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lyme

lyme Sentence Examples

  • The bone-bed of Axmouth in Devonshire and Westbury and Aust in Gloucestershire, in the Penarth or Rhaetic series of strata, contains the scales, teeth and bones of saurians and fishes, together with abundance of coprolites; but neither there nor at Lyme Regis is there a sufficient quantity of phosphatic material to render the working of it for agricultural purposes remunerative.

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  • He was elected to represent Lyme Regis in Elizabeth's second parliament of 1563 as well as for Banbury, and preferred to sit for the former borough.

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  • LYME REGIS, a market town and municipal borough and watering-place in the western parliamentary division of Dorsetshire, England, 151 m.

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  • No evidence of settlement on the site of Lyme Regis exists before that afforded by a grant, dated 774, purporting to be by Cynewulf, king of the West-Saxons, of land here to the church of Sherborne, and a similar grant by King Æthelstan to the church of Glastonbury.

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  • In 1086 three manors of Lyme are mentioned: that belonging to Sherborne abbey, which was granted at the dissolution to Thomas Goodwin, who alienated it in the following year; that belonging to Glastonbury, which seems to have passed into lay lands during the middle ages, and that belonging to William Belet.

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  • The last was acquired by the family of Bayeux, from whom it passed by marriage to Elias de Rabayne, whose nephew, Peter Baudrat, surrendered it to the crown in1315-1316when the king became lord of one moiety of the borough, henceforth known as Lyme Regis.

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  • Lyme ranked as a port in 1234, and Edward I.

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  • granted Lyme to the burgesses at a fee-farm of 32 marks; on the petition of the inhabitants, who were impoverished by tempests and high tides, this was reduced to loo shillings in 1410 and to 5 marks in 1481.

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  • In 1591 Elizabeth incorporated Lyme, and further charters were obtained from James I., Charles II.

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  • Lyme returned two members to parliament from 1295 to 1832 when the representation was reduced to one.

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  • Its medieval importance as the only shelter between Portland Roads and the river Exe caused the burgesses to receive grants of quayage for its maintenance in 1335 and many subsequent years, while its convenience probably did much to bring upon Lyme the unsuccessful siege by Prince Maurice in 1644.

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  • In 1685 Lyme was the scene of the landing of James, duke of Monmouth, in his attempt upon the throne.

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  • no movement; and when on the 11th of June Monmouth's three ships, having eluded the royal fleet, arrived off Lyme Regis, he landed amid the curiosity rather than the sympathy of the inhabitants.

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  • The outcrop of the Lias, mainly clay with thin limestones and ironstones, runs in an almost continuous band across the country from Lyme Regis, through Bath, Cheltenham, near Leicester, and Lincoln to Redcar in Yorkshire.

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  • Thorpe Mandeville, Helion Bumstead, Higham Ferrers, Swaffham Bulbeck, Stoke Gifford, Shepton Mallet; similarly names like Lyme Regis, King's Sutton, Monks' Kirby, Zeal Monachorum, Milton Abbas, Bishop's Waltham, Prior's Dean, Huish Episcopi date from feudal times.

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  • Elymus arenarius (lyme grass) occurs on sandy sea-shores in the north temperate zone and is a useful sand-binder.

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  • Warren was named in honour of a surveyorMoses Warren, of New Lyme, Connecticut - employed by the Connecticut Land Company, which sold the land to the first settlers.

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  • dignitaryeral Manager had traveled by car from Dorchester to Lyme Regis where he met with the town's civic dignitaries.

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  • microhabitat types at Lyme Regis.

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  • Everyone is at risk for Lyme disease, including newborns.

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  • Lyme Regis " She sells seashells by the seashore " Nursery Rhyme inspired by Mary Manning, a Lyme Regis paleontologist.

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  • seashells by the seashore " Nursery Rhyme inspired by Mary Manning, a Lyme Regis paleontologist.

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  • The down side is that the area around Lyme Bay is quite silty.

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  • tapeworm infestation or Lyme disease.

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  • Before publication, I sent the typescript to Lyme Regis for approval, and it came back with emendations on every page.

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  • The bone-bed of Axmouth in Devonshire and Westbury and Aust in Gloucestershire, in the Penarth or Rhaetic series of strata, contains the scales, teeth and bones of saurians and fishes, together with abundance of coprolites; but neither there nor at Lyme Regis is there a sufficient quantity of phosphatic material to render the working of it for agricultural purposes remunerative.

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  • The following analysis of a sauriocoprolite from Lyme Regis is given by T.

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  • He was elected to represent Lyme Regis in Elizabeth's second parliament of 1563 as well as for Banbury, and preferred to sit for the former borough.

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  • LYME REGIS, a market town and municipal borough and watering-place in the western parliamentary division of Dorsetshire, England, 151 m.

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  • No evidence of settlement on the site of Lyme Regis exists before that afforded by a grant, dated 774, purporting to be by Cynewulf, king of the West-Saxons, of land here to the church of Sherborne, and a similar grant by King Æthelstan to the church of Glastonbury.

    0
    0
  • In 1086 three manors of Lyme are mentioned: that belonging to Sherborne abbey, which was granted at the dissolution to Thomas Goodwin, who alienated it in the following year; that belonging to Glastonbury, which seems to have passed into lay lands during the middle ages, and that belonging to William Belet.

    0
    0
  • The last was acquired by the family of Bayeux, from whom it passed by marriage to Elias de Rabayne, whose nephew, Peter Baudrat, surrendered it to the crown in1315-1316when the king became lord of one moiety of the borough, henceforth known as Lyme Regis.

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  • Lyme ranked as a port in 1234, and Edward I.

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  • granted Lyme to the burgesses at a fee-farm of 32 marks; on the petition of the inhabitants, who were impoverished by tempests and high tides, this was reduced to loo shillings in 1410 and to 5 marks in 1481.

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  • In 1591 Elizabeth incorporated Lyme, and further charters were obtained from James I., Charles II.

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  • Lyme returned two members to parliament from 1295 to 1832 when the representation was reduced to one.

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    0
  • Its medieval importance as the only shelter between Portland Roads and the river Exe caused the burgesses to receive grants of quayage for its maintenance in 1335 and many subsequent years, while its convenience probably did much to bring upon Lyme the unsuccessful siege by Prince Maurice in 1644.

    0
    0
  • In 1685 Lyme was the scene of the landing of James, duke of Monmouth, in his attempt upon the throne.

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  • no movement; and when on the 11th of June Monmouth's three ships, having eluded the royal fleet, arrived off Lyme Regis, he landed amid the curiosity rather than the sympathy of the inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • The outcrop of the Lias, mainly clay with thin limestones and ironstones, runs in an almost continuous band across the country from Lyme Regis, through Bath, Cheltenham, near Leicester, and Lincoln to Redcar in Yorkshire.

    0
    0
  • Thorpe Mandeville, Helion Bumstead, Higham Ferrers, Swaffham Bulbeck, Stoke Gifford, Shepton Mallet; similarly names like Lyme Regis, King's Sutton, Monks' Kirby, Zeal Monachorum, Milton Abbas, Bishop's Waltham, Prior's Dean, Huish Episcopi date from feudal times.

    0
    0
  • Elymus arenarius (lyme grass) occurs on sandy sea-shores in the north temperate zone and is a useful sand-binder.

    0
    0
  • Warren was named in honour of a surveyorMoses Warren, of New Lyme, Connecticut - employed by the Connecticut Land Company, which sold the land to the first settlers.

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    0
  • Lyme Regis " She sells seashells by the seashore " Nursery Rhyme inspired by Mary Manning, a Lyme Regis paleontologist.

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  • The down side is that the area around Lyme Bay is quite silty.

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  • From ticks your dog may contract tapeworm infestation or Lyme disease.

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  • Before publication, I sent the typescript to Lyme Regis for approval, and it came back with emendations on every page.

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  • Ticks are far worse, causing infection at the bite site and also transferring dangerous diseases such as Lyme disease.

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  • Don't forget to ask if there are health risks native to your destination such as Heart worm or Lyme Disease.

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  • Advantage works by killing adult fleas, while Frontline kills fleas at multiple life stages and also kills ticks that can carry Lyme disease.

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  • It is very ornamental, and may be grown in the same way as the Lyme Grass.

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  • These tiny ticks can carry Lyme disease.

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  • If you spend time outdoors in areas that are possibly infested with deer ticks it is important to know the symptoms of Lyme disease.

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  • The physician will also exclude other potential causes for the symptoms and rash, including rubella, infectious mononucleosis, bacterial infections such as Lyme disease, allergic reactions, and lupus.

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  • Lyme disease, spread by ticks, can cause encephalitis, as can Colorado tick fever.

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  • The bacterial infection involved in Lyme disease has also been demonstrated as causing some cases of Bell's palsy.

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  • Clearly the overwhelming majority of children that contract mononucleosis, cold sores, Lyme disease, cold or flu do not develop Bell's palsy.

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  • Lyme disease-An acute, recurrent, inflammatory disease involving one or a few joints, and transmitted by the bite of ticks carrying the spiral-shaped bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

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  • The condition was originally described in the community of Lyme, Connecticut, but has also been reported in other parts of the United States and other countries.

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  • Lyme disease is an inflammatory disease transmitted through the bite of a deer tick carrying the spiral-shaped bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

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  • Lyme disease is also called Lyme borreliosis.

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  • Lyme disease is an inflammatory, systemic disease, meaning that it affects multiple body systems.

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  • Borrelia burgdorferi, the spiral-shaped bacterium called a spirochete, that causes Lyme disease, was not discovered until 1981 by Willy Burgdorfer.

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  • Although Lyme disease is easily treated, it is not easily diagnosed, since symptoms are often attributed to other conditions.

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  • If not treated early and properly with antibiotics, Lyme disease can have long-term and disabling effects.

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  • In its early stages, Lyme disease affects the skin and produces flu-like symptoms; the disease spreads to the joints and nervous system in its later stages.

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  • Lyme disease is a vector-borne disease, meaning that it is transmitted from one host to another by a carrier-called a vector-that transmits but does not become infected with the disease.

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  • In the United States, the deer tick in the genus Ixodes is the vector for Borrelia burgdorferi and Lyme disease transmission.

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  • Lyme disease is transmitted when a tick carrying the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium bites a human to feed on blood.

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  • It is the next stage-the nymph-that causes most cases of Lyme disease.

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  • Neither Borrelia burgdorferi nor Lyme disease can be transmitted directly from one person to another or from pets to humans.

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  • Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States.

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  • According to the CDC, the actual number of Lyme cases may exceed 200,000 due to underreporting and limitations in disease surveillance methods.

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  • CDC statistics indicate that the largest proportion of Lyme disease cases occurs in children aged five to 14 years, and more than 50 percent of Lyme disease cases involve children under age 12.

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  • In the United States, the Great Lakes region and the Pacific Northwest also have a higher incidence of Lyme disease.

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  • Lyme disease is caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium.

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  • Treating Lyme disease early and thoroughly is important because Lyme disease can hide for long periods within the body in a clinically latent state.

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  • Furthermore, when and how symptoms of Lyme disease appear can vary widely from patient to patient.

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  • People who experience recurrent bouts of symptoms over time are said to have chronic Lyme disease.

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  • The most recognizable indicator of Lyme disease is a rash around the site of the tick bite.

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  • About 80 percent of patients with Lyme disease develop EM.

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  • Of those who develop Lyme disease, about 50 percent notice flu-like symptoms, including fatigue, headache, chills and fever, muscle and joint pain, and lymph node swelling.

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  • Many children with Lyme disease can develop neurologic symptoms within a few weeks following a tick bite.

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  • In adults, less common effects of Lyme disease are heart abnormalities (such as irregular rhythm or cardiac block) and eye abnormalities (such as swelling of the cornea, tissue, or eye muscles and nerves).

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  • However, children with Lyme disease frequently complain of chest pain and have papilledema (swelling of the optic nerve).

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  • In addition, children with late-stage Lyme disease are more likely than adults to have fever and joint swelling and pain.

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  • Most doctors will not prescribe antibiotics immediately following a tick bite but will ask parents to monitor their child for symptoms of early Lyme disease.

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  • In children, symptoms of Lyme disease can mimic those of other common childhood conditions, and children may not realize they have been bitten by a tick; therefore, diagnosis of Lyme disease in children can be difficult.

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  • Therefore, diagnosis of Lyme disease relies on information the patient and parents provide and the doctor's clinical judgment, particularly through elimination of other possible causes of the symptoms.

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  • Differential diagnosis (distinguishing Lyme disease from other diseases) is based on clinical evaluation with laboratory tests used for clarification when necessary.

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  • In February 1999 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new blood test for Lyme disease called PreVue.

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  • Doctors may not consider Lyme disease if it is rare locally but will take it into account if a patient mentions vacationing in an area where the disease is commonly found.

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  • The treatment for Lyme disease is antibiotic therapy.

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  • If a child has strong indications of Lyme disease (symptoms and medical history), the doctor will probably begin treatment on the presumption of this disease.

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  • The longer a patient is ill with Lyme disease before treatment, the longer the course of therapy must be, and the more aggressive the treatment.

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  • When symptoms indicate nervous system involvement or a severe episode of Lyme disease, an intravenous antibiotic (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ampicillin) may be given for four to six weeks or longer.

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  • Some physicians consider intravenous ceftriaxone the best therapy for any late manifestation of disease, but treatments for late Lyme disease are still controversial as of 2004.

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  • Supportive therapies may minimize symptoms of Lyme disease or improve the immune response.

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  • A Western herb, spilanthes (Spilanthes spp.), may be effective in treating diseases such as Lyme disease that are caused by spirochetes (spiral-shaped bacteria).

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  • It is important to note that no alternative treatments have been proven to cure Lyme disease.

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  • Only a small percentage of Lyme disease patients fail to respond or relapse (have recurring episodes).

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  • Most fatalities reported with Lyme disease involved patients coinfected with babesiosis.

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  • A vaccine for Lyme disease known as LYMErix was available from 1998 to 2002, when it was removed from the United States market.

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  • Disseminated Lyme disease sometimes causes Bell's palsy.

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  • Erythema migrans-A red skin rash that is one of the first signs of Lyme disease in about 75% of patients.

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  • Lyme borreliosis-Another name for Lyme disease.

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  • Syphilis and Lyme disease are caused by spirochetes.

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  • "Bacterial Diseases Caused by Spirochetes: Lyme Disease (Lyme Borreliosis)."

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  • Krupp, et al. "Study and Treatment of Post Lyme Disease (STOP-LD): A Randomized Double Masked Clinical Trial."

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  • Pontrelli. "Central Nervous System Lyme Disease."

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  • S. "Current and Novel Therapies for Lyme Disease."

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  • P., et al. "Duration of Antibiotic Therapy for Early Lyme Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial."

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  • Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey Inc. 43 Winton Road, East Brunswick, NJ 08816.

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  • "Tick-Borne Diseases, Lyme." eMedicine, December 13, 2002.

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  • "Neurological Manifestations of Lyme Disease in Children."

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  • Some studies suggest that among other things, colostrum is one effective element in the treatment of Lyme disease.

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  • Finally, Irene McGee shared her battle against Lyme disease, a condition not previously covered on a television reality show.

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  • Coprolites have been found at Lyme Regis, enclosed by the ribs of ichthyosauri, and in the remains of several species of fish; also in the abdominal cavities of a species of fossil fish, Macropoma Mantelli, from the chalk of Lewes.

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  • Coprolites have been found at Lyme Regis, enclosed by the ribs of ichthyosauri, and in the remains of several species of fish; also in the abdominal cavities of a species of fossil fish, Macropoma Mantelli, from the chalk of Lewes.

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