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lustre

lustre

lustre Sentence Examples

  • The Church added a lustre of a different kind.

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  • The lustre is metallic and brilliant.

    120
    49
  • The lustre is metallic and brilliant.

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    49
  • The densest anthracite is of ten of a semi-metallic lustre, resembling somewhat that of graphite.

    49
    20
  • The densest anthracite is of ten of a semi-metallic lustre, resembling somewhat that of graphite.

    49
    20
  • The lustre is bright and metallic. In its external characters graphite is thus strikingly similar to molybdenite.

    36
    15
  • It is an ironblack, opaque mineral, with metallic lustre; hardness about 6, sp. gr.

    33
    23
  • William inherited the baleful lustre, without the substantial power, which his ancestors had given to the name of Orange.

    26
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  • They are crystalline solids showing a characteristic green metallic lustre; they are readily soluble in water and dye red or violet.

    15
    25
  • It has the characteristic appearance of pure silk - a brilliant soft white body with a pearly lustre - insoluble in water, alcohol and ether, but it dissolves freely in concentrated alkaline solutions, mineral acids, strong acetic acid and in ammoniacal solution of oxide of copper.

    13
    10
  • The liquid metals, when cooled down sufficiently, some at lower, others at higher, temperatures freeze into compact solids, endowed with the (relative) non-transparency and the lustre of their liquids.

    13
    12
  • The best varieties are black and pitchy in lustre, or even bright and scarcely to be distinguished from true coals.

    12
    11
  • The minute globular bodies have occasionally a sub-pearly lustre, and glassy rocks which possess this structure have been called perlites (q.v.).

    12
    12
  • Boron dissolves in molten aluminium, and on cooling, transparent, almost colourless crystals are obtained, possessing a lustre, hardness and refractivity near that of the diamond.

    11
    11
  • A dull stony-looking rock results, the vitreous lustre having entirely disappeared, and in microscopic section this exhibits a cryptocrystalline structure, being made up of exceedingly minute grains principally of quartz and felspar.

    11
    11
  • For a few isolated purposes, however, it is desirable to use a glass which has not been touched upon either surface and thus preserves the lustre of its " fire polish " undiminished; this can be attained in crown-glass but not in sheet, since one side of the latter is always more or less marked by the rubber used in the process of flattening.

    11
    11
  • The best varieties are black and pitchy in lustre, or even bright and scarcely to be distinguished from true coals.

    11
    11
  • Boron dissolves in molten aluminium, and on cooling, transparent, almost colourless crystals are obtained, possessing a lustre, hardness and refractivity near that of the diamond.

    11
    11
  • The interior of the shell is remarkable for the absence of pearly lustre on its interior surface.

    10
    6
  • The interior of the shell is remarkable for the absence of pearly lustre on its interior surface.

    10
    6
  • Though part of the plumage in many sun-birds gleams with metallic lustre, they owe much of their beauty to feathers which are not lustrous, though almost as vivid,' and the most wonderful combination of the brightest colours - scarlet, purple, blue, green and yellow - is often seen in one and the same bird.

    10
    9
  • Iodine is a greyish-black shining solid, possessing a metallic lustre and having somewhat the appearance of graphite.

    8
    7
  • Their lustre is vitreous except when they contain many minute crystals; they are then velvety or even resinous in appearance.

    8
    8
  • Prices were low, foreign commerce was already large, business thriving; wealth gave social status; the official British class lent a lustre to society; and Boston " town " was drawing society from the " country."

    7
    7
  • It exhibits considerable lustre and is not subject to tarnishing on exposure to normal air.

    7
    9
  • The colour of the mineral is silver-white or steel-grey, with a metallic lustre, but it is often tarnished yellow; the streak is greyish-black.

    6
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  • Dr Chase's measures with the Yale heliometer indicated for it, in 1894, a parallax of about o" � 035; 2 and it must, accordingly, be of nearly four times the total brightness of Sirius, while its aerial lustre exceeds seventyfold that of the solar photosphere.

    6
    5
  • Properties Zinc is a bluish-white metal, showing a high lustre when freshly fractured.

    6
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  • It sublimes in thin plates of a dark colour and metallic lustre, and is soluble in solutions of the caustic alkalis.

    5
    2
  • The staple type has black glaze showing little lustre, and in choice varieties this is curiously speckled and pitted with red.

    5
    4
  • A week after his death, his widow, the princess Mary of England, gave birth to a son who, as William III., was to give added lustre to the house of Orange.

    5
    4
  • The personal appearance of Stevenson has often been described: he was tall, extremely thin, dark-haired, restless, compelling attention with the lustre of his wonderful brown eyes.

    5
    5
  • every branch and leaf is lighted up with a silvery lustre of indescribable beauty....

    5
    6
  • It has a firm gelatinous consistence and wax-like lustre, and, microscopically, is found to be homogeneous and structureless, with a translucency like that of ground-glass.

    5
    6
  • Thenceforth Seto became the headquarters of the manufacture of cha-no-yu utensils, and many of the tiny pieces turned out there deserve high admiration, their technique being perfect, and their mahogany, russet-brown, amber and buff glazes showing wonderful lustre and richness.

    5
    6
  • On the 25th of May 1671 the dignities of count and baron were introduced into Denmark "to give lustre to the court"; a few months later the order of the Danebrog was instituted as a fresh means of winning adherents by marks of favour.

    5
    6
  • Short fibre silks are still put through cards and treated like cotton; but the value of silk is in its lustre, elasticity and strength, which characteristics are obtained by keeping fibres as long as possible.

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  • His indefatigable activity on behalf of Western civilization, now threatened with extinction by the Ottomans, excites admiration and adds an undying lustre to his memory.

    5
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  • Lustre, however, cannot be imparted unless the wool was originally of a silky nature.

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  • substances having high specific gravity, malleability, opacity, and especially a peculiar lustre, the term "metal" became generic for all substances with these properties.

    5
    8
  • Crystals of sulphur are transparent or translucent and highly refractive with strong birefringence; they have a resinous or slightly adamantine lustre, and present the characteristic sulphur-yellow colour.

    4
    2
  • Crystals of sulphur are transparent or translucent and highly refractive with strong birefringence; they have a resinous or slightly adamantine lustre, and present the characteristic sulphur-yellow colour.

    4
    2
  • Rhodes was again famous for its pottery in medieval times; this was a lustre ware at first imitated from Persian, though it afterwards developed into an independent style of fine colouring and rich variety of design.

    4
    3
  • Robespierre, who hated the Girondists, whose lustre had so long obscured his own, had proposed to includethem in the proscription lists of September; the Mountain to a man desired their overthrow.

    4
    3
  • Metallic sodium possesses a silvery lustre, but on exposure to moist air the surface is rapidly dulled by a layer of the hydroxide.

    4
    3
  • The faces of slates have usually a slightly silky lustre due to the abundance of minute scales of mica all lying parallel and reflecting light simultaneously from their pearly basal planes.

    4
    3
  • An important character, and one by which the mineral may always be recognized, is the perfect cubical cleavage, on which the lustre is brilliant and metallic. The colour of the mineral and of its streak is lead-grey; it is opaque; the hardness is 2 2 and the specific gravity 7.5.

    4
    3
  • It preserves its lustre in dry air, but in moist air it becomes tarnished by the formation of a film of oxide.

    4
    3
  • The erection of the obelisks of the Vatican, the Lateran, the Piazza del Popolo and the square behind the tribune of Sta Maria Maggiore lent a lustre to Rome which no other city in the world could rival.

    4
    3
  • Fancy cotton goods are of great variety, and many of them have trade names that are used temporarily or occasion produced on the surface of the cloth by needles placed in a sliding frame; lustre, a light dress material with a lustrous face sometimes made with a cotton warp and woollen weft; zephyr, a light, coloured dress material usually in small patterns; bobbinnet, a machine-made fabric, originally an imitation of lace made with bobbins on a pillow.

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  • Deposits of limonite in cavities may have a rounded surface or even a stalactitic form, and may present a brilliant lustre, of blackish colour, forming what is called in Germany Glaskopf (glass head).

    4
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  • Note that in Turkish su means both " water " and " the lustre of a jewel," while in English we speak of " gems of the first water."

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  • From the great size of the trunk and the even grain of the red cedar-like wood it is a valuable tree to the farmer and carpenter: it splits readily and evenly, and planes and polishes well; cut radially, the medullary plates give the wood a fine satiny lustre; it is strong and durable, but not so elastic as many of the western pines and firs.

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  • On this account the fibres of tussur or tussore silk tend to split up into fine fibrillae under the various preparatory processes in manufacturing, and its riband structure is the cause of the glassy lustre peculiar to the woven and finished fibres.

    3
    3
  • Both in the gum and in the boiled-off state silk has the peculiar property of imbibing certain metallic salts largely and combining very firmly with them, the fibre remaining to external appearance undiminished in strength and lustre, but much added to in size and weight.

    3
    3
  • The Chinese prepare a rouge, said to be from safflower, which, spread on the cards on which it is sold, has a brilliant metallic green lustre, but when moistened and applied to the skin assumes a delicate carmine tint.

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  • On this account the fibres of tussur or tussore silk tend to split up into fine fibrillae under the various preparatory processes in manufacturing, and its riband structure is the cause of the glassy lustre peculiar to the woven and finished fibres.

    3
    3
  • By their sufferings no less than by their deeds of daring, her citizens showed themselves to be sublime, devoted and disinterested, winning the purest laurels which give lustre to Italian story.

    3
    4
  • The different kinds of mica vary from perfectly colourless and transparent - as in muscovite - through shades of yellow, green, red and brown to black and opaque - as in lepidomelane; the former have a pearly lustre and the latter a submetallic lustre on the cleavage surfaces.

    3
    5
  • The works by his hand are remarkable for their ruby tint, with a beautiful metallic lustre; but only one small tazza remains in Gubbio itself.

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  • When not tarnished, the mineral has a silver-white colour with a tinge of red, and the lustre is metallic. Hardness 2-21; specific gravity 9-70-9.83.

    3
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  • Diamond possesses a brilliant " adamantine " lustre, but this tends to be greasy on the surface of the natural stones and gives FIG.

    3
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  • Diamond possesses a brilliant " adamantine " lustre, but this tends to be greasy on the surface of the natural stones and gives FIG.

    3
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  • With their resinous to adamantine lustre and their translucency they also present somewhat the appearance of horn; hence the name hornsilver.

    3
    6
  • The pronotum and elytra are often adorned with bright colours or metallic lustre, and marked with stripes or spots.

    2
    2
  • Crystals of azurite belong to the monoclinic system; they have a vitreous lustre and are translucent.

    2
    2
  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

    2
    3
  • eilos, like), strictly belongs to certain elements which do not possess the properties of the true metals, although they more closely resemble them than the non-metals in many respects; thus, selenium and tellurium, which are closely allied to sulphur in their chemical properties, although bad conductors of heat and electricity, exhibit metallic lustre and have relatively high specific gravities.

    2
    3
  • Others again, like Gasteracantha and Acrosoma, belonging to the Argyopidae, are armed with sharp and strong abdominal spines, and these spiders are hard-shelled like beetles and are spotted with black on a reddish or yellow ground, their spines shining with steel-blue lustre.

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  • 13) owes its effect entirely to surface colour and lustre.

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  • They are (at least practically) non-transparent; they reflect light in a peculiar manner, producing what is called "metallic lustre."

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  • The tetraiodide, TiI 4, is a reddish brown mass having a metallic lustre.

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  • But after proper treatmenti the former develops a glossy black patina with violet sheen, and the latter shows beautiful shades of grey with silvery lustre.

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  • GOLD [[[symbol]] Au, atomic weight 1 95.7(11 = I),197 2(O =16)], a metallic chemical element, valued from the earliest ages on account of the permanency of its colour and lustre.

    0
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  • Bright, glance or pitch coal is another brilliant variety, brittle, and breaking into regular fragments of a black colour and pitchy lustre.

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  • This is removed by solution in hot dilute sulphuric acid and a layer of pure frosted silver is left on the surface, which appears dead white in colour, and has lost its metallic lustre.

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  • It is a dark blue powder with a marked coppery lustre.

    0
    0
  • Magnesium is a silvery white metal possessing a high lustre.

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  • C. Ullmann's name of stilpnosiderite, from the Greek ariAirvOs (shining) is sometimes applied to such kinds of limonite as have a pitchy lustre.

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  • H.*) Whatever lustre the international position won by Maximilian I might add to the ducal house, on Bavaria itself its effect during the next two centuries was more dubious.

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  • Malthus has in more modern times derived a certain degree of reflected lustre from the rise and wide acceptance of the Dar, winian hypothesis.

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  • For this reason the mineral is not always readily recognized by inspection, though the perfect dodecahedral cleavage, the adamantine lustre, and the brown streak are characters which may be relied upon.

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  • The event which threw the greatest lustre upon this reign was the acquisition of the kingdom of Burgundy, or Aries, which was bequeathed to Conrad by its king, Rudolph III., the uncle of his wife, Gisela.

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  • and German unionists alike: " Firmly determined to preserve undimmed the lustre of our crown," it ran, " but prepared to share our rights with the representatives of our peoples, we trust that with God's aid and in common with our peoples we shall succeed in uniting all the countries and races of the monarchy in one great body politic."

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  • This single instance need not, it is true, show a Hellenism of any profundity; still it does show that certain parts of Hellenism had become so essential to the lustre of a court that even an Arsacid could not be without them.

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  • He was compelled, however, to add that the lustre of his pontificate would be for ever dulled by the tragic fall of Constantinople, which the Turks took in 1453.

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  • When exposed to the air it becomes quickly covered with a film of oxide; the tarnished metal when plunged into water reassumes its metallic lustre, the oxide film being quickly dissolved.

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  • You saw a plain, old-fashioned face, without life or lustre - a figure which had never looked young, and was now prematurely aged; the furrowed face bore witness to concentrated thought.

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  • The female figure is largely made use of, and rich and harmonious colours are sought, the glitter of metal being invariably subdued by deadening its lustre, or by patinas and oxides.

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  • The reign of Mamunthat reign in which art, science and letters, under the patronage of the caliph, threw so brilliant a lustre - had a very stormy beginning.

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  • The colour is iron-black and the lustre metallic; hardness 6, specific gravity 5.2.

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  • The colour is brass-yellow, and the lustre metallic; the streak, or colour of the powder, is greenish-black.

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  • Although he was at least sixty-five years of age at this period, his poetic faculty displayed itself with more than usual warmth and lustre in the glowing series of elegies, styled Eridanus, which he poured forth to commemorate the rapture of this union.

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  • The crop is said to be ready for gathering when the flowers appear; if gathered before, the fibre is weak, while if left until the seed is ripe, the fibre is stronger, but is coarser and lacks the characteristic lustre.

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  • The characters by which qualities of jute are judged are colour, lustre, softness, strength, length, firmness, uniformity and absence of roots.

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  • The best qualities are of a clear whitish-yellow colour, with a fine silky lustre, soft and smooth to the touch, and fine, long and uniform in fibre.

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  • The magnificence of its mosques and other public buildings, the number of its schools, and the extent of its warehouses shed lustre on the city; but wealth and luxury began to undermine its prosperity, and its ruin was hastened by the conduct of the Moslem refugees from Spain.

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  • one in which Swedish prose shone with any special lustre.

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  • Guntz (Comptes rendus, 1901, 133, p. 872) electrolyses a saturated solution of barium chloride using a mercury cathode and obtains a 3% barium amalgam; this amalgam is transferred to an iron boat in a wide porcelain tube and the tube slowly heated electrically, a good yield of pure barium being obtained at about looo C. The metal when freshly cut possesses a silver white lustre, is a little harder than lead, and is extremely easily oxidized on exposure; it is soluble in liquid ammonia, and readily attacks both water and alcohol.

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  • This, however, the prince president, to his credit, declined to accept, and made "an exception in favour of a savant whose works had thrown lustre on France, and whose existence his government would regret to embitter."

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  • The grain is fine and close, and when polished has a silky lustre.

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  • It usually occurs as lamellar or glanular masses, with a tin-white colour and metallic lustre, in limestone or in mineral veins often in association with ores of silver.

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  • Antimony is a silvery white, crystalline, brittle metal, and has a high lustre.

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  • It was probably the, uayvijrts XLOos of Theophrastus, described as a stone of silvery lustre, easily Scotland under Henry VIII.

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  • He had personally less to do with the successes in India than with the other great enterprises that shed an undying lustre on his administration; but his generous praise in parliament stimulated the genius of Clive, and the forces that acted at the close of the struggle were animated by his indomitable spirit.

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  • He had a family of three sons and two daughters, of whom the second son, William, was destined to add fresh lustre to a name which is one of the greatest in the history of England.

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  • Crystallized haematite, such as that from the iron-mines of Elba, presents a steel-grey or ironblack colour, with a brilliant metallic lustre, sometimes beautifully iridescent.

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  • Very thin laminae of haematite, blood-red by transmitted light, occur as microscopic enclosures in certain minerals, such as carnallite and sun-stone, to which they impart colour and lustre.

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  • In appearance silver presents a pure white colour with a perfect metallic lustre.

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  • It assumes a metallic lustre on burnishing or heating to redness.

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  • They exhibit the oratorical fervour, the pleader's eloquence in its most perfect lustre, which Petrarch possessed in no less measure than subjective passion.

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  • The form of the body is very various: some are rounded or oval, others elongated, almost linear; some are covered with warty protuberances, whilst others are smooth and shining, often with a metallic lustre.

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  • The faces of these two rhombohedra exhibit differences in surface characters, those of r being usually brighter in lustre than those of z; further, the former often predominate in size (figs.

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  • Thus in the microcrystalline chalcedony the lustre is waxy, the fracture fibrous to even, and the external form botryoidal or stalactitic flint and chert are compact and have a splintery fracture: jasper is a compact variety intermixed with much iron oxide and clay and has a dull and even fracture.

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  • In some districts the tsetse fly causes great havoc. The most interesting of the endemic insectivora is the Chrysochloris or " golden mole," so called from the brilliant yellow lustre of its fur.

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  • A characteristic Cape tree is Leucadendron argenteum or silver tree, so named from the silver-like lustre of stem and leaves.

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  • The skin of the body is sometimes blue, whilst the wool has a bright lustre, is curled in small distinct pirls, and is of uniform staple.

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  • In bulk, the metal has a silvery white lustre and takes a high polish.

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  • They are youngest of the gods, bright lords of lustre, honey-hued.

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  • The diamonds of this district are noted for their purity and lustre, and are generally associated with other crystals - garnets, agates, quartz and chalcedonies.

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  • Wieland was appointed tutor to her son; and the names of Herder, Goethe and Schiller shed an undying lustre on her court.

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  • C. Pickering in 1884, the Uranometria Nova Oxoniensis, giving the relative lustre of 2784 stars, by C. Pritchard in 1885.

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  • irXivOos, a tile), in petrology, a dark grey or dark brown crypto-crystalline substance which has an almost vitreous lustre, and when pure appears structureless to the unaided eye.

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  • These are dispelled by heat and the flint becomes white and duller in lustre.

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  • This, however, is perhaps a fiction of later poets who wished to give lustre to the ancestry of Brian Boruma, as very few of the Dalcais princes appear in the list of the kings of Cashel.

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  • would shed lustre on his nephew.

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  • These masses are of a dull grey colour, owing to surface tarnish; only on fresh fractures is the colour tin-white with metallic lustre.

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  • His imitator and superintendent, Fouquet, the Maecenas of the future Augustus, concealed this gambling policy beneath the lustre of the arts and the glamour of a literature remarkable for elevation of thought ana vigour of style, and further characterized by the proud though somewhat restricted freedom conceded to men like Corneille, Descartes and Pascal, but soon to disappear.

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  • The lias shales of Whitby contain blocks of semi-mineralized wood, or jet, which is black with a resinous lustre, and a fibrous structure.

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  • The finer varieties are used as an emollient and demulcent in medicine, and in the manufacture of confectionery; the commoner qualities are used as an adhesive paste, for giving lustre to crape, silk, &c., in cloth finishing to stiffen the fibres, and in calico-printing.

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  • lustre (Fleur de Coin) Perfect mint state, with no abrasions or marks, and full luster.

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  • lustre solution should not be applied to pieces with gilt or luster decoration.

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  • lustre the overwhelming majority of the buildings known to have been decorated with luster tile from Kashan had funerary functions.

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  • lustre good condition, NO damage or wear to the luster finish, a rare find in such good condition.

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  • Rhodes was again famous for its pottery in medieval times; this was a lustre ware at first imitated from Persian, though it afterwards developed into an independent style of fine colouring and rich variety of design.

    0
    0
  • By their sufferings no less than by their deeds of daring, her citizens showed themselves to be sublime, devoted and disinterested, winning the purest laurels which give lustre to Italian story.

    0
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  • The Church added a lustre of a different kind.

    0
    0
  • In working amber, it is turned on the lathe and polished with whitening and water or with rotten stone and oil, the final lustre being given by friction with flannel.

    0
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  • It sublimes in thin plates of a dark colour and metallic lustre, and is soluble in solutions of the caustic alkalis.

    0
    0
  • The pronotum and elytra are often adorned with bright colours or metallic lustre, and marked with stripes or spots.

    0
    0
  • Crystals of azurite belong to the monoclinic system; they have a vitreous lustre and are translucent.

    0
    0
  • It is an ironblack, opaque mineral, with metallic lustre; hardness about 6, sp. gr.

    0
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  • In central Italy the influence of the First Consul was paramount; for in 1801 he transformed the grand duchy of Tuscany into the kingdom of Etruria for the duke of Parma; and, seeing that that promotion added lustre to the fortunes of the duchess of Parma (a Spanish infanta), Spain consented lamely enough to the cession of Louisiana to France.

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

    0
    0
  • Prices were low, foreign commerce was already large, business thriving; wealth gave social status; the official British class lent a lustre to society; and Boston " town " was drawing society from the " country."

    0
    0
  • Others again, like Gasteracantha and Acrosoma, belonging to the Argyopidae, are armed with sharp and strong abdominal spines, and these spiders are hard-shelled like beetles and are spotted with black on a reddish or yellow ground, their spines shining with steel-blue lustre.

    0
    0
  • With their resinous to adamantine lustre and their translucency they also present somewhat the appearance of horn; hence the name hornsilver.

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  • The metals are mostly bodies of high specific gravity; they exhibit, when polished, a peculiar brilliancy or metallic lustre, and they are good conductors of heat and electricity; the nonmetals, on the other hand, are mostly bodies of low, specific gravity, and bad conductors of heat and electricity, and do not exhibit metallic lustre.

    0
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  • eilos, like), strictly belongs to certain elements which do not possess the properties of the true metals, although they more closely resemble them than the non-metals in many respects; thus, selenium and tellurium, which are closely allied to sulphur in their chemical properties, although bad conductors of heat and electricity, exhibit metallic lustre and have relatively high specific gravities.

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  • The personal appearance of Stevenson has often been described: he was tall, extremely thin, dark-haired, restless, compelling attention with the lustre of his wonderful brown eyes.

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  • Their lustre is vitreous except when they contain many minute crystals; they are then velvety or even resinous in appearance.

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  • The minute globular bodies have occasionally a sub-pearly lustre, and glassy rocks which possess this structure have been called perlites (q.v.).

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  • A dull stony-looking rock results, the vitreous lustre having entirely disappeared, and in microscopic section this exhibits a cryptocrystalline structure, being made up of exceedingly minute grains principally of quartz and felspar.

    0
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  • The different kinds of mica vary from perfectly colourless and transparent - as in muscovite - through shades of yellow, green, red and brown to black and opaque - as in lepidomelane; the former have a pearly lustre and the latter a submetallic lustre on the cleavage surfaces.

    0
    0
  • The works by his hand are remarkable for their ruby tint, with a beautiful metallic lustre; but only one small tazza remains in Gubbio itself.

    0
    0
  • every branch and leaf is lighted up with a silvery lustre of indescribable beauty....

    0
    0
  • It exhibits considerable lustre and is not subject to tarnishing on exposure to normal air.

    0
    0
  • It has a firm gelatinous consistence and wax-like lustre, and, microscopically, is found to be homogeneous and structureless, with a translucency like that of ground-glass.

    0
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  • 13) owes its effect entirely to surface colour and lustre.

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  • For a few isolated purposes, however, it is desirable to use a glass which has not been touched upon either surface and thus preserves the lustre of its " fire polish " undiminished; this can be attained in crown-glass but not in sheet, since one side of the latter is always more or less marked by the rubber used in the process of flattening.

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  • substances having high specific gravity, malleability, opacity, and especially a peculiar lustre, the term "metal" became generic for all substances with these properties.

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  • They are (at least practically) non-transparent; they reflect light in a peculiar manner, producing what is called "metallic lustre."

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  • The liquid metals, when cooled down sufficiently, some at lower, others at higher, temperatures freeze into compact solids, endowed with the (relative) non-transparency and the lustre of their liquids.

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  • Properties Zinc is a bluish-white metal, showing a high lustre when freshly fractured.

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  • The tetraiodide, TiI 4, is a reddish brown mass having a metallic lustre.

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  • But after proper treatmenti the former develops a glossy black patina with violet sheen, and the latter shows beautiful shades of grey with silvery lustre.

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  • The staple type has black glaze showing little lustre, and in choice varieties this is curiously speckled and pitted with red.

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  • Thenceforth Seto became the headquarters of the manufacture of cha-no-yu utensils, and many of the tiny pieces turned out there deserve high admiration, their technique being perfect, and their mahogany, russet-brown, amber and buff glazes showing wonderful lustre and richness.

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  • William inherited the baleful lustre, without the substantial power, which his ancestors had given to the name of Orange.

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  • GOLD [[[symbol]] Au, atomic weight 1 95.7(11 = I),197 2(O =16)], a metallic chemical element, valued from the earliest ages on account of the permanency of its colour and lustre.

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  • When not tarnished, the mineral has a silver-white colour with a tinge of red, and the lustre is metallic. Hardness 2-21; specific gravity 9-70-9.83.

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  • Bright, glance or pitch coal is another brilliant variety, brittle, and breaking into regular fragments of a black colour and pitchy lustre.

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  • The colour of the mineral is silver-white or steel-grey, with a metallic lustre, but it is often tarnished yellow; the streak is greyish-black.

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  • Though part of the plumage in many sun-birds gleams with metallic lustre, they owe much of their beauty to feathers which are not lustrous, though almost as vivid,' and the most wonderful combination of the brightest colours - scarlet, purple, blue, green and yellow - is often seen in one and the same bird.

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  • They are crystalline solids showing a characteristic green metallic lustre; they are readily soluble in water and dye red or violet.

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  • This is removed by solution in hot dilute sulphuric acid and a layer of pure frosted silver is left on the surface, which appears dead white in colour, and has lost its metallic lustre.

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  • Dr Chase's measures with the Yale heliometer indicated for it, in 1894, a parallax of about o" � 035; 2 and it must, accordingly, be of nearly four times the total brightness of Sirius, while its aerial lustre exceeds seventyfold that of the solar photosphere.

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  • On the 25th of May 1671 the dignities of count and baron were introduced into Denmark "to give lustre to the court"; a few months later the order of the Danebrog was instituted as a fresh means of winning adherents by marks of favour.

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  • Robespierre, who hated the Girondists, whose lustre had so long obscured his own, had proposed to includethem in the proscription lists of September; the Mountain to a man desired their overthrow.

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  • Metallic sodium possesses a silvery lustre, but on exposure to moist air the surface is rapidly dulled by a layer of the hydroxide.

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  • The faces of slates have usually a slightly silky lustre due to the abundance of minute scales of mica all lying parallel and reflecting light simultaneously from their pearly basal planes.

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  • The lustre is bright and metallic. In its external characters graphite is thus strikingly similar to molybdenite.

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  • Richard Head in his Life and Death of Mother Shipton (1684) says, "the body was of indifferent height, her head was long, with sharp fiery eyes, her nose of an incredible and unproportionate length, having many crooks and turnings, adorned with many strange pimples of divers colours, as red, blue and dirt, which like vapours of brimstone gave such a lustre to her affrighted spectators in the dead time of the night, that one of them confessed several times in my hearing that her nurse needed no other light to assist her in her duties" Allowing for the absurdity of this account, it certainly seems (if any reliance is to be placed on the so-called authorities) that the child was phenomenally plain and deformed.

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  • An important character, and one by which the mineral may always be recognized, is the perfect cubical cleavage, on which the lustre is brilliant and metallic. The colour of the mineral and of its streak is lead-grey; it is opaque; the hardness is 2 2 and the specific gravity 7.5.

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  • From the great size of the trunk and the even grain of the red cedar-like wood it is a valuable tree to the farmer and carpenter: it splits readily and evenly, and planes and polishes well; cut radially, the medullary plates give the wood a fine satiny lustre; it is strong and durable, but not so elastic as many of the western pines and firs.

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  • Iodine is a greyish-black shining solid, possessing a metallic lustre and having somewhat the appearance of graphite.

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  • It is a dark blue powder with a marked coppery lustre.

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  • It has the characteristic appearance of pure silk - a brilliant soft white body with a pearly lustre - insoluble in water, alcohol and ether, but it dissolves freely in concentrated alkaline solutions, mineral acids, strong acetic acid and in ammoniacal solution of oxide of copper.

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  • According to the amount of gum to be boiled off the soap solutions are made strong or weak; but care has to be exercised not to overdo the scouring, whereby loss of strength, substance and lustre would result.

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  • Both in the gum and in the boiled-off state silk has the peculiar property of imbibing certain metallic salts largely and combining very firmly with them, the fibre remaining to external appearance undiminished in strength and lustre, but much added to in size and weight.

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  • Short fibre silks are still put through cards and treated like cotton; but the value of silk is in its lustre, elasticity and strength, which characteristics are obtained by keeping fibres as long as possible.

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  • Magnesium is a silvery white metal possessing a high lustre.

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  • It preserves its lustre in dry air, but in moist air it becomes tarnished by the formation of a film of oxide.

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  • His indefatigable activity on behalf of Western civilization, now threatened with extinction by the Ottomans, excites admiration and adds an undying lustre to his memory.

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  • The erection of the obelisks of the Vatican, the Lateran, the Piazza del Popolo and the square behind the tribune of Sta Maria Maggiore lent a lustre to Rome which no other city in the world could rival.

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  • Fancy cotton goods are of great variety, and many of them have trade names that are used temporarily or occasion produced on the surface of the cloth by needles placed in a sliding frame; lustre, a light dress material with a lustrous face sometimes made with a cotton warp and woollen weft; zephyr, a light, coloured dress material usually in small patterns; bobbinnet, a machine-made fabric, originally an imitation of lace made with bobbins on a pillow.

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  • C. Ullmann's name of stilpnosiderite, from the Greek ariAirvOs (shining) is sometimes applied to such kinds of limonite as have a pitchy lustre.

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  • Deposits of limonite in cavities may have a rounded surface or even a stalactitic form, and may present a brilliant lustre, of blackish colour, forming what is called in Germany Glaskopf (glass head).

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  • H.*) Whatever lustre the international position won by Maximilian I might add to the ducal house, on Bavaria itself its effect during the next two centuries was more dubious.

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  • A week after his death, his widow, the princess Mary of England, gave birth to a son who, as William III., was to give added lustre to the house of Orange.

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  • Note that in Turkish su means both " water " and " the lustre of a jewel," while in English we speak of " gems of the first water."

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  • The Chinese prepare a rouge, said to be from safflower, which, spread on the cards on which it is sold, has a brilliant metallic green lustre, but when moistened and applied to the skin assumes a delicate carmine tint.

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  • Lustre, however, cannot be imparted unless the wool was originally of a silky nature.

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  • Malthus has in more modern times derived a certain degree of reflected lustre from the rise and wide acceptance of the Dar, winian hypothesis.

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  • The lustre is resinous to adamantine, and the index of refraction high (2.369 for sodium light).

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  • For this reason the mineral is not always readily recognized by inspection, though the perfect dodecahedral cleavage, the adamantine lustre, and the brown streak are characters which may be relied upon.

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  • The event which threw the greatest lustre upon this reign was the acquisition of the kingdom of Burgundy, or Aries, which was bequeathed to Conrad by its king, Rudolph III., the uncle of his wife, Gisela.

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  • Chalcedony is a translucent substance of rather waxy lustre, presenting great variety of colours, though usually white, grey, yellow or brown.

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  • and German unionists alike: " Firmly determined to preserve undimmed the lustre of our crown," it ran, " but prepared to share our rights with the representatives of our peoples, we trust that with God's aid and in common with our peoples we shall succeed in uniting all the countries and races of the monarchy in one great body politic."

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  • This single instance need not, it is true, show a Hellenism of any profundity; still it does show that certain parts of Hellenism had become so essential to the lustre of a court that even an Arsacid could not be without them.

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  • He was compelled, however, to add that the lustre of his pontificate would be for ever dulled by the tragic fall of Constantinople, which the Turks took in 1453.

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  • When exposed to the air it becomes quickly covered with a film of oxide; the tarnished metal when plunged into water reassumes its metallic lustre, the oxide film being quickly dissolved.

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  • You saw a plain, old-fashioned face, without life or lustre - a figure which had never looked young, and was now prematurely aged; the furrowed face bore witness to concentrated thought.

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  • The female figure is largely made use of, and rich and harmonious colours are sought, the glitter of metal being invariably subdued by deadening its lustre, or by patinas and oxides.

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  • The reign of Mamunthat reign in which art, science and letters, under the patronage of the caliph, threw so brilliant a lustre - had a very stormy beginning.

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  • The colour is iron-black and the lustre metallic; hardness 6, specific gravity 5.2.

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  • The colour is brass-yellow, and the lustre metallic; the streak, or colour of the powder, is greenish-black.

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  • Although he was at least sixty-five years of age at this period, his poetic faculty displayed itself with more than usual warmth and lustre in the glowing series of elegies, styled Eridanus, which he poured forth to commemorate the rapture of this union.

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  • (See Alkali Manufacture.) Potassium chlorate crystallizes in large white tablets, of a bright lustre.

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  • The crop is said to be ready for gathering when the flowers appear; if gathered before, the fibre is weak, while if left until the seed is ripe, the fibre is stronger, but is coarser and lacks the characteristic lustre.

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  • The characters by which qualities of jute are judged are colour, lustre, softness, strength, length, firmness, uniformity and absence of roots.

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  • The best qualities are of a clear whitish-yellow colour, with a fine silky lustre, soft and smooth to the touch, and fine, long and uniform in fibre.

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  • The magnificence of its mosques and other public buildings, the number of its schools, and the extent of its warehouses shed lustre on the city; but wealth and luxury began to undermine its prosperity, and its ruin was hastened by the conduct of the Moslem refugees from Spain.

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  • one in which Swedish prose shone with any special lustre.

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  • Guntz (Comptes rendus, 1901, 133, p. 872) electrolyses a saturated solution of barium chloride using a mercury cathode and obtains a 3% barium amalgam; this amalgam is transferred to an iron boat in a wide porcelain tube and the tube slowly heated electrically, a good yield of pure barium being obtained at about looo C. The metal when freshly cut possesses a silver white lustre, is a little harder than lead, and is extremely easily oxidized on exposure; it is soluble in liquid ammonia, and readily attacks both water and alcohol.

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  • This, however, the prince president, to his credit, declined to accept, and made "an exception in favour of a savant whose works had thrown lustre on France, and whose existence his government would regret to embitter."

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  • The grain is fine and close, and when polished has a silky lustre.

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  • It usually occurs as lamellar or glanular masses, with a tin-white colour and metallic lustre, in limestone or in mineral veins often in association with ores of silver.

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  • Antimony is a silvery white, crystalline, brittle metal, and has a high lustre.

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  • It was probably the, uayvijrts XLOos of Theophrastus, described as a stone of silvery lustre, easily Scotland under Henry VIII.

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  • He had personally less to do with the successes in India than with the other great enterprises that shed an undying lustre on his administration; but his generous praise in parliament stimulated the genius of Clive, and the forces that acted at the close of the struggle were animated by his indomitable spirit.

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  • He had a family of three sons and two daughters, of whom the second son, William, was destined to add fresh lustre to a name which is one of the greatest in the history of England.

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  • Crystallized haematite, such as that from the iron-mines of Elba, presents a steel-grey or ironblack colour, with a brilliant metallic lustre, sometimes beautifully iridescent.

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  • Very thin laminae of haematite, blood-red by transmitted light, occur as microscopic enclosures in certain minerals, such as carnallite and sun-stone, to which they impart colour and lustre.

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  • In appearance silver presents a pure white colour with a perfect metallic lustre.

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  • It assumes a metallic lustre on burnishing or heating to redness.

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  • They exhibit the oratorical fervour, the pleader's eloquence in its most perfect lustre, which Petrarch possessed in no less measure than subjective passion.

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  • The form of the body is very various: some are rounded or oval, others elongated, almost linear; some are covered with warty protuberances, whilst others are smooth and shining, often with a metallic lustre.

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  • The faces of these two rhombohedra exhibit differences in surface characters, those of r being usually brighter in lustre than those of z; further, the former often predominate in size (figs.

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  • Thus in the microcrystalline chalcedony the lustre is waxy, the fracture fibrous to even, and the external form botryoidal or stalactitic flint and chert are compact and have a splintery fracture: jasper is a compact variety intermixed with much iron oxide and clay and has a dull and even fracture.

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  • In some districts the tsetse fly causes great havoc. The most interesting of the endemic insectivora is the Chrysochloris or " golden mole," so called from the brilliant yellow lustre of its fur.

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  • A characteristic Cape tree is Leucadendron argenteum or silver tree, so named from the silver-like lustre of stem and leaves.

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  • The skin of the body is sometimes blue, whilst the wool has a bright lustre, is curled in small distinct pirls, and is of uniform staple.

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  • In bulk, the metal has a silvery white lustre and takes a high polish.

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  • They are youngest of the gods, bright lords of lustre, honey-hued.

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  • The diamonds of this district are noted for their purity and lustre, and are generally associated with other crystals - garnets, agates, quartz and chalcedonies.

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  • Wieland was appointed tutor to her son; and the names of Herder, Goethe and Schiller shed an undying lustre on her court.

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  • C. Pickering in 1884, the Uranometria Nova Oxoniensis, giving the relative lustre of 2784 stars, by C. Pritchard in 1885.

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  • irXivOos, a tile), in petrology, a dark grey or dark brown crypto-crystalline substance which has an almost vitreous lustre, and when pure appears structureless to the unaided eye.

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  • These are dispelled by heat and the flint becomes white and duller in lustre.

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  • This, however, is perhaps a fiction of later poets who wished to give lustre to the ancestry of Brian Boruma, as very few of the Dalcais princes appear in the list of the kings of Cashel.

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  • would shed lustre on his nephew.

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  • These masses are of a dull grey colour, owing to surface tarnish; only on fresh fractures is the colour tin-white with metallic lustre.

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  • Arsenic possesses a steel-grey colour, and a decided metallic lustre; it crystallizes on sublimation and slow condensation in rhombohedra, isomorphous with those of antimony and tellurium.

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  • His imitator and superintendent, Fouquet, the Maecenas of the future Augustus, concealed this gambling policy beneath the lustre of the arts and the glamour of a literature remarkable for elevation of thought ana vigour of style, and further characterized by the proud though somewhat restricted freedom conceded to men like Corneille, Descartes and Pascal, but soon to disappear.

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  • Rashi had no sons, but his three daughters were women of culture, and two of the sons of Jochebed (see Rashbam and TAM), as well as others of his descendants, carried on the family tradition for learning, adding lustre to Rashi's fame.

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  • The lias shales of Whitby contain blocks of semi-mineralized wood, or jet, which is black with a resinous lustre, and a fibrous structure.

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  • The finer varieties are used as an emollient and demulcent in medicine, and in the manufacture of confectionery; the commoner qualities are used as an adhesive paste, for giving lustre to crape, silk, &c., in cloth finishing to stiffen the fibres, and in calico-printing.

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  • Lustre: Fairly sheer with a lot of shine, this is another option for color-phobes.

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  • There's any color a girl could dream of in finishes from Veluxe Pearl to Lustre.

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  • They are held well above the water, shining with an almost silvery lustre in bright sunlight, and scented like a tea-rose.

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  • Lustre refers to that shine, that glow that truly fine pearls give off.

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  • Lustre is directly linked to the depth of a pearl's nacre, so it's easy to understand why thicker nacre is so desirable.

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  • When nacre, lustre, color, shape and smoothness are all relatively equal, it's the size of the pearl that is the final determining factor of its value.

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  • Having been featured in a range of top bridal and fashion magazines, including Lustre, Vogue, and Bride's, Ritani rings are not hard to find.

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