This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

luke

luke

luke Sentence Examples

  • He travelled under an alias; Luke Greely.

    4
    2
  • The guy's name is John Luke Grasso.

    3
    1
  • He was Luke the Fluke, but you didn't call him that.

    2
    1
  • St Luke iv.

    2
    3
  • high, and St Luke's (Protestant Episcopal) Cathedral.

    1
    0
  • granted a Friday market, and two fairs, at the feast of St Philip and St James, and on St Luke's day.

    1
    0
  • The city's charitable institutions include the Memorial (1903), Virginia Sheltering Arms (1889) and St Luke's hospitals, the Retreat for the Sick (1877), the Eye, Nose, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1880), the Confederate Soldiers' Home (1884), supported jointly by the state and the city, a Home for Needy Confederate Women (1900), the City Almshouse and Hospital, and several orphanages and homes for the aged.

    0
    0
  • Evanson rejected most of the books of the New Testament as forgeries, and of the four gospels he accepted only that of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • The gospel is synoptic in character and is closely related to Matthew, though in the Resurrection accounts it has affinities with Luke.

    0
    0
  • Now it is again generally admitted that in these sections we have the genuine account of one who was a member of Paul's company, who may well have been Luke.

    0
    0
  • This linguistic evidence, which is of quite unusual force, has never yet been fairly faced by those who deny Luke's authorship of Acts.

    0
    0
  • Ioo, as is commonly assumed by critics who reject the authorship by Luke.

    0
    0
  • Some critics, however, hold that it is wholly Luke's own composition, and that the Hebraic style - in which he was able to write in consequence of his familiarity with the LXX.

    0
    0
  • Luke has also slightly altered the position of the call of the first disciples in the sequence of events.

    0
    0
  • - This is an insertion into the Marcan outline of matter chiefly taken from the Logian document (the Address, Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • v.-vii.; the healing of the centurion's servant, Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • 5-13; the message of the Baptist and the discourse for which it gave occasion, Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • He includes besides, a few pieces peculiar to this Gospel which Luke had probably himself collected.

    0
    0
  • Many sections, however, contained in the corresponding part of Mark have no parallel in Luke, while the parallel to one of them is placed later and differs considerably in form.

    0
    0
  • - This is another insertion into the Marcan outline, much longer than the previous one, and consisting partly of matter taken from the Logian document (warnings to men who offer to become disciples, Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • 19-22; a missioncharge, Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 7-16, 40; thanksgiving that the Father reveals to the simple that which is hidden from the wise, Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 16, 17, &c., &c.) and partly of sections peculiar to Luke, about which the same remark may be made as before.

    0
    0
  • - Luke again takes up his Marcan document, nearly at the point at which he left it, and follows it in the main, though he adds the story of Zacchaeus and the parable of the Minae (the Ten Pieces of Money), and omits the withering of the fig-tree and some matter at the end of the discourse on the Last Things, which are given in Mark.

    0
    0
  • This feature of Christ's ministry appears only in one passage of Mark; some other illustrations of it are mentioned in Matthew, but in Luke there are several more which are peculiar to himself (see the three individual cases vii.

    0
    0
  • Once more the word € ary ycWeVBat ("to proclaim good tidings") is a favourite one with Luke.

    0
    0
  • 21 = Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • In the Beatitudes in Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • But while there is in Luke's Gospel this strain of asceticism -as to many in modern times it will appear to be-the prevailing spirit is gentle and tender, and there is in it a note of spiritual gladness, which is begun by the song and the messages of angels and the hymns and rejoicing of holy men and women, accompanying the birth of the Christ (chaps.

    0
    0
  • on St Luke (in international Series, 4th ed., 1906); W.

    0
    0
  • (Matthew xxiv., Luke xxi.).

    0
    0
  • According to the birth-narrative embodied in Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 18, &c.), who visited him 1 There is no reason to suppose that Jutta is intended by the 76Xts 'Iona of Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 12), and to whom he taught special forms of prayer (Luke v.

    0
    0
  • The Munich MS., formerly at Bamberg, begins at line 85, and has many lacunae, but continues the history down to the last verse of St Luke's Gospel, ending, however, in the middle of a sentence.

    0
    0
  • Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • Addai was supposed to be one of the Seventy of Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Among newer churches the most noticeable are the Evangelical church of St Luke, a Transitional building, with an imposing dome, finished in 1896, and the Gothic parochial church of the Giesing suburb, with a tower 312 ft.

    0
    0
  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

    0
    0
  • Augustine found a justification for these penal measures in the "compel them to come in" of Luke xiv.

    0
    0
  • 3, 2); or when he " mingled the blood " of some unknown Galileans " with their sacrifices " (Luke xiii.

    0
    0
  • The Religions of the World (1847); Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy (at first an article in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, 1848); The Church a Family (1850); The Old Testament (1851); Theological Essays (1853); The Prophets and Kings of the Old Testament (1853); Lectures on Ecclesiastical History (1854); The Doctrine of Sacrifice (1854); The Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old Testament (1855); The Epistles of St John (1857); The Commandments as Instruments of National Reformation (1866); On the Gospel of St Luke (1868); The Conscience: Lectures on Casuistry (1868); The Lord', Prayer, a Manual (1870).

    0
    0
  • Earlier in life he had a great admiration for Origen, and translated many of his works, and this lasted after he had settled at Bethlehem, for in 389 he translated Origen's homilies on Luke; but he came to change his opinion and wrote violently against two admirers of the great Alexandrian scholar, John, bishop of Jerusalem, and his own former friend Rufinus.

    0
    0
  • The appeal was to " those who from the beginning had been eyewitnesses and ministers of the word " (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Luke (the greatest festival is on the 8th of September).

    0
    0
  • Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore assumed by some authorities that the Lysanias in Luke (A.D.

    0
    0
  • The expression was borrowed from Josephus by Luke, who wrongly imagined that Lysanias I.

    0
    0
  • The germ of both is to be found in the Gospels; the first words of the Greater Doxology, or Gloria in Excelsis, being taken from Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • 69 in Matth.), include only the opening words (those from St Luke's gospel), though the passage in Athanasius shows by an et caetera that only the beginning of the hymn is given.

    0
    0
  • The author of the complete work, as we now have it, has modified the original Two Ways by inserting near the beginning a considerable section containing, among other matter, passages from the Sermon on the Mount, in which the language of St Matthew's Gospel is blended with that of St Luke's.

    0
    0
  • Three of the Gospels have clearly been for some time in circulation; St Matthew's is used several times, and there are phrases which occur only in St Luke's, while St John's Gospel lies behind the eucharistic prayers which the writer has embodied in his work.

    0
    0
  • Blaise Pascal and Immanuel Kant, among others, have Sextus's grouping in mind when they oppose themselves to " dogmatism " and " scepticism " legal or political, the decree (says Marcellus) of the legislative assembly; but it might also be of the emperor (Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • How little his heart was with it was shown by the labour he soon undertook of translating and prefacing Schleiermacher's essay on the Gospel of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • In the words of the Gospel of St Luke, he ordered "the whole world to be taxed," or, according to the revised version, to be enrolled.

    0
    0
  • II (to Jesus), Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 25.4 Luke i.

    0
    0
  • MARY, known as Mary Magdalene, a woman mentioned in the Gospels, first in Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • Mary of Magdala has been confounded (1) with the unnamed fallen woman who in Simon's house anointed Christ's feet (Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • The origin of its later name, meaning the "Baths of St Luke," is uncertain.

    0
    0
  • John has a metaphysical prologue; Matthew and Luke have historical prologues; and Mark is without any prologue.

    0
    0
  • 35-37; and " Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do" Luke xxiii.

    0
    0
  • The materials for the allegory will have been certain Old Testament narratives, but especially the Synoptic accounts of Jesus' raisings of Jairus's daughter and of the widow's son (Mark v.; (Luke vii.).

    0
    0
  • Mary and Martha are admittedly identical with the sisters in Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 38-42; and already some Greek fathers connect the Lazarus of this allegory with the Lazarus of the parable (Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • In Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 28-34); the neighbour to be thus loved and served is simply any and every suffering fellow-man; and the pattern for such perfect love is found in a schismatical Samaritan (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • This view is confirmed by the fact that in Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • Here again we note that they do not appear at the corresponding point in Luke, though some of them are given by him in other contexts.

    0
    0
  • 53 would be explained if the narrative (which is not in Luke) may be held to be an interpolation by one not familiar with the localities.

    0
    0
  • Further, Mark's work may very probably have been used by Luke in its original form.

    0
    0
  • Both Matthew and Luke show signs of having had a somewhat different beginning before them.

    0
    0
  • 29; Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • Further, its opening seems modelled on the lines of the preface to Luke's Gospel, to which, along with Acts, it may owe something of its very conception as a reasoned appeal to the lover of truth.

    0
    0
  • II, 4); Philip received the north-east of the realm and was called tetrarch; and Galilee was given to Herod Antipas, who bore the same title (Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • In the same passage of Luke mention is made of Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene near Damascus, in the valley of the B arada.

    0
    0
  • 1, and in Luke's genealogy of Christ, Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • Another allusion to the tripartite division is also no doubt to be found in the expression " the law, the prophets, and the psalms," in Luke xxiv.

    0
    0
  • These two works, the Logia (or, as some prefer to call it, the Non-Marcan document common to Matthew and Luke) and the Mark-Gospel, were the prime factors in all the subsequent composition of Gospels.

    0
    0
  • Our Matthew and our Luke are just combinations, differently constructed, of these two documents, with a certain amount of additional matter which the editors had collected for themselves.

    0
    0
  • St Luke was the first to write, as we may see from his preface, definitely in the spirit of a historian.

    0
    0
  • It is an event of no small importance for criticism that so eminent a scholar as Prof. Harnack should have come round to the view, almost universally prevalent in England, that St Luke himself was the final editor and author of both the Third Gospel and the Acts.

    0
    0
  • The reasons which converge upon the conclusion just expressed as to the origin and nature of the fundamental documents worked up in our present Synoptic Gospels are as follows: (i.) The literary analysis of the Synoptic Gospels brings out a number of sections common to Matthew and Luke which probably at one time existed as an independent document.

    0
    0
  • The matter peculiar to Matthew and Luke raises a number of interesting questions which are still too much sub judice to be answered decidedly or dogmatically, though approximate and provisional answers may before long be forthcoming.

    0
    0
  • The date of the completed Luke depends (a) on whether or not we believe Luke himself or a later disciple to be the author, and (b) whether or not we believe that the author of Acts had seen Josephus' Antiquities, published in A.D.

    0
    0
  • 93 or 94 Professor Burkitt takes an original line in maintaining that Luke was the author of both works, and yet that he had seen Antiq.

    0
    0
  • When we come to historical books like the third Gospel and the Acts, we find the writer just pursuing the ordinary methods of history, and not claiming to do anything more (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • This is the general view of the Church of his time, except the little clique known as the Alogi who rejected the Fourth Gospel, and Marcion who only recognized St Luke.

    0
    0
  • There are many indications early in the 2nd century of a tendency towards the recognition of a single Gospel; for instance, there are the local Gospels according to Hebrews, according to Egyptians; Marcion had but one Gospel, St Luke, the Valentinians preferred St John and so on; Tatian reduced the Four Gospels to one by means of a Harmony, and it is possible that something of the kind may have existed before he did this.

    0
    0
  • The only exception which they allowed to this general rule was in the case of certain passages, especially in the last chapters of Luke, where the " Western " authorities omit words which are found in the Neutral and Alexandrian texts.

    0
    0
  • Luke wrote the first edition of the Gospel for Theophilus from Caesarea; this is the Neutral text of the Gospel.

    0
    0
  • the causes which make the Gospels according to Matthew, Mark and Luke at once so much alike and so different, has resulted in the demonstration of the priority of Mark, which " was known to Matthew and Luke in the same state and with the same contents as we have it now."

    0
    0
  • Luke and Matthew appear to have been published between 80 and ioo.

    0
    0
  • If Luke used Josephus, as F.

    0
    0
  • (b) Evidence of St Luke's Gospel (ii.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay (Was Christ Born at Bethlehem?, 1898, pp. 1 49 ff.) defends the exact accuracy of St Luke's " first census " as witnessing to the (otherwise of course unknown) introduction into Syria of the periodic fourteen years' census which the evidence of papyri has lately established for Egypt, at least from A.D.

    0
    0
  • St Luke's statement of a general census is in all probability erroneous, and the introduction of the name Quirinius appears to be due to confusion with the census of A.D.

    0
    0
  • But St Luke's account, when the name of Quirinius is subtracted from it, ceases to contain any chronological evidence.

    0
    0
  • Strangely enough, however, the missing name of the governor under whom the census of the Nativity was carried out appears to be supplied by an author who wrote more than a century after St Luke, and has by no means a good reputation for historical trustworthiness.

    0
    0
  • This Saturninus was the middle one of the three governors of Syria named above, and as his successor Varus must have arrived by the middle of 6 B.C. at latest (for coins of Varus are extant of the twenty-fifth year of the era of Actium), his own tenure must have fallen about 8 and 7 B.C., and his census cannot be placed later than 7 or 7-6 B.C. The independence of Tertullian's information about this census is guaranteed by the mere fact of his knowledge of the governor's name; and if there was a census about that date, it would be unreasonable not to identify it with St Luke's census of the Nativity.

    0
    0
  • Evidence of St Luke's Gospel (iii.

    0
    0
  • 16) " beginning to be thirty years " in the sense of " not yet quite thirty," but " at the beginning of His ministry," as in Luke xxiii.

    0
    0
  • St Luke's phrase is a general one, " about thirty years old," and cannot be so pressed as to exclude some latitude in either direction.

    0
    0
  • (a) Evidence of St Luke's Gospel (iii.

    0
    0
  • 25; or (ii.) St Luke has made here a second error in chronology, caused perhaps in this case by reckoning back from the Crucifixion, and only allowing one year to the ministry of Christ.

    0
    0
  • 26-27; and as the Nativity was placed in 7-6 B.C. (at latest), this would make the age of Christ at his Baptism to be about thirty-two, which tallies well enough with St Luke's general estimate.

    0
    0
  • (b) Evidence of St Luke's Gospel (ix.

    0
    0
  • - Still stronger is the impression of brevity suggested by St Luke.

    0
    0
  • St Luke himself may have understood literally, like so many of his readers in ancient times, the reference which he records to the " acceptable year of the Lord " (iv.

    0
    0
  • Luke xiii.

    0
    0
  • No doubt it would be possible to explain Tiberius 16 as a combination of Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • 1 with a one-year ministry, and even to treat Tiberius 15 as an unintelligent repetition from St Luke - though the omission to allow a single year for the ministry would be so strange as to be almost unintelligible - but the date by the consuls has an independent look about it, and of its extreme antiquity the evidence gives two indications: (i.) Hippolytus's Commentary on Daniel (now generally dated c. A.D.

    0
    0
  • 200) combines it with an apparently inconsistent date, Tiberius 18; the latter is clearly his own combination of the length of the ministry (he says in the same passage that Christ suffered in his 33rd year) with Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • There is, therefore, some slight presumption that the three earlier periods, which together cover about fifteen years, were intended by so artistic a writer as St Luke to mark each some similar lapse of time.

    0
    0
  • is interpreted as applying to Jesus (Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • Amos) and the discourse after the reading of the lesson from the prophets in Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Luke is a beautiful building with Norman and Early English portions, but is mainly Decorated, with a western tower and spire.

    0
    0
  • 9), which contains an independent translation of the Gospel of St Matthew, and a gloss on those of St Mark, St Luke and St John g > > founded upon the Lindisfarne glosses.

    0
    0
  • Bright, The Gospel of Saint Luke in Anglo-Saxon (Oxford, 1893); for earlier editions see Cook, op. cit, p. lx.

    0
    0
  • Commentaries on the Gospels of St Matthew, St Mark and St Luke, we are told by the heading in one of the MSS.

    0
    0
  • It appears to be earlier than 150, and to be taken from a Gospel which followed more or less closely the version of the teaching of Jesus given by Matthew and Luke.

    0
    0
  • It consists of four psalms, a canticle, psalms 148-150, a hymn, the Benedictus (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Vespers or Evensong consists of five varying psalms, a hymn, the Magnificat (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • It consists of the general confession, four fixed psalms, a hymn, the Nunc dimittis (Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • 26-29, Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • Luke's account is too much interpolated from Paul, and the texts of his oldest MSS.

    0
    0
  • 24 is epexegetic, and Luke and Paul rightly substitute the nominative.

    0
    0
  • 6-22a, which is certainly authentic, is not homogeneous in itself, the situation of verses 6-8 hardly agreeing with that of 9 seq., while verse i i ("Luke alone is with me") cannot have been written at the same time as verse 21.

    0
    0
  • Against such the writer argues in Paul's name, as Luke had already done.

    0
    0
  • and Luke ii.) the birthplace of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • Luke xxi.

    0
    0
  • The present article is concerned solely with general considerations affecting the four canonical Gospels; see for details of each, the articles under Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

    0
    0
  • We also xi" 9 a gather from Luke's preface (i.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the second and third there are indications, though slight ones, that he held the view of their composition and authorship which was common from the last quarter of the century onwards (see Mark, Gospel Of, and Luke, Gospel oF), but he has made the largest use of our first Gospel.

    0
    0
  • There is also a considerable amount of matter common to Matthew and Luke, but not found in Mark.

    0
    0
  • This second source used in the composition of Matthew and Luke has frequently been called " The Logia " in order to signify that it was a collection of the sayings and discourses of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • It may, however, fairly be called " the Logian document," as a convenient way of indicating the character of the greater part of the matter which our first and third evangelists have taken from it, and this designation is used in the articles on the Gospels of Luke and Matthew.

    0
    0
  • The arrangement of its contents can, it seems, best be learned from Luke.

    0
    0
  • Christ's own teaching and that of his disciples began with the proclamation of the kingdom of God (or of heaven) (Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • They were acknowledged in Christ's words, " He that is not against you is for you " (Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • Clement himself, taking it for granted that an epistle to Hebrews must have beeen written in Hebrew, supposes that Luke translated it for the Greeks.

    0
    0
  • According to some this disciple was Clement of Rome; others name Luke; but the truth, says Origen, is known to God alone (Euseb.

    0
    0
  • Luther (who suggests Apollos) and Calvin (who thinks of Luke or Clement) followed with the decisive argument that Paul, who lays such stress on the fact that his gospel was not taught him by man (Gal.

    0
    0
  • But on the other hand the Essenes avoided marriage, which the Pharisees held in honour; they offered no animal-sacrifices in the Temple; they refrained from the use of oil, which was customary among the Pharisees (Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • vi.; Luke Tyerman, Life of George Whitefield (1876); J.

    0
    0
  • The personality of Lazarus in John's account, his relation to Martha and Mary, and the possibility that John reconstructed the story by the aid of inferences from the story of the supper in Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Lazarus is also the name given by Luke (xvi.

    0
    0
  • It is curious, not only that Luke's story does not appear in the other gospels, but also that in no other of Christ's parables is a name given to the central character.

    0
    0
  • In The Kingdom of God (1889), which first encountered serious hostile criticism in his own communion, he accounted for some of the differences between the first and third evangelists on the principle of accommodation - maintaining that Luke had altered both the text and the spirit of his sources to suit the needs of those for whom he wrote.

    0
    0
  • 28; Luke xiv.

    0
    0
  • 18), and once in a parable, the "Rich Man and Lazarus" (Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • The term Paradise (Luke xxiii.

    0
    0
  • When he speaks of death as "sleep" (Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • Degrees of award are recognized (Luke xii.

    0
    0
  • 36; Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • In the New Testament, though it is used in the sense of " offering (Luke xxi.

    0
    0
  • 19) and Luke (ch.

    0
    0
  • 7; St Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • Io), the order to which Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, belonged (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 1692), English soldier and politician, third son of Sir Miles Fleetwood of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire, and of Anne, daughter of Nicholas Luke of Woodend, Bedfordshire, was admitted into Gray's Inn on the 30th of November 1638.

    0
    0
  • JUDAEA, the name given to the southern part of Palestine as occupied by the Jewish community in post-exilic days under Persian, Greek and Roman overlordship. In Luke and Acts the term is sometimes used loosely to denote the whole of western Palestine.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the testimony of Acts, the only question, since Harnack admits the Lucan authorship,' is whether Luke is describing the organization of the Church as it existed at the time of the events recorded or reflecting the arrangements which prevailed at the time when the book was written.

    0
    0
  • It is difficult to see how Luke can have been wrong with regard to the "Ephesian elders" who came to meet Paul at Miletus since he was present on the occasion (xx.

    0
    0
  • This is not likely, but, at all events, it would only prove that the office under another name existed at Ephesus, for otherwise Luke could not possibly have put into the mouth of Paul the address which follows.

    0
    0
  • readings) from the prophetic books had been made afterwards and was in existence in our Lord's time, as may be gathered from such passages as St Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • 22, and the parable of Luke xix.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at private schools and at King's College, London, after his father's promotion to the rectory of St Luke's, Chelsea.

    0
    0
  • 10 and Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • A market for each Saturday was granted to Corfe in 1214, and in 1248 the town obtained a fair and a market on each Thursday, while Elizabeth granted fairs on the feasts of St Philip and St James and of St Luke; both of these still survive.

    0
    0
  • io; Luke xiv.

    0
    0
  • 23; Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • 2 Its duration is vaguely stated; from Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • 14; Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • He is known also by other names: (a) " Simon" (Eiµwv) in Mark four times and Luke seven times.

    0
    0
  • This use is only found in narrative before the story of the mission of the apostles: it is also found in speeches; Matthew once, Mark once and Luke twice.

    0
    0
  • (c) " Simon Peter" is found in Matthew once, Luke once, John seventeen times (and perhaps also in 2 Peter i.

    0
    0
  • (d) " Peter" is found in Matthew nineteen times, Mark eighteen times, Luke sixteen times, Acts fifty-one times, John fifteen times, Galatians twice, i Peter once.

    0
    0
  • 18-36; Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • i sqq.; Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • 18 sqq.; Luke v.

    0
    0
  • 14 sqq.; Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • i sqq.; Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • 16 sqq.; Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • 36 sqq.; Luke xii.

    0
    0
  • 27; Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • 3 sqq.); and as prominent during the Last Supper (Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • sr; Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • 18-22; Luke v.

    0
    0
  • The account in Matthew is practically identical with that in Mark and is no doubt taken from the Marcan source, but Luke and John have different traditions.

    0
    0
  • Luke, who certainly used Mark, has partly rearranged this narrative and partly rejected it in favour of a different version.

    0
    0
  • But it seems probable that this is the motive which led to the redactorial change in Luke, and that the Marcan account, which is traditionally' connected with Peter, ought to be followed.

    0
    0
  • Luke preferred to connect it with the call of Peter, the writer of John xxi.

    0
    0
  • 13-23; Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • This narrative is followed, with the exception of the last part, by Luke, who as usual is inclined to omit anything which could be regarded as derogatory to the Apostles.

    0
    0
  • 5, and perhaps by Luke xxiv.

    0
    0
  • The Jerusalem narrative is represented especially by Luke and John (excluding John xxi.

    0
    0
  • An account of it is preserved in John xxi., but it is here connected - probably wrongly - with a miraculous draught of fishes, just as the account of his call is in Luke.

    0
    0
  • 48 with Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • 19 with Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • 19, A.V.; Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • 31) gives some extracts from his letter to one Aristides, reconciling the apparent discrepancy between Matthew and Luke in the genealogy of Christ by a reference to the Jewish law, which compelled a man to marry the widow of his deceased brother, if the latter died without issue.

    0
    0
  • Further, the healing of Naaman (alluded to in Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • In 1227 a market on Monday and a fair on the vigil and day of St Luke the Evangelist were granted to the archbishop, and in 1320 Archbishop Melton obtained the right of holding two new fairs on the feasts of St James the Apostle lasting five days and of SS.

    0
    0
  • 3, Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • There is more to be said for the suggestion that he was the brother of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • He seems to have received the ordinary Christian scriptures; and Origen, who treats him as a notable exegete, has preserved fragments of a commentary by him on the fourth gospel (brought together by Grabe in the second volume of his Spicilegium), while Clement of Alexandria quotes from him what appears to be a passage from a commentary on Luke.

    0
    0
  • 28; Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • The city has a public library, a county court house, St Luke's hospital, the G.

    0
    0
  • A document, no longer extant, which was partially incorporated into the Gospels of St Matthew and St Luke.

    0
    0
  • Further information added by St Luke's Gospel.

    0
    0
  • We pass on now to compare with this narrative of St Mark another very early document which no longer exists in an independent form, but which can be partially reconstructed from the portions of it which have been embodied in the Gospels of St Matthew and St Luke.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly so much of St Mark's Gospel has been taken over word for word in the Gospels of St Luke and St Matthew that, if every copy of it had perished, we could still reconstruct large portions of it by carefully comparing their narratives.

    0
    0
  • They did not hesitate, however, to alter St Mark's language where it seemed to them rough or obscure, for each of them had a distinctive style of his own, and St Luke was a literary artist of a high order.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that many passages of St Luke's Gospeel which have no parallel in St Matthew were also derived from this early source; but this is not easily capable of distinct proqf; and, therefore, in order to gain a secure conception of the document we must confine ourselves at first to those parts of it which were borrowed by both writers.

    0
    0
  • We shall, however, look to St Luke in the main as preserving for us the more nearly its original form.

    0
    0
  • We cannot say by our present method of determination, how this document closed; for in the narratives of the Passion and the Resurrection St Matthew and St Luke only coincide in passages which they have taken from St Mark.

    0
    0
  • There can be little doubt that much more of it is embedded in St Luke's Gospel, and something more also in St Matthew's; but in order to stand on firm ground we have considered thus far only those portions which both of these writers elected to use in composing their later narratives.

    0
    0
  • It can only be effected by a close examination of the style and language of the document, which may enable us in some instances to identify with comparative security certain passages which are found in St Luke, but which St Matthew did not regard as suitable for his purpose.

    0
    0
  • These are found in St Luke, but not in St Matthew.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, it is not improbable that the wonderful words which begin, " Come unto Me all ye that labour," were drawn by St Matthew from the same document, though they are not recorded by St Luke.

    0
    0
  • But here we have entered upon a region of less certainty, in which critical scholarship has still much to do; and these passages are mentioned here only as a reminder that the document must have contained more than what St Matthew and St Luke each independently determined to borrow from it.

    0
    0
  • St Luke was a physician who had accompanied St Paul on his missionary journeys.

    0
    0
  • St Luke, on the contrary, chooses between parallel stories of his two sources, preferring neither to duplicate nor to combine: he incorporates St Mark in continuous sections, following him alone for a time, then leaving him entirely, and then returning to introduce a new block of his narrative.

    0
    0
  • St Luke gives a table of genealogy which is irreconcilable with the artificial table of St Matthew's Gospel, and which traces our Lord's ancestry up to Adam, " which was the son of God."

    0
    0
  • The scene ends with the rejection of Christ by His own townsfolk, as in the parallel story of St Mark which St Luke does not give.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that St Luke found this narrative in the second document, and chose it after his manner in preference to the less instructive story in St Mark.

    0
    0
  • For the closing scenes at Jerusalem St Luke makes considerable additions to St Mark's narrative: he gives a different account of the Last Supper, and he adds the trial before Herod and the incident of the penitent robber.

    0
    0
  • St Luke's use of his two main sources has preserved the characteristics of both of them.

    0
    0
  • This impression is confirmed by the Gospels of St Matthew and St Luke, which though they add much fresh material do not disturb the general scheme presented by St Mark.

    0
    0
  • Away from the atmosphere of contention we find Him manifesting the same broad sympathy and freedom from convention which we have noted in the other Gospels, especially in that of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • Luke xiv.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions are the technical college, Leonard Street, and St Mark's, St Luke's and the Royal chest hospitals.

    0
    0
  • 37 f.; Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • 24) and the parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • Nicholaus de Lyra (commenting on the passage in Luke) says that Mammon est nomen daemonis.

    0
    0
  • The Petrine Matthew bears the closest relationship to this original Gospel (Urevangelium); the Pauline Luke is later and arose independently; Mark represents a still later development; the account in John is idealistic: it "does not possess historical truth, and cannot and does not really lay claim to it."

    0
    0
  • In 1701 he published A Paraphrase upon the Gospel of St Matthew, which was followed, in 1702, by the Paraphrases upon the Gospels of St Mark and St Luke, and soon afterwards by a third volume upon St John.

    0
    0
  • In 1846 a water-cure was established where St Luke's hospital now stands, in the adjoining borough of Fountain Hill (pop. in 1900, 1214), and for a few years this attracted a considerable number of visitors during the summer season.

    0
    0
  • 14, Luke v.

    0
    0
  • It has generally been supposed, on the strength of Luke's account (v.

    0
    0
  • 29), that Matthew gave a feast in Jesus' honour (like Zacchaeus, Luke xix.

    0
    0
  • This supreme love to God is a complete oneness with him in will, a will which is expressed in service to our fellow-men in the simplest and most natural relationship (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 12; Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • It is a seed sown in good ground and bringing forth fruit, or in bad ground and fruitless (Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • It is not come " with observation," so that men shall say " to here and to there " (Luke xvii.

    0
    0
  • It is not of this world, and does not possess the characteristics or the glory of the kingdom of the earth (Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • It is already present among men (Luke xvii.

    0
    0
  • i i-13; Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • 2-7; Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • 28; Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 38-40; Luke xiii.

    0
    0
  • This book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament, was read at first as the companion and sequel of the Gospel of Luke.

    0
    0
  • Luke xxiv.

    0
    0
  • (5) Finally, as we gather from the parallel account in Luke xxiv.

    0
    0
  • Thus both parts of the author's work alike tend to produce assured conviction of Christianity as of Divine origin (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Muratorian Canon, Irenaeus, Tertullian,Clement and Origen), all points to Luke, the companion and fellowworker of Paul (Philem.

    0
    0
  • We have every reason to trust the Church's tradition at this time, particularly as Luke was not prominent enough as an associate of Paul to suggest the theory as a guess.

    0
    0
  • The form of the book, however, in all respects favours Luke, who was of non-Jewish birth (see Col.

    0
    0
  • The medical cast of much of its language, which is often of a highly technical nature, points strongly the same way;' while the early tradition that Luke was born in the Syrian Antioch admirably suits the 1 This argument, first worked out by Dr W.

    0
    0
  • Hobart, The Medical Language of St Luke (Dublin, 1882), but hitherto neglected by many Continental scholars, has been urged afresh by Harnack, Lukas der Arzt (Leipzig, 1906; Eng.

    0
    0
  • I) quotes these passages as proof that Luke, the author, was a companion of the apostle.

    0
    0
  • Most scholars admit that the " we " narrative is that of a personal companion of Paul, who was probably none other than Luke, in view of his traditional authorship of Acts.

    0
    0
  • But many suppose that the tradition arose from confused remembrance of the use by a later author of Luke's " we " document or travel-diary.

    0
    0
  • On the whole, then, the most tenable theory is that the writer of the " we " sections was also the author of Acts; and that he was Luke, Paul's companion during most of his later ministry, and also his " counterpart," "as a Hellene, who yet had personal sympathy with Jewish primitive Christianity " (Harnack, op. cit.

    0
    0
  • p. 103; see also Luke).

    0
    0
  • " Further, if our author was a careful inquirer (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Such a man as Luke would have rare facilities for collecting Palestinian materials, varying no doubt in accuracy, but all relatively primitive, whether in Antioch or in Caesarea, where he probably resided for some two years in contact with men like Philip the Evangelist (xxi.

    0
    0
  • The speech of Paul at Athens, as given by Luke, would not occupy more than a minute or two in delivery.

    0
    0
  • The prologue to Luke's Gospel itself implies the dying out of the generation of eye-witnesses as a class.

    0
    0
  • Such a mistake was far more likely to arise in oral transmission of the speech, before it reached Luke at all.

    0
    0
  • 28-30), are treated as though they would specially interest " Theophilus " and his circle; also an early tradition makes Luke die in the adjacent Bithynia.

    0
    0
  • It may well contain some true supplements to the original text, derived from local tradition or happy inference - a few perhaps from a written source used by Luke.

    0
    0
  • Luke xv.

    0
    0
  • 8 and Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • 21 and Luke x.

    0
    0
  • This he did by setting aside the spurious gospels, purging the real gospel (the Gospel of Luke) from supposed judaizing interpolations, and restoring the true text of 2 On the relation of matter to the Creator, Marcion himself seems not to have speculated, though his followers may have done so.

    0
    0
  • Besides these excavated monuments, the Stadion; the enceinte of fortifications erected by Lysimachus, which runs from the tower called the "Prison of St Paul" and right along the crests of the Bulbul (Prion) and Panajir hills; the round monument miscalled the "Tomb of St Luke"; and the Opistholeprian gymnasium near the Magnesian gate, are worthy of attention.

    0
    0
  • g), and at his transfiguration " the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment was white and glistering " (Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 7) goes back to either Luke's gospel or its source at this particular point.

    0
    0
  • The hypothesis that a saying of Jesus is loosely added here to an Old Testament citation is very forced, and the inference is that by the time the author wrote, Luke's gospel was reckoned as This would be explicable if Luke could be assumed to have been the author, in whole or part, of the pastorals.

    0
    0
  • The most curious of later buildings is the church of St Luke, south-east of the Cadmea, believed to contain the tomb of the evangelist.

    0
    0
  • 14 f., where from the general circle of his disciples Jesus "made twelve (` whom he also named apostles,' Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • 1 ff.) blends the calling of the twelve with their actual sending forth, while Luke (vi.

    0
    0
  • 13) makes Jesus himself call them "apostles" (for Luke's usage cf.

    0
    0
  • But it is doubtful whether Jesus ever used the term for the Twelve, in relation to their temporary missions, any more than for the "seventy others" whom he "sent forth" later (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 28; Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • Luke viii.

    0
    0
  • With George Upfold (1796-1872), bishop of Indiana from 1849 to 1872, Doane founded St Luke's in New York City.

    0
    0
  • 13--t7= Luke v.

    0
    0
  • In the Gospel of Luke also, it is true, this same source has been used for the teaching of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • 17-48) this is suggested by a comparison with Luke itself, and there are ono or two others where from the character of the matter it seems not improbable, especially vi.

    0
    0
  • into the discourse spoken on a mountain, when crowds from all parts were present, given in the Logian document, he has introduced some pieces which, as we infer from Luke, stood separately in that document (cf.

    0
    0
  • 19-21 with Luke xii.

    0
    0
  • 22, 23 with Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • 24 with Luke xvi.

    0
    0
  • 25-34 with Luke xii.

    0
    0
  • 7-II with Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • 7-II, which in Matthew is combined with an address to disciples, from the Logian document, is connected by Luke with the sending out of seventy disciples (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 24-45) combines the parallel account in the Logian document and adds Christ's reply to another attack (Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • Again, the commission to them to preach throughout the world is supported by Luke xxiv.

    0
    0
  • Once more, there is somewhat more parallelism between the fragments of the Gospel according to the Hebrews and this Gospel than is the case with Luke, not to say Mark.

    0
    0
  • In particular the evangelist brings out more strongly than either Mark or Luke the national rejection of Jesus, while the Gospel ends with the commission of Jesus to His disciples after His resurrection to "make disciples of all the peoples."

    0
    0
  • The title "Son of God" is also used with somewhat greater frequency than in Mark and Luke: ii.

    0
    0
  • Most of what the Fathers narrate of Cerdo's tenets has probably been transferred to him from his famous pupil Marcion, like whom he is said to have rejected the Old Testament and the New, except part of Luke's Gospel and of Paul's Epistles.

    0
    0
  • He was also employed to announce the birth of John the Baptist to Zacharias, and that of the Messiah to the Virgin Mary (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Because he stood in the divine presence (see Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 43 seq.), Luke (xxiii.

    0
    0
  • Both Mark and Luke say that Joseph was a "councillor" (EVaxiµwv 130vXEUTi13, Mark xv.

    0
    0
  • Luke indeed, regarding him as such, says that he "had not consented to their counsel and deed," but Mark (xiv.

    0
    0
  • 34), the sense of "the wisdom of the just" of Luke i.

    0
    0
  • True, the mystical sense given to the term in one of the sources of Luke, by Paul and some of the Church fathers, is not present.

    0
    0
  • It is clearly manifest in the humanitarianism of Luke also.

    0
    0
  • In the terrible "famine of St Luke" in 1835, Selassie still further won the hearts of his subjects by his wise measures and personal generosity; and by extending his hospitality to Europeans, he brought his country within the closer ken of civilized European powers.

    0
    0
  • The missionaries, who have reduced the language to writing (Gospel of St Luke, London, 1881), assert that it contains no fewer than 30,000 words, although the numerals stop at five, already a compound form, and although the same word expresses both hand and finger; but it appears that a large number of the words included in this total are compounds.

    0
    0
  • ANNUNCIATION, the announcement made by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary of the incarnation of Christ (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 1-16.; Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • 14), and: " To each that asketh thee give " (Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • The passage where re-birth is best put forward in connexion with baptism is Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • That in the temple of Herod is referred to in Luke i.

    0
    0
  • During these years the luke of Bedford, Coke of Nor~olk, and Robert Bakewell were busy in the improvement of stock and agriculture.

    0
    0
  • 26; Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • It has further been argued that the narratives of the Virgin birth (Matthew, Luke) are an intermediate stage in Christology.

    0
    0
  • 22-29; Luke 14 -22.

    0
    0
  • 1886, &c.); St Luke (2 vols., 1871; 3rd ed., 1888; Eng.

    0
    0
  • Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • It was published under the title of Elias Redivivus, the text being Luke i.

    0
    0
  • The remainder of his life was devoted to helping Brian Walton with the Polyglot Bible (1657) and to his own best-known work, the Horae Hebraicae et Talmudicae, in which the volume relating to Matthew appeared in 1658, that relating to Mark in 1663, and those relating to 1 Corinthians, John and Luke, in 1664, 1671 and 1674 respectively.

    0
    0
  • His works, consisting of sermons and a mystical commentary on the Bible, were published in an appendix to those of St Francis, in the Annales Minorum of Luke Wadding (Antwerp, 1623), and are also reproduced by Horoy, Medii aevi bibliotheca patristica (1880, vi.

    0
    0
  • the Hexaemeron (Creation) and Abraham, some of the Psalms, and the Gospel according to Luke.

    0
    0
  • Among the charitable institutions are the general hospitals (Harper, Grace and St Mary's); the Detroit Emergency, the Children's Free and the United States Marine hospitals; St Luke's hospital, church home, and orphanage; the House of Providence (a maternity hospital and infant asylum); the Woman's hospital and foundling's home; the Home for convalescent children, &c. In 1894 the mayor, Hazen Senter Pingree (1842-1901), instituted the practice of preparing, through municipal aid and supervision, large tracts of vacant land in and about the city for the growing of potatoes and other vegetables and then, in conjunction with the board of poor commissioners, assigning it in small lots to families of the unemployed, and furnishing them with seed for planting.

    0
    0
  • 7; Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Simon is warned against him, and Judas yields to him as tempter (Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • Jesus's cures are represented as a triumph over Satan (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Luke Hansard >>

    0
    0
  • Luke (i.

    0
    0
  • The guy's name is John Luke Grasso.

    0
    0
  • I waited to hear John Luke Grasso, and steeled myself to pretend I didn't recognize the name.

    0
    0
  • It wasn't John Luke Russo!

    0
    0
  • Our boy John Luke Grasso drives a motor home!

    0
    0
  • He travelled under an alias; Luke Greely.

    0
    0
  • I was in a cold sweat as I drove toward town knowing John Luke Grasso was in the area!

    0
    0
  • He was Luke the Fluke, but you didn't call him that.

    0
    0
  • Does the name John Luke Grasso ring any bells?

    0
    0
  • The Luke part would fit but I just can't say.

    0
    0
  • As for Luke the Fluke, he sounds like John Luke Grasso to a tee and a prime suspect for killing my friend's sister.

    0
    0
  • I see no reason not to mention my suspicion about John Luke Grasso and his connection to Willard.

    0
    0
  • John Luke Grasso, his name was so much bile on my tongue I gagged to keep it down.

    0
    0
  • "John Luke Grasso is responsible," I stated firmly.

    0
    0
  • There was no brief respite, no few days of safety; John Luke Grasso was here in our back yard!

    0
    0
  • I hoped to god my wife was smarter than John Luke Grasso.

    0
    0
  • John Luke Grasso is our man.

    0
    0
  • The detective seemed unconvinced until I told him John Luke Grasso wanted something from my friend and he might have contacted him.

    0
    0
  • While it would take time for precise confirmation, we all knew the burned out vehicle contained the bodies of Howie Abbott and John Luke Grasso.

    0
    0
  • We don't even know if John Luke Grasso was Annie Abbott's killer

    0
    0
  • Well, the closing ' Home Again ' starts all strummed acoustic then eventually launches into Luke singing over himself - the cello appears.

    0
    0
  • It has been claimed that the words of our Lord in Luke 21: are of doubtful authenticity.

    0
    0
  • Luke gives the same beatitude as Matthew but phrases it differently: Blessed be ye poor, for yours is the kingdom of God.

    0
    0
  • Luke refers to Mary as " a virgin betrothed to a man whose name was Joseph " (Lk 1:27 ).

    0
    0
  • We cannot find a birthplace for Luke in the UK.

    0
    0
  • In the churchyard look out for the epitaph to Luke Woodward, the village blacksmith.

    0
    0
  • Luke Jones ran an outstanding race in the intermediate boys championship where he took the bronze medal just 10 seconds behind the race winner.

    0
    0
  • Luke Drozd Jonathan Geer - Essex Not a Burberry cap or a customized Ford Fiesta in sight thank christ.

    0
    0
  • centrifugal tendency in the church from Paul to Luke.

    0
    0
  • Jane and Luke will be tackling the challenge on a tandem provided by Specialized.

    0
    0
  • commemorated on a plaque in St Luke's Church.

    0
    0
  • Yet Luke is usually held to be later than Mark, but it is not concerned to emphasize the Christological confession.

    0
    0
  • Luke Prince seemed to be having some success down the right flank and twice produced good crosses that made the Bedworth defense flap.

    0
    0
  • Defensively very good at the back, tim, andy, matty Curtis, and speedy luke all looked solid.

    0
    0
  • In Luke 8:28 We have the deliverance of Legion.

    0
    0
  • Now, unless we are extremely dense, we can hardly miss what Luke is saying.

    0
    0
  • despiset His face like a flint to go up to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51 ), despising the shame (Hebrews 12:2 ).

    0
    0
  • Here Luke uses the dissension to introduce seven prominent men.

    0
    0
  • In the midst of a fierce lightsaber duel with the Sith Lord, Luke faces a terrible truth about the Skywalker legacy.

    0
    0
  • We've seen an echidna in our school ground. from Luke To Marcus and Jake B. How are you?

    0
    0
  • Young Luke, seven years old was out in the Fens with his Dad on his first Winter Pike fishing expedition.

    0
    0
  • fifteenth chapter of Luke has been the center of my study of the New Testament.

    0
    0
  • fourteenth chapter of Luke's gospel, interestingly, includes both.

    0
    0
  • Beloved wife of Bernard, dearly loved mother of Bev and Niki, loving grandmother of Luke, Dominic and Anna.

    0
    0
  • Discipleship demands the renunciation of possessiveness (Luke 14:33 ), of the material greed which causes so much human deprivation and environmental destruction.

    0
    0
  • Who it sounds like Cool Hand Luke are slightly grungy and heavy, slightly poppy and slightly experimental.

    0
    0
  • halcyon days. j. Greek tile in blue, representing St. Luke.

    0
    0
  • half volleybroke to Luke Garrard who made no mistake with a half-volley from fifteen yards.

    0
    0
  • Luke Harding reports that Germany is reveling in an explosion of national pride and silly headgear.

    0
    0
  • heaven's gates (Luke 13:25 ).

    0
    0
  • Luke Welch leaves to become a housemaster at More House School in Surrey which specializes in children who have difficulties associated with dyslexia.

    0
    0
  • Prof Luke O'Neill provided a keynote talk on the functioning of innate immunity at the mucosal barrier.

    0
    0
  • Did he get anything wrong, because, if he did, then Luke is not inerrant, and nor is the bible.

    0
    0
  • Therefore, we should read in Luke 3:23 that Joseph was son- in-law of Heli.

    0
    0
  • ironmonger row is closed to traffic at the Old Street/St Luke's Close end, there is access for pedestrians only.

    0
    0
  • Mule gimmer lambs are sold at the annual Carlisle Luke Fair sale in September.

    0
    0
  • Shortly before the half hour mark the game livened up when Luke Prince charged into the area to latch onto a Jenkins pass.

    0
    0
  • Luke from England on 20th Oct 2004 V. Good.

    0
    0
  • I rang Dawn the day after and several times after that and only seemed to be getting a Luke warm response from her.

    0
    0
  • A crazed machete wielding maniac attacked children in St. Luke's Infants School, Blakenhall.

    0
    0
  • Matthean parallel to Luke here at Mt.

    0
    0
  • maxillofacial surgeon at St Luke's Hospital, Bradford.

    0
    0
  • nineteenth chapter of Luke, there are a couple verses of interest there.

    0
    0
  • Luke often used the Greek Old Testament for his stories.

    0
    0
  • orgy Luke reminds his mother at the end, tolerance extends even to those who enjoy orgies of whipping, torture and mutilation.

    0
    0
  • City were lifted from the start with the appearance of Luke Prince, playing having rejected overtures from DML rivals Weston-super-Mare.

    0
    0
  • The patristic traditions, which afford little help, are as follows: patristic traditions, which afford little help, are as follows: Patristic Tradition Matthew | Luke | Page ^ MARK.

    0
    0
  • Stephen and the Hellenists Luke begins a new pericope, in Acts 6:1, as the phrase " and in those days " shows.

    0
    0
  • The Passover pilgrimage might be linked in with Jesus ' pilgrimage to the Passover in Jerusalem when he was twelve (Luke 2:41-52 ).

    0
    0
  • Luke was too busy getting his eyebrows plucked to join in.

    0
    0
  • But Luke had been the chief presbyter when the Church was founded, and for a few years thereafter.

    0
    0
  • When Luke skips town, Jo plots an almighty surprise for unsuspecting punters at Chez Chez, - but how will Cheryl react?

    0
    0
  • Elsewhere, third-seeded English professional Scott Handley beat Australian qualifier Luke Margan, 11-7, 11-8, 11-5.

    0
    0
  • Stowe's resignation follows the loss of Luke Smith, who resigned in disgrace his councilor seat in August.

    0
    0
  • Also, are you going to write a sequel to " Eight Days of Luke "?

    0
    0
  • Despite extensive searches and several unconfirmed sightings there has been no news from Luke since and his current whereabouts remain a mystery.

    0
    0
  • Dr. Steve Worrall is a consultant oral & maxillofacial surgeon at St Luke's Hospital, Bradford.

    0
    0
  • I fully sympathize with your son Luke's problems.

    0
    0
  • In Mondays are Red, Luke wakes from a coma to find that he has developed an extraordinary condition called synaesthesia.

    0
    0
  • There is a standing centrifugal tendency in the church from Paul to Luke.

    0
    0
  • Luke often used the Greek Old testament for his stories.

    0
    0
  • thirteenth chapter of Luke takes us deeper into the ministry of the gospel of God.

    0
    0
  • twelfth chapter of Luke's Gospel.

    0
    0
  • whinged a lot (which forward doesn't) and looked the part but was generally taken care of my Cool Hand Luke!

    0
    0
  • wielding maniac attacked children in St. Luke's Infants School, Blakenhall.

    0
    0
  • Both, as we have come to expect from Luke, involved some excellent guitar work with gentle and sometimes wry lyrics.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Luke is Perpendicular, enlarged in modern times.

    0
    0
  • granted a fair at the feast of St Luke, 18th of October), and by Henry VIII.

    0
    0
  • 46) in which Joseph and Mary lived (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 25, 26; Luke xxii.

    0
    0
  • St Luke iv.

    0
    0
  • 46; Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • 35) and Zacchaeus (Luke xix.

    0
    0
  • 1) and with the good Samaritan (Luke x.

    0
    0
  • mighty works of God" were interpolated by Luke in the document he transcribed.'

    0
    0
  • high, and St Luke's (Protestant Episcopal) Cathedral.

    0
    0
  • 26; Luke xx.

    0
    0
  • Antonio in Padua, 1452, and an altar-piece of St Luke and other saints for the church of S.

    0
    0
  • In 1501 Bishop Luke of Prague edited the first Protestant hymn-book; in 1502 he issued a catechism, which circulated in Switzerland and Germany and fired the catechetical zeal of Luther; in 1565 John Blahoslaw translated the New Testament into Bohemian; in1579-1593the Old Testament was added; and the whole, known as the Kralitz Bible, is used in Bohemia still.

    0
    0
  • Complete works, edited by Luke Wadding (13 vols., Lyons, 1639) and at Paris (26 vols., 1891-1895).

    0
    0
  • granted a Friday market, and two fairs, at the feast of St Philip and St James, and on St Luke's day.

    0
    0
  • The city's charitable institutions include the Memorial (1903), Virginia Sheltering Arms (1889) and St Luke's hospitals, the Retreat for the Sick (1877), the Eye, Nose, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1880), the Confederate Soldiers' Home (1884), supported jointly by the state and the city, a Home for Needy Confederate Women (1900), the City Almshouse and Hospital, and several orphanages and homes for the aged.

    0
    0
  • The most important parts are the homilies on Jeremiah, the books of Moses, Joshua and Luke, and the commentaries on Matthew, John and Romans.

    0
    0
  • 18) and baeriAcp (Luke xi.

    0
    0
  • BENEDICTUS, the hymn of Zacharias (Luke i.

    0
    0
  • Evanson rejected most of the books of the New Testament as forgeries, and of the four gospels he accepted only that of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • He it was who was called a "fox" by Christ (Luke xiii.

    0
    0
  • The words ascribed to Christ in Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Trachonitis (mentioned in Luke iii.

    0
    0
  • Two treaties negotiated with the Sioux by Luke Lea, commissioner, and Governor Alexander Ramsey in 1851 opened to settlement the greater part of the land within the territory west of the Mississippi, and such an unparalleled rush to the new lands took place that a census taken in 1857 showed a population of 150,037.

    0
    0
  • The severity with which Henry treated the last rebels was regarded as a blot upon his fame; but the only case of merely vindictive punishment was that of the poet Luke de la Barre, who was sentenced to lose his eyes for a lampoon upon the king, and only escaped the sentence by committing suicide.

    0
    0
  • 79 (edition of 1852); Fontana, Monumenta Dominicana, p. 52 (Rome, 16 75); Luke Wadding, Annales Minorum, iii.

    0
    0
  • Mark's narratives of the sepulture by Joseph of Arirathea and of the empty tomb are taken as posterior to St Paul; the narratives of the infancy in Matthew and Luke as later still.

    0
    0
  • Theol., 1885, pp. 498-504) as a fragment of one of the primitive gospels mentioned in Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 709-712), and is of opinion that this gospel, in the form in which it was known to Epiphanius, Jerome and Origen, was " a recast of an older original," which, written originally in Aramaic, was nearly related to the Logia used by St Matthew and the Ebionitic writing used by St Luke, " which itself was only a later redaction of the Logia."

    0
    0
  • The gospel is synoptic in character and is closely related to Matthew, though in the Resurrection accounts it has affinities with Luke.

    0
    0
  • He edited and revised Matthew (the 9th ed., 1897), Mark and Luke (the 9th ed., 1901), John (the 9th ed., 1902), Romans (the 9th ed., 1899), the Epistles to Timothy and Titus (the 7th ed., 1902), Hebrews (the 6th ed., 1897), the Epistles of John (the 6th ed., 1900).

    0
    0
  • If also the passage in Ambrose of Milan (on Luke i.

    0
    0
  • GOSPEL OF ST LUKE, the third of the four canonical Gospels of the Christian Church.

    0
    0
  • - The earliest indication which we possess of the belief that the author was Luke, the companion of the Apostle Paul (Col.

    0
    0
  • 11), is found in Justin Martyr, who, in his Dialogue with Trypho (c. 103), when making a statement found only in our Luke, instead of referring for it simply to the "Apostolic Memoirs," his usual formula, says that it is contained in the memoirs composed by "the Apostles and those that followed them."

    0
    0
  • But the first distinct mention of Luke as the author of the Gospel is that by Irenaeus in his famous passage about the Four Gospels (Adv.

    0
    0
  • This tradition is important in spite of the fact that it first comes clearly before us in a writer belonging to the latter part of the 2nd century, because the prominence and fame of Luke were not such as would of themselves have led to his being singled out to have a Gospel attributed to him.

    0
    0
  • The question of the authorship cannot, however, be decided without considering the internal evidence, the interpretation of which in the case of the Third Gospel and the Acts (the other writing attributed to Luke) is a matter of peculiar interest.

    0
    0
  • Now it is again generally admitted that in these sections we have the genuine account of one who was a member of Paul's company, who may well have been Luke.

    0
    0
  • This linguistic evidence, which is of quite unusual force, has never yet been fairly faced by those who deny Luke's authorship of Acts.

    0
    0
  • Ioo, as is commonly assumed by critics who reject the authorship by Luke.

    0
    0
  • There is then strong reason for believing the tradition that Luke, the companion of the Apostle Paul, was the author of our third Gospel and the Acts.

    0
    0
  • These, it is said, point to the author's having been a physician, as Luke (Col.

    0
    0
  • 14) was (see esp. Hobart, The Medical Language of St Luke, 1882).

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, a comparison of Luke xxi.

    0
    0
  • seems to show that in using his document Luke here mingled with the prophecy the interpretation which events had suggested and that the siege of Jerusalem in A.D.

    0
    0
  • 1-4, Luke alludes to other Gospel-records which preceded his own.

    0
    0
  • Luke also claims that he has written "in order."

    0
    0
  • Some critics, however, hold that it is wholly Luke's own composition, and that the Hebraic style - in which he was able to write in consequence of his familiarity with the LXX.

    0
    0
  • - In the main Luke here follows his Marcan document.

    0
    0
  • 1-6a), is given by Luke at the very beginning of it, perhaps because of the previous connexion of Jesus with Nazareth.

    0
    0
  • Luke has also slightly altered the position of the call of the first disciples in the sequence of events.

    0
    0
  • - This is an insertion into the Marcan outline of matter chiefly taken from the Logian document (the Address, Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • v.-vii.; the healing of the centurion's servant, Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • 5-13; the message of the Baptist and the discourse for which it gave occasion, Luke vii.

    0
    0
  • He includes besides, a few pieces peculiar to this Gospel which Luke had probably himself collected.

    0
    0
  • Many sections, however, contained in the corresponding part of Mark have no parallel in Luke, while the parallel to one of them is placed later and differs considerably in form.

    0
    0
  • - This is another insertion into the Marcan outline, much longer than the previous one, and consisting partly of matter taken from the Logian document (warnings to men who offer to become disciples, Luke ix.

    0
    0
  • 19-22; a missioncharge, Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 7-16, 40; thanksgiving that the Father reveals to the simple that which is hidden from the wise, Luke x.

    0
    0
  • 16, 17, &c., &c.) and partly of sections peculiar to Luke, about which the same remark may be made as before.

    0
    0
  • - Luke again takes up his Marcan document, nearly at the point at which he left it, and follows it in the main, though he adds the story of Zacchaeus and the parable of the Minae (the Ten Pieces of Money), and omits the withering of the fig-tree and some matter at the end of the discourse on the Last Things, which are given in Mark.

    0
    0
  • This feature of Christ's ministry appears only in one passage of Mark; some other illustrations of it are mentioned in Matthew, but in Luke there are several more which are peculiar to himself (see the three individual cases vii.

    0
    0
  • Once more the word € ary ycWeVBat ("to proclaim good tidings") is a favourite one with Luke.

    0
    0
  • 21 = Luke xviii.

    0
    0
  • In the Beatitudes in Luke vi.

    0
    0
  • But while there is in Luke's Gospel this strain of asceticism -as to many in modern times it will appear to be-the prevailing spirit is gentle and tender, and there is in it a note of spiritual gladness, which is begun by the song and the messages of angels and the hymns and rejoicing of holy men and women, accompanying the birth of the Christ (chaps.

    0
    0
  • on St Luke (in international Series, 4th ed., 1906); W.

    0
    0
  • (Matthew xxiv., Luke xxi.).

    0
    0
  • = Luke xxi.) conflicts with this view, and is therefore suspicious.

    0
    0
  • According to the birth-narrative embodied in Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 18, &c.), who visited him 1 There is no reason to suppose that Jutta is intended by the 76Xts 'Iona of Luke i.

    0
    0
  • 12), and to whom he taught special forms of prayer (Luke v.

    0
    0
  • The Munich MS., formerly at Bamberg, begins at line 85, and has many lacunae, but continues the history down to the last verse of St Luke's Gospel, ending, however, in the middle of a sentence.

    0
    0
  • Luke ii.

    0
    0
  • Addai was supposed to be one of the Seventy of Luke x.

    0
    0
  • Among newer churches the most noticeable are the Evangelical church of St Luke, a Transitional building, with an imposing dome, finished in 1896, and the Gothic parochial church of the Giesing suburb, with a tower 312 ft.

    0
    0
  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

    0
    0
  • Augustine found a justification for these penal measures in the "compel them to come in" of Luke xiv.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →