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lucerne

lucerne

lucerne Sentence Examples

  • Clover, lucerne and sainfoin make up the bulk of artificial pasturage, while vetches, crimson clover and cabbage are the other chief forage crops.

  • The temporary includes vetches, pulse, lupine, clover and trifolium; and the perennial, meadow-trefoil, lupinella, sulla (fledysarum coronarium), lucerne and darnel.

  • The river valleys abound in natural pasture, and sainfoin, lucerne and other forage crops are largely grown; cattle-raising is an important source of wealth, and the cheeses of Troyes are well known.

  • lettuce, endive, beet, radish, cress; cereals; and fodder plants such as lucerne and carob.

  • Thus his " studious and sedentary life " passed pleasantly enough, interrupted only at rare intervals by boyish excursions of a day or a week in the neighbourhood, and by at least one memorable tour of Switzerland, by Basel, Zurich, Lucerne and Bern, made along with Pavilliard in the autumn of 1755.

  • Various kinds of fodder crops are grown in Transcaucasia, such as hay, rye-grass and lucerne.

  • In Oakland Cemetery is a large monument to Confederate soldiers; another monument in Oakland, "To the unknown Confederate Dead," is a reproduction of the Lion of Lucerne; in West View Cemetery (4 m.

  • Pfyffer in wax, now in Lucerne, the other by J.

  • There is more than one meaning of Lucerne discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • Lucerne, Switzerland (Canton) >>

  • from Lucerne by the St Gotthard railway and 22 m.

  • Its port on the Lake of Lucerne, Fliielen, is 2 m.

  • The orange, indigo, lucerne and European vegetables are grown.

  • Of course care must be exercised in the selection of plants - such as sorghum, maize, wheat, and alfalfa or lucerne - which are adapted to dry conditions and a warm climate.

  • A great mass of pale-green foliage is usually composed of the algarrobo trees, while the course of the river is marked by lines or groups of palms, by fine old willows (Salix humboldtiana), fruit-gardens, and fields of cotton, Indian corn, sugar-cane and alfalfa (lucerne).

  • On the other hand the Mors Pilati tells how when condemned by the emperor he committed suicide; and his body, thrown first into the Tiber and then the Rhone, disturbed both waters, and was driven north into " Losania," where it was plunged in the gulf near Lucerne and below Mt Pilatus (originally no doubt Pileatus or cloud-capped), from whence it is raised every Good Friday to sit and wash unavailing hands.

  • Meiringen is frequented by travellers in summer, as it is the meeting-point of many routes: from Interlaken by the lake of Brienz and Brienz, from Lucerne by the Briinig railway (28 m.), from Engelberg by the Joch Pass (7267 ft.), from the upper Valais by the Grimsel Pass (7100 ft.), and from Grindelwald by the Great Scheidegg Pass (6434 ft.).

  • The progress of the Reformation attracted the attention of all Switzerland, but there was a strong opposition to it, especially in the five Forest Cantons: Lucerne, Zug, Schwyz, Uri and Unterwalden; and the Zurichers felt it necessary to form a league in its defence.

  • When a solemn embassy of rebuke was sent to Zurich from a diet held at Lucerne, on the 26th of January 1524, the city replied that in matters relating to the Word of God and the salvation of souls she would brook no interference.

  • After journeys in Italy and England, he again settled in Strassburg, but, disturbed by the Reformation, sought an exile at Lucerne in Switzerland in 1526.

  • made him his private secretary, in 1793 creating him titular archbishop of Tyre and despatching him to Lucerne as nuncio.

  • The outskirts are richly cultivated with wheat, barley, lucerne and poppies.

  • Potatoes, rye, lucerne and other kinds of forage are also important crops.

  • from Stansstad, its port on the south shore of the lake of Lucerne, and 12 m.

  • Bernese Oberland (from the Lake of Geneva to the Furka, the Reuss Valley and the Lake of Lucerne).

  • Vaud, Fribourg, the Valais, Lucerne, Uri and Unterwalden.

  • 4,974 Brunig Pass (Meiringen to Lucerne), railway over..

  • Clover and lucerne are the other leading crops, and large flocks of sheep are kept in the region.

  • The general agricultural products of the country are wheat, barley, pulse, fruit, madder, asafoetida, lucerne, clover and tobacco.

  • born at Lucerne in 1488.

  • This led to his being transferred to Lucerne, and again (1523) reinstated at Zurich.

  • It is probably to this ballad that Melchior Russ of Lucerne (who began his Chronicle in 1482) refers when, in his account (from Justinger) of the evil deeds of the bailiffs in the Forest districts, he excuses himself from giving the story.

  • In general see two excellent works by Franz Heinemann, TellIconographie, Lucerne, 1902 (reproductions, with text, of the chief representations of Tell in art from 1507 onwards), and Tell-Bibliographie (including that of Schiller's play), published in 1908 at Bern.

  • from Lucerne by the St Gotthard railway, 19 m.

  • Maitland is the centre of the rich agricultural district of the Hunter valley, which produces maize, wheat and other cereals, lucerne, tobacco, fruit and wine; excellent coal also is worked in the vicinity.

  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.

  • In Brittany, where it scarcely ripens the grain, it furnishes a strong crop in the autumn upon sandy soil where clover and lucerne will yield but a poor produce.

  • Lucerne and a trefoil called shaftal form important fodder crops in the western parts of the country, and, when irrigated, are said to afford ten or twelve cuttings in the season.

  • The following are the more important streams of this name: Two rivers in the west of Russia, both falling into the Gulf of Riga, near Riga, which is situated between them; a river in the north of France, falling into the sea below Gravelines, and navigable as far as St Omer; and a river of Switzerland, in the cantons of Lucerne and Aargau, which carries the waters of Lakes Baldegger and Hallwiler into the Aar.

  • from Lucerne and 512 m.

  • From 1815 to 1848 it shared with Zurich and Lucerne the supreme rule (which shifted from one to the other every two years) in the Swiss confederation, while in 1848 a federal law made Bern the sole political capital, where the federal government is permanently fixed and where the ministers of foreign powers reside.

  • Its principal products are cotton, wheat and opium - the anti-opium decrees of 1906 had little effect on the province up to 1910 - and these it exchanges with the neighbouring provinces for coal, iron, salt, &c. Kao-liang, pulse, millet, maize, groundnut, barley, beans, pease, lucerne, and rape seed are also grown.

  • The lines serving these places all start from the eastern railway station (that from Thun reaches the western or main railway station), whence steamers depart for the Giessbach Falls, Brienz and Meiringen, on the way to Lucerne or to the Grimsel Pass.

  • Alfalfa, or lucerne (Medicago sativa), is grown extensively for shipment to the mining towns of the desert provinces.

  • On the Karroo are numerous ostrich farms. Lucerne is very largely grown as fodder for the cattle.

  • There are also numerous ostrich farms, in particular in the districts of Oudtshoorn and Ladismith in the Little Karroo, where lucerne grows with extraordinary luxuriance.

  • The shores of the lake - reminding a visitor somewhat of the Swiss lake of Lucerne - rise almost sheer to over 6000 ft.

  • This is divided into six parts: (i.) Rome et Italie Lucerne (Medicago sativa), z nat.

  • Hersche, Zwei Characterbilder, on Diogenes of Sinope and Paetus (Lucerne, 1865); monographs by A.

  • de Schumacher, a Swiss councillor of state and chief of the department of justice in the canton of Lucerne.

  • The soil is admirably cultivated, the principal crops being wheat, rice, barley, maize, millet, lucerne, tobacco, vegetables and fruit.

  • Alfalfa (or lucerne) formed the principal part of the hay crop in 1899, and was produced chiefly in the counties of Utah (95,316 tons), Salt Lake (91,266 tons), Cache (64,543 tons) and Boxelder (50,019 tons), all in the northern part of the state.

  • Lucerne and clover are extensively grown for fodder.

  • It is agreed on all sides that the last stanza, attributing the authorship to Halbsuter of Lucerne, "as he came back from the battle," is a very late addition.

  • Many authorities regard it as made up of three distinct songs (one of which refers to the battle and Winkelried), possibly put together by the younger Halbsuter (citizen of Lucerne in 1435, died between 1470 and 1480), though others contend that the Sempach-Winkelried section bears clear traces of having been composed after the Reformation began, that is, about 1520 or 1530.

  • We find in the "Anniversary Book" of Emmetten in Unterwalden (drawn up in 1560) the name of "der Winkelriedt" at the head of the Nidwalden men; and in a book by Horolanus, a pastor at Lucerne (about 1563), that of "Erni Winckelried" occurs some way down the list of Unterwalden men.

  • In the MS. of the chronicle of Diebold Schilling of Bern (c. 1480) there is in the picture of the battle of Sempach a warrior pierced with spears falling to the ground, which may possibly be meant for Winkelried; while in that of Diebold Schilling of Lucerne (1511), though in the text no allusion is made to any such incident, there is a similar picture of a man who has accomplished Winkelried's feat, but he is dressed in the colours of Lucerne.

  • Five cases at least are known: a follower of the count of Hapsburg, in a skirmish with the Bernese in 1271; Stulinger of Ratisbon (Regensburg) in 1332, in the war of the count of Kyburg against the men of Bern and Solothurn; Conrad Royt of Lucerne, at Nancy in 1477; Henri Wolleben, at Frastanz in 1499, in the course of the Swabian War; and a man at the battle of Kappel in 1531.

  • - See in particular Theodor von Liebenau's Die Schlacht bei Sempach - Gedenkbuch zur fiinften Sacularfeser (1886), published at the expense of the government of Lucerne.

  • Wheat, barley, millet, pease, lentils, rice, sorghum, lucerne and cotton are the chief agricultural products.

  • of Great Britain rye is chiefly or solely cultivated as a forage-plant for cattle and horses, being usually sown in autumn for spring use, after the crop of roots, turnips, &c., is exhausted, and before the clover and lucerne are ready.

  • 2 (Lucerne, 1893).

  • from Alpnachstad, its port on the lake of Lucerne.

  • other pod-fruits largely cultivated are various kinds of beans and peas, lentils (Ervum lens), Spanish lentils (Lcithyrus sativus) and other species of Lathyrus, lupines, &c. The principal fodder-crops are lucerne (Medicago saliva) and esparcette (a variety of sainfoin).

  • In England red-clover hay, or, better still, crimson-clover or lucerne hay, is liberally fed to farm horses with about io lb per day of oats, while they usually run in open yards with shelter sheds.

  • biennial congress of the Lucerne Sports International held in Prague during October 1929.

  • gloss over his crew's defeat in Lucerne.

  • Unquestionably one of Europe's most charming cities, Lucerne also has the added virtue of stunning lakeside and mountain scenery on its doorstep.

  • lakeside resort of Weggis the best way: by steamer from Lucerne.

  • lucerne hay in California, USA.

  • lucerne plants by root dipping into conidial suspensions.

  • Six week old salt-tolerant lucerne seedlings (Medicago media) were inoculated by the method of root dipping and wound inoculation.

  • orientation tour of the beautiful city of Lucerne.

  • paprika meal, olive leaves, lucerne hay or soya-bean hulls as the sole source of fiber.

  • Both crews had beaten the British boat in Lucerne at the final pre-Olympic regatta.

  • I intend to start this potentially vast project with a case-study of one city: Lucerne in Switzerland.

  • Vast areas of land have been ploughed and sown with lucerne (alfalfa); magnificent permanent pasturage has been created where there were coarse and hard grasses in former days, and Argentina has been able to add baled hay to her list of exports.

  • Clover, lucerne and sainfoin make up the bulk of artificial pasturage, while vetches, crimson clover and cabbage are the other chief forage crops.

  • The temporary includes vetches, pulse, lupine, clover and trifolium; and the perennial, meadow-trefoil, lupinella, sulla (fledysarum coronarium), lucerne and darnel.

  • The river valleys abound in natural pasture, and sainfoin, lucerne and other forage crops are largely grown; cattle-raising is an important source of wealth, and the cheeses of Troyes are well known.

  • lettuce, endive, beet, radish, cress; cereals; and fodder plants such as lucerne and carob.

  • Thus his " studious and sedentary life " passed pleasantly enough, interrupted only at rare intervals by boyish excursions of a day or a week in the neighbourhood, and by at least one memorable tour of Switzerland, by Basel, Zurich, Lucerne and Bern, made along with Pavilliard in the autumn of 1755.

  • Various kinds of fodder crops are grown in Transcaucasia, such as hay, rye-grass and lucerne.

  • As affecting agricultural practice there were three noteworthy improvements in respect of the making of which, without the consent of or notice to his landlord, a tenant might claim compensation - (1) the consumption on the holding " by horses, other than those regularly employed on the holding," of corn, cake or other feeding-stuff not produced on the holding; (2) the "consumption on the holding by cattle, sheep, or pigs, or by horses other than those regularly employed on the holding, of corn proved by satisfactory evidence to have been produced and consumed on the holding "; (3) " laying down temporary pasture with clover, grass, lucerne, sainfoin or other seeds sown more than two years prior to the determination of the tenancy."

  • To the former belong the ordinary leguminous crops - the clovers, beans, peas, vetches or tares, sainfoin, lucerne, for example - which obtain their nitrogen from the air, and are independent of the application of nitrogenous manures, whilst in their roots they accumulate a store of nitrogen which will ultimately become available for future crops of other kinds.

  • In Oakland Cemetery is a large monument to Confederate soldiers; another monument in Oakland, "To the unknown Confederate Dead," is a reproduction of the Lion of Lucerne; in West View Cemetery (4 m.

  • His political indiscretions at Dresden were made the excuse for bitter persecutions: scandalmongers made his friendship with the ill-fated king a danger to both; and Wagner was obliged to retire to Triebschen near Lucerne for the next six years.

  • Pfyffer in wax, now in Lucerne, the other by J.

  • There is more than one meaning of Lucerne discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • Lucerne, Switzerland (Canton) >>

  • from Lucerne by the St Gotthard railway and 22 m.

  • Its port on the Lake of Lucerne, Fliielen, is 2 m.

  • The orange, indigo, lucerne and European vegetables are grown.

  • Of course care must be exercised in the selection of plants - such as sorghum, maize, wheat, and alfalfa or lucerne - which are adapted to dry conditions and a warm climate.

  • A great mass of pale-green foliage is usually composed of the algarrobo trees, while the course of the river is marked by lines or groups of palms, by fine old willows (Salix humboldtiana), fruit-gardens, and fields of cotton, Indian corn, sugar-cane and alfalfa (lucerne).

  • On the other hand the Mors Pilati tells how when condemned by the emperor he committed suicide; and his body, thrown first into the Tiber and then the Rhone, disturbed both waters, and was driven north into " Losania," where it was plunged in the gulf near Lucerne and below Mt Pilatus (originally no doubt Pileatus or cloud-capped), from whence it is raised every Good Friday to sit and wash unavailing hands.

  • Meiringen is frequented by travellers in summer, as it is the meeting-point of many routes: from Interlaken by the lake of Brienz and Brienz, from Lucerne by the Briinig railway (28 m.), from Engelberg by the Joch Pass (7267 ft.), from the upper Valais by the Grimsel Pass (7100 ft.), and from Grindelwald by the Great Scheidegg Pass (6434 ft.).

  • The progress of the Reformation attracted the attention of all Switzerland, but there was a strong opposition to it, especially in the five Forest Cantons: Lucerne, Zug, Schwyz, Uri and Unterwalden; and the Zurichers felt it necessary to form a league in its defence.

  • When a solemn embassy of rebuke was sent to Zurich from a diet held at Lucerne, on the 26th of January 1524, the city replied that in matters relating to the Word of God and the salvation of souls she would brook no interference.

  • After journeys in Italy and England, he again settled in Strassburg, but, disturbed by the Reformation, sought an exile at Lucerne in Switzerland in 1526.

  • made him his private secretary, in 1793 creating him titular archbishop of Tyre and despatching him to Lucerne as nuncio.

  • The outskirts are richly cultivated with wheat, barley, lucerne and poppies.

  • Potatoes, rye, lucerne and other kinds of forage are also important crops.

  • from Stansstad, its port on the south shore of the lake of Lucerne, and 12 m.

  • Bernese Oberland (from the Lake of Geneva to the Furka, the Reuss Valley and the Lake of Lucerne).

  • Vaud, Fribourg, the Valais, Lucerne, Uri and Unterwalden.

  • 4,974 Brunig Pass (Meiringen to Lucerne), railway over..

  • Clover and lucerne are the other leading crops, and large flocks of sheep are kept in the region.

  • The general agricultural products of the country are wheat, barley, pulse, fruit, madder, asafoetida, lucerne, clover and tobacco.

  • born at Lucerne in 1488.

  • This led to his being transferred to Lucerne, and again (1523) reinstated at Zurich.

  • It is probably to this ballad that Melchior Russ of Lucerne (who began his Chronicle in 1482) refers when, in his account (from Justinger) of the evil deeds of the bailiffs in the Forest districts, he excuses himself from giving the story.

  • He goes on to narrate how Tell, irritated by his treatment, stirred up his friends against the governor, who seized and bound him and was conveying him by boat to his castle on the lake of Lucerne, when a storm arose, and Tell, by reason of his great bodily strength, was, _ after being unbound, given charge of the rudder on his promise to bring the boat safely to land.

  • In general see two excellent works by Franz Heinemann, TellIconographie, Lucerne, 1902 (reproductions, with text, of the chief representations of Tell in art from 1507 onwards), and Tell-Bibliographie (including that of Schiller's play), published in 1908 at Bern.

  • from Lucerne by the St Gotthard railway, 19 m.

  • Maitland is the centre of the rich agricultural district of the Hunter valley, which produces maize, wheat and other cereals, lucerne, tobacco, fruit and wine; excellent coal also is worked in the vicinity.

  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.

  • In Brittany, where it scarcely ripens the grain, it furnishes a strong crop in the autumn upon sandy soil where clover and lucerne will yield but a poor produce.

  • Lucerne and a trefoil called shaftal form important fodder crops in the western parts of the country, and, when irrigated, are said to afford ten or twelve cuttings in the season.

  • The following are the more important streams of this name: Two rivers in the west of Russia, both falling into the Gulf of Riga, near Riga, which is situated between them; a river in the north of France, falling into the sea below Gravelines, and navigable as far as St Omer; and a river of Switzerland, in the cantons of Lucerne and Aargau, which carries the waters of Lakes Baldegger and Hallwiler into the Aar.

  • from Lucerne and 512 m.

  • From 1815 to 1848 it shared with Zurich and Lucerne the supreme rule (which shifted from one to the other every two years) in the Swiss confederation, while in 1848 a federal law made Bern the sole political capital, where the federal government is permanently fixed and where the ministers of foreign powers reside.

  • Its principal products are cotton, wheat and opium - the anti-opium decrees of 1906 had little effect on the province up to 1910 - and these it exchanges with the neighbouring provinces for coal, iron, salt, &c. Kao-liang, pulse, millet, maize, groundnut, barley, beans, pease, lucerne, and rape seed are also grown.

  • The lines serving these places all start from the eastern railway station (that from Thun reaches the western or main railway station), whence steamers depart for the Giessbach Falls, Brienz and Meiringen, on the way to Lucerne or to the Grimsel Pass.

  • Alfalfa, or lucerne (Medicago sativa), is grown extensively for shipment to the mining towns of the desert provinces.

  • On the Karroo are numerous ostrich farms. Lucerne is very largely grown as fodder for the cattle.

  • There are also numerous ostrich farms, in particular in the districts of Oudtshoorn and Ladismith in the Little Karroo, where lucerne grows with extraordinary luxuriance.

  • The shores of the lake - reminding a visitor somewhat of the Swiss lake of Lucerne - rise almost sheer to over 6000 ft.

  • This is divided into six parts: (i.) Rome et Italie Lucerne (Medicago sativa), z nat.

  • Hersche, Zwei Characterbilder, on Diogenes of Sinope and Paetus (Lucerne, 1865); monographs by A.

  • de Schumacher, a Swiss councillor of state and chief of the department of justice in the canton of Lucerne.

  • The soil is admirably cultivated, the principal crops being wheat, rice, barley, maize, millet, lucerne, tobacco, vegetables and fruit.

  • Alfalfa (or lucerne) formed the principal part of the hay crop in 1899, and was produced chiefly in the counties of Utah (95,316 tons), Salt Lake (91,266 tons), Cache (64,543 tons) and Boxelder (50,019 tons), all in the northern part of the state.

  • Lucerne and clover are extensively grown for fodder.

  • It is agreed on all sides that the last stanza, attributing the authorship to Halbsuter of Lucerne, "as he came back from the battle," is a very late addition.

  • Many authorities regard it as made up of three distinct songs (one of which refers to the battle and Winkelried), possibly put together by the younger Halbsuter (citizen of Lucerne in 1435, died between 1470 and 1480), though others contend that the Sempach-Winkelried section bears clear traces of having been composed after the Reformation began, that is, about 1520 or 1530.

  • We find in the "Anniversary Book" of Emmetten in Unterwalden (drawn up in 1560) the name of "der Winkelriedt" at the head of the Nidwalden men; and in a book by Horolanus, a pastor at Lucerne (about 1563), that of "Erni Winckelried" occurs some way down the list of Unterwalden men.

  • In the MS. of the chronicle of Diebold Schilling of Bern (c. 1480) there is in the picture of the battle of Sempach a warrior pierced with spears falling to the ground, which may possibly be meant for Winkelried; while in that of Diebold Schilling of Lucerne (1511), though in the text no allusion is made to any such incident, there is a similar picture of a man who has accomplished Winkelried's feat, but he is dressed in the colours of Lucerne.

  • Five cases at least are known: a follower of the count of Hapsburg, in a skirmish with the Bernese in 1271; Stulinger of Ratisbon (Regensburg) in 1332, in the war of the count of Kyburg against the men of Bern and Solothurn; Conrad Royt of Lucerne, at Nancy in 1477; Henri Wolleben, at Frastanz in 1499, in the course of the Swabian War; and a man at the battle of Kappel in 1531.

  • - See in particular Theodor von Liebenau's Die Schlacht bei Sempach - Gedenkbuch zur fiinften Sacularfeser (1886), published at the expense of the government of Lucerne.

  • Wheat, barley, millet, pease, lentils, rice, sorghum, lucerne and cotton are the chief agricultural products.

  • of Great Britain rye is chiefly or solely cultivated as a forage-plant for cattle and horses, being usually sown in autumn for spring use, after the crop of roots, turnips, &c., is exhausted, and before the clover and lucerne are ready.

  • 2 (Lucerne, 1893).

  • from Alpnachstad, its port on the lake of Lucerne.

  • other pod-fruits largely cultivated are various kinds of beans and peas, lentils (Ervum lens), Spanish lentils (Lcithyrus sativus) and other species of Lathyrus, lupines, &c. The principal fodder-crops are lucerne (Medicago saliva) and esparcette (a variety of sainfoin).

  • In England red-clover hay, or, better still, crimson-clover or lucerne hay, is liberally fed to farm horses with about io lb per day of oats, while they usually run in open yards with shelter sheds.

  • Both crews had beaten the British boat in Lucerne at the final pre-Olympic regatta.

  • I intend to start this potentially vast project with a case-study of one city: Lucerne in Switzerland.

  • The beautiful Bulova Accutron Lucerne collection offers something for both men and women.

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