of the Dominion.

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  • The people of Nova Scotia in particular, dissatisfied with the way in which their province had been drawn into the Union, maintained a fierce opposition to the Ottawa government, until their leader, Joseph Howe, fearing an armed rising, came to an agreement with Macdonald and accepted a seat in his cabinet.

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  • The career of Sir John Macdonald must be considered in connexion with the political history of Canada and the conditions of its government during the latter half of the 19th century.

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  • Such a man Macdonald proved himself to be.

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  • In unveiling that memorial Lord Rosebery fitly epitomized the meaning of his life and work when he said: "We recognize only this, that Sir John Macdonald had grasped the central idea that the British Empire is the greatest secular agency for good now known to mankind; that that was the secret of his success; and that he determined to die under it, and strove that Canada should live under it."

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  • Macdonald became a member of the Imperial Privy Council in 1879, and in 1884 he received the Grand Cross of the Bath.

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  • Hugh John Macdonald, at one time premier of the province of Manitoba.

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  • By his second marriage, to Miss Bernard in 1867, Macdonald left an only daughter.

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  • On his death in 1891 his widow was created Baroness Macdonald of Earnscliffe.

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  • Macdonald is one written by his private secretary, Joseph Pope.

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  • John Sandfield Macdonald >>

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  • Rousseau, however, never saw any of the alleged children; and Mrs Macdonald has shown good cause for believing that their existence was a myth, an imposition on Rousseau's credulity, invented by Therese and her mother to make the tie more binding.

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  • Mrs Frederika Macdonald, in her Jean Jacques Rousseau (1906), makes out a good case for regarding Mme.

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  • d'Epinay and others, and while Mrs Macdonald's researches have done much to suggest a rehabilitation of Rousseau's veracity they have not definitely been accepted to an extent which would justify the rewriting of these other lives in her sense.

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  • In 1882 he became Conservative member for King's County, N.B., in the Dominion parliament, and in 1885 entered the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as minister of marine and fisheries; in 1888 he became minister of finance, which position he held till the defeat of his party in 1896.

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  • .," which contains reprints of Napier's Descriptio of 1614, Kepler's writings on logarithms (1624-1625), &c. In 1889 a translation of Napier's Constructio of 1619 was published by Walter Rae Macdonald.

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  • 760 seq.; Macdonald, Development of Muslim Theology, 80, 147 seq.; Dhahabi Tadhkira (edit.

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  • John Macdonald of Islay, who died about 1386, was the first to adopt the title of Lord of the Isles.

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  • The French were in possession of the place in 1797 and again in 1805; and in 1809 Marshal Macdonald having, in accordance with the terms of the peace of Vienna, entered the citadel which he had vainly besieged, blew it all up with the exception of the belltower and the citizens' or clock tower.

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  • Greene (1904), of Maine by William MacDonald (1902), of Michigan by W.

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  • GEORGE MACDONALD (1824-1905), Scottish novelist and poet, was born at Huntly, Aberdeenshire.

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  • Macdonald's youth was passed in his native town, under the immediate influence of the Congregational Church, and in an atmosphere strongly impregnated with Calvinism.

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  • Both as preacher and as lecturer on literary topics George Macdonald's sincerity and moral enthusiasm exercised great influence upon thoughtful minds.

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  • Sir Hector Archibald Macdonald >>

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  • The Macdonald Institute at Guelph, Ontario, the buildings and equipment of which Sir William provided at a cost of $182,500, and the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue, 20 m.

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  • The property of the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue comprises 561 acres, of which 74 acres are devoted to campus and field-research plots, ioo acres to a petite culture farm and 387 acres to a live-stock and grain farm.

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  • The land, buildings and equipment of the college, which cost over $2,500,000, were presented by Sir William Macdonald, who in addition has provided for the future maintenance of the work by a trust fund of over $2,000,000.

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  • Since the beginning of the 10th century agricultural education and rural training in Canada have been greatly stimulated by the munificence of Sir William C. Macdonald of Montreal.

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  • John Alexander Macdonald under took the formation of an administration.

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  • The government of Sir John Macdonald felt, however, that the future of the Dominion depended upon linking together the Atlantic and the Pacific, and in view of the vast unoccupied spaces lying between the Great Lakes and the Rocky Mountains, open to immigration from the United States, their audacity in undertaking the work was doubtless justified.

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  • The prime minister of the Dominion, Sir John Macdonald, was asked to act as one of the imperial commissioners in carrying on these negotiations.

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  • While Sir John Macdonald's administration was supported in Nova Scotia, it was weakened in Ontario on account of the clemency shown to Riel, and in Quebec by the refusal to grant a general amnesty to all who had taken part in the rebellion.

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  • Macdonald, while asserting his own innocence, felt compelled to resign without waiting for the vote of parliament.

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  • Macdonald brought forward a proposal to adopt what was called a " national policy," or, in other words, a system of protection for Canadian industries.

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  • After some years of fierce discussion in parliament and throughout the country the question was brought to an issue in 1878, when, with a large majority of followers pledged to carry out protection, Sir John Macdonald was restored to power.

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  • Macdonald continuing from that time without a break until his death in 1891, while his party remained in power till 1896» This long-continued Conservative supremacy was apparently due to the policy of bold and rapid development which it had adopted, and which appealed to a young and ambitious country more strongly than the more cautious proposals of the Liberal leaders.

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  • The general election of 1882 turned chiefly upon endorsement of the national policy of protection; in that of 1887 the electoral test was again applied to the same issue, while Sir John Macdonald also asked for approval of the government's action in exacting from Riel the full penalty of his guilt.

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  • upheld by the electors, and Macdonald was continued in power with a large parliamentary majority.

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  • The question after long and vehement discussion was brought to a final issue in the election of 1891, and Sir John Macdonald's government was again sustained.

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  • Soon after the election of 1891 Sir John Macdonald (q.v.) died, after an active political career of more than forty years.

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  • During the years which succeeded the death of Sir John Macdonald a succession of losses weakened the position of the Conservative party which had held power so long.

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  • Senate, became prime minister on Macdonald's death in 1891, but in 1892 was compelled by ill-health to resign, and in 1893 he died.

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  • Sir William Macdonald in 1908 built and endowed, at an expenditure of at least J;700,000, an agricultural college and normal school at St Anne's, near Montreal.

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  • The creation of a supreme court engaged the attention of Sir John Macdonald in the early years after federation, but was only finally accomplished in 1876, during the premiership of Alexander Mackenzie.

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  • The Best Of These Are Joseph Pope'S Memoirs Of Sir John Macdonald (1894), W.

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  • Macdonald (1883); " Canadian Literature," By J.

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  • Sir John Macdonald, then in opposition, had committed his party to a protectionist policy, and Laurier, notwithstanding that the Liberal party stood for a low tariff, avowed himself to be "a moderate protectionist."

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  • In 1878 his party went out of office and Sir John Macdonald entered upon a long term of power, with protection as the chief feature of his policy, to which was afterwards added the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway.

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  • He was associated with Blake in his sustained opposition to high tariff, and to the Conservative plan for the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, and was a conspicuous figure in the long struggle between Sir John Macdonald and the leaders of the Liberal party to settle the territorial limits of the province of Ontario and the legislative rights of the provinces under the constitution.

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  • But from the first he won great popularity even in the English-speaking provinces, and showed unusual capacity for leadership. His party was beaten in the first general election held after he became leader (1891), but even with its policy of unrestricted reciprocity with the United States, and with Sir John Macdonald still at the head of the Conservative party, it was beaten by only a small majority.

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  • His strong facial resemblance both to Lord Beaconsfield and to Sir John Macdonald marked him out in the public eye, and he captured attention by his charm of manner, fine command of scholarly English and genuine eloquence.

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  • Macdonald, Bar Hill (reprint, Glasgow, 1906).

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  • Macdonald, Roman Stones in Hunterian Mus.

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  • Colonel Younghusband again accompanied the mission, and the troops were commanded by General Ronald Macdonald.

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  • Receiving, however, but a cool reception from Macdonald of Boisdale, he set sail again and arrived at the bay of Lochnanuagh on the west coast of Inverness-shire.

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  • Disguised in female attire and aided by a passport obtained by the devoted Flora Macdonald, he passed through Skye and parted from his gallant conductress at Portree.

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  • Macdonald's Muslim Theology (London, 1903), especially the creed of Ash`ari in Appendix iii.

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  • On the other side the road avoids the old path through the dreaded Cardinello gorge (here passed Macdonald's army in December, 1800) in order to descend by zigzags to Pianazzo.

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  • At Guelph is the Ontario Agricultural College, founded and endowed by the provincial government, and greatly enlarged and improved by the generosity of Sir William Macdonald (b.

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  • Macdonald and George Brown.

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  • The first provincial government, formed on coalition lines by John Sandfield Macdonald, was thrifty and not unprogressive, but in 1871 was defeated by a reorganized liberal party, which held power from 1871 to 1905, and on the whole worthily.

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  • In 1893, when the title Oil Rivers Protectorate was changed to that of Niger Coast Protectorate, a regular administration was established (subject to the Foreign Office in London) under Sir Claude Macdonald, who was succeeded as commissioner and consul-general in 1896 by Sir Ralph Moor (1860-1909).

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  • His force consisted of Gatacres British brigade (1st Warwicks, Lincoins, Seaforths and Camerons) and Hunters Egyptian division (3 brigades under Colonels Maxwell, MacDonald and Lewis respectively), Broadwoods cavalry, Tudways camel corps and Longs artillery.

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  • Lyttelton (1st Northumberlands and Grenadier Guards, 2nd Lancashire and Rifle Brigade); Egyptian division, under Major-General Hunter, consisting of four brigades, commanded by Colonels MacDonald, Maxwell, Lewis and, Collinson; mounted troops2Ist Lancers, camel corps, and Egyptian cavalry; artillery, under Colonel Long, 2 British batteries, 5 Egyptian batteries, and 20 machine guns; detachment of Royal Engineers.

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  • MacDonald distinguished himself by his tactics, and completely repulsed the enemy.

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  • Macdonald, Muslim Theology (London, 1903); the Hidaya (trans.

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  • Macdonald, Trans.

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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.

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  • Sir Nial Campbell of Lochow, founder of the house of Argyll, secured shipping for him, and he reached a castle of Macdonald of Islay (Angus Og), his ally, at Dunaverty in Kintyre.

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  • The Macdonald tradition is that their clan was on the right wing, under Angus Og; the old accounts place them with Bruce's reserves.

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  • As the Celts marched south the earl of Ross slew Ronald Macdonald, whose inheritance was claimed by John of the Isles.

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  • He was rewarded by five or six months of dangerous and distressful wanderings, and would certainly have been taken at one juncture but for the courageous and wise assistance of Flora Macdonald, while on all hands the highlanders displayed the most devoted loyalty.

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  • His first portrait to attract attention, from its fine quality, was that of George Macdonald, the poet and novelist, now the property of the university of Aberdeen.

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  • Meanwhile Mrs. MacDonald, one of the women taken captive, aided by her native servant, escaped, and barefoot and in her nightdress ran through the jungle to another planter's house.

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  • Though his eloquence had done more than anything else to make practicable a union of the British North American provinces, he opposed confederation, largely owing to wounded vanity; but on finding it impossible to obtain from the imperial authorities the repeal of the British North America Act, he refused to join his associates in the extreme measures which were advocated, and on the promise from the Canadian government of better financial terms to his native province, entered (on the 30th of January 1869) the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as president of the council.

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  • Oudinot's (XII.) corps, the extreme right wing, was to work round by the hilly country to Jenkwitz in rear of Bautzen, Macdonald's (XI.) corps was to assault Bautzen, and Marmont, with the VI.

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  • The Guard and other general reserves were in rear of Macdonald and Marmont.

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  • To a heavy counterstroke against Oudinot, which completely drove that marshal from the ground won on the 20th, the emperor paid no more heed than to order Macdonald to support the XII corps.

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  • From 1878 till 1891 he was minister of customs in the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald; then minister of militia; and under the premiership of Sir John Thompson, minister of trade and commerce.

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  • Briefly, after successive gains and losses, not only Erivan was taken from Persia but Tabriz also, and finally, through the intervention of Sir John Macdonald, the English envoy, a new treaty was concluded at Turkmanchai, laying down the boundary between Russia and Persia.

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  • 175 sqq.; Macdonald, Muslim Theology, eec., 99 sqq.

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  • command of a division, he took part in the battles of Liitzen and Bautzen and the operations of Marshal Macdonald, and at the battle of Leipzig (in which he commanded the XI.

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  • Macdonald's "Life of al-Ghazzali," in Journal of American Oriental Society, vol.

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  • Steele, Canoe and Camera, a Two Hundred Mile Tour through the Maine Forests (New York, 1882); William MacDonald, The Government of Maine, Its History and Administration (New York, 1902); Maine Historical Society Collections (Portland, 1831-); W.

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  • Macdonald, the great protectionist prime minister of Canada, in a conversation with the presen writer in 1882, avowed without hesitation that protectionist taxation in Canada was indefensible on economic grounds, and he defended it exclusively for political reasons.

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  • JOHN SANDFIELD MACDONALD (1812-1872), Canadian statesman, was born at St Raphael, Glengarry county, Ontario, on the 12th of December 1812.

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  • Lawrence Macdonald >>

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  • In 1873 the attack on Sir John Macdonald's ministry with regard to the Pacific Railway charter resulted in its defeat, and Mackenzie formed a new government, taking the portfolio of public works and becoming the first liberal premier of Canada.

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  • He remained in power till 1878, when industrial depression enabled Macdonald to return to office on a protectionist programme.

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  • The Art Gallery and Museum at Schoolhill, built in the Italian Renaissance style of red and brown granite, contains an excellent collection of pictures, the Macdonald Hall of portraits of contemporary artists by themselves being of altogether exceptional interest and unique of its kind in Great Britain.

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  • 44 ff.; Macdonald, Development of Muslim Theology, I10, 157, index.

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  • by the "Pleiad" expedition, and in 1889 to 131° E., and the Kebbi to Bifara by Major (afterwards Sir Claude) Macdonald, further progress towards the Tuburi marsh being prevented by the shallowness of the water.

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  • Mockler Ferryman, Up the Niger; Narrative of Major Claude Macdonald's Mission to the Niger and Benue Rivers ...

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  • In the campaign of 1809 Eugene commanded the army of Italy, with General (afterwards Marshal) Macdonald as his adlatus.

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  • The battle of Sacile, where he fought against the Austrian army of the Archduke John, did not yield proofs of military talent on the part of Eugene or of Macdonald; but on the retreat of the enemy into Austrian territory (owing to the disasters of their main army on the Danube) Eugene's forces pressed them vigorously and finally won an important victory at Raab in the heart of the Austrian empire.

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  • Then, joining the main army under Napoleon, in the island of Lobau in the Danube, near Vienna, Eugene and Macdonald acquitted themselves most creditably in the great battle of Wagram (6th July 1809).

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  • of Africa (London, 1895); Leroy-Beaulieu, De la colonisation chez les peuples modernes (Paris, 1898); Les Nouvelles Societes anglo-saxonnes (Paris, 1897); MacDonald, Select Charters illustrative of American History, 1606-1775 (New York, 18 99); B.

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  • Macdonald on the question of separate schools for New Brunswick.

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  • You might remember the story of Kyle MacDonald who famously traded up from one red paperclip to a house, one small exchange at a time between July 2005 and July 2006.

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  • Transport supremo Gus MacDonald 's vision is to improve public transport to the extent that drivers leave their cars at home.

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  • The former bishop of the Highland vicariate, Ranald MacDonald, became the first vicar-apostolic of the Western vicariate.

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  • But Macdonald adds: These big wodges of cash are unusual.

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  • The series features bizarre and satirical tellings of the biographies of some of the most popular soft rock bands of the 1970s, focusing especially on Doobie Brothers front man Michael MacDonald and Kenny Loggins.

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  • Jenni Pulos has been busy, promoting a new season of Flipping Out and wrapping up work on a new animated movie called The Outback, which also stars Tim Curry, Alan Cumming, and Norm MacDonald.

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  • Masurel, Claire, and Kady MacDonald Denton.

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  • The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald - This story is reportedly one of Lord of the Rings author J.R.R. Tolkien's favorite books when he was a child.

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  • The show debuted in 1965 staring MacDonald Carey and Frances Reid as Tom and Alice Horton.

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  • MacDonald Carey originated the role of Dr. Tom Horton in 1965.

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  • Susan Flannery won a Daytime Emmy as an Outstanding Actress, and the same year, her co-star Macdonald Carey won the male category.

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  • Frances Reid, Macdonald Carey, Josh Taylor, Andrea Hall and Jed Allan also won awards in varying Soapy Award categories the following year.

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  • MacDonald. Jason Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary company of Medifast, is responsible for the development, manufacturing, and distribution of the all the products that are central to the plan.

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  • There were only three band members to begin with: Rory MacDonald on guitar, Blair Douglas on accordion and Calum MacDonald on the drums.

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  • Thanks to Facebook, you can download this application and fulfill all of your childhood Old MacDonald fantasies.

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