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lydia

lydia

lydia Sentence Examples

  • Maybe I'll get to fire Lydia Larkin.

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  • Lydia Larkin continued to stare, then shrugged and began filling her glass.

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  • After it was repeated, Dean answered it to find Lydia Larkin.

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  • After it was repeated, Dean answered it to find Lydia Larkin.

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  • I see you've met Lydia.

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  • What's the story on sweet Lydia?

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  • The next stop on his list was visiting Ms. Lydia Larkin, deputy sheriff, whose presentation of a speeding ticket and general attitude still pissed him off, just remembering it.

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  • Lydia lived in a newly constructed condo on Oak Street as it drifted out of the main body of town and became the back road to neighboring Ridgway, ten miles away.

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  • Close on his heels was Lydia Larkin, tucking in her blouse and adjusting her skirt.

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  • Lydia glanced up and down and then took Fitzgerald's face in her hands and kissed him full on the mouth—no glad-to-see-you-grandpa embrace.

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  • He explained his aborted visit to Lydia Larkin and watching as she embraced her boss.

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  • Deputy Sheriff Lydia Larkin drove by in her official white Blazer and Dean repressed the impulse to give her a one-finger salute.

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  • He wondered if it was Lydia Larkin, the new deputy, hot on the trail of a speeder.

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  • Lydia Larkin moved into the glow and stood silhouetted before him.

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  • "Can you stand on your own here?" he asked, as Lydia remained pressed against him.

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  • Lydia croaked in a panicked whisper.

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  • He had turned to check Lydia's light above him when another display followed.

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  • Lydia called out to him as he moved away from her.

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  • Instead of inching his way back to Lydia he remained by the wrecked Jeep.

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  • Dean motioned toward Lydia's direction.

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  • Dean was seated on the step of a rescue vehicle when Lydia was pulled up to the road.

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  • He turned to Lydia Larkin as one of the EMT personnel hurried over.

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  • Lydia looked over at Dean.

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  • Dean's Jeep was at the uphill end of the line of cluttered vehicles and Lydia Larkin was long gone by the time he was free to leave.

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  • Lydia was not as tall as Jennifer Radisson, but only by an inch or two.

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  • Lydia fell silent, eyes closed.

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  • Lydia, you don't owe me a damn thing but some answers.

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  • Lydia spoke in a whisper.

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  • Dean could tell by the look on her face that Lydia wanted to forget about Billy Langstrom and the accident, but she answered.

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  • Lydia thought a moment.

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  • They were close to wrapping up the session when deputy Lydia Larkin moved quietly into the room.

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  • Dean joined the applause while Lydia Larkin looked embarrassed.

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  • Lydia Larkin moved a step forward.

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  • He did so now, describing Lydia's reluctance in descending to the accident, but glossing over just how petrified she'd been.

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  • But in Fitzgerald's defense, there were two pint bottles of vodka at Lydia Larkin's place, so he may have bought them for her.

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  • Dean thought about Lydia Larkin, the new redhead in town.

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  • "There's Lydia Larkin," Cynthia said, reluctance evident in her voice.

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  • Ten minutes later, Lydia Larkin answered her door dressed in very tight and very small white shorts with a red elastic thing that covered only her breasts and nothing of the acres of skin in the middle.

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  • Lydia simply gave a dismissive wave of her hand and went inside, leaving Dean to follow.

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  • Let's stop pretending, Lydia.

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  • I saw you—when he left your place The fire in Lydia Larkin's eyes cooled appreciably.

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  • He told Lydia about Fitzgerald buying the vodka on the morning of the Fourth of July, denying it, and saying at the debate that there was liquor in Billy's vehicle when he, Dean, felt there wasn't.

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  • There was nervousness in Lydia's voice.

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  • Lydia turned her back to him, and as she walked to her bedroom, pulled her scanty top off over her head.

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  • Lydia Larkin thought the story was nonsense.

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  • It was Lydia Larkin.

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  • Something between this Lydia and Fitzgerald?

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  • Lydia Larkin opened the door as soon as she spotted Dean.

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  • Lydia walked away from him, down the path to the beginning of the trail that led back to an area known as the Big Blue Wilderness.

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  • I can't lie for you, Lydia.

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  • Lydia Larkin spun out of the meadow in a cloud of dust, leaving Dean to await its dissipation before following in his open vehicle.

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  • But what Lydia suggested he was up to was the worst kind of criminal sexual harassment.

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  • If he could only be sure it wasn't Lydia who'd chased Billy Langstrom down the mountain, siren screaming, to his rolling, crushing death.

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  • He brought Cynthia up to speed on his meeting with Lydia after confirming there was no further word on Martha's disappearance.

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  • Lydia Larkin had led Dean in with neither exchanging a word.

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  • He looked around the corner to see if Lydia was listening.

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  • "Don't say anything," Lydia said.

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  • Lydia did all but ignore Cynthia who in turn was equally cool to the visitor.

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  • "Lydia, I don't like this sneaking around business," Dean said.

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  • Lydia just glanced at her blankly and turned her attention to Dean.

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  • Lydia put her hand on his knee, as if Cynthia were not in the room.

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  • Before she could say a word, Lydia too stood up and looked down on Cynthia, who was ten inches shorter.

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  • So that's Miss Lydia Larkin.

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  • It was Lydia's trailing smoke that floated it to life.

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  • Lydia, the long distance runner—now a smoker.

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  • Lydia Larkin's voice broke the silence.

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  • "What will Fitzgerald do?" was Cynthia first reaction when Dean told her of Lydia's conversation with her boss.

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  • I'm a witness in his car and the state guys were in Lydia's vehicle.

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  • There's not enough to charge him with anything, but I have to give Lydia credit; she set him up like a bowling alley.

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  • I'd guess he'll think twice now before intimidating Ms. Lydia Larkin!

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  • I can't say I like Lydia very much but I'd hate to see him hurt her.

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  • Dean then told Fred of Lydia Larkin's clever set up of Fitzgerald.

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  • It was dark as he peddled, headlamp on, down the side streets of the now-quiet town and out the back road the short distance to Lydia's place.

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  • There was a sheriff's vehicle parked out front, but Dean wasn't sure if it belonged to Fitzgerald or Lydia.

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  • He called Lydia's name but it was several minutes before he heard steps, and more time before the door was opened.

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  • Lydia Larkin was bent over at the waist, hardly able to stand, clutching her mid-section.

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  • "You need a doctor, Lydia," he said as she reached for a rag on the coffee table.

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  • Lydia's gun rested on the coffee table.

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  • This time there was no doubt that Lydia laughed but didn't answer.

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  • Lydia rose as if to stop him.

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  • Use some sense, Lydia.

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  • Lydia, I want no part of covering up a crime.

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  • Lydia Larkin considered her answer.

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  • David Dean harbored serious doubts about leaving Lydia Larkin's apartment without either contacting the police or calling an ambulance—or maybe a lawyer.

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  • His suspicions concerning Lydia's actions and his continued silence in not reporting them came too close to involving him as an accessory in whatever she might have done.

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  • He had seen Lydia's bloodstained apartment and witnessed its disrupted condition.

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  • Brandon Westlake, mournfully depressed, readied for Billy Langstrom's funeral while Dean wondered if Lydia Larkin might be involved in funeral plans of her own.

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  • There was no sign of Fitzgerald, Lydia Larkin, the jailer, or Fred O'Connor.

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  • And Lydia's taking a sick day—woman stuff, I guess.

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  • I talked to Lydia on the phone.

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  • It was an abridged version, excluding any mention of last night's session at Lydia's apartment but detailing the missing bones and Dean's suspicion concerning Billy Langstrom's death.

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  • Dean then brought Lydia Larkin into the picture by telling Jake Weller how she had radioed Fitzgerald with the two Denver investigators in her car, making the call from the spot where he claimed she'd be out of reception.

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  • Weller added, "Maybe Lydia reported that business to Denver and that's why Fitzgerald got recalled."

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  • Dean was happy to move the subject away from Fitzgerald's evening encounter with Lydia.

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  • Remaining quiet about Lydia's prior night's involvement with Fitzgerald was looking like a very poor decision.

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  • They spent the evening in their private quarters mulling over the possibilities and skirting the question that Lydia had actually killed her boss, which in spite of mounting concern, Dean continued to find unlikely.

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  • While he was thrilled that Dean might now be running unopposed, he was positive Lydia had killed her boss.

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  • Dean crept from the room, wondering if it was Lydia returning to visit.

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  • Lydia Larkin is running for sheriff.

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  • I'm not sure running against Lydia will be any easier than taking on Fitzgerald.

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  • Until he knew exactly what had happened in Lydia's apartment and the details of Fitzgerald's departure anything was possible.

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  • He remained, however, uncertain how to do so without immersing himself further in Lydia Larkin's sordid activities.

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  • Knowing Lydia Larkin, I'm not so sure.

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  • Dean didn't think Lydia Larkin did anything for the fun of it.

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  • You think Lydia knocked off Fitzgerald so she could run for sheriff?

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  • He mulled the subject over in his mind and decided to speak to Lydia Larkin again.

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  • It was Lydia Larkin, in uniform, in her official vehicle.

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  • "I hear you got the kid back," Lydia said as he opened the passenger side door and slid in beside her.

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  • That was an incredibly stupid stunt to pull, Lydia.

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  • Lydia turned off the engine and they sat there alone with no other cars in sight.

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  • Lydia slammed on the breaks, flinging Dean against his seat belt.

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  • Lydia Larkin was a wreck, as unstable as the night Billy Langstrom died.

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  • Lydia spoke not another word, ignoring Dean in favor of her thoughts as she raced back to town.

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  • When Dean told Fred about Fitzgerald's death Fred immediately, in his best I-told-you-so tone, assigned the guilt to Lydia Larkin.

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  • An autopsy would surely reveal Fitzgerald's knife wound, bringing Lydia Larkin's complicity into play, and probably Dean's.

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  • Lydia Larkin stood, feet apart, in the classic shooting position, both hands clamped on her smoking gun.

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  • Lydia mumbled, he raised his gun.

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  • Lydia staggered to her feet and joined them, leaving the grisly sight behind.

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  • In the days that followed, the shooting was ruled justified and Lydia Larkin was cleared of any wrongdoing.

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  • When pressed, they opined only that Brandon Westlake acted more suicidal than threatening but they had been with him for several minutes where Lydia had just arrived.

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  • Lydia Larkin was never brought into the picture.

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  • The headlines of the local newspaper proudly announced, "Under Sheriff Solves Fifty-Year-Old Murder," which Lydia neither confirmed nor denied, nor did the Deans offer public comment.

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  • When they questioned Jake Weller about the source of the high-level endorsement, he hinted Lydia Larkin knew someone in the system who'd pulled strings.

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  • Newly crowned heroine Lydia Larkin won the election by eight votes.

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  • Before Dean could contact Lydia to offer his congratulations, she visited Bird Song the day after Cynthia returned.

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  • Lydia left Cynthia standing by the sink and walked into the parlor with Dean.

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  • Finally, Lydia said, "I told your wife I was going to ask you," then added, "I really underestimated that woman."

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  • Are you sure you're comfortable with me working for Sheriff Lydia Larkin?

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  • Lydia is a bit— sexually aggressive.

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  • Lydia and I have an understanding, Cynthia was dabbing Mercurochrome on a cut knuckle.

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  • First you slap Fitzgerald, then you do lord-knows-what to Lydia!

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  • Lydia Larkin let loose a sigh of relief.

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  • Lydia >>

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  • by Ionia and Lydia, on the W.

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  • It was absorbed into the kingdom of Lydia, where Carian troops formed the bodyguard of the king.

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  • Friedrich, Archaologische Karte von Kleinasien (1899); Perrot and Chipiez, History of Art in Phrygia, Lydia, Caria and Lycia (Eng.

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  • 7 6 5 ff., is a mixture of Greek traditions with a few oriental elements; here the first king is Medos (the Median empire); his nameless son is succeeded by Cyrus, a blessed ruler, beloved by the gods, who gave peace to all his friends and conquered Lydia, Phrygia, Ionia.

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  • Soon after the conquest of the Median empire, Cyrus was attacked by a coalition of the other powers of the East, Babylon, Egypt and Lydia, joined by Sparta, the greatest military power of Greece.

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  • In the spring of 546 Croesus of Lydia began the attack and advanced into Cappadocia, while the other powers were still gathering their troops.

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  • decided to continue the war against Athens and give strong support to the Spartans, he sent in 408 the young prince into Asia Minor, as satrap of Lydia and Phrygia Major with Cappadocia, and commander of the Persian troops, "which gather into the field of Castolos" (Xen.

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  • War between Seleucus and Lysimachus broke out, and on the field of Coru-pedion in Lydia Lysimachus fell (281).

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  • For the same reason he abstained from drastic religious reforms in his capacity as high-priest of Lydia.

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  • He was the traditional king of Sipylus in Lydia (or of Phrygia), and was the intimate friend of Zeus and the other gods, to whose table he was admitted.

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  • The story of Tantalus is an echo of a semi-Greek kingdom, which had its seat at Sipylus, the oldest and holiest city of Lydia, the remains of which are still visible.

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  • The financial administration was entrusted to separate officials; we hear of such in Lydia (Arr.

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  • These two survivors of the forty years' conflict soon entered upon the crowning fight, and in 281 Lysimachus fell in the battle of Corupedion (in Lydia), leaving Seleucus virtually master of the empire.

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  • Syria, Pontus, Lydia, Galatia, and above all Thrace were sources of supply.

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  • After taking sketches of the most interesting objects and copying a number of inscriptions, he returned to Smyrna through Caria and Lydia.

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  • Burmeister regards the legend as an incident in the struggle between the followers of Dionysus and Apollo in Thebes, in which the former were defeated and driven back to Lydia.

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  • Heffter builds up the story round the dripping rock in Lydia, really representing an Asiatic goddess, but taken by the Greeks for an ordinary woman.

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  • The Pamphylians are first mentioned among the nations subdued by the Mermnad kings of Lydia, and afterwards passed in succession under the dominion of the Persian and Macedonian monarchs.

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  • Egypt had already recovered its independence (660 B.C.) with the help of mercenaries sent by Gyges of Lydia, who had vainly solicited aid from Assyria against his Cimmerian enemies.

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  • Through Phrygia and Lydia influences of this same Cappadocian civilization passed towards the west; and indeed, before the Greek colonization of Asia Minor, a loosely knit Hatti empire may have stretched even to the Aegean.

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  • The powers of Phrygia and Lydia rose successively out of its ruins, and continued to offer westward passage to influences of Mesopotamian culture till well into historic times.

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  • At this time the Hatti empire or confederacy probably included, on the west, both Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • SARDIS, more correctly Sardes (al Xap& ts), the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a conventus under the Roman Empire, and the metropolis of the province Lydia in later Roman and Byzantine times, was situated in the middle Hermus valley, at the foot of Mt.

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  • It still, however, retained its titular supremacy and continued to be the seat of the metropolitan bishop of the province of Lydia, formed in A.D.

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  • In Levantine waters connexions grew up with the great marts of Chalcis and Miletus, with the rulers of Lydia, Phrygia, Cyprus and Egypt.

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  • The king could do little against them; even Autophradates, satrap of Lydia, who had remained faithful, was forced for some time to unite himself with the rebels.

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  • He maintained his ascendancy until about 515, when Oroetes, the Persian governor of Lydia, who had been reproached for his failure to reduce Samos by force, lured him to the mainland by false promises of gain and put him to death by crucifixion.

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  • In tracing the growth of Persia from a petty subject kingdom to a vast dominant empire, he has occasion to set out the histories of Lydia, Media, Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, Scythia, Thrace, and to describe the countries and the peoples inhabiting them, their natural productions, climate, geographical position, monuments, &c.; while, in noting the contemporaneous changes in Greece, he is led to tell of the various migrations of the Greek race, their colonies, commerce, progress in the arts, revolutions, internal struggles, wars with one another, legislation, religious tenets and the like.

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  • According to Herodotus, the first mint was probably that established by Gyges in Lydia towards the end of the 8th century B.C. for the coining of gold, silver and electrum, an 1 Lenormant, La Monnaie dans l'antiquite', i.

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  • The Old-Dorian Hercules is represented in three cycles of myth, the Argive, the Boeotian and the Thessalian; the legends of Arcadia, Aetolia, Lydia, &c., and Italy are either local or symbolical and comparatively late.

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  • ALYATTES, king of Lydia (609-560 B.C.), the real founder of the Lydian empire, was the son of Sadyattes, of the house of the Mermnadae.

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  • Manisa, q.v.), a city of Lydia about 40 m.

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  • ALEXANDER OF TRALLES (ALEXANDER TRALLIANUS), Greek physician, born at Tralles in Lydia, lived probably about the middle of the 6th century and practised medicine with success at Rome.

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  • downwards, usually 167, in Aradus, Cilicia and on to the Aegean coast, in Lydia and in Macedonia (17).

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  • Note: That this unit was used for gold in Egypt, one thousand years before becoming a silver coin weight in Asia Minor, need not be dwelt on, when we see in the coinage of Lydia (17) gold pieces and silver on the same standard, which was expressly formed for silver alone, i.e.

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  • During the king's absence on a tour round the world in 1881, his sister, Mrs Lydia Dominis (b.

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  • of Asia Minor including the ancient Lydia, Ionia, Caria and western Lycia.

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  • LYDIA MARIA CHILD (1802-1880), American author, was born at Medford, Massachusetts, on the 11th of February 1802.

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  • See The Letters of Lydia Maria Child, with a Biographical Introduction by J.

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  • (2) Two towns named Hyrcania are mentioned, one in Hyrcania, the other in Lydia.

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  • It included Mysia, Lydia, Caria and Phrygia, and therefore, of course, Aeolis, Ionia and the Troad.

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  • He also married a Greek princess named Ladice, the daughter of Battus, king of Cyrene, and he made alliances with Polycrates of Samos and Croesus of Lydia.

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  • Benedict Arnold was a native of Norwich; Mrs Lydia H.

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  • Pharnabazus, weary of bearing the whole cost of the war for the Peloponnesians, agreed to a period of truce so that envoys might visit Susa, but at this stage the whole position was changed by the appointment of Cyrus the Younger as satrap of Lydia, Greater Phrygia and Cappadocia.

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  • Of these, one may note for their later celebrity Philadelphia in Lydia and Attalia on the Pamphylian coast.

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  • In Lydia " not a trace " of the old language was left in Strabo's time (Strabo xiv.

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  • Lydia, and aided by lonian and Carian mercenaries, extended and consolidated his power.i By the ninth year of his reign he was in full possession of Thebes.

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  • 34-45) related to have occurred, incidentally show in what high estimation the recreation of hunting was held in Lydia.

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  • The country named Phrygia in the better known period of history lies inland, separated from the sea by Paph]agonia, Bithynia, Mysia and Lydia.

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  • These monuments, which are found in Lydia, Phrygia, Cappadocia and Lycaonia, as well as in north and central Syria, point to the existence of a homogeneous civilization over those countries; they show a singularly marked style of art, and are frequently inscribed with a peculiar kind of hieroglyphics, engraved boustrophedon; and they originated probably from a great Hittite kingdom, whose kings ruled the countries from Lydia to the borders of Egypt.

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  • 5 When the Persians conquered Lydia they retained, at least for a time, this route, which they found in existence.

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  • Gyges, the first Mermnad king of Lydia (687-653), had a Phrygian mother.

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  • The kingdom of Lydia appears to have become important about the end of the 8th century, and to have completely barred the path between Phrygia and Cyme or Smyrna.

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  • The Maeander above its junction with the Lycus formed for a little way the boundary between Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • The Hermus drains a small district included in the Byzantine Phrygia, but in earlier times assigned to Lydia and Mysia.

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  • Monatsber (1879); Texier, Asie mineure (1862); Steuart, Ancient monuments of Lydia and Phrygia, besides the special chapters in the geographical treatises of Cramer, Vivien St Martin, Forbiger, &c., numerous articles by recent travellers; J.

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  • Armenia and Cappadocia were likewise subdued; the attempt to advance farther into Asia Minor led to a war with Alyattes of Lydia.

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  • According to Herodotus, he was the son of Cyaxares and reigned thirty-five years (584-550 B.C.); his wife was Aryenis, the daughter of Alyattes of Lydia (Herod.

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  • For the last eight years of his life after this sudden leap out of obscurity we have a faithful record of Sterne's feelings and movements in letters to various persons, published in 1 775 by his sole child and daughter, Lydia Sterne de Medalle, and in the Letters from Yorick to Eliza (1766-1767), also published in 1775.

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  • Farther south there are zones of serpentine, and of crystalline and schistose rocks, some of which are probably Palaeozoic. The direction of the folds of this region is from west to east, but on the borders of Phrygia and Mysia they meet the north-westerly extension of the Taurus folds and bend around the ancient mass of Lydia.

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  • The Phrygian power was broken in the 9th or 8th century B.C. by the Cimmerii, who entered Asia Minor through Armenia; and on its decline rose the kingdom of Lydia, with its centre at Sardis.

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  • 560-546 B.C.) carried the boundaries of Lydia to the Halys, and subdued the Greek colonies on the coast.

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  • Too jealous of each other to combine, and too demoralized by luxury to resist, they fell an easy prey to Lydia; and when the Lydian kingdom ended with the capture of Sardis by Cyrus, 546 B.C. they passed, almost without resistance, to Persia.

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  • The eastern shores of the Aegean, which the earliest historical records represent to us as the seat of a brilliant civilization, giving way before the advance of the great military empires (Lydia and afterwards Persia), are almost a blank in Homer's map. The line of settlements can be traced in the Catalogue from Crete to Rhodes, and embraces the neighbouring islands of Cos and Calymnos.

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  • Lysimachus crossed the Hellespont, and in 281 a decisive battle took place at the plain of Corus (Corupedion) in Lydia.

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  • 1713) in 1703, and in 1715 to Mrs Lydia George (d.

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  • Of the states which arose out of the shattered Assyrian Empire (Media, Babylon, Egypt, Cilicia and Lydia), Media was by far the strongest.

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  • Cyrus and hi~ Persians paid little heed to the treaties which the Median kink had concluded with the other powers; and the result was I great coalition against him, embracing Nabonidus of Babylon Amasis of Egypt, Croesus of Lydia, and the Spartans, whosi highly efficient army seemed to the Oriental states of great value In the spiing of 546 B.C., Croesus opened the attack.

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  • Cyrtt flung himself upon him, beat him at Pteria in Cappadocia and pursued him to Lydia.

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  • Thus a strong Persian propagandism arose especially in Armenia and Cappadocia, where the religion took deep root among the people, but also in Lydia and Lycia.

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  • 559), and several cities in Lydia.

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  • On his arrival at Ephesus a three months' truce was concluded with Tissaphernes, the satrap of Lydia and Caria, but negotiations conducted during that time proved fruitless, and on its termination Agesilaus raided Phrygia, where he easily won immense booty since Tissaphernes had concentrated his troops in Caria.

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  • Af ter spending the winter in organizing a cavalry force, he made a successful incursion into Lydia in the spring of 395.

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  • Of the three great river basins of Ionia and Lydia, those of the Hermus, Cayster and Maeander, it commanded the second, and had already access by easy passes to the other two.

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  • The city seems to have been more than once under tyrannical rule in the early Ionian period; and it fell thereafter first to Croesus of Lydia, and then to Cyrus, the Persian, and when the Ionian revolt against Persia broke out in the year 500 B.C. under the lead of Miletus, the city remained submissive to Persian rule.

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  • He continued true to the Romans during their wars with Antiochus and Perseus, and his kingdom spread over the greater part of western Asia Minor, including Mysia, Lydia, great part of Phrygia, Ionia and Caria.

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  • The kings of Cilicia and the Tabal offered their daughters to the harem of Assur-bani-pal; embassies came from Ararat, and even Gyges of Lydia despatched envoys to "the great king" in the hope of obtaining help against the Cimmerians.

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  • In the autumn of 1835 he married Miss Lydia Jackson of Plymouth, having previously purchased a spacious old house and garden at Concord.

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  • ARACHNE, in Greek mythology, the daughter of Idmon of Colophon in Lydia, a dyer in purple.

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  • Mention may also be made of the following: Hecataeus of Miletus (550-476); Acusilaus of Argos, 2 who paraphrased in prose (correcting the tradition where it seemed necessary) the genealogical works of Hesiod in the Ionic dialect; he confined his attention to the prehistoric period, and made no attempt at a real history; Charon of Lampsacus (c. 450), author of histories of Persia, Libya, and Ethiopia, of annals (a)pot) of his native town with lists of the prytaneis and archons, and of the chronicles of Lacedaemonian kings; Xanthus of Sardis in Lydia (c. 450), author of a history of Lydia, one of the chief authorities used by Nicolaus of Damascus (II.

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  • He cultivated friendly relations with the tyrants of Miletus and Mytilene, and maintained a connexion with the kings of Lydia, of Egypt and, possibly, of Phrygia.

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  • The worship of Dionysus was actively conducted in Asia Minor, particularly in Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • In Lydia his triumphant return from India was celebrated by an annual festival on Mount Tmolus; in Lydia he assumed the long beard and long robe which were of terwards given him in his character of the " Indian Bacchus," the conqueror of the East, who, after the campaigns of Alexander, was reported to have advanced as far as the Ganges.

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  • ROSIN (a later variant of "resin," q.v.) or Colophony (Colophonia resina, resin from Colophon in Lydia), the resinous constituent of the oleo-resin exuded by various species of pine, known in commerce as crude turpentine.

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  • Croesus of Lydia had formed an alliance with her.

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  • It was bounded by Lydia and Phrygia on the S., by Bithynia on the N.E., and by the Propontis and Aegean Sea on the N.

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  • The chief physical features of Mysia (considered apart from that of the Troad) are the two mountain-chains, Olympus (7600 ft.) in the north and Temnus in the south, which for some distance separates Mysia from Lydia, and is afterwards prolonged through Mysia to the neighbourhood of the Gulf of Adramyttium.

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  • LYDIA, in ancient geography, a district of Asia Minor, the boundaries of which it is difficult to fix, partly because they varied at different epochs.

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  • Under the Heraclid dynasty the limits of Lydia must have been already extended, since according to Strabo (xiii.

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  • Under the Mermnads Lydia became a maritime as well as an inland power.

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  • Lydia never again shrank back into its original dimensions.

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  • Lydia proper was exceedingly fertile.

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  • 4) that Sandon belongs not to Lydia but to Cilicia.

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  • According to the native historian Xanthus (460 B.C.) three dynasties ruled in succession over Lydia.

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  • Xanthus, however, puts Torrhebus in the place of Tyrsenus, and makes him the eponym of a district in Lydia.

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  • It is doubtful whether Xanthus recognized the Greek legends which brought Pelops from Lydia, or rather Maeonia, and made him the son of Tantalus.

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  • The Assyrian inscriptions have shown that the Assyrians had never crossed the Halys, much less known the name of Lydia, before the age of Assur-bani-pal, and consequently the theory which brought the Heraclids from Nineveh must be given up. But the Hittites, another Oriental people, deeply imbued with the elements of Babylonian culture, had overrun Asia Minor and established themselves on the shores of the Aegean before the reign of the Egyptian king Rameses II.

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  • The subject allies who then fight under their banners include the Masu or Mysians and the Dardani of the Troad, while the Hittites have left memorials in Lydia.

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  • Gyges (q.v.) put him to death and established the dynasty of the Mermnads, 687 B.C. Gyges initiated a new policy, that of making Lydia a maritime power; but towards the middle of his reign the kingdom was overrun by the Cimmerii.

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  • The trade and wealth of Lydia rapidly increased, and the Greek towns fell one after the other before the attacks of the Lydian kings.

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  • The result was that the king of Lydia became the richest prince of his age.

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  • After Alexander the Great's death, Lydia passed to Antigonus; then Achaeus made himself king at Sardis, but was defeated and put to death by Antiochus.

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  • The electrum coins of Lydia were of two kinds, one weighing 168.4 grains for the inland trade, and another of 224 grains for the trade with Ionia.

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  • The situation of Smyrna on the path of comir.erce between Lydia and the west raised it during the 7th century to the height of power and splendour.

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  • It lay at the head of au arm of the sea, which reached far inland and admitted the Greek trading ships into the heart of Lydia.

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  • by Lydia.

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  • This event may be referred to the middle of the 7th century B.C. About 700 B.C. Gyges, first Mermnad king of Lydia, invaded the territories of Smyrna and Miletus, and is said to have taken Colophon as his son Ardys did Priene.

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  • In parts of Asia Minor (Lydia and Caria) the monks were even forced to marry the nuns.

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  • Maybe I'll get to fire Lydia Larkin.

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  • I see you've met Lydia.

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  • What's the story on sweet Lydia?

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  • The next stop on his list was visiting Ms. Lydia Larkin, deputy sheriff, whose presentation of a speeding ticket and general attitude still pissed him off, just remembering it.

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  • Lydia lived in a newly constructed condo on Oak Street as it drifted out of the main body of town and became the back road to neighboring Ridgway, ten miles away.

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  • Close on his heels was Lydia Larkin, tucking in her blouse and adjusting her skirt.

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  • Lydia glanced up and down and then took Fitzgerald's face in her hands and kissed him full on the mouth—no glad-to-see-you-grandpa embrace.

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  • He explained his aborted visit to Lydia Larkin and watching as she embraced her boss.

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  • Deputy Sheriff Lydia Larkin drove by in her official white Blazer and Dean repressed the impulse to give her a one-finger salute.

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  • He wondered if it was Lydia Larkin, the new deputy, hot on the trail of a speeder.

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  • Lydia Larkin moved into the glow and stood silhouetted before him.

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  • Lydia Larkin was silent, a look of sheer panic on her face.

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  • Lydia pressed her body against him so tightly he could feel her quiver with each tiny step.

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  • "Can you stand on your own here?" he asked, as Lydia remained pressed against him.

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  • Lydia croaked in a panicked whisper.

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  • He had turned to check Lydia's light above him when another display followed.

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  • Lydia called out to him as he moved away from her.

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  • "He's dead," he called up to Lydia, who was out of sight behind a bulge in the slope.

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  • Instead of inching his way back to Lydia he remained by the wrecked Jeep.

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  • Dean motioned toward Lydia's direction.

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  • Dean was seated on the step of a rescue vehicle when Lydia was pulled up to the road.

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  • He turned to Lydia Larkin as one of the EMT personnel hurried over.

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  • Lydia looked over at Dean.

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  • Dean's Jeep was at the uphill end of the line of cluttered vehicles and Lydia Larkin was long gone by the time he was free to leave.

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  • During the short drive to Lydia Larkin's quarters, Dean's brain pounded with the question of the siren that preceded the horrible accident—and his glimpse of a white vehicle.

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  • Lydia was not as tall as Jennifer Radisson, but only by an inch or two.

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  • She was a different person, different from the Lydia Larkin who'd busted him for speeding and far different from the frightened girl who reluctantly descended to the wreck.

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  • Lydia Larkin continued to stare, then shrugged and began filling her glass.

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  • Lydia fell silent, eyes closed.

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  • Lydia, you don't owe me a damn thing but some answers.

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  • Lydia spoke in a whisper.

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  • Dean could tell by the look on her face that Lydia wanted to forget about Billy Langstrom and the accident, but she answered.

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  • Lydia thought a moment.

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  • They were close to wrapping up the session when deputy Lydia Larkin moved quietly into the room.

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  • Dean joined the applause while Lydia Larkin looked embarrassed.

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  • Lydia Larkin moved a step forward.

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  • Lydia Larkin, hero of the day, scooted out before the gavel fell.

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  • He did so now, describing Lydia's reluctance in descending to the accident, but glossing over just how petrified she'd been.

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  • But in Fitzgerald's defense, there were two pint bottles of vodka at Lydia Larkin's place, so he may have bought them for her.

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  • Dean thought about Lydia Larkin, the new redhead in town.

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  • "There's Lydia Larkin," Cynthia said, reluctance evident in her voice.

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  • Ten minutes later, Lydia Larkin answered her door dressed in very tight and very small white shorts with a red elastic thing that covered only her breasts and nothing of the acres of skin in the middle.

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  • Lydia simply gave a dismissive wave of her hand and went inside, leaving Dean to follow.

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  • Let's stop pretending, Lydia.

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  • I saw you—when he left your place The fire in Lydia Larkin's eyes cooled appreciably.

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  • Lydia returned, her old arrogance renewed.

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  • He told Lydia about Fitzgerald buying the vodka on the morning of the Fourth of July, denying it, and saying at the debate that there was liquor in Billy's vehicle when he, Dean, felt there wasn't.

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  • There was nervousness in Lydia's voice.

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  • Lydia turned her back to him, and as she walked to her bedroom, pulled her scanty top off over her head.

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  • Lydia Larkin thought the story was nonsense.

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  • It was Lydia Larkin.

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  • Something between this Lydia and Fitzgerald?

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  • Lydia Larkin opened the door as soon as she spotted Dean.

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  • Lydia walked away from him, down the path to the beginning of the trail that led back to an area known as the Big Blue Wilderness.

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  • I can't lie for you, Lydia.

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  • Lydia Larkin spun out of the meadow in a cloud of dust, leaving Dean to await its dissipation before following in his open vehicle.

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  • But what Lydia suggested he was up to was the worst kind of criminal sexual harassment.

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  • If he could only be sure it wasn't Lydia who'd chased Billy Langstrom down the mountain, siren screaming, to his rolling, crushing death.

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  • He brought Cynthia up to speed on his meeting with Lydia after confirming there was no further word on Martha's disappearance.

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  • Cynthia was appalled that Fitzgerald would go to such extremes to intimidate Lydia if everything the woman said was true.

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  • Lydia Larkin had led Dean in with neither exchanging a word.

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  • He looked around the corner to see if Lydia was listening.

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  • Lydia Larkin was seated at a desk in the drab outer room, looking as pensive as Fred O'Connor back in his cell.

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  • "Don't say anything," Lydia said.

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  • Lydia did all but ignore Cynthia who in turn was equally cool to the visitor.

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  • "Lydia, I don't like this sneaking around business," Dean said.

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  • Lydia just glanced at her blankly and turned her attention to Dean.

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  • Lydia put her hand on his knee, as if Cynthia were not in the room.

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  • Before she could say a word, Lydia too stood up and looked down on Cynthia, who was ten inches shorter.

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  • So that's Miss Lydia Larkin.

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  • It was Lydia's trailing smoke that floated it to life.

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  • Lydia, the long distance runner—now a smoker.

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  • Lydia Larkin's voice broke the silence.

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  • "What will Fitzgerald do?" was Cynthia first reaction when Dean told her of Lydia's conversation with her boss.

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  • I'm a witness in his car and the state guys were in Lydia's vehicle.

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  • There's not enough to charge him with anything, but I have to give Lydia credit; she set him up like a bowling alley.

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  • I'd guess he'll think twice now before intimidating Ms. Lydia Larkin!

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  • I can't say I like Lydia very much but I'd hate to see him hurt her.

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  • Dean then told Fred of Lydia Larkin's clever set up of Fitzgerald.

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  • It was dark as he peddled, headlamp on, down the side streets of the now-quiet town and out the back road the short distance to Lydia's place.

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  • There was a sheriff's vehicle parked out front, but Dean wasn't sure if it belonged to Fitzgerald or Lydia.

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  • He called Lydia's name but it was several minutes before he heard steps, and more time before the door was opened.

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  • Lydia Larkin was bent over at the waist, hardly able to stand, clutching her mid-section.

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  • "You need a doctor, Lydia," he said as she reached for a rag on the coffee table.

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  • Lydia's blouse was ripped nearly in half from the neck down, with one portion hanging nearly to her knees while she clutched the other about her breasts.

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  • Lydia's gun rested on the coffee table.

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  • This time there was no doubt that Lydia laughed but didn't answer.

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  • Lydia rose as if to stop him.

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  • Did he rape you, Lydia?

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  • Use some sense, Lydia.

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  • Lydia, I want no part of covering up a crime.

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  • Lydia Larkin considered her answer.

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  • David Dean harbored serious doubts about leaving Lydia Larkin's apartment without either contacting the police or calling an ambulance—or maybe a lawyer.

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  • While he possessed knowledge of a brutal attack, if the victim, Lydia, allowed it to happen as she said, wasn't she culpable in some convoluted way for the results of her entrapment?

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  • His suspicions concerning Lydia's actions and his continued silence in not reporting them came too close to involving him as an accessory in whatever she might have done.

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  • He had seen Lydia's bloodstained apartment and witnessed its disrupted condition.

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  • Brandon Westlake, mournfully depressed, readied for Billy Langstrom's funeral while Dean wondered if Lydia Larkin might be involved in funeral plans of her own.

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  • There was no sign of Fitzgerald, Lydia Larkin, the jailer, or Fred O'Connor.

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  • And Lydia's taking a sick day—woman stuff, I guess.

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  • I talked to Lydia on the phone.

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  • It was an abridged version, excluding any mention of last night's session at Lydia's apartment but detailing the missing bones and Dean's suspicion concerning Billy Langstrom's death.

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  • Dean then brought Lydia Larkin into the picture by telling Jake Weller how she had radioed Fitzgerald with the two Denver investigators in her car, making the call from the spot where he claimed she'd be out of reception.

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  • Weller added, "Maybe Lydia reported that business to Denver and that's why Fitzgerald got recalled."

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  • Dean was happy to move the subject away from Fitzgerald's evening encounter with Lydia.

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  • Remaining quiet about Lydia's prior night's involvement with Fitzgerald was looking like a very poor decision.

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  • They spent the evening in their private quarters mulling over the possibilities and skirting the question that Lydia had actually killed her boss, which in spite of mounting concern, Dean continued to find unlikely.

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  • While he was thrilled that Dean might now be running unopposed, he was positive Lydia had killed her boss.

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  • Dean crept from the room, wondering if it was Lydia returning to visit.

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  • Lydia Larkin is running for sheriff.

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  • I'm not sure running against Lydia will be any easier than taking on Fitzgerald.

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  • Until he knew exactly what had happened in Lydia's apartment and the details of Fitzgerald's departure anything was possible.

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  • He remained, however, uncertain how to do so without immersing himself further in Lydia Larkin's sordid activities.

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  • Knowing Lydia Larkin, I'm not so sure.

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  • Dean didn't think Lydia Larkin did anything for the fun of it.

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  • You think Lydia knocked off Fitzgerald so she could run for sheriff?

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  • He mulled the subject over in his mind and decided to speak to Lydia Larkin again.

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  • It was Lydia Larkin, in uniform, in her official vehicle.

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  • "I hear you got the kid back," Lydia said as he opened the passenger side door and slid in beside her.

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  • That was an incredibly stupid stunt to pull, Lydia.

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  • Lydia turned off the engine and they sat there alone with no other cars in sight.

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  • Lydia slammed on the breaks, flinging Dean against his seat belt.

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  • Lydia Larkin was a wreck, as unstable as the night Billy Langstrom died.

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  • Lydia spoke not another word, ignoring Dean in favor of her thoughts as she raced back to town.

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  • When Dean told Fred about Fitzgerald's death Fred immediately, in his best I-told-you-so tone, assigned the guilt to Lydia Larkin.

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  • An autopsy would surely reveal Fitzgerald's knife wound, bringing Lydia Larkin's complicity into play, and probably Dean's.

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  • Lydia Larkin stood, feet apart, in the classic shooting position, both hands clamped on her smoking gun.

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  • Lydia mumbled, he raised his gun.

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  • Lydia staggered to her feet and joined them, leaving the grisly sight behind.

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  • In the days that followed, the shooting was ruled justified and Lydia Larkin was cleared of any wrongdoing.

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  • When pressed, they opined only that Brandon Westlake acted more suicidal than threatening but they had been with him for several minutes where Lydia had just arrived.

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  • Lydia Larkin was never brought into the picture.

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  • If Lydia Larkin had heard Westlake's admission before she fired the fatal shot, it was apparently lost in her mind in the mayhem that followed.

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  • The headlines of the local newspaper proudly announced, "Under Sheriff Solves Fifty-Year-Old Murder," which Lydia neither confirmed nor denied, nor did the Deans offer public comment.

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  • When they questioned Jake Weller about the source of the high-level endorsement, he hinted Lydia Larkin knew someone in the system who'd pulled strings.

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  • Newly crowned heroine Lydia Larkin won the election by eight votes.

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  • Before Dean could contact Lydia to offer his congratulations, she visited Bird Song the day after Cynthia returned.

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  • Lydia left Cynthia standing by the sink and walked into the parlor with Dean.

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  • Finally, Lydia said, "I told your wife I was going to ask you," then added, "I really underestimated that woman."

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  • Are you sure you're comfortable with me working for Sheriff Lydia Larkin?

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  • Lydia is a bit— sexually aggressive.

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  • Lydia and I have an understanding, Cynthia was dabbing Mercurochrome on a cut knuckle.

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  • First you slap Fitzgerald, then you do lord-knows-what to Lydia!

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  • Lydia Larkin let loose a sigh of relief.

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  • Vengeance or the path of true love - which will Lydia choose?

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  • Lydia Gard has the lowdown The sun is good for you!

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  • My dad along with his friend made Lydia a hip spica seat.

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  • true love - which will Lydia choose?

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  • Perhaps the largest tumulus on record is the tomb of Alyattes, king of Lydia, situated near Sardis, constructed in his own lifetime, before 560 B.C. It is a huge mound, i180 ft.

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  • Causes of this were (I) the peace-loving luxury (born of commercial wealth and contact with Oriental life) of the great Ionian cities of Asia; (2) the tameness with which they submitted first to Lydia and to Persia, then to Athenian pretensions, then to Sparta, and finally to Persia again; (3) the decadence and downfall of Athens, which still counted as Ionian and had claimed (since Solon's time) seniority among " Ionian " states.

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  • by Ionia and Lydia, on the W.

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  • It was absorbed into the kingdom of Lydia, where Carian troops formed the bodyguard of the king.

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  • On the border-land between Caria and Lydia lay other Greek cities, Miletus, Priene, and Magnesia (see articles s.v.), colonized in early times by the Ionians.

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  • Friedrich, Archaologische Karte von Kleinasien (1899); Perrot and Chipiez, History of Art in Phrygia, Lydia, Caria and Lycia (Eng.

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  • 7 6 5 ff., is a mixture of Greek traditions with a few oriental elements; here the first king is Medos (the Median empire); his nameless son is succeeded by Cyrus, a blessed ruler, beloved by the gods, who gave peace to all his friends and conquered Lydia, Phrygia, Ionia.

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  • Soon after the conquest of the Median empire, Cyrus was attacked by a coalition of the other powers of the East, Babylon, Egypt and Lydia, joined by Sparta, the greatest military power of Greece.

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  • In the spring of 546 Croesus of Lydia began the attack and advanced into Cappadocia, while the other powers were still gathering their troops.

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  • decided to continue the war against Athens and give strong support to the Spartans, he sent in 408 the young prince into Asia Minor, as satrap of Lydia and Phrygia Major with Cappadocia, and commander of the Persian troops, "which gather into the field of Castolos" (Xen.

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  • War between Seleucus and Lysimachus broke out, and on the field of Coru-pedion in Lydia Lysimachus fell (281).

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  • For the same reason he abstained from drastic religious reforms in his capacity as high-priest of Lydia.

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  • He was the traditional king of Sipylus in Lydia (or of Phrygia), and was the intimate friend of Zeus and the other gods, to whose table he was admitted.

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  • The story of Tantalus is an echo of a semi-Greek kingdom, which had its seat at Sipylus, the oldest and holiest city of Lydia, the remains of which are still visible.

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  • In Europe, (I) Thrace; in Asia Minor, (2) Phrygia on the Hellespont, (3) Lydia, (4) Caria, (5) Lycia and Pamphylia, (6) Great Phrygia, (7) Paphlagonia and Cappadocia; between the Empire.

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  • The financial administration was entrusted to separate officials; we hear of such in Lydia (Arr.

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  • These two survivors of the forty years' conflict soon entered upon the crowning fight, and in 281 Lysimachus fell in the battle of Corupedion (in Lydia), leaving Seleucus virtually master of the empire.

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  • Syria, Pontus, Lydia, Galatia, and above all Thrace were sources of supply.

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  • After taking sketches of the most interesting objects and copying a number of inscriptions, he returned to Smyrna through Caria and Lydia.

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  • Burmeister regards the legend as an incident in the struggle between the followers of Dionysus and Apollo in Thebes, in which the former were defeated and driven back to Lydia.

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  • Heffter builds up the story round the dripping rock in Lydia, really representing an Asiatic goddess, but taken by the Greeks for an ordinary woman.

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  • The Pamphylians are first mentioned among the nations subdued by the Mermnad kings of Lydia, and afterwards passed in succession under the dominion of the Persian and Macedonian monarchs.

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  • Egypt had already recovered its independence (660 B.C.) with the help of mercenaries sent by Gyges of Lydia, who had vainly solicited aid from Assyria against his Cimmerian enemies.

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  • Through Phrygia and Lydia influences of this same Cappadocian civilization passed towards the west; and indeed, before the Greek colonization of Asia Minor, a loosely knit Hatti empire may have stretched even to the Aegean.

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  • The powers of Phrygia and Lydia rose successively out of its ruins, and continued to offer westward passage to influences of Mesopotamian culture till well into historic times.

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  • At this time the Hatti empire or confederacy probably included, on the west, both Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • " White Syrians," however, were still in Cappadocia even after the Cimmerians had destroyed the Phrygian monarchy, allowing Lydia to become independent under the Mermnad dynasty.

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  • SARDIS, more correctly Sardes (al Xap& ts), the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a conventus under the Roman Empire, and the metropolis of the province Lydia in later Roman and Byzantine times, was situated in the middle Hermus valley, at the foot of Mt.

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  • The early Lydian kingdom was far advanced in the industrial arts (see Lydia), and Sardis was the chief seat of its manufactures.

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  • It still, however, retained its titular supremacy and continued to be the seat of the metropolitan bishop of the province of Lydia, formed in A.D.

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  • In Levantine waters connexions grew up with the great marts of Chalcis and Miletus, with the rulers of Lydia, Phrygia, Cyprus and Egypt.

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  • The king could do little against them; even Autophradates, satrap of Lydia, who had remained faithful, was forced for some time to unite himself with the rebels.

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  • He maintained his ascendancy until about 515, when Oroetes, the Persian governor of Lydia, who had been reproached for his failure to reduce Samos by force, lured him to the mainland by false promises of gain and put him to death by crucifixion.

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  • In tracing the growth of Persia from a petty subject kingdom to a vast dominant empire, he has occasion to set out the histories of Lydia, Media, Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, Scythia, Thrace, and to describe the countries and the peoples inhabiting them, their natural productions, climate, geographical position, monuments, &c.; while, in noting the contemporaneous changes in Greece, he is led to tell of the various migrations of the Greek race, their colonies, commerce, progress in the arts, revolutions, internal struggles, wars with one another, legislation, religious tenets and the like.

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  • According to Herodotus, the first mint was probably that established by Gyges in Lydia towards the end of the 8th century B.C. for the coining of gold, silver and electrum, an 1 Lenormant, La Monnaie dans l'antiquite', i.

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  • The Old-Dorian Hercules is represented in three cycles of myth, the Argive, the Boeotian and the Thessalian; the legends of Arcadia, Aetolia, Lydia, &c., and Italy are either local or symbolical and comparatively late.

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  • ALYATTES, king of Lydia (609-560 B.C.), the real founder of the Lydian empire, was the son of Sadyattes, of the house of the Mermnadae.

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  • Manisa, q.v.), a city of Lydia about 40 m.

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  • ALEXANDER OF TRALLES (ALEXANDER TRALLIANUS), Greek physician, born at Tralles in Lydia, lived probably about the middle of the 6th century and practised medicine with success at Rome.

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  • downwards, usually 167, in Aradus, Cilicia and on to the Aegean coast, in Lydia and in Macedonia (17).

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  • Note: That this unit was used for gold in Egypt, one thousand years before becoming a silver coin weight in Asia Minor, need not be dwelt on, when we see in the coinage of Lydia (17) gold pieces and silver on the same standard, which was expressly formed for silver alone, i.e.

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  • During the king's absence on a tour round the world in 1881, his sister, Mrs Lydia Dominis (b.

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  • 17), showing the influence of the Aphrodite-Adonis myth, relates that Attis, the impotent son of the Phrygian Cala.us, went into Lydia to institute the worship of the Great Mother, and was there slain by a boar sent by Zeus.

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  • of Asia Minor including the ancient Lydia, Ionia, Caria and western Lycia.

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  • LYDIA MARIA CHILD (1802-1880), American author, was born at Medford, Massachusetts, on the 11th of February 1802.

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  • See The Letters of Lydia Maria Child, with a Biographical Introduction by J.

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  • (2) Two towns named Hyrcania are mentioned, one in Hyrcania, the other in Lydia.

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  • It included Mysia, Lydia, Caria and Phrygia, and therefore, of course, Aeolis, Ionia and the Troad.

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  • He also married a Greek princess named Ladice, the daughter of Battus, king of Cyrene, and he made alliances with Polycrates of Samos and Croesus of Lydia.

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  • Benedict Arnold was a native of Norwich; Mrs Lydia H.

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  • A tithe of cattle appears in Lydia (Nic. Damasc. fr.

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  • Lydia was a great slavemarket, and Asia Minor was a chief seat of the Diaspora at an early date (comp. Gutschmidt, Neue Beitrage, p. 77), so that "Sepharad" in itself does not supply ground for Hitzig's argument that Obadiah was written in the Greek period, when we read of many Jews being transplanted to Asia Minor (Jos.

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  • Pharnabazus, weary of bearing the whole cost of the war for the Peloponnesians, agreed to a period of truce so that envoys might visit Susa, but at this stage the whole position was changed by the appointment of Cyrus the Younger as satrap of Lydia, Greater Phrygia and Cappadocia.

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  • Of these, one may note for their later celebrity Philadelphia in Lydia and Attalia on the Pamphylian coast.

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  • In Lydia " not a trace " of the old language was left in Strabo's time (Strabo xiv.

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  • Lydia, and aided by lonian and Carian mercenaries, extended and consolidated his power.i By the ninth year of his reign he was in full possession of Thebes.

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  • 34-45) related to have occurred, incidentally show in what high estimation the recreation of hunting was held in Lydia.

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  • The country named Phrygia in the better known period of history lies inland, separated from the sea by Paph]agonia, Bithynia, Mysia and Lydia.

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  • These monuments, which are found in Lydia, Phrygia, Cappadocia and Lycaonia, as well as in north and central Syria, point to the existence of a homogeneous civilization over those countries; they show a singularly marked style of art, and are frequently inscribed with a peculiar kind of hieroglyphics, engraved boustrophedon; and they originated probably from a great Hittite kingdom, whose kings ruled the countries from Lydia to the borders of Egypt.

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  • 5 When the Persians conquered Lydia they retained, at least for a time, this route, which they found in existence.

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  • Gyges, the first Mermnad king of Lydia (687-653), had a Phrygian mother.

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  • The kingdom of Lydia appears to have become important about the end of the 8th century, and to have completely barred the path between Phrygia and Cyme or Smyrna.

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  • complete success, till some time between 6ro and 590 Phrygia then fell under the Lydian power, and by the treaty of 585 the Halys was definitely fixed as the boundary between Lydia and Media (see Lydia and Persia).

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  • The Maeander above its junction with the Lycus formed for a little way the boundary between Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • The Hermus drains a small district included in the Byzantine Phrygia, but in earlier times assigned to Lydia and Mysia.

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  • Monatsber (1879); Texier, Asie mineure (1862); Steuart, Ancient monuments of Lydia and Phrygia, besides the special chapters in the geographical treatises of Cramer, Vivien St Martin, Forbiger, &c., numerous articles by recent travellers; J.

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  • Armenia and Cappadocia were likewise subdued; the attempt to advance farther into Asia Minor led to a war with Alyattes of Lydia.

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  • According to Herodotus, he was the son of Cyaxares and reigned thirty-five years (584-550 B.C.); his wife was Aryenis, the daughter of Alyattes of Lydia (Herod.

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  • For the last eight years of his life after this sudden leap out of obscurity we have a faithful record of Sterne's feelings and movements in letters to various persons, published in 1 775 by his sole child and daughter, Lydia Sterne de Medalle, and in the Letters from Yorick to Eliza (1766-1767), also published in 1775.

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  • The recent discovery by Keil and Premerstein (Denkschriften der Wiener Akademie,'iii., 1908) of Lydian inscriptions containing the symbol 8 suggests that the old derivation of the Etruscans from Lydia may be true and that they brought this symbol with them (see article on F).

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  • Farther south there are zones of serpentine, and of crystalline and schistose rocks, some of which are probably Palaeozoic. The direction of the folds of this region is from west to east, but on the borders of Phrygia and Mysia they meet the north-westerly extension of the Taurus folds and bend around the ancient mass of Lydia.

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  • The Phrygian power was broken in the 9th or 8th century B.C. by the Cimmerii, who entered Asia Minor through Armenia; and on its decline rose the kingdom of Lydia, with its centre at Sardis.

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  • 560-546 B.C.) carried the boundaries of Lydia to the Halys, and subdued the Greek colonies on the coast.

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  • Too jealous of each other to combine, and too demoralized by luxury to resist, they fell an easy prey to Lydia; and when the Lydian kingdom ended with the capture of Sardis by Cyrus, 546 B.C. they passed, almost without resistance, to Persia.

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  • The eastern shores of the Aegean, which the earliest historical records represent to us as the seat of a brilliant civilization, giving way before the advance of the great military empires (Lydia and afterwards Persia), are almost a blank in Homer's map. The line of settlements can be traced in the Catalogue from Crete to Rhodes, and embraces the neighbouring islands of Cos and Calymnos.

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  • Lysimachus crossed the Hellespont, and in 281 a decisive battle took place at the plain of Corus (Corupedion) in Lydia.

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  • 1713) in 1703, and in 1715 to Mrs Lydia George (d.

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  • Of the states which arose out of the shattered Assyrian Empire (Media, Babylon, Egypt, Cilicia and Lydia), Media was by far the strongest.

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  • Cyrus and hi~ Persians paid little heed to the treaties which the Median kink had concluded with the other powers; and the result was I great coalition against him, embracing Nabonidus of Babylon Amasis of Egypt, Croesus of Lydia, and the Spartans, whosi highly efficient army seemed to the Oriental states of great value In the spiing of 546 B.C., Croesus opened the attack.

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  • Cyrtt flung himself upon him, beat him at Pteria in Cappadocia and pursued him to Lydia.

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  • Thus a strong Persian propagandism arose especially in Armenia and Cappadocia, where the religion took deep root among the people, but also in Lydia and Lycia.

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  • 559), and several cities in Lydia.

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  • On his arrival at Ephesus a three months' truce was concluded with Tissaphernes, the satrap of Lydia and Caria, but negotiations conducted during that time proved fruitless, and on its termination Agesilaus raided Phrygia, where he easily won immense booty since Tissaphernes had concentrated his troops in Caria.

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  • Af ter spending the winter in organizing a cavalry force, he made a successful incursion into Lydia in the spring of 395.

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  • Of the three great river basins of Ionia and Lydia, those of the Hermus, Cayster and Maeander, it commanded the second, and had already access by easy passes to the other two.

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  • The city seems to have been more than once under tyrannical rule in the early Ionian period; and it fell thereafter first to Croesus of Lydia, and then to Cyrus, the Persian, and when the Ionian revolt against Persia broke out in the year 500 B.C. under the lead of Miletus, the city remained submissive to Persian rule.

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  • He continued true to the Romans during their wars with Antiochus and Perseus, and his kingdom spread over the greater part of western Asia Minor, including Mysia, Lydia, great part of Phrygia, Ionia and Caria.

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  • The kings of Cilicia and the Tabal offered their daughters to the harem of Assur-bani-pal; embassies came from Ararat, and even Gyges of Lydia despatched envoys to "the great king" in the hope of obtaining help against the Cimmerians.

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  • In the autumn of 1835 he married Miss Lydia Jackson of Plymouth, having previously purchased a spacious old house and garden at Concord.

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  • ARACHNE, in Greek mythology, the daughter of Idmon of Colophon in Lydia, a dyer in purple.

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  • Mention may also be made of the following: Hecataeus of Miletus (550-476); Acusilaus of Argos, 2 who paraphrased in prose (correcting the tradition where it seemed necessary) the genealogical works of Hesiod in the Ionic dialect; he confined his attention to the prehistoric period, and made no attempt at a real history; Charon of Lampsacus (c. 450), author of histories of Persia, Libya, and Ethiopia, of annals (a)pot) of his native town with lists of the prytaneis and archons, and of the chronicles of Lacedaemonian kings; Xanthus of Sardis in Lydia (c. 450), author of a history of Lydia, one of the chief authorities used by Nicolaus of Damascus (II.

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  • He cultivated friendly relations with the tyrants of Miletus and Mytilene, and maintained a connexion with the kings of Lydia, of Egypt and, possibly, of Phrygia.

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  • The worship of Dionysus was actively conducted in Asia Minor, particularly in Phrygia and Lydia.

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  • In Lydia his triumphant return from India was celebrated by an annual festival on Mount Tmolus; in Lydia he assumed the long beard and long robe which were of terwards given him in his character of the " Indian Bacchus," the conqueror of the East, who, after the campaigns of Alexander, was reported to have advanced as far as the Ganges.

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  • ROSIN (a later variant of "resin," q.v.) or Colophony (Colophonia resina, resin from Colophon in Lydia), the resinous constituent of the oleo-resin exuded by various species of pine, known in commerce as crude turpentine.

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  • Croesus of Lydia had formed an alliance with her.

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  • It was bounded by Lydia and Phrygia on the S., by Bithynia on the N.E., and by the Propontis and Aegean Sea on the N.

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  • The chief physical features of Mysia (considered apart from that of the Troad) are the two mountain-chains, Olympus (7600 ft.) in the north and Temnus in the south, which for some distance separates Mysia from Lydia, and is afterwards prolonged through Mysia to the neighbourhood of the Gulf of Adramyttium.

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  • It appears from Herodotus and Strabo that they were kindred with the Lydians and Carians, a fact attested by their common participation in the sacred rites at the great temple of Zeus at Labranda, as well as by the statement of the historian Xanthus of Lydia that their language was a mixture of Lydian and Phrygian.

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  • LYDIA, in ancient geography, a district of Asia Minor, the boundaries of which it is difficult to fix, partly because they varied at different epochs.

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  • Under the Heraclid dynasty the limits of Lydia must have been already extended, since according to Strabo (xiii.

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  • Under the Mermnads Lydia became a maritime as well as an inland power.

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  • Lydia never again shrank back into its original dimensions.

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  • Lydia proper was exceedingly fertile.

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  • 4) that Sandon belongs not to Lydia but to Cilicia.

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  • According to the native historian Xanthus (460 B.C.) three dynasties ruled in succession over Lydia.

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  • Xanthus, however, puts Torrhebus in the place of Tyrsenus, and makes him the eponym of a district in Lydia.

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  • It is doubtful whether Xanthus recognized the Greek legends which brought Pelops from Lydia, or rather Maeonia, and made him the son of Tantalus.

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  • The Assyrian inscriptions have shown that the Assyrians had never crossed the Halys, much less known the name of Lydia, before the age of Assur-bani-pal, and consequently the theory which brought the Heraclids from Nineveh must be given up. But the Hittites, another Oriental people, deeply imbued with the elements of Babylonian culture, had overrun Asia Minor and established themselves on the shores of the Aegean before the reign of the Egyptian king Rameses II.

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  • The subject allies who then fight under their banners include the Masu or Mysians and the Dardani of the Troad, while the Hittites have left memorials in Lydia.

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  • Gyges (q.v.) put him to death and established the dynasty of the Mermnads, 687 B.C. Gyges initiated a new policy, that of making Lydia a maritime power; but towards the middle of his reign the kingdom was overrun by the Cimmerii.

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  • The trade and wealth of Lydia rapidly increased, and the Greek towns fell one after the other before the attacks of the Lydian kings.

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