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lucania

lucania

lucania Sentence Examples

  • It was colonized by Timoleon in 338 B.C. with settlers from Velia in Lucania, and in the time of the tyrant Phintias (289-279) it had regained some of its power.

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  • Its southern extremity, Calabria, forms a complete peninsula, being united to the mass of Lucania or the Basilicata by an isthmus isthmus 35 m.

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  • farther, from the basin-shaped group of the Monti del Matese (which rises to 6660 ft.) to the neighbourhood of Potenza, in the heart of the province of Basilicata, corresponding nearly to the ancient Lucania.

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  • The third region contained Lucania and Bruttiuin; it was bounded on the west coast by the Silarus, on the east by the Bradanus.

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  • Here the Via Appia turned eastward towards Beneventum, while the Via Popiia continued in a south-easterly direction through the Campanian plain and thence southwards through the mountains of Lucania and Bruttii as far as Rhegium.

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  • From Aequum Tuticum, on the Via Traiana, the Via Herculia ran to the south-east, crossing the older Via Appia, then south to Potentia and so on to join the Via Popilia in the centre of Lucania.

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  • Under Diocletian and Maximian a road (the Via Herculia) was constructed from Aequum Tuticum to Pons Aufidi near Venusia, where it crossed the Via Appia and went on into Lucania, passing through Potentia and Grumentum, and joining the Via Popilia near Nerulum.

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  • above sea-level, belonging in Roman times to Apulia, and lying on the boundary between it and Lucania.

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  • It was separated from Lucania on the north by a line drawn from the mouth of the river Laus on the west to a point a little south of the river Crathis on the east.

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  • Augustus joined it with Lucania (from which it was divided by the rivers Laus and Crathis) to form the third region of Italy.

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  • In the 2nd and 3rd centuries, for administrative and juridical purposes, it was sometimes (with Lucania) joined to Apulia and Calabria.

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  • Diocletian placed Lucania and Brittii (as the name was then spelt) under a corrector, whose residence was at Rhegium.

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  • Caelius Rufus in 48 in his rising against Caesar, but was slain near Thurii in Lucania.

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  • Under his leadership, Tarentum fought with unvarying success against the Messapii, Lucania and even Syracuse.

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  • `Hpltacca), an ancient city of Lucania, situated near the modern Policoro, 3 m.

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  • Atena) of Lucania, upon the Via Popillia, 7 m.

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  • One of these last is a boundary stone relating to the assignation of lands in the time of the Gracchi, of which six other examples have been found in Campania and Lucania.

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  • Pesto), an ancient Greek city in Lucania, near the sea, with a railway station 24 m.

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  • For many years the city maintained its independence, though surrounded by the hostile native inhabitants of Lucania.

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  • "M n,, later 'EMa), an ancient town of Lucania, Italy, on the hill now crowned by the medieval castle of Castellammare della Bruca, 440 ft.

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  • Having gained another victory in 542, this time in the valley of Mugello, he left Tuscany for Naples, captured that city and then received the submission of the provinces of Lucania, Apulia and Calabria.

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  • His father held the offices of comes privatarum and sacrarum largitionum (controller of the emperor's private revenue and the public exchequer) under Odoacer, and subsequently attached himself to Theodoric, by whom he was appointed corrector (governor) of Bruttii and Lucania, and praefectus praetorio.

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  • of the river Aufidus (Ofanto), and not far from the boundary of Lucania (hence Horace describes himself as "Lucanus an Apulus anceps, nam Venusinus arat finem sub utrumque colonus").

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  • Apparently the same unit is found (18) at Heraclea in Lucania, 21.86; and, as the general foot of the South Italians, or Oscan foot (18), best defined by the 100 feet square being (3/10)ths of the jugerum, and therefore = 10.80 or half of 21.60.

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  • LUCANIA, in ancient geography, a district of southern Italy, extending from the Tyrrhenian Sea to the Gulf of Tarentum.

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  • Just within the frontier of Lucania rises Monte Pollino, 7325 ft., the highest peak in the southern Apennines.

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  • The Crathis, which forms at its mouth the southern limit of the province, belongs almost wholly to the territory of the Bruttii, but it receives a tributary, the Sybaris (Coscile), from the mountains of Lucania.

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  • The district of Lucania was so called from the people bearing the name Lucani (Lucanians) by whom it was conquered about the middle of the 5th century B.C. Before that period it was included under the general name of Oenotria, which was applied by the Greeks to the southernmost portion of Italy.

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  • For administrative purposes under the Roman empire, Lucania was always united with the district of the Bruttii.

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  • In the upland valley of the Tanagrus were Atina, Forum Popilii and Consilinum; Eburi (Eboli) and Volceii (Buccino), though to the north of the Silarus, were also included in Lucania.

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  • In the 4th century the correctores of Lucania and the territory of the Bruttii resided here, but it did not attain its full importance till after the Lombard conquest.

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  • According to some accounts, Philolaus, obliged to flee, took refuge first in Lucania and then at Thebes, where he had as pupils Simmias and Cebes, who subsequently, being still young men (vcavifKoL), were present at the death of Socrates.

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  • From Campania the rebels marched into Lucania, a country better suited for guerrilla warfare.

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  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

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  • Spartacus led them against Rome, but their hearts seem to have failed them; and instead of attacking the capital, he passed on again to Lucania.

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  • Aquila), and that this dialect closely resembled the Oscan of Lucania and Samnium, though presenting some peculiarities of its own, which warrant, perhaps, the use of the name North Oscan.

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  • By means of the Via Campana it had easy communication north-westward with Neapolis, Puteoli and Capua, and thence by the Via Appia with Rome; and southwards with Pompeii and Nuceria, and thence with Lucania and the Bruttii.

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  • BASILICATA, a territorial division of Italy, now known as the province of Potenza, which formed a part of the ancient Lucania.

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  • On the 1st of May 305, the day of Diocletian's abdication, he also, but without his colleague's sincerity, divested himself of the imperial dignity at Mediolanum (Milan), which had been his capital, and retired to a villa in Lucania; in the following year, however, he was induced by his son Maxentius to reassume the purple.

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  • The man who brought the grain from Africa to the public stores at Ostia, the baker who made it into loaves for distribution, the butchers who brought pigs from Samnium, Lucania or Bruttium, the purveyors of wine and oil, the men who fed the furnaces of the public baths, were bound to their callings from one generation to another.

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  • Admonished by an angel, he crossed the sea to Lucania and went to Rome, where he suffered martyrdom.

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  • It was colonized by Timoleon in 338 B.C. with settlers from Velia in Lucania, and in the time of the tyrant Phintias (289-279) it had regained some of its power.

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  • Its southern extremity, Calabria, forms a complete peninsula, being united to the mass of Lucania or the Basilicata by an isthmus isthmus 35 m.

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  • farther, from the basin-shaped group of the Monti del Matese (which rises to 6660 ft.) to the neighbourhood of Potenza, in the heart of the province of Basilicata, corresponding nearly to the ancient Lucania.

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  • It thus still comprised only the two provinces subsequently known as Lucania and Bruttium (see references s.v.

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  • How far also the language or languages spoken in Bruttium and at certain points of Lucania, such as Anxia, differed from the Oscan of Samnium and Campania there is not enough evidence to show (see BRUTTII).

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  • The third region contained Lucania and Bruttiuin; it was bounded on the west coast by the Silarus, on the east by the Bradanus.

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  • Here the Via Appia turned eastward towards Beneventum, while the Via Popiia continued in a south-easterly direction through the Campanian plain and thence southwards through the mountains of Lucania and Bruttii as far as Rhegium.

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  • From Aequum Tuticum, on the Via Traiana, the Via Herculia ran to the south-east, crossing the older Via Appia, then south to Potentia and so on to join the Via Popilia in the centre of Lucania.

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  • Under Diocletian and Maximian a road (the Via Herculia) was constructed from Aequum Tuticum to Pons Aufidi near Venusia, where it crossed the Via Appia and went on into Lucania, passing through Potentia and Grumentum, and joining the Via Popilia near Nerulum.

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  • above sea-level, belonging in Roman times to Apulia, and lying on the boundary between it and Lucania.

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  • It was separated from Lucania on the north by a line drawn from the mouth of the river Laus on the west to a point a little south of the river Crathis on the east.

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  • Augustus joined it with Lucania (from which it was divided by the rivers Laus and Crathis) to form the third region of Italy.

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    0
  • In the 2nd and 3rd centuries, for administrative and juridical purposes, it was sometimes (with Lucania) joined to Apulia and Calabria.

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    0
  • Diocletian placed Lucania and Brittii (as the name was then spelt) under a corrector, whose residence was at Rhegium.

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    0
  • Caelius Rufus in 48 in his rising against Caesar, but was slain near Thurii in Lucania.

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    0
  • Under his leadership, Tarentum fought with unvarying success against the Messapii, Lucania and even Syracuse.

    0
    0
  • `Hpltacca), an ancient city of Lucania, situated near the modern Policoro, 3 m.

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  • Atena) of Lucania, upon the Via Popillia, 7 m.

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  • One of these last is a boundary stone relating to the assignation of lands in the time of the Gracchi, of which six other examples have been found in Campania and Lucania.

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  • Pesto), an ancient Greek city in Lucania, near the sea, with a railway station 24 m.

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  • For many years the city maintained its independence, though surrounded by the hostile native inhabitants of Lucania.

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    0
  • "M n,, later 'EMa), an ancient town of Lucania, Italy, on the hill now crowned by the medieval castle of Castellammare della Bruca, 440 ft.

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  • Having gained another victory in 542, this time in the valley of Mugello, he left Tuscany for Naples, captured that city and then received the submission of the provinces of Lucania, Apulia and Calabria.

    0
    0
  • His father held the offices of comes privatarum and sacrarum largitionum (controller of the emperor's private revenue and the public exchequer) under Odoacer, and subsequently attached himself to Theodoric, by whom he was appointed corrector (governor) of Bruttii and Lucania, and praefectus praetorio.

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  • of the river Aufidus (Ofanto), and not far from the boundary of Lucania (hence Horace describes himself as "Lucanus an Apulus anceps, nam Venusinus arat finem sub utrumque colonus").

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  • Apparently the same unit is found (18) at Heraclea in Lucania, 21.86; and, as the general foot of the South Italians, or Oscan foot (18), best defined by the 100 feet square being (3/10)ths of the jugerum, and therefore = 10.80 or half of 21.60.

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    0
  • LUCANIA, in ancient geography, a district of southern Italy, extending from the Tyrrhenian Sea to the Gulf of Tarentum.

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    0
  • Just within the frontier of Lucania rises Monte Pollino, 7325 ft., the highest peak in the southern Apennines.

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    0
  • The Crathis, which forms at its mouth the southern limit of the province, belongs almost wholly to the territory of the Bruttii, but it receives a tributary, the Sybaris (Coscile), from the mountains of Lucania.

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    0
  • The district of Lucania was so called from the people bearing the name Lucani (Lucanians) by whom it was conquered about the middle of the 5th century B.C. Before that period it was included under the general name of Oenotria, which was applied by the Greeks to the southernmost portion of Italy.

    0
    0
  • For administrative purposes under the Roman empire, Lucania was always united with the district of the Bruttii.

    0
    0
  • In the upland valley of the Tanagrus were Atina, Forum Popilii and Consilinum; Eburi (Eboli) and Volceii (Buccino), though to the north of the Silarus, were also included in Lucania.

    0
    0
  • In the 4th century the correctores of Lucania and the territory of the Bruttii resided here, but it did not attain its full importance till after the Lombard conquest.

    0
    0
  • According to some accounts, Philolaus, obliged to flee, took refuge first in Lucania and then at Thebes, where he had as pupils Simmias and Cebes, who subsequently, being still young men (vcavifKoL), were present at the death of Socrates.

    0
    0
  • From Campania the rebels marched into Lucania, a country better suited for guerrilla warfare.

    0
    0
  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

    0
    0
  • Spartacus led them against Rome, but their hearts seem to have failed them; and instead of attacking the capital, he passed on again to Lucania.

    0
    0
  • Aquila), and that this dialect closely resembled the Oscan of Lucania and Samnium, though presenting some peculiarities of its own, which warrant, perhaps, the use of the name North Oscan.

    0
    0
  • By means of the Via Campana it had easy communication north-westward with Neapolis, Puteoli and Capua, and thence by the Via Appia with Rome; and southwards with Pompeii and Nuceria, and thence with Lucania and the Bruttii.

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    0
  • BASILICATA, a territorial division of Italy, now known as the province of Potenza, which formed a part of the ancient Lucania.

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    0
  • On the 1st of May 305, the day of Diocletian's abdication, he also, but without his colleague's sincerity, divested himself of the imperial dignity at Mediolanum (Milan), which had been his capital, and retired to a villa in Lucania; in the following year, however, he was induced by his son Maxentius to reassume the purple.

    0
    0
  • The man who brought the grain from Africa to the public stores at Ostia, the baker who made it into loaves for distribution, the butchers who brought pigs from Samnium, Lucania or Bruttium, the purveyors of wine and oil, the men who fed the furnaces of the public baths, were bound to their callings from one generation to another.

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  • Admonished by an angel, he crossed the sea to Lucania and went to Rome, where he suffered martyrdom.

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    0
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