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lyre

lyre

lyre Sentence Examples

  • Anion's lyre and the dolphin were translated to the stars.

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  • He touched his lyre and began to play the accompaniment.

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  • In somewhat sensational and affected but prophetic words Gaj compared Illyria to a lyre, " a triangle between Skutari, Varna and Villach.

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  • The most usual attributes of Apollo were the lyre and the bow; the tripod especially was dedicated to him as the god of prophecy.

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  • Of these the "acoucryptophone" was one of the most elegant - a light box, shaped like an ancient lyre and suspended by a metallic wire from a piano in the room above.

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  • His head and lyre floated " down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore," where the inhabitants buried his head and a shrine was built in his honour near Antissa.

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  • This was founded shortly after the Conquest and originated from the endowment which the monks of Lyre near Evreux held in Bowcombe, including the church, mill, houses, land and tithes of the manor.

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  • From the 6th century onwards he was looked upon as one of the chief poets and musicians of antiquity, the inventor or perfecter of the lyre, who by his music and singing was able not only to charm the wild beasts, but even to draw the trees and rocks from their places, and to arrest the rivers in their course.

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  • He was also the god of music, the special preserver of poets, and to him the lyre was sacred.

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  • ORPHEUS, in Greek legend, the chief representative of the art of song and playing on the lyre, and of great importance in the religious history of Greece.

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  • Her Spiridion, which was dedicated to him, Sept cardes de la lyre, Consuelo, and La Comtesse de Rudolstadt, were written under the Humanitarian inspiration.

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  • Enchantress, say, to my forsaken lyre What magic power is this recalls me still?

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  • He represents the art of playing the flute as opposed to the lyre - the one the accompaniment of the worship of Cybele, the other that of the worship of Apollo.

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  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."

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  • When the instrument was played, the vibrations were transmitted silently, and became audible in the lyre, which thus appeared to play of itself.

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  • After punishing Lycus and Dirce for cruel treatment of Antiope, they built and fortified Thebes, huge blocks of stone forming themselves into walls at the sound of Amphion's lyre (Horace, Odes, iii.

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  • 1214), Chiron teaching Achilles the art of playing on the lyre (ibid.

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  • Let us now compare these data with the account given in the Homeric poems. The word " rhapsode " does not yet exist; we hear only of the singer " (aoc56s), who does not carry a wand or laurel-branch, but the lyre (40pyry), with which he accompanies his "song."

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  • The difference made by substituting the wand or branch of laurel for the lyre of the Homeric singer is a slighter one, though not without significance.

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  • The recitation of the Hesiodic poems was from the first unaccompanied by the lyre.

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  • We can only suppose that the lyre in the hands of the epic poet or reciter was in reality a piece of convention, a " survival " from the stage in which narrative poetry had a lyrical character.

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  • He plays the lyre at the banquets of the gods, and causes Marsyas to be flayed alive because he had boasted of his superior skill in playing the flute, and the ears of Midas to grow long because he had declared in favour of Pan, who contended that the flute was a better instrument than Apollo's favourite, the lyre.

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  • In the Apollo Citharoedus or Musagetes in the Vatican, he is crowned with laurel and wears the long, flowing robe of the Ionic bard, and his form is almost feminine in its fulness; in a statue at Rome of the older and more vigorous type he is naked and holds a lyre in his left hand; his right arm rests upon his head, and a griffin is seated at his side.

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  • 9 represents a bearded Apollo, playing on the lyre, in a chariot drawn by winged horses; fig.

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  • The culture prevailing in the Horn of Africa is, naturally, mainly Hamito Semitic; here are found both cylindrical and bee-hive huts, the sword (which has been adopted by the Masai to the south), the lyre (which has found its way to some of the Nilotic tribes) and the head-rest.

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  • 11) mentions the dove, fish, ship, lyre, anchor, as suitable devices for Christian signet rings.

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  • They were very fond of music, and it was the custom for their ambassadors the priests to present themselves clad in white, playing the lyre and singing songs.

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  • As priest, Eumolpus purifies Heracles from the murder of the Centaurs; as musician, he instructs him (as well as Linus and Orpheus) in playing the lyre, and is the reputed inventor of vocal accompaniments to the flute.

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  • The graceful Menura superba, or lyre-bird, with its tail feathers spread in the shape of a lyre, is a very characteristic form.

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  • In 1831 Wheatstone by his " magic lyre" experiment showed that, when the sounding-boards of two musical instruments are connected together by a rod of pine wood, a tune played on one will be faithfully reproduced by the other.

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  • The lyre was carried to heaven by the Muses, and was placed amongst the stars.

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  • Marsyas found it, and having acquired great skill in playing it, challenged Apollo to a contest with his lyre.

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  • He was trained in all manly accomplishments by heroes of the highest renown in each, until in a transport of anger at a reprimand he slew Linus, his instructor in music, with the lyre.

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  • 1, 62) means by saying that he "sustained the burden of epic poetry with the lyre."

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  • The sailors, desirous of hearing so famous a musician, consented, and the poet, standing on the deck of the ship, in full minstrel's attire, sang a dirge accompanied by his lyre.

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  • Another conception of them is that of singers of the lament for the dead, for which reason they are often used in the adornment of tombs, and represented beating their breasts and tearing their hair or playing the flute or lyre.

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  • It may even be admitted that the swift-flowing movement, and the simplicity of thought and style, which we admire in the Iliad are an inheritance from the earlier " lays " - the 104a &v&p&v such as Achilles and Patroclus sang to the lyre in their tent.

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  • The true-born children of the lyre high emprise of the soul can never tire.

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  • A fine fresco of Apollo playing a lyre - see picture - is thought to represent the young Nero.

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  • Like her brother Apollo, Artemis was also associated with music, and was frequently depicted carrying a lyre.

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  • To the left, a standing female holding a lyre.

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  • We must tune the lyre for Winter moods, As the birds fly higher to southern woods.

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  • The shepherd chosen by her in her holy heart, Gudea, the ruler of Lagac, placed the lyre (?

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  • He immediately killed a tortoise and, hollowing out its shell for a sounding board, invented the lyre.

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  • When he sang his songs to the Orphic lyre, possessed by a divine frenzy, Ficino knew what Orpheus knew.

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  • V Make me thy lyre, even as the forest is: What if my leaves are falling like its own?

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  • Teacher mended the broken lyre of my life and gave me mental concepts to replace sight and hearing.

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  • Apollo is the god of music, playing a golden lyre.

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  • lyre player on the side panel of the throne.

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  • And must thy lyre, so long divine, Degenerate into hands like mine?

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  • Next, the herald came forward carrying Demodocus ' ringing lyre.

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  • Spiridion (1838) and Les Sept cordes de la lyre (1840) are mystic echoes of Lamennais.

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  • We are not without a clue to the pitch usual in the classic Greek and Alexandrian ages: the vocal octave to which the lyre was adapted was noted as from e to O.

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  • These were at first purely symbolical, meaningless to any but a Christian eye, such as the Vine, the Good Shepherd, the Sheep, the Fisherman, the Fish, &c. Even the personages of ancient mythology were pressed into the service of early Christian art, and Orpheus, taming the wild beasts with his lyre, symbolized the peaceful sway of Christ; and Ulysses, deaf to the Siren's song, represented the Believer triumphing over the allurements of sensual pleasure.

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  • It is, however, known that the Hungarians had their own martial songs, and that their princes kept lyre and lute who sang festal odes in praise of the national relics.

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  • Its strained and inharmonious chords are Carinthia, Gorizia, Istria, Croatia, Slavonia, Dalmatia, Ragusa, Bosnia, Montenegro, Herzegovina, Serbia, Bulgaria and Lower Hungary," and " on the great lyre of Europe they must harmonize once more."

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  • The recitation of the Hesiodic poems was from the first unaccompanied by the lyre, i.e.

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  • Toute la lyre, his latest legacy to the world, would be enough, though no other evidence were left, to show that the author was one of the very greatest among poets and among men; unsurpassed in sublimity of spirit, in spontaneity of utterance, in variety of power, and in perfection of workmanship; infinite and profound beyond all reach of praise at once in thought and in sympathy, in perception and in passion; master of all the simplest as of all the subtlest melodies or symphonies of song that ever found expression in a Border ballad or a Pythian ode.

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  • The lyre and harp soundtrack was replaced with wailing heavy metal guitars.

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  • The word lyric derives from an ancient Greek word for a song sung with a lyre.

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