How to use Lydgate in a sentence

lydgate
  • If it be true, as Bishop Alcock of Ely affirms, that Lydgate wrote a poem on the loss of France and Gascony, it seems necessary to suppose that he lived two years longer, and thus indications point to the year 1451, or thereabouts, as the date of his death.

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  • Lydgate had a consuming passion for literature, and it was probably that he might indulge this taste more fully that in 1 434 he retired from the priorate of Hatfield Broadoak (or Hatfield Regis), to which he had been appointed in June 1423.

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  • Lydgate is a most voluminous writer.

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  • For a couple of centuries Lydgate's reputation equalled, if it did not surpass, that of his master.

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  • It must be conceded as no small merit in Lydgate that, in an age of experiment he should have succeeded so often in hitting the right word.

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  • In spite of that, Lydgate is characteristically medieval - medieval in his prolixity, his platitude, his want of judgment and his want of taste; medieval also in his pessimism, his Mariolatry and his horror of death.

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  • Recent criticism has been far more impartial, and almost too much respect has been paid to his attainments, especially in the matter of metre, though Lydgate himself, with offensive lightheartedness, admits his poor craftsmanship.

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  • Lydgate's most doughty and learned apologist is Dr Schick, whose preface to the Temple of Glass embodies practically all that is known or conjectured concerning this author, including the chronological order of his works.

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  • Lydgate followed in the wake of Chaucer.

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  • John Lydgate studied him affectionately.

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  • His return to London on the 14th of February 1432 was celebrated with a great pageant devised by Lydgate.

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  • Two fragments of such a work have been preserved in texts of Lydgate's Troy-book, the first in MS. Camb.

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  • Amongst English men of letters he befriended Reginald Pecock, Whethamstead of St Albans, Capgrave the historian, Lydgate, and Gilbert Kymer, who was his physician and chancellor of Oxford university.

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  • In 1866 he made a valuable contribution to the history of Scottish literature by the discovery of 2200 lines on the siege of Troy incorporated in a MS. of Lydgate's Troye Booke, and of the Legends of the Saints, an important work of some 40,000 lines.

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  • Born at Lydgate, Suffolk, John Lydgate entered the Benedictine abbey of Bury St Edmunds at fifteen.

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  • Lydgate passed as a portent of learning, and, according to Bale, he pursued his studies not only at both the English universities but in France and Italy.

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  • This "traditional biography" prolongs his life to the year 1461, but it is quite improbable that he lived many years after 1446, when Abbot Curteys died and John Baret, treasurer of Bury, signed an extant receipt for a pension which he shared with Lydgate, and which continued to be paid till 1449.

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  • This friendship appears to have decided Lydgate's career, and in his Troy-book and elsewhere are reverent and touching tributes to his "master."

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  • Cursed with such immoderate fluency Lydgate could not sustain himself at the highest level of artistic excellence; and, though imbued with a sense of the essentials of poetry, and eager to prove himself in its various manifestations, he stinted himself of the self-discipline necessary to perfection of form.

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  • One of the most obvious defects of this school is excessive attachment to polysyllabic terms. Lydgate is not quite so great a sinner in this respect as are some of his successors, but his tendency cannot be mistaken, and John Metham is amply justified in his censure Eke John Lydgate, sometime monk of Bury, His books indited with terms of rhetoric And half-changed Latin, with conceits of poetry.

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  • These attributes jarred on the sensitive Ritson, who racked his brains for contumelious epithets such as "stupid and disgusting," "cart-loads of rubbish," &c.; and during the greater part of the 18th and 19th centuries Lydgate's reputation was at its lowest ebb.

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  • Lydgate certainly possessed extraordinary versatility, which enabled him to turn from elaborate epics to quite popular poems like the Mumming at Hertford, A Ditty of Women's Horns and London Lickpenny.

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  • Outside, Oldham twinkling in the distance, there was dusting of snow on old Lydgate.

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