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macc

macc

macc Sentence Examples

  • Allies of the first Hasmonaeans in their struggles against the Greeks (1 Macc. v.

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  • 35; 2 Macc. v.

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  • Macc. ix.

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  • See the Icelandic account of the elephant, also a decidedly Alexandrian fragment upon the 7.iapyos, founded upon 4 Macc. i.

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  • 5, 6; 2 Macc. i.

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  • The author of 2 Maccabees infers from his success that the nation had forfeited all right to divine protection for the time (2 Macc. v.

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  • slew a Jew who came to sacrifice and the king's officer and pulled down the altar " (1 Macc. ii.

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  • Bacchides and Alcimus returned meanwhile into the land of Judah; at Elasa " Judas fell and the rest fled " (i Macc. ix.

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  • 30; 1 Macc. i.

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  • He was, doubtless, a man of high standing, but neither a king nor a high-priest, certainly not the apostate priest Alcimus (1 Macc. vii.

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  • In 2 Macc. xii.

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  • i Macc. v.

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  • The dress was of crimson (7ropcbupa); this and the badges were the king's gift, and except by royal grant neither crimson nor gold might, apparently, be worn at court (1 Macc. ro, 20; 62; 89; 11, 58; Athen.

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  • 285; 2 Macc. ix.

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  • Nothing more is known of him, and the name is only given by Josephus (not in 1 Macc. ii.

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  • The wild legends of its preservation at the taking of Jerusalem (2 Macc. ii.

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  • The History of Johannes Hyrcanus is mentioned in r Macc. xvi.

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  • Hippolytus tells us that in his time most Christians said " the Psalms of David," and believed the whole book to be his; but this title and belief are both of Jewish origin, for in 2 Macc. ii.

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  • is referred (as a prophecy) in i Macc. vii.

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  • with 1 Macc. xiii.

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  • i Macc. i.

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  • 10-17, with the parallel i Macc. i 11-15).

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  • the legend in 2 Macc. i.

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  • Under the form Gazera it is mentioned (1 Macc. iv.

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  • It was first taken from the Syrians by Simon the Asmonean (1 Macc. xiv.

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  • Macc. ill.

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  • The historical interest of Michmash is connected with the strategical importance of the position, commanding the north side of the Pass of Michmash, which made it the headquarters of the Philistines and the centre of their forays in their attempt to quell the first rising under Saul, as it was also at a later date the headquarters of Jonathan the Hasinonaean (1 Macc. ix.

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  • 1 Macc. x.

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  • Restored by the Roman Gabinius from the ruins to which it had been reduced by the Jewish wars (1 Macc. v.

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  • The Mount Azotus of r Macc. ix.

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  • 6-12; i Macc. iii.

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  • According to other traditions he restored the templeservice and founded a collection of historical documents (2 Macc. i.

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  • i Macc. iii.

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  • In 2 Macc. ii.

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  • These statements are found in a part of 2 Macc. which.

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  • Antiochus's attempt to suppress the religion of the Jews (i Macc. i.

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  • Rise of the Maccabees (I Macc. ii.).

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  • Victories of Judas Maccabaeus over the generals of Antiochus (I Macc. iii.-iv.).

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  • Re-dedication of the Temple on 25th Chisleu (December), I Macc. iv.

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  • Death of Judas Maccabaeus (1 Macc. ix.

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  • Jonathan, younger brother of Judas, leader of the loyal Jews (I Macc. ix.

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  • Simon, elder brother of Judas (i Macc. xiii.-xvi.).

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  • seq., the sequel of which belongs to the canonical Ezra), and the martyrdom of Eleazer (2 Macc. vi.

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  • seq., compare 4 Macc.).

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  • It is suggested that the name Aristobulus was taken from 2 Macc. i.

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  • iI; i Macc. ii.

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  • 1 Macc. xiv.

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  • r Macc. viii.

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  • This renders it impossible to accept Haupt's suggestion that Purim is connected with the celebration of Nicanor's Day, to celebrate the triumph of Judas Maccabaeus over the Syrian general Nicanor at Adasa (161 B.C.) on the 13th of Adar, since this is the date of the Fast of Esther, and, besides, the Second Book of Maccabees, which refers to Nicanor's Day, speaks of it as the day before Mordecai's Day (2 Macc. xvi.

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  • The festival is first mentioned in 2 Macc. xv.

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  • But there is an interesting parallel in the legend of the kindling of the sacred fire and the igniting of the "thick water" in the time of Nehemiah (2 Macc. i.

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  • A notice of its history in 147 B.C. is found in 1 Macc. x.

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  • 39 sqq.; 2 Macc. X.

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  • 1.13 f.; 2 Macc. 4., 10 f.).

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  • In Maccabean times Joseph and Azarias attacked it unsuccessfully (1 Macc. v.

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  • 55-62; 2 Macc. xii.

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  • A tradition preserved in 2 Macc. iii.

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  • a bribe for the high-priesthood and another for leave and to convert Jerusalem into a Greek city (2 Macc. iv.

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  • The party who wished to make a covenant with the heathen (1 Macc. i.

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  • Menelaus, the brother of Simon the Benjamite, had bought the high-priesthood over the head of Jason, who fled into the country of the Ammonites, in 172 B.C. (2 Macc. iv.

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  • The practice of Judaism was prohibited by a royal edict (r Macc. i.

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  • 41-63; 2 Macc. vi.-vii.

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  • To the minority of strict Jews he was therefore " the abomination of desolation standing where he ought not "; but the majority he carried with him and, when he was dying (165 B.C.) during his eastern campaigns, he wrote to the loyal Jews as their fellow citizen and general, exhorting them to preserve their present goodwill towards him and his son, on the ground that his son would continue his policy in gentleness and kindness, and so maintain friendly relations with them (2 Macc. ix.).

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  • But Judas did not lay down his arms, and added to his resources by rescuing the Jews of Galilee and Gilead and settling them in Judaea (1 Macc. v.).

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  • In the battle of Adasa, which soon followed, Nicanor was defeated and his forces annihilated, thanks to the Jews who came out from all the villages of Judaea (1 Macc. vii.

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  • At this point (r6r B.C.) Judas sent an embassy to Rome and an alliance was concluded (r Macc. viii.), too late to save Judas from the determined and victorious attack of Demetrius.

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  • The Syrian general made fruitless attempts to capture them, and build forts in Judaea whose garrisons should harass Israel (r Macc. ix.

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  • 50-53), but Jonathan and Simon, brothers of Judas, found their power increase until Jonathan ruled at Michmash as judge and destroyed the godless out of Israel (r Macc. ix.

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  • Finally, in 141 B.C., the new era began: the yoke of the heathen was taken away from Israel and Simon was declared high-priest and general and ruler of the Jews for ever until there should arise a faithful prophet (1 Macc. xiii.

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  • It has been ingeniously suggested in this more scientific generation that the explosion was due to the ignition of some; forgotten store of oil or naphtha, such as was said to have been stored in the temple (2 Macc. i.

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  • Catholics support this doctrine chiefly by reference to the Jewish belief in the efficacy of prayer for the dead (2 Macc. xii.

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  • Accordingly some have insisted that the story must have been composed at some period when Jewish dead were left unburied, either in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes (2 Macc. v.

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  • is 1 Macc. xv.

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  • 7) and a holy place (I Macc: iii.

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  • In 1 Macc. v.

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  • MACCABEES, the name (in the plural) of a distinguished Jewish family dominant in Jerusalem in the 2nd century B.C. According to I Macc. ii.

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  • Thus the mother of the seven brethren, whose martyrdom is related in 2 Macc. vi., vii., is called by early Christian writers " the mother of the Maccabees."

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  • This name Jewish authors naturally prefer to that of Maccabees; they also style i and 2 Macc. "Books of the Hasmonaeans."

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  • Its internal resources were assiduously developed; trade, agriculture, civic justice and religion were fostered; while at no epoch in its post-exilic history did Israel enjoy an equal measure of social happiness (1 Macc. xiv.

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  • LITERATURE.-I and 2 Macc. and Josephus are the main sources for the Maccabaean history.

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  • MAcC).

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  • 2 Macc. iii.

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  • Epiphanes (2 Macc. v.

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  • An Aretas is mentioned in 1 Macc. xv.

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  • " And Onias said, This is the lover of the brethren, he who prayeth much for the people and the holy city, Jeremiah the prophet of God " (2 Macc. xv.

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  • of the high-priest Onias III., which took place about 174 B.C., and the Syrian king's subsequent murder of the same person not later than 171 (2 Macc. iv.

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  • xxvi.-xxviii.; 2 Macc. iv.

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  • In the second temple a new altar was built after the fashion of the former (i Macc. iv.

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  • The incense altar in the second temple was removed by Antiochus Epiphanes (r Macc. i.

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  • 21) and restored by Judas Maccabaeus (i Macc. iv.

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  • ASSIDEANS (the Anglicized form, derived through the Greek, of the Hebrew Hasidim, " the pious"), the name of a party or sect which stood out against the Hellenization of the Jews in the 2nd century B.C. After the massacre of those who fled from the forces of Antiochus Epiphanes and would not resist on the sabbath, Mattathias (or Judas) decided to set aside the law and was joined by a company of Assideans, brave men of Israel every one, who offered themselves willingly for the law (1 Macc. ii.

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  • 2 Macc. viii.

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  • On the appointment of Alcimus (162 B.C.), "a descendant of Aaron" as high-priest, "the Assideans were the first who sought peace" (1 Macc. vii.

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  • According to 2 Macc. xiv., Alcimus identified them with the whole party of the rebels, of which they were only one, though the most important, section.

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  • This work is said to have been in five books and formed the basis of the present 2 Macc. (see ch.

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  • 11-13), and he is not mentioned in a still later and somewhat fanciful description of Nehemiah's work (2 Macc. i.

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  • 42 contain a more detailed narrative of the events recorded in 1 Macc. i.

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  • The remainder of the book runs parallel to 1 Macc. iii.

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  • Both in trustworthiness and in style it is inferior to 1 Macc. Besides being highly coloured, the narrative does not observe strict chronological sequence.

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  • In 1 Macc. there is a keen sense of the part to be played by the Jews themselves, of the necessity of employing their own skill and valour; here they are made to rely rather upon divine intervention.

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  • The eschatology of 2 Macc. is singularly advanced, for it combines the doctrine of a resurrection with that of immortality.

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  • io, 36) prove, however, that the latter was written later than r Macc.; and it is equally clear that it was composed.

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  • Luther judged of it as unfavourably as he judged of I Macc. favourably, and even " wished it had never existed."

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  • Sixtus conjectures that it may have been a Greek translation of the " chronicles " of John Hyrcanus, alluded to in i Macc. xvi.

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  • The Arabic " Book of Maccabees " contained in the Paris and London Polyglotts, and purporting to be a history of the Jews from the affair of Heliodorus (186 B.C.) to the close of Herod's reign, is historically worthless, being nothing but a compilation from i and 2 Macc. and Josephus.

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  • Keil's commentary on i and 2 Macc. is very largely indebted to Grimm.

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  • C. Bissell on I, 2 and 3 Macc. in LangeSchaff's commentary, 1880 - the whole Apocrypha being embraced in one volume, and much of the material being transferred from Grimm; G.

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  • Rawlinson on 1 and 2 Macc. in the Speaker's Commentary 1888 (containing much useful matter, but marred by too frequent inaccuracy); O.

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  • Black on 1 Macc. in the Cambridge Bible for Schools (1897) E.

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  • Kamphausen on 2 Macc. and A.

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  • Deissmann on Macc. in Die A pok.

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  • 21, 23); the former was destroyed by Jonathan, the brother of Judas the Maccabee (i Macc. x.

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  • Surprisingly cheerful and sunny day for the top of the Macc!

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  • Allies of the first Hasmonaeans in their struggles against the Greeks (1 Macc. v.

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  • 35; 2 Macc. v.

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  • Macc. ix.

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  • See the Icelandic account of the elephant, also a decidedly Alexandrian fragment upon the 7.iapyos, founded upon 4 Macc. i.

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  • 5, 6; 2 Macc. i.

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  • The author of 2 Maccabees infers from his success that the nation had forfeited all right to divine protection for the time (2 Macc. v.

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  • slew a Jew who came to sacrifice and the king's officer and pulled down the altar " (1 Macc. ii.

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  • But it was Menelaus who was sent by the king " to encourage " (2 Macc. xi.

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  • Bacchides and Alcimus returned meanwhile into the land of Judah; at Elasa " Judas fell and the rest fled " (i Macc. ix.

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  • 30; 1 Macc. i.

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  • He was, doubtless, a man of high standing, but neither a king nor a high-priest, certainly not the apostate priest Alcimus (1 Macc. vii.

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  • In 2 Macc. xii.

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  • i Macc. v.

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  • to Lasthenes in which al &Karai Kai Ta TXf 7 are mentioned, I Macc. I I, 35 (Beloch, by an oversight, refers to the paraphrase of the documents in Joseph.

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  • The salt monopoly is mentioned in I Macc. 30, 29; I I, 35, a suspected source, but supported in this detail by the analogy of Ptolemaic Egypt and Rome.

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  • The dress was of crimson (7ropcbupa); this and the badges were the king's gift, and except by royal grant neither crimson nor gold might, apparently, be worn at court (1 Macc. ro, 20; 62; 89; 11, 58; Athen.

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  • 285; 2 Macc. ix.

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  • Nothing more is known of him, and the name is only given by Josephus (not in 1 Macc. ii.

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  • The wild legends of its preservation at the taking of Jerusalem (2 Macc. ii.

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  • I-3) .1 True to their antecedents, the Ammonites, with some of the neighbouring tribes, did their utmost to resist and check the revival of the Jewish power under Judas Maccabaeus (1 Macc. v.

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  • The History of Johannes Hyrcanus is mentioned in r Macc. xvi.

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  • Hippolytus tells us that in his time most Christians said " the Psalms of David," and believed the whole book to be his; but this title and belief are both of Jewish origin, for in 2 Macc. ii.

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  • is referred (as a prophecy) in i Macc. vii.

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  • with 1 Macc. xiii.

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  • i Macc. i.

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  • (See further Priest.) In the Maccabaean age the high priest Jonathan received the purple robe and crown and the buckle of gold worn on the shoulder as a sign of priestly and secular rank (1 Macc. X.

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  • sq.), and the recognition that national costume, custom and morality were inseparable underlay the objection to the Greek cap (the7rTavos) introduced among the Jews under Antiochus Epiphanes (2 Macc. iv.

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  • 10-17, with the parallel i Macc. i 11-15).

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  • the legend in 2 Macc. i.

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  • Under the form Gazera it is mentioned (1 Macc. iv.

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  • It was first taken from the Syrians by Simon the Asmonean (1 Macc. xiv.

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  • Macc. ill.

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  • The historical interest of Michmash is connected with the strategical importance of the position, commanding the north side of the Pass of Michmash, which made it the headquarters of the Philistines and the centre of their forays in their attempt to quell the first rising under Saul, as it was also at a later date the headquarters of Jonathan the Hasinonaean (1 Macc. ix.

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  • the Ramathaim of 1 Macc. xi.

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  • 1 Macc. x.

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  • Restored by the Roman Gabinius from the ruins to which it had been reduced by the Jewish wars (1 Macc. v.

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  • The Mount Azotus of r Macc. ix.

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  • 6-12; i Macc. iii.

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  • According to other traditions he restored the templeservice and founded a collection of historical documents (2 Macc. i.

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  • i Macc. iii.

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  • In 2 Macc. ii.

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  • These statements are found in a part of 2 Macc. which.

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  • Antiochus's attempt to suppress the religion of the Jews (i Macc. i.

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  • Rise of the Maccabees (I Macc. ii.).

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  • Victories of Judas Maccabaeus over the generals of Antiochus (I Macc. iii.-iv.).

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  • Re-dedication of the Temple on 25th Chisleu (December), I Macc. iv.

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  • Death of Judas Maccabaeus (1 Macc. ix.

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  • Jonathan, younger brother of Judas, leader of the loyal Jews (I Macc. ix.

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  • Simon, elder brother of Judas (i Macc. xiii.-xvi.).

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  • seq., the sequel of which belongs to the canonical Ezra), and the martyrdom of Eleazer (2 Macc. vi.

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  • seq., compare 4 Macc.).

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  • It is suggested that the name Aristobulus was taken from 2 Macc. i.

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  • iI; i Macc. ii.

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  • 1 Macc. xiv.

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  • r Macc. viii.

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  • This renders it impossible to accept Haupt's suggestion that Purim is connected with the celebration of Nicanor's Day, to celebrate the triumph of Judas Maccabaeus over the Syrian general Nicanor at Adasa (161 B.C.) on the 13th of Adar, since this is the date of the Fast of Esther, and, besides, the Second Book of Maccabees, which refers to Nicanor's Day, speaks of it as the day before Mordecai's Day (2 Macc. xvi.

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  • The festival is first mentioned in 2 Macc. xv.

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  • But there is an interesting parallel in the legend of the kindling of the sacred fire and the igniting of the "thick water" in the time of Nehemiah (2 Macc. i.

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  • A notice of its history in 147 B.C. is found in 1 Macc. x.

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  • 39 sqq.; 2 Macc. X.

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  • 1.13 f.; 2 Macc. 4., 10 f.).

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  • In Maccabean times Joseph and Azarias attacked it unsuccessfully (1 Macc. v.

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  • 55-62; 2 Macc. xii.

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  • A tradition preserved in 2 Macc. iii.

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  • a bribe for the high-priesthood and another for leave and to convert Jerusalem into a Greek city (2 Macc. iv.

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  • The party who wished to make a covenant with the heathen (1 Macc. i.

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  • Menelaus, the brother of Simon the Benjamite, had bought the high-priesthood over the head of Jason, who fled into the country of the Ammonites, in 172 B.C. (2 Macc. iv.

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  • The practice of Judaism was prohibited by a royal edict (r Macc. i.

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  • 41-63; 2 Macc. vi.-vii.

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  • To the minority of strict Jews he was therefore " the abomination of desolation standing where he ought not "; but the majority he carried with him and, when he was dying (165 B.C.) during his eastern campaigns, he wrote to the loyal Jews as their fellow citizen and general, exhorting them to preserve their present goodwill towards him and his son, on the ground that his son would continue his policy in gentleness and kindness, and so maintain friendly relations with them (2 Macc. ix.).

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  • But Judas did not lay down his arms, and added to his resources by rescuing the Jews of Galilee and Gilead and settling them in Judaea (1 Macc. v.).

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  • Indeed, Alcimus and his company did more mischief among the Israelites than the heathen (1 Macc. vii.

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  • In the battle of Adasa, which soon followed, Nicanor was defeated and his forces annihilated, thanks to the Jews who came out from all the villages of Judaea (1 Macc. vii.

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  • At this point (r6r B.C.) Judas sent an embassy to Rome and an alliance was concluded (r Macc. viii.), too late to save Judas from the determined and victorious attack of Demetrius.

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  • The Syrian general made fruitless attempts to capture them, and build forts in Judaea whose garrisons should harass Israel (r Macc. ix.

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  • 50-53), but Jonathan and Simon, brothers of Judas, found their power increase until Jonathan ruled at Michmash as judge and destroyed the godless out of Israel (r Macc. ix.

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  • Finally, in 141 B.C., the new era began: the yoke of the heathen was taken away from Israel and Simon was declared high-priest and general and ruler of the Jews for ever until there should arise a faithful prophet (1 Macc. xiii.

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  • It has been ingeniously suggested in this more scientific generation that the explosion was due to the ignition of some; forgotten store of oil or naphtha, such as was said to have been stored in the temple (2 Macc. i.

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  • Catholics support this doctrine chiefly by reference to the Jewish belief in the efficacy of prayer for the dead (2 Macc. xii.

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  • Accordingly some have insisted that the story must have been composed at some period when Jewish dead were left unburied, either in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes (2 Macc. v.

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  • is 1 Macc. xv.

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  • 7) and a holy place (I Macc: iii.

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  • In 1 Macc. v.

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  • MACCABEES, the name (in the plural) of a distinguished Jewish family dominant in Jerusalem in the 2nd century B.C. According to I Macc. ii.

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  • Thus the mother of the seven brethren, whose martyrdom is related in 2 Macc. vi., vii., is called by early Christian writers " the mother of the Maccabees."

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  • This name Jewish authors naturally prefer to that of Maccabees; they also style i and 2 Macc. "Books of the Hasmonaeans."

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  • Its internal resources were assiduously developed; trade, agriculture, civic justice and religion were fostered; while at no epoch in its post-exilic history did Israel enjoy an equal measure of social happiness (1 Macc. xiv.

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  • LITERATURE.-I and 2 Macc. and Josephus are the main sources for the Maccabaean history.

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  • 2 Macc. iii.

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  • Epiphanes (2 Macc. v.

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  • An Aretas is mentioned in 1 Macc. xv.

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  • " And Onias said, This is the lover of the brethren, he who prayeth much for the people and the holy city, Jeremiah the prophet of God " (2 Macc. xv.

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  • of the high-priest Onias III., which took place about 174 B.C., and the Syrian king's subsequent murder of the same person not later than 171 (2 Macc. iv.

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  • xxvi.-xxviii.; 2 Macc. iv.

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  • In the second temple a new altar was built after the fashion of the former (i Macc. iv.

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  • The incense altar in the second temple was removed by Antiochus Epiphanes (r Macc. i.

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  • 21) and restored by Judas Maccabaeus (i Macc. iv.

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  • ASSIDEANS (the Anglicized form, derived through the Greek, of the Hebrew Hasidim, " the pious"), the name of a party or sect which stood out against the Hellenization of the Jews in the 2nd century B.C. After the massacre of those who fled from the forces of Antiochus Epiphanes and would not resist on the sabbath, Mattathias (or Judas) decided to set aside the law and was joined by a company of Assideans, brave men of Israel every one, who offered themselves willingly for the law (1 Macc. ii.

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  • 2 Macc. viii.

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  • On the appointment of Alcimus (162 B.C.), "a descendant of Aaron" as high-priest, "the Assideans were the first who sought peace" (1 Macc. vii.

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  • According to 2 Macc. xiv., Alcimus identified them with the whole party of the rebels, of which they were only one, though the most important, section.

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  • This work is said to have been in five books and formed the basis of the present 2 Macc. (see ch.

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  • 11-13), and he is not mentioned in a still later and somewhat fanciful description of Nehemiah's work (2 Macc. i.

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  • 42 contain a more detailed narrative of the events recorded in 1 Macc. i.

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  • The remainder of the book runs parallel to 1 Macc. iii.

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  • Both in trustworthiness and in style it is inferior to 1 Macc. Besides being highly coloured, the narrative does not observe strict chronological sequence.

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  • In 1 Macc. there is a keen sense of the part to be played by the Jews themselves, of the necessity of employing their own skill and valour; here they are made to rely rather upon divine intervention.

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  • The eschatology of 2 Macc. is singularly advanced, for it combines the doctrine of a resurrection with that of immortality.

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  • io, 36) prove, however, that the latter was written later than r Macc.; and it is equally clear that it was composed.

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  • Luther judged of it as unfavourably as he judged of I Macc. favourably, and even " wished it had never existed."

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  • Sixtus conjectures that it may have been a Greek translation of the " chronicles " of John Hyrcanus, alluded to in i Macc. xvi.

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  • The Arabic " Book of Maccabees " contained in the Paris and London Polyglotts, and purporting to be a history of the Jews from the affair of Heliodorus (186 B.C.) to the close of Herod's reign, is historically worthless, being nothing but a compilation from i and 2 Macc. and Josephus.

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  • Keil's commentary on i and 2 Macc. is very largely indebted to Grimm.

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  • C. Bissell on I, 2 and 3 Macc. in LangeSchaff's commentary, 1880 - the whole Apocrypha being embraced in one volume, and much of the material being transferred from Grimm; G.

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  • Rawlinson on 1 and 2 Macc. in the Speaker's Commentary 1888 (containing much useful matter, but marred by too frequent inaccuracy); O.

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  • Black on 1 Macc. in the Cambridge Bible for Schools (1897) E.

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  • Kamphausen on 2 Macc. and A.

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  • Deissmann on Macc. in Die A pok.

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  • 21, 23); the former was destroyed by Jonathan, the brother of Judas the Maccabee (i Macc. x.

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