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lubbock

lubbock

lubbock Sentence Examples

  • (From Lubbock, after Allman.) by the founder proceeds to grow and to bud in the same way as the founder did, producing a side branch of the main stem.

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  • Lubbock), The Scenery of Switzerland (London, 1896) and The Scenery of England (London, 1902).

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) on these subjects are familiar to all naturalists.

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  • Lubbock's experiments of inLlucing ants to seek objects that had been removed show that they are guided by scent rather than by sight, and that any disturbance of their surroundings often causes great uncertainty in their actions.

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  • Lubbock goes so far as to conclude the account of his experiments with the remark that " It is difficult altogether to deny them the gift of reason ...

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  • Morgan sums up a discussion on Lubbock's experiments in which the ants failed to utilize particles of earth for bridge-making, with the suggestive remark that " What these valuable experiments seem to show is that the ant, probably the most intelligent of all insects, has no claim to be regarded as a rational being."

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  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Origin and Metamorphosis of Insects (London, 1874); L.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) and L.

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  • According to the researches of Lubbock and of E.

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  • Lubbock traced at least twenty moults in Cloeon; at about the tenth rudiments of the wingcases began to appear.

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  • After 1872, in addition to its regular organs, it issued Hungarian translations of several popular scientific English works, as, for instance, Darwin's Origin of Species; Huxley's Lessons in Physiology; Lubbock's Prehistoric Times; Proctor's Other Worlds than Ours; Tyndall's Heat as a Mode of Motion, &c. Versions were also made of Cotta's Geologie der Gegenwart and Helmholtz's Populcire Vorlesungen.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) separated the springtails as a distinct order, the Collembola, and by many students this separation has been maintained.

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  • An advanced and vehement Radical in politics and Progressive in municipal affairs, Mr Harrison in 1886 stood unsuccessfully for parliament against Sir John Lubbock for London University.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • Lubbock (Obs.

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  • Abulfeda the geographer, writing in the r3th century, notices the fact that part of the Apamaean Lake was inhabited by Christian fishermen who lived on the lake in wooden huts built on piles, and Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) mentions that the Rumelian fishermen on Lake Prasias "still inhabit wooden cottages built over the water, as in the time of Herodotus."

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  • Chambers (London, 1865); Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Prehistoric Times (4th ed., London, 1878); Robert Munro, The Lake-Dwellings of Europe (London, 1890), with a bibliography of the subject.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), "Monograph of the Collembola and Thysanura," Ray Society, 1873.

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  • British species are mentioned in Lubbock's monograph; for recent additions see G.

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  • - Fustel de Coulanges, La Cite antique (Paris, 1864); Lubbock, Origin of Civilization (1870); Whitney, Oriental and Linguistic Studies (New York, 1872 and 18 74); Brinton, The Religious Sentiment (1876); Myths of the New World' (New York, 1876); Essays of an Americanist (1890); Religions of Primitive Peoples (1897); Keary, Outlines of Primitive Belief (London, 1882); Leblois, Les Bibles et les initiateurs de l'humanite (4 vols.

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  • He married, in 1853, Alice Margaret, daughter of the second Lord Stanley of Alderley, and had a numerous family; his second daughter became in 1884 the wife of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • John Lubbock, 1st baron Avebury >>

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  • Lubbock and J.

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  • Lubbock, and afterwards by Delaunay.

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  • This body had for its first president the distinguished naturalist Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • (From Lubbock, after Allman.) by the founder proceeds to grow and to bud in the same way as the founder did, producing a side branch of the main stem.

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    0
  • Lubbock), The Scenery of Switzerland (London, 1896) and The Scenery of England (London, 1902).

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

    0
    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) on these subjects are familiar to all naturalists.

    0
    0
  • Lubbock's experiments of inLlucing ants to seek objects that had been removed show that they are guided by scent rather than by sight, and that any disturbance of their surroundings often causes great uncertainty in their actions.

    0
    0
  • Lubbock goes so far as to conclude the account of his experiments with the remark that " It is difficult altogether to deny them the gift of reason ...

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    0
  • Morgan sums up a discussion on Lubbock's experiments in which the ants failed to utilize particles of earth for bridge-making, with the suggestive remark that " What these valuable experiments seem to show is that the ant, probably the most intelligent of all insects, has no claim to be regarded as a rational being."

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    0
  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Origin and Metamorphosis of Insects (London, 1874); L.

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  • Brauer, Lubbock, Sharp, Burner, &c. (opp. cit.); P. Mayer (Jena, Zeits.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) and L.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) proved it to extend over more than six months; but in larger and more robust genera (e.g.

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  • According to the researches of Lubbock and of E.

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  • Lubbock traced at least twenty moults in Cloeon; at about the tenth rudiments of the wingcases began to appear.

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    0
  • After 1872, in addition to its regular organs, it issued Hungarian translations of several popular scientific English works, as, for instance, Darwin's Origin of Species; Huxley's Lessons in Physiology; Lubbock's Prehistoric Times; Proctor's Other Worlds than Ours; Tyndall's Heat as a Mode of Motion, &c. Versions were also made of Cotta's Geologie der Gegenwart and Helmholtz's Populcire Vorlesungen.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) separated the springtails as a distinct order, the Collembola, and by many students this separation has been maintained.

    0
    0
  • An advanced and vehement Radical in politics and Progressive in municipal affairs, Mr Harrison in 1886 stood unsuccessfully for parliament against Sir John Lubbock for London University.

    0
    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • Lubbock (Obs.

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  • Abulfeda the geographer, writing in the r3th century, notices the fact that part of the Apamaean Lake was inhabited by Christian fishermen who lived on the lake in wooden huts built on piles, and Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) mentions that the Rumelian fishermen on Lake Prasias "still inhabit wooden cottages built over the water, as in the time of Herodotus."

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    0
  • Chambers (London, 1865); Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Prehistoric Times (4th ed., London, 1878); Robert Munro, The Lake-Dwellings of Europe (London, 1890), with a bibliography of the subject.

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), "Monograph of the Collembola and Thysanura," Ray Society, 1873.

    0
    0
  • British species are mentioned in Lubbock's monograph; for recent additions see G.

    0
    0
  • - Fustel de Coulanges, La Cite antique (Paris, 1864); Lubbock, Origin of Civilization (1870); Whitney, Oriental and Linguistic Studies (New York, 1872 and 18 74); Brinton, The Religious Sentiment (1876); Myths of the New World' (New York, 1876); Essays of an Americanist (1890); Religions of Primitive Peoples (1897); Keary, Outlines of Primitive Belief (London, 1882); Leblois, Les Bibles et les initiateurs de l'humanite (4 vols.

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  • He married, in 1853, Alice Margaret, daughter of the second Lord Stanley of Alderley, and had a numerous family; his second daughter became in 1884 the wife of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • John Lubbock, 1st baron Avebury >>

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  • Lubbock and J.

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  • Lubbock, and afterwards by Delaunay.

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  • This body had for its first president the distinguished naturalist Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • Little People of America Inc. PO Box 745, Lubbock, TX 79408.

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  • Pocket Full of Stitches: This Lubbock, TX needlepoint store carries a wide variety of needlepoint patterns, threads, and supplies.

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