Macaulay sentence example

macaulay
  • Macaulay imputes this reduction to Hastings as a characteristic act of financial immorality; but in truth it had been expressly enjoined by the court of directors, in a despatch dated six months before he took up office.
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  • Macaulay states that the members of council were put in ill-humour because their salute of guns was not proportionate to their dignity.
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  • Macaulay in especial exerted all his art, though in contradiction of probability and fact, to deepen still further the shade which rests upon his reputation.
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  • If the Puritans regarded bowls with no friendly eye, as Lord Macaulay asserts, one can hardly wonder at it.
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  • Macaulay terms, him, justly enough, "the father of modern Toryism, of Toryism modified to suit an order of things in which the House of Commons is the most powerful body in the state."
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  • These crude ideas of Cromwell's character were extinguished by Macaulay's irresistible logic, by the publication of Cromwell's letters by Carlyle in 1845, which showed Cromwell clearly to be "not a man of falsehoods, but a man of truth"; and by Gardiner, whom, however, it is somewhat difficult to follow when he represents Cromwell as "a typical Englishman."
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  • 1853) from Macaulay's History; and also produced the CEuvres completes (10 vols.
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  • Henceforth his name was known in all European countries; the English translation by Mrs Austin was the occasion of one of Macaulay's most brilliant essays.
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  • He belonged to the school of Thucydides and Gibbon, not to that of Macaulay and Taine; he deals by preference with the rulers and leaders of the world, and he strictly limits his field to the history of the state, or, as we should say, political history; and in this he is followed by Seeley, one of the greatest of his adherents.
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  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.
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  • An anti-slavery society was established in 1823, the principal members of which, besides Wilberforce and Buxton, were Zachary Macaulay, Dr Lushington and Lord Suffield.
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  • Macaulay, James Stephen, and others, continued the struggle, only suspending it during a period allowed to the local legislatures for carrying into effect the measures expected from them.
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  • His descriptions, which were somewhat exaggerated, were largely used by Macaulay in his History of England.
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  • This Berlin visit is more or less familiar to English readers from the two great essays of Macaulay and Carlyle as well as from the Frederick 'of the ' latter.
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  • Both were unjust to Voltaire, and Macaulay was unjust to Frederick as well.
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  • Frederick, though his love of teasing for teasing's sake has been exaggerated by Macaulay, was a martinet of the first water, had a sharp though one-sided idea of justice, and had not the slightest intention of allowing Voltaire to insult or to tyrannize over his other guests and servants.
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  • Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome gives a dramatic version of the story.
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  • Among its more famous contributors were Lord Brougham, Sir Walter Scott, Carlyle, Hazlitt and Macaulay.
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  • The monthly reviews include the Christian Observer (1802-1857), conducted by members of the established church upon evangelical principles, with Zachary Macaulay as the first editor; Monthlies.
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  • Lord Macaulay's description of Roxana, Moll Flanders and Colonel Jack as "utterly nauseous and wretched" must be set aside as a freak of criticism.
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  • In 1690 he moved a famous amendment to the Corporation Bill, proposing the addition of a clause - the purport of which was misrepresented by Macaulay - for disqualifying for office for seven years municipal functionaries who in defiance of the majority of their colleagues had surrendered their charters to the Crown.
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  • He was one of the earliest of English parliamentary orators; his speeches greatly impressed his contemporaries, and in a later generation, as Macaulay observes, they were "a favourite theme of old men who lived to see the conflicts of Walpole and Pulteney."
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  • With all its manifold instructiveness, his book is a narrative as entertaining as those of Macaulay or Froude.
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  • Hallam, like Macaulay, ultimately referred all political questions to the standard of Whig constitutionalism.
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  • In fact, allusions to the necessary studies of a gentleman meet us constantly, reminding us of the unlikely erudition of the schoolboy in Macaulay.
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  • He also commenced a translation of Macaulay's History.
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  • He began his labours with The Age of Casimir the Great (1848), and Boleslaw the Brave (1849), following these with Jadwiga and Jagiello, in three volumes (1855-1856) - a work which Spasovich, in his Russian History of Slavonic Literature, compares in vigour of style and fullness of colour with Macaulay's History of England and Thierry's Norman Conquest.
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  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.
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  • The tablet over Schomberg's grave contains what Macaulay called a "furious libel," though it only states that the duke's relatives refused the expense of the tablet.
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  • The important Mirour de l'omme, by John Gower, contains about 30,000 lines written in very good French at the end of the 14th century (Macaulay, The Complete Works of John Gower, i., Oxford, 1899).
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  • (2) An application from the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica - who might, 1 suppose, as in Macaulay's time, almost command the services of the most eminent scholars and historians of the country - to me, a mere poet, proposing that I should contribute to that great repository of erudition the biography of Mary Queen of Scots.
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  • 2 Macaulay describes Hume's characteristic fault as an historian: " Hume is an accomplished advocate.
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  • Macaulay's description of Whitgift as "a narrow, mean, tyrannical priest, who gained power by servility and adulation," is tinged with rhetorical exaggeraticn; but undoubtedly Whitgift's extreme High Church notions led him to treat the Puritans with exceptional intolerance.
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  • In 1846 he was sent as minister to London, where he lived in constant companionship with Macaulay and Hallam.
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  • He held a prominent place as an historian, his works including a Storia del teatro (1860), and Storia dei comuni italiani (1861), besides a translation of Macaulay's History of England (1856).
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  • It was on this last subject that Lord Macaulay's famous minute was written.
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  • - The splendid example of his style which Macaulay contributed in the article on Johnson to the 7th edition of this encyclopaedia has become classic, and has therefore been retained above with a few trifling modifications in those places in which his invincible love of the picturesque has drawn him demonstrably aside from the dull line of veracity.
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  • Macaulay, it must be noted, exaggerated persistently the poverty of Johnson's pedigree, the squalor of his early married life, the grotesqueness of his entourage in Fleet Street, the decline and fall from complete virtue of Mrs Thrale, the novelty and success of the Dictionary, the complete failure of the Shakespeare and the political tracts.
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  • Matthew Arnold, who edited six selected Lives of the poets, regarded it as one of Macaulay's happiest and ripest efforts.
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  • Sir Walter Scott, Croker, Hayward, Macaulay, Thomas Carlyle (whose famous Fraser article was reprinted in 1853) and Whitwell Elwin have done as much as anybody perhaps to sustain the zest for Johnsonian studies.
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  • Macaulay's prediction that the interest in the man would supersede that in his "Works" seemed and seems likely enough to justify itself; but his theory that the man alone mattered and that a portrait painted by the hand of an inspired idiot was a true measure of the man has not worn better than the common run of literary propositions.
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  • "I went to the House on Monday," wrote Macaulay in March 1854, "and heard Bright say everything I thought."
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  • In 1854 selection by examination as a method of appointment to posts in the English public service was first substituted for the patronage system, which had caused grave dissatisfaction (see Macaulay's speech on the subject, The Times of the 25th of June 1853).
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  • In the winter of 1838 he was visited in Rome by Macaulay, Manning and Gladstone.
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  • According to the inscription upon his statue at Calcutta, from the pen of Macaulay: " He abolished cruel rites; he effaced humiliating distinctions; he gave liberty to the expression of public opinion; his constant study it was to elevate the intellectual and moral character of the nations committed to his charge."
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  • Macaulay was the first legal member of council, and the first president of the law commission.
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  • The penal code, originally drawn up by Macaulay in 1837, passed into law in 1860, together with codes of civil and criminal procedure.
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  • By the French Academy of Moral and Political Sciences he was made correspondent (1857) and foreign associate (the first Englishman since Macaulay) (1864).
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  • This he followed up in 1882 with his Macaulay in the same series.
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  • Macaulay's bluff and strenuous character, his rhetorical style, his unphilosophical conception of history, were entirely out of harmony with Morison's prepossessions.
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  • Yet in his anxiety to do justice to his subject he steeped himself in Macaulay till his style often recalls that which he is censuring.
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  • Lingard's History gives an exhaustive and trustworthy account of the Popish terror and its victims; and the chief incidents in Oates's career are graphically described by Macaulay.
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  • The Apophthegms, though hardly deserving Macaulay's praise of being the best collection of jests in the world, contain a number of those significant anecdotes which Bacon used with such effect in his other writings.
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  • Macaulay, while admitting the accuracy of the process, denied its efficiency, on the ground that an operation performed naturally was not rendered more easy or efficacious by being subjected to analysis.'
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  • He was the author of the appendices on botany (in part) and ornithology in Potter's History and Antiquities of Charnwood Forest (1842); Mr Macaulay's Character of the Clergy.
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  • It is no longer necessary for serious criticism to refute the objections to its authenticity raised during the 19th century in certain quarters;12 as Macaulay said of the authenticity of Caesar's commentaries, "to doubt on that subject is the mere rage of scepticism."
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  • Lochiel, who died in February 1719, is called by Macaulay the "Ulysses of the Highlands."
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  • The governor at the time was Zachary Macaulay, father of Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay.
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  • Several of the governors, like Zachary Macaulay, Colonel Dixon Denham, the explorer, and Sir Samuel Rowe, were men of distinction.
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  • It included remarkable incunabula, 16th-century literature, and scientific literature; and among its special collections are Lord Macaulay's library of British Parliamentary papers, a great collection of English Commonwealth pamphlets, one on the history of Mexico, and other rarities.
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  • The Rohillas were defeated by Colonel Champion in April 1774, and the majority of them fled across the Ganges; but the charges of destroying a nation, brought against Hastings by Burke and Macaulay, were greatly exaggerated.
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  • It is a fine building in Tudor Style, "worthy," said Macaulay, "to stand in the High Street of Oxford."
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  • Though Calcutta was called by Macaulay "the city of palaces," its modern public buildings cannot compare with those of Bombay.
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  • It had long been a fundamental principle of Indian government that the sepoy would always be true to his salt - knowing, as Macaulay wrote in 1840, that there was not another state in India which would not, in spite of the most solemn promises, leave him to die of hunger in a ditch as soon as he had ceased to be useful.
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  • In 1849 he wrote a preface to a new edition of Clarkson's Life of William Penn, defending the Quaker statesman against Macaulay's criticisms. In 1850 he married Jane Martha, eldest daughter of the famous Dr Arnold of Rugby.
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  • Macaulay is not greatly superior in impartiality to Hume; Gibbon and Robertson were less open to temptation because they avoided English subjects.
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  • The story of Hastings's crimes, as Macaulay says, made the blood of Burke boil in his veins.
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  • Macaulay's youthful lines, written early in 1813, testify to the impression made by his career.
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  • Did the critic, asks Macaulay, ever hear any speaking that was less ornamented than that of Demosthenes, or more diffuse than that of Cicero?
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  • Yet the critic's remark was not so pointless as Macaulay thought it.
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  • Cromwell's civil policy, to use Macaulay's words, was " able, straightforward, and cruel."
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  • The woollen manufacture grew and flourished, and Macaulay is probably warranted in saying that under Charles II.
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  • It has been thought by Macaulay and others that Ferguson led the English government to believe that he was a spy in their interests, and that his frequent escapes from justice were due to official connivance.
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  • Macaulay never married, but was inordinately fond of his sisters and of his nieces.
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  • Francis Macaulay ' s father, the Rev s Macaulay ' s father, the Rev Samuel Macaulay, was a Minister in the Methodist Church.
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  • He served his legal traineeship with Glasgow solicitors Cameron Macaulay.
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  • As a matter of fact, the book which Macaulay was professing to review describes at length the honourable part consistently taken by Hastings in opposition to the great majority of the council.
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  • He was often inconsistent, he was generally intractable and overbearing, and he was always pompous and affected to a degree which, Macaulay has remarked, seems scarcely compatible with true greatness.
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  • Those periods which have been dominated by the great masters of style have been less interested in the criticism of the historian's methods of investigation than in the beauty of his rhetoric. The scientific historian, deeply interested in the search for truth, is generally but a poor artist, and his uncoloured picture of the past will never rank in literature beside the splendid distortions which glow in the pages of a Michelet or Macaulay.
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  • Macaulay's ridicule has rescued from oblivion the criticism which pronounced the eloquence of Chatham to be more ornate than that of Demosthenes, and less diffuse than that of Cicero.
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  • We read together, "As You Like It," Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with America," and Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson."
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  • In a different way Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson" was interesting.
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  • Francis Macaulay ' s father, the Rev Samuel Macaulay, was a Minister in the Methodist Church.
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