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lynchburg

lynchburg

lynchburg Sentence Examples

  • ALLEN GRANBERY THURMAN (1813-1895), American jurist and statesman, was born at Lynchburg, Virginia, on the 13th of November 1813.

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  • The college in 1907-1908 had 150 students and a faculty of 16; it publishes an endowed historical series called The John P. Branch Historical Papers of Randolph-Macon College; and it is a part of the "RandolphMacon System of Colleges and Academies," which includes, besides, Randolph-Macon Academy (1890) at Bedford City, Virginia, and Randolph-Macon Academy (1892) at Front Royal, Virginia, both for boys; Randolph-Macon Woman's College (1893) at Lynchburg, Virginia, which in 1907-1908 had an enrolment of 390; and Randolph-Macon Institute, for girls, Danville, Virginia, which was admitted into the "System" in 1897.

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  • of Lynchburg.

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  • It was expected that he would move towards Lynchburg, as part of a combined movement against Lee's communications.

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  • "CARTER GLASS (1858-), American politician, was born at Lynchburg, Va., Jan.

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  • He studied in the schools of his native town; learned the printer's trade, which he followed several years; and became proprietor of the Daily News and the Daily Advance, the morning and evening papers of Lynchburg.

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  • General Hunter, who replaced Sigel, won a combat at Piedmont, and marched on the 8th of June towards Lynchburg.

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  • of Lynchburg, in the S.

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  • Barytes is mined near Lynchburg; the value of the output in 1907 was $32,833, since which date the output has decreased.

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  • and W.: the Southern railway, with its main line traversing the state in the direction of its greatest length leaving Washington to run south-west through Alexandria, Charlottesville, Lynchburg and Danville to the North Carolina line, with connexions to Richmond and a line to Norfolk on the east; the Atlantic Coast line with its main lines running S.

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  • from Richmond and Norfolk; the Norfolk & Western crossing the state from east to west in the southern part with Norfolk its eastern terminus, passing through Lynchburg and leaving the state at the south-western corner at Bristol, and the Chesapeake & Ohio crossing the state from east to west farther north than the Norfolk & Western from Newport News on the coast through Richmond to the West Virginia line.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Richmond (the capital), Norfolk, Petersburg, Roanoke, Newport News, Lynchburg, Portsmouth and Danville.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.

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  • Watson et all., Mineral Resources of Virginia (Lynchburg, 1907).

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  • ALLEN GRANBERY THURMAN (1813-1895), American jurist and statesman, was born at Lynchburg, Virginia, on the 13th of November 1813.

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  • The college in 1907-1908 had 150 students and a faculty of 16; it publishes an endowed historical series called The John P. Branch Historical Papers of Randolph-Macon College; and it is a part of the "RandolphMacon System of Colleges and Academies," which includes, besides, Randolph-Macon Academy (1890) at Bedford City, Virginia, and Randolph-Macon Academy (1892) at Front Royal, Virginia, both for boys; Randolph-Macon Woman's College (1893) at Lynchburg, Virginia, which in 1907-1908 had an enrolment of 390; and Randolph-Macon Institute, for girls, Danville, Virginia, which was admitted into the "System" in 1897.

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  • of Lynchburg.

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  • It was expected that he would move towards Lynchburg, as part of a combined movement against Lee's communications.

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  • "CARTER GLASS (1858-), American politician, was born at Lynchburg, Va., Jan.

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  • He studied in the schools of his native town; learned the printer's trade, which he followed several years; and became proprietor of the Daily News and the Daily Advance, the morning and evening papers of Lynchburg.

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  • General Hunter, who replaced Sigel, won a combat at Piedmont, and marched on the 8th of June towards Lynchburg.

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  • of Lynchburg, in the S.

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  • Barytes is mined near Lynchburg; the value of the output in 1907 was $32,833, since which date the output has decreased.

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  • and W.: the Southern railway, with its main line traversing the state in the direction of its greatest length leaving Washington to run south-west through Alexandria, Charlottesville, Lynchburg and Danville to the North Carolina line, with connexions to Richmond and a line to Norfolk on the east; the Atlantic Coast line with its main lines running S.

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  • from Richmond and Norfolk; the Norfolk & Western crossing the state from east to west in the southern part with Norfolk its eastern terminus, passing through Lynchburg and leaving the state at the south-western corner at Bristol, and the Chesapeake & Ohio crossing the state from east to west farther north than the Norfolk & Western from Newport News on the coast through Richmond to the West Virginia line.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Richmond (the capital), Norfolk, Petersburg, Roanoke, Newport News, Lynchburg, Portsmouth and Danville.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning which are not under state control are: Washington and Lee University (nonsectarian, 1749), at Lexington; Hampden-Sidney College (Presbyterian, 1776), at Hampden-Sidney; Richmond College (Baptist, 1832), at Richmond; Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, 1832), at Ashland; Emory and Henry College (Methodist Episcopal, 1838), at Emory; Roanoke College (Lutheran, 1853), at Salem; Bridgewater College (German Baptist, 1879), at Bridgewater; Fredericksburg College (Presbyterian, 1893), at Fredericksburg; Virginia Union University (Baptist, 1899), at Richmond; and Virginia Christian College (Christian, 1903), at Lynchburg.

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  • Watson et all., Mineral Resources of Virginia (Lynchburg, 1907).

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  • He called to him:--"My friend, which of these roads shall I travel to go to Lynchburg?"

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  • The world's largest Christian university is located in Lynchburg, Virginia.

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