Lycia sentence example

lycia
  • Among such settlements may be mentioned Phaselis in Lycia, perhaps also Soli in Cilicia, Salapia on the east Italian coast, Gela in Sicily, the Lipari islands, and Rhoda in north-east Spain.

    0
    0
  • In return for their more equivocal attitude during the Third Macedonian War they were deprived by Rome of some possessions in Lycia, and damaged by the partial diversion of their trade to Delos (167).

    0
    0
  • A terrible struggle took place for the possession of his body, until Apollo rescued it from the Greeks, and by the command of Zeus washed and cleansed it, anointed it with ambrosia, and handed it over to Sleep and Death, by whom it was conveyed for burial to Lycia, where a sanctuary (Sarpedoneum) was erected in honour of the fallen hero.

    0
    0
  • Having been expelled from Crete by the latter, he and his comrades sailed for Asia, where he finally became king of Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Between this headland and the frontier of Lycia is the sheltered bay of Marmarice, noted in modern times as one of the finest harbours of the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The country known as Caria was shared between the Carians proper and the Caunians, who were a wilder people, inhabiting the district between Caria and Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Harpagus afterwards stood in high favour with Cyrus, and commanded the army which subdued the coasts of Asia Minor; his family seems to have been settled in Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Megalithic town walls were naturally common in that stony land, Palestine, and very typical specimens of them were found in the Palestine Exploration Fund's excavations at Bethshemesh (`Ain Shems) directed by Dr. Duncan Mackenzie, 29 whose work also threw new light on the phenomenon of the appearance in Palestine between the 12th and 10th centuries B.C. of subMycenaean (Greek) pottery, which can only be ascribed to the Philistines, whose historical position as a foreign invading force from the Aegean area (Lycia and Crete-Kaphtor) is now entirely vindicated.

    0
    0
  • On the so-called Harpy monument from Lycia, now in the British Museum, the Harpies appear carrying off some small figures, supposed to be the daughters of Pandareus, unless they are intended to represent departed souls.

    0
    0
  • He entered Lycia and explored the Xanthus from the mouth at Patara upwards.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Nine miles from Patara he discovered the ruins of Xanthus, the ancient capital of Lycia, finely situated on hills, and abounding in magnificent remains.

    0
    0
  • Late in 1839 Fellows, under the auspices of the British Museum, again set out for Lycia, accompanied,by George Scharf, who assisted him in sketching.

    0
    0
  • This second visit resulted in the discovery of thirteen ancient cities, and in 1841 appeared An Account of Discoveries in Lycia, being a Journal kept during a Second Excursion in Asia Minor.

    0
    0
  • In 1844 he presented to the British Museum his portfolios, accounts of his expeditions, and specimens of natural history illustrative of Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Proetus thereupon sent him to Iobates, his wife's father, king of Lycia, with a letter or sealed tablet, in which were instructions, apparently given by means of signs, to take the life of the bearer.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Arriving in Lycia, he was received as a guest and entertained for nine days.

    0
    0
  • Bellerophon was honoured as a hero at Corinth and in Lycia.

    0
    0
  • This was especially the case on the side of Lycia, where the upland district of Milyas was sometimes included in Pisidia, at other times assigned to Lycia.

    0
    0
  • The most important of them are Termessus, near the frontier of Lycia, a strong fortress in a position of great natural strength and commanding one of the principal passes into Pamphylia; Cremna, another mountain fortress, north of the preceding, impending over the valley of the Cestrus; Sagalassus, a little farther north, a large town in a strong position, the ruins of which are among the most remarkable in Asia Minor; Selge, on the right bank of the Eurymedon, surrounded by rugged mountains, notwithstanding which it was in Strabo's time a large and opulent city; and Antioch, known for distinction's sake as Antioch of Pisidia, and celebrated for the visit of St Paul.

    0
    0
  • The honour paid to her in Delphi and Delos might be explained as part of the cult of her son Apollo; but temples to her existed in Argos; in Mantineia and in Xanthus in Lycia; her sacred grove was on the coast of Crete.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In Lycia graves are frequently placed under her protection, and she is also known as a goddess of fertility and as Kouporp60os.

    0
    0
  • Lycia, one of the chief seats of the cult of Apollo, where most frequent traces are found of the worship of Leto as the great goddess, was probably the earlier home of her religion.

    0
    0
  • Having driven the Persians out of Greek towns in Lycia and Caria, he met and routed the Persians on land and sea at the mouth of the Eurymedon in Pamphylia.

    0
    0
  • Thucydides is almost certainly wrong in saying that the amount of the original tribute was 460 talents (about £106,000); this figure cannot have been reached for at least twelve, probably twenty years, when new members had been enrolled (Lycia, Caria, Eion, Lampsacus).

    0
    0
  • These provinces had not yet been conquered by the Macedonians, and Antigonus (governor of Phrygia, Lycia and Pamphylia) refused to undertake the task at the command of Perdiccas.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In Lycia, which in spite of " the son of Harpagus " and King Pericles, had never been brought under one man's rule, the Greek influence is more limited.

    0
    0
  • It was noted from early times for its temple and oracle of Apollo, and, as the port of Xanthus and other towns of the same valley, had a large trade, and was regarded as the metropolis of Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Though the mountain ranges of Lycia are all offshoots of Mt.

    0
    0
  • The steep and rugged pass between Solyma and the sea, called the Climax ("Ladder"), was the only direct communication between Lycia and Pamphylia.

    0
    0
  • The limits of Lycia towards the interior seem to have varied at different times.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • According to Artemidorus (whose authority is followed by Strabo), the towns that formed the Lycian league in the days of its integrity were twentythree in number; but Pliny states that Lycia once possessed seventy towns, of which only twenty-six remained in his day.

    0
    0
  • Myra, one of the most important cities of Lycia, occupied the entrance of the valley of the Andriacus; on the coast between this and the mouth of the Xanthus stood Antiphellus, while in the interior at a short distance were found Phellus, Cyaneae and Candyba.

    0
    0
  • No traces of recent volcanic action exist in Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Their occupation of Lycia was probably later, and since the Lycian inscriptions are not found far inland, we may conclude that they entered the country from the sea.

    0
    0
  • In this tradition there is a reminiscence of the fact that the Lycians had been sea-rovers before their settlement in Lycia.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Lydians failed to subdue Lycia, but after the fall of the Lydian empire it was conquered by Harpagus the general of Cyrus, Xanthus or Arnna, the capital, being completely destroyed.

    0
    0
  • Few parts of Asia Minor were less known in modern times than Lycia up to the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • One of the most interesting results of these recent researches has been the discovery of numerous inscriptions in the native language of the country, and written in an alphabet peculiar to Lycia.

    0
    0
  • The later sepulchral monuments belong to a class which is widely spread over Asia Minor from Lycia to Pontus.

    0
    0
  • Hence Argos was perhaps the earliest town of importance in Greece; the legends indicate its high antiquity and its early intercourse with foreign countries (Egypt, Lycia, &c.).

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There are, however, examples in Greece proper, and one, Lycia in Asia Minor, of real federal unions.

    0
    0
  • It attains in Lycia an altitude of 10,500 ft., and in the Bulgar Dagh (Cilicia) of over 10,000 ft.

    0
    0
  • In Lycia are the Indus (Gereniz Chai), and the Xanthus (Eshen Chai).

    0
    0
  • The native reports of a maneless lion in Lycia (arslan) are probably based on the existence of large panthers.

    0
    0
  • Errors in policy and in government facilitated the rise of Pontus into a formidable power under Mithradates, who was finally driven out of the country by Pompey, and died 63 B.C. Under the settlement of Asia Minor by Pompey, Bithynia-Pontus and Cilicia became provinces, whilst Galatia and Cappadocia were allowed to retain nominal independence for over half a century more under native kings, and Lycia continued an autonomous League.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Nicola, founded in 5087 to receive the relics of this saint, which were brought from Myra in Lycia, and now lie beneath the altar in the crypt.

    0
    0
  • The king of Lycia asked duly (on the tenth day from the guest's coming) for a token (nree oiLua 15&rOat), and then knew what Proetus wished to be done.

    0
    0
  • There existed, in fact, under the Achaemenids a strong colonizing movement, diffused through the whole empire; traces of this policy occur more especially in Armenia, Cappadocia and, Lycia, but also in the rest of Asia Minor, and not rarely in Syria and Egypt.

    0
    0
  • Thus a strong Persian propagandism arose especially in Armenia and Cappadocia, where the religion took deep root among the people, but also in Lydia and Lycia.

    0
    0
  • In the troubles that followed Nearchus attached himself to Antigonus, under whom he held the government of his old provinces of Lycia and Pamphylia, and probably therefore shared in the downfall (301) of that monarch.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy commanded a fleet in person which detached the coast towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus and crossed to Greece, where Ptolemy took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308).

    0
    0
  • He was baptized by Babylas, bishop of Antioch; preached with much success in Lycia; and was martyred about A.D.

    0
    0
  • The name Lycea, or Lycia, begins to appear in the 6th century.

    0
    0
  • He was made governor of Greater Phrygia in 333, and in the division of the provinces after Alexander's death (323) Pamphylia and Lycia were added to his command.

    0
    0
  • Sphinxes of the usual Greek type are represented seated on each side of two doorways in an ancient frieze found by Sir Charles Fellowes at Xanthus in Lycia, and now in the British Museum.

    0
    0
  • Initiation included also an asylum or refuge within the strong walls of Samothrace, for which purpose it was used among others by Arsinoe, who, to show her gratitude, afterwards caused a monument to be erected there, the ruins of which were explored in 1 A grammarian of Patrae in Achaea (or Patara in Lycia), pupil of Eratosthenes (275-195 B.C.), and author of a periplus and a collection of Delphic oracles.

    0
    0
  • The successes of Alyattes and of Croesus finally changed the Lydian kingdom into a Lydian empire, and all Asia Minor westward of the Halys, except Lycia, owned the supremacy of Sardis.

    0
    0
  • On his return, the king devised yet one more trap for him, laying an ambush, with picked men of Lycia.

    0
    0
  • Who the "flint-hearted Lycia" may be, to whom the poet seems to allude as his own disdainful mistress, is unknown; indeed, the record of Ford's private life is little better than a blank.

    0
    0
  • At the same period there were continuous rebellions in Asia Minor; Pisidia, Paphlagonia, Bithynia and Lycia, threw off the Persian yoke and Hecatomnus, the satrap of Caria, obtained an almost independent position.

    0
    0