Lowell sentence examples

lowell
  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad and by electric railways to Andover, Boston, Lowell, Haverhill and Salem, Massachusetts, and to Nashua and Salem, New Hampshire.

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  • In 1838 Lundy removed to Lowell, La Salle county, Illinois, where he printed several copies of the Genius of Universal Emancipation.

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  • According to the census of 1900 there were 33 incorporated cities in Massachusetts, of which 8 had between 12,000 and 20,000 inhabitants; 5 between 20,000 and 25,000 (Everett, North Adams, Quincy, Waltham, Pittsfield); 2 io between 25,000 and 50,000 (Holyoke, Brockton, Haverhill, Salem, Chelsea, Malden, Newton, Fitchburg, Taunton, Gloucester); 7 between 50,000 and ioo,000 (Lowell, Cambridge, Lynn, Lawrence, New Bedford, Springfield, Somerville); and 3 more than roo,000 inhabitants, viz.

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  • With Austin Phelps and Lowell Mason he prepared The Sabbath Hymn Book (1858).

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  • The Lowell Institute, established in 1839 (by John Lowell, Jr., who bequeathed $237,000 for the purpose), provides yearly courses of free public lectures, and its lecturers have included many of the leading scholars of America and Europe.

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  • Railway connexion with Worcester, Lowell and Providence was opened in 1835; with Albany, N.Y., and thereby with various lines of interior communication, in 1841 (double track, 1868); with Fitchburg, in 1845; and in 1851 connexion was completed with the Great Lakes and Canada.

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  • Russell Lowell, My Study Windows; R.

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  • Francis (Lowell Hydraulic Experiments, Boston, Mass., 1855) led him to propose variations in the accepted formulae for the discharge over weirs, and a generation later a very complete investigation of this subject was carried out by H.

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  • He was the author of numerous papers on light and in 1903 published Light Waves and Their Uses, being Lowell lectures for 1899.

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  • On the summit of Ontake are eight large and several small craters, and there also may be seen displays of trance and divine possession, such as are described by Mr Percival Lowell in Occult Japan (1895).

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  • The Lowell Offering (1841) was written by factory girls of Lowell (q.v.), Mass.

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  • The Merrimac, the second stream of the state in volume, runs in a charming valley through the extreme northeast corner, and affords immensely valuable water-power at Lowell, Lawrence and Haverhill.

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  • Vast water-power is developed on the Merrimac at Lawrence and Lowell, and on the Connecticut at South Hadley, and to a less extent at scores of other cities on many streams and artificial ponds; many of the machines that have revolutionized industrial conditions since the beginning of the factory system have been invented by Massachusetts men; and the state contains various technical schools of great importance.

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  • " Not a yard of fancy wool fabric had ever been woven by the power-loom in any country till done by William Crompton at the Middlesex Mills, Lowell, in 1840 " (Samuel Lawrence).

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  • 1 These two schools were removed subsequently to Framingham (1853) and Westfield (1844), where they are still active; while others flourish at Bridgewater (1840), Salem (1854), Worcester (1874), Fitchburg (1895), North Adams (1897), Hyannis (1897) and Lowell (1897), that at Framingham being open to women only.

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  • Such schools exist (1909) in Lowell, Fall River and New Bedford.

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  • befc,re the Lowell Institute ...

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  • Lowell are two on " New England two Centuries Ago " and " Witchcraft."

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  • Sanborn; and Lowell's criticism in his Fable for Critics.

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  • The first steps in railway building were taken in 1835, when the Boston & Maine, the Concord, and the Nashua & Lowell railways were incorporated.

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  • The opening of the Middlesex Canal through the town in 1803 and of the Boston & Lowell railroad in 1835 gave an impetus to the town's growth.

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  • Lowell, Government and Parties in Continental Europe (Boston, 1896); J.

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  • Besides editions of English classics his works include a Life of Queen Victoria (1902),(1902), Great Englishmen of the Sixteenth Century (1904), based on his Lowell Institute lectures at Boston, Mass., in 1903, and Shakespeare and the Modern Stage (1906).

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  • He published Pike County Ballads (1871) - the most famous being "Little Breeches" - a volume worthy to rank with Bret Harte, if not with the Lowell of the Bigelow Papers; Castilian Days (1871), recording his observations in Spain; and a volume of Poems (1890); with John G.

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  • Lowell, Governments and Parties in Continental Europe (Boston, 1896).

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  • During the presidential campaign he made speeches in Illinois, and in Massachusetts he spoke before the Whig State Convention at Worcester on the 12th of September, and in the next ten days at Lowell, Dedham, Roxbury, Chelsea, Cambridge and Boston.

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  • Lowell, Governments and Parties in Continental Europe (1896).

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  • JOHN LOWELL (1743-1802), American jurist, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on the 17th of June 1743, and was a son of the Reverend John Lowell, the first pastor of Newburyport, and a descendant of Perceval Lowle or Lowell (1571-1665), who emigrated from Somersetshire to Massachusetts Bay in 1639 and was the founder of the family in New England.

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  • John Lowell graduated at Harvard in 1760, was admitted to the bar in 1763, represented Newburyport (1776) and Boston (1778) in the Massachusetts Assembly, was a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of1779-1780and, as a member of the committee appointed to draft a constitution, secured the insertion of the clause, "all men are born free and equal," which was interpreted by the supreme court of the state in 1783 as abolishing slavery in the state.

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  • His son, John Lowell (1769-1840), graduated at Harvard in 1786, was admitted to the bar in 1789 (like his father, before he was twenty years old), and retired from active practice in 1803.

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  • After the war Lowell abandoned politics, and won for himself the title of "the Columella of New England" by his interest in agriculture - he was for many years president of the Massachusetts Agricultural Society.

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  • Another son of the first John Lowell, Francis Cabot Lowell (1775-1817), the founder in the United States of cotton manufacturing, was born in Newburyport on the 7th of April 1775, graduated at Harvard in 1793, became a merchant in Boston, and, during the war of 1812, with his cousin (who was also his brother-in-law), Patrick Tracy Jackson, made use of the knowledge of cotton-spinning gained by Lowell in England (whither he had gone for his health in 1810) and devised a power loom.

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  • Lowell worked hard to secure a protective tariff on cotton goods.

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  • The city of Lowell, Massachusetts, was named in his honour.

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  • Charles Lowell (1782-1861), brother of the last named, was born in Boston, graduated at Harvard in 1800, studied law and then theology, and after two years in Edinburgh and one year on the Continent was from 1806 until his death pastor of the West Congregational (Unitarian) Church of Boston, a charge in which Cyrus A.

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  • Charles Lowell had a rare sweetness and charm, which reappeared in his youngest son, James Russell Lowell.

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  • Francis Cabot Lowell's son, John Lowell (1799-1836), was born in Boston, travelled in India and the East Indies on business in 1816 and 1817, in 1832 set out on a trip around the world, and on the 4th of March 1836 died in Bombay.

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  • By a will made, said Edward Everett, "on the top of a palace of the Pharaohs," he left $237,000 to establish what is now known as the Lowell Institute.

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  • See the first lecture delivered before the Institute, Edward Everett's A Memoir of Mr John Lowell, Jr. (Boston, 1840).

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  • A grandson of Francis Cabot Lowell, EDWARD JACKSON

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  • Lowell >>

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  • She was a poet of delicate power, but also possessed a lofty enthusiasm, a high conception of purity and justice, and a practical temper which led her to concern herself 1 See under Lowell, John.

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  • Lowell was already looked upon by his companions as a man marked by wit and poetic sentiment; Miss White was admired for her beauty, her character and her intellectual gifts, and the two became thus the hero and heroine among a group of ardent young men and women.

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  • The first-fruits of this passion was a volume of poems, published in 1841, entitled A Year's Life, which was inscribed by Lowell in a veiled dedication to his future wife, and was a record of his new emotions with a backward glance at the preceding period of depression and irresolution.

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  • The betrothal, moreover, stimulated Lowell to new efforts towards self-support, and though nominally maintaining his law office, he threw his energy into the establishment, in company with a friend, Robert Carter, of a literary journal, to which the young men gave the name of The Pioneer.

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  • Lowell himself had already turned his studies in dramatic and early poetic literature to account in another magazine, and continued the series in The Pioneer, besides contributing poems; but after the issue of three monthly numbers, beginning in January 1843, the magazine came to an end, partly because of a sudden disaster which befell Lowell's eyes, partly through the inexperience of the conductors and unfortunate business connexions.

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  • The venture confirmed Lowell in his bent towards literature.

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  • The dialogue form was used merely to secure an undress manner of approach to his subject; there was no attempt at the dramatic. The book reflects curiously Lowell's mind at this time, for the conversations relate only partly to the poets and dramatists of the.

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  • Just as this book appeared Lowell and Miss White were married, and spent the winter and early spring of 1845 in Philadelphia.

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  • Here, besides continuing his literary contributions to magazines, Lowell had a regular engagement as an editorial writer on The Pennsylvania Freeman, a fortnightly journal devoted to the Anti-Slavery cause.

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  • Lowell's mother meanwhile was living, sometimes at home, sometimes at a neighbouring hospital, with clouded mind, and his wife was in frail health.

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  • These troubles and a narrow income conspired to make Lowell almost a recluse in these days, but from the retirement of Elmwood he sent forth writings which show how large an interest he took in affairs.

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  • Lowell had acquired a reputation among men of letters and a cultivated class of readers, but this satire at once brought him a wider fame.

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  • Lowell himself discovered what he had done at the same time that the public did, and he followed the poem with eight others either in the Courier or the Anti-Slavery Standard.

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  • The death of Lowell's mother, and the fragility of his wife's health, led Lowell, with his wife, their daughter Mabel and their infant son Walter, to go to Europe in 1851, and they went direct to Italy.

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  • The early months of their stay were saddened by the death of Walter in Rome, and by the news of the illness of Lowell's father, who had a slight shock of paralysis.

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  • They returned in November 1852, and Lowell published some recollections of his journey in the magazines, collecting the sketches later in a prose volume, Fireside Travels.

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  • At the invitation of his cousin, he delivered a course of lectures on English poets before the Lowell Institute in Boston in the winter of 1855.

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  • Lowell accepted the appointment, with the proviso that he should have a year of study abroad.

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  • In the autumn of 1857 The Atlantic Monthly was established, and Lowell was its first editor.

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  • In 1877 Lowell, who had mingled so little in party politics that the sole public office he had held was the nominal one of elector in the Presidential election of 1876, was appointed by President Hayes minister resident at the court of Spain.

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  • The spontaneity of Lowell's nature is delightfully disclosed in his personal letters.

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  • The Works of James Russell Lowell, in ten volumes (Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1890); edition de luxe, 61 vols.

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  • Letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eliot Norton, in two volumes (New York, Harper & Brothers, 1899); Life of James Russell Lowell (2 vols.), by Horace E.

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  • Scudder (Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1901); James Russell Lowell and his Friends (Boston, 1899), by Edward Everett Hale.

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  • John Lowell >>

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  • Jametel, "La Koree: ses ressources, son avenir commercial," L'Economiste francaise (Paris, July 1881); Percival Lowell, Choson: The Land of the Morning Calm (London, Boston, 1886); L.

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  • LOWELL, a city and one of the county-seats (Cambridge being the other) of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated in the N.E.

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  • Lowell is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • The area of Lowell is 14.1 sq.

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  • Whitney (both of Lowell), whose regiment was mobbed in Baltimore on the 19th of April 1861 while marching to Washington; and a bronze figure of Victory (after one by Rauch in the Valhalla at Ratisbon), commemorating the Northern triumph in the Civil War.

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  • The Lowell textile school, opened in 1897, offers courses in cotton manufacturing, wool manufacturing, designing, chemistry and dyeing, and textile engineering; evening drawing schools and manual training in the public schools have contributed to the high degree of technical perfection in the factories.

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  • In factory output ($46,879,212 in 1905; $41,202,984 in 1900) Lowell ranked fifth in value in 1905 and fourth in 1900 among the cities of Massachusetts; more than three-tenths of the total population are factory wage-earners, and nearly 19% of the population are in the cotton mills.

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  • Formerly Lowell was called the " Spindle City " and the " Manchester of America," but it was long ago surpassed in the manufacture of textiles by Fall River and New Bedford: in 1905 the value of the cotton product of Lowell, $19,340,925, was less than 60% of the value of cotton goods made at Fall River.

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  • Woollen goods made in Lowell in 1905 were valued at $2,579,363; hosiery and knitted goods, at $3,816,964; worsted goods, at $1,978,552.

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  • Lowell was the home of the inventor of rubber heels, Humphrey O'Sullivan.

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  • The founders of Lowell were Patrick Tracy Jackson (1780-1847), Nathan Appleton (1779-1861), Paul Moody (1779-1831) and the business manager chosen by them, Kirk Boott (1790-1837).

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  • The opportunity for developing water-power by the purchase of the canal around Pawtucket Falls (chartered for navigation in 1792) led them to choose the adjacent village of East Chelmsford as the site of their projected cotton mills; they bought the Pawtucket canal, and incorporated in 1822 the Merrimack Manufacturing Company; in 1823 the first cloth was actually made, and in 1826 a separate township was formed from part of Chelmsford and was named in honour of Francis Cabot Lowell, who with Jackson had improved Cartwright's power loom, and had planned the mills at Waltham.

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  • In 1836 Lowell was chartered as a city.

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  • Lowell annexed parts of Tewksbury in 1834, 1874, 1888 and 1906, and parts of Dracut in 1851, 1874 and 1879.

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  • The " corporation," as the employers were called, provided from the first for the welfare of their employees, and Lowell has always been notably free from labour disturbances.

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  • The character of the early employees of the mills, later largely displaced by French Canadians and Irish, and by immigrants from various parts of Europe, is clearly seen in the periodical, The Lowell Offering, written and published by them in 1840-1845.

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  • Harriet Hanson wrote Early Factory Labor in New England (1883) and Loom and Spindle (1898), an important contribution to the industrial and social history of Lowell.

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  • Lucy Larcom,' born in Beverly, came to Lowell in 1835, where her widowed mother kept a " corporation " boarding-house, and where she became a " doffer," changing bobbins in the mills.

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  • She wrote much, especially for the Offering; became an ardent abolitionist and (in 1843) the friend of Whittier; left Lowell in 1846, and taught for several years, first in Illinois, and then in Beverly and Norton, Massachusetts.

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  • Butler was from boyhood a resident of Lowell, where he began to practise law in 1841.

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  • (Boston, 1880); Illustrated History of Lowell, Massachusetts (Lowell, 1897); the books of Harriet H.

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  • Lowell Institute >>

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  • He delivered the South African lectures in 1908, the Lowell lectures in 1909, and in 1911 was Chichele lecturer in modern history.

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  • It is traversed by the Boston & Maine railroad and by the Lowell & Boston electric railway.

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  • Dwight were the chief writers, and to which James Russell Lowell, J.

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  • Those of Greek nationality have churches in New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Boston, Lowell (Massachusetts) and other places.

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  • He delivered a course of six Lowell lectures in Boston, and visited New York, New Haven, Baltimore, &c., spending the winter at Washington.

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  • C. Lowell constructed in 1814 at Waltham the first successful power-loom in America, was engaged in the manufacture of cotton goods in Amesbury.

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  • He graduated at Waterville (now Colby) College in 1838, was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1840, began practice at Lowell, Massachusetts, and early attained distinction as a lawyer, particularly in criminal cases.

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  • Entering politics as a Democrat, he first attracted general attention by his violent campaign in Lowell in advocacy of the passage of a law establishing a ten-hour day for labourers; he was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1853, and of the state senate in 1859, and was a delegate to the Democratic national conventions from 1848 to 1860.

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  • In 1847, 1848, 1849 and 1853 he delivered five courses of lectures on the Lowell Institute foundation.

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  • James Russell Lowell said, "To him more than to all other causes did the young martyrs of our Civil War owe the sustaining strength of thoughtful heroism that is so touching in every record of their lives."

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  • Critical estimates are also to be found in Matthew Arnold's Discourses in America, John Morley's Critical Miscellanies, Henry James's Partial Portraits, Lowell's My Study Windows, Birrell's Obiter Dicta (2nd series), Stedman's Poets of America, Whipple's American Literature, &c. There is a Bibliography of Ralph Waldo Emerson, by G.

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  • Nathan Appleton, one of the founders of Lowell, and a sister of Thomas G.

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  • Of the lectures on Dante which he delivered about this time, James Russell Lowell says: "These lectures, illustrated by admirable translations, are remembered with grateful pleasure by many who were thus led to learn the full significance of the great Christian poet."

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  • Lowell, Louis Agassiz, G.

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  • Meanwhile he did much editing and compiling, and produced, among other works in prose, The Stranger in Lowell (1845), Supernaturalism in New England (1847), Leaves from Margaret Smith's Journal (1849), a pleasing treatment in old-style English of an early Colonial theme.

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  • Elbridge Gerry lived and James Russell Lowell was born, lived and died in "Elmwood" (built in 1767); Oliver Wendell Holmes was born in Cambridge also; John Fiske, the historian, lived here; and there are many other literary associations, attractive and important for those interested in American letters.

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  • As a satirist and observer he is simply the "Cooper who 's written six volumes to prove he's as good as a Lord" of Lowell's clever portrait; his enormous vanity and his irritability find vent in a sort of dull violence, which is exceedingly tiresome.

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  • Lowell, Fable for Critics; M.

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  • Furber he edited Hymns and Choirs (1860), and with Professor Park and Lowell Mason The Sabbath Hymn Book (1859).

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  • Other schools in Springfield are: the training school of the International Young Men's Christian Association (1885); the American International College, established in Lowell (1885) as the French-American College for the education of French-Canadians, and now working among various immigrant races; and the MacDuffie school (1890) and the Elms (1866), both schools for girls.

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  • CHARLES RUSSELL LOWELL (1835-1864), American soldier, was born on the and of January 1835 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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  • His mother, Anna Cabot Jackson Lowell (1819-1874), a daughter of Patrick Tracy Jackson, married Charles Russell Lowell, a brother of James Russell Lowell; she wrote verse and books on education.

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  • Lowell married in October 1863, Josephine Shaw (1843-1905), a sister of Colonel R.

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  • Emerson (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Russell Lowell (Boston, 1907).

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  • James Russell Lowell >>

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  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.

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  • Lowell, Impressions of Spain (London, 1900, written 1877f 880 when Lowell was American minister to the court of Spain); P.Gotor de Burbhguena, Nuestras cosiumbres (Madrid, 1900);

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  • Among his numerous books are Outdoor Papers (1863); Malbone: an Oldport Romance (1869); Life of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (in "American Men of Letters" series, 1884); A Larger History of the United States of America to the Close of President Jackson's Administration (1885); The Monarch of Dreams (1886); Travellers and Outlaws (1889); The Afternoon Landscape (1889), poems and translations; Life of Francis Higginson (in "Makers of America," 1891); Concerning All of Us (1 g 92); The Procession of the Flowers and Kindred Papers (1897); Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (in "American Men of Letters" series, 1902); John Greenleaf Whittier (in "English Men of Letters" series, 1902); A Reader's History of American Literature (1903), the Lowell Institute lectures for 1903, edited by Henry W.

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  • First in order of date among the current monthly magazines comes the New York Harper's New Monthly Magazine (I 850),the earliest existing illustrated American serial, then the Boston Atlantic Monthly (1857), with which was incorporated the Galaxy (1866) in 1878, famous for its editors Lowell, Howells and T.

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  • In poetry, a pioneer of the modern spirit in American verse was Richard Henry Dana; and later came Bryant, Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell and Holmes.

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  • JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL (1819-1891), American author and diplomatist, was born at Elmwood, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 22nd of February 1819, the son of Charles Lowell (1.782-1861)J On his mother's side he was descended from the Spences and Traills, who made their home in the Orkney Islands, his great-grandfather, Robert Traill, returning to England on the breaking out of hostilities in 1775.

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  • It was to open the way to new ideals in literature and art, and the writers to whom Lowell turned for assistance - Hawthorne, Emerson, Whittier, Poe, Story and Parsons, none of them yet possessed of a wide reputation - indicate the acumen of the editor.

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  • It was a period with him of great mental activity, and is represented by four of his books which stand as admirable witnesses to the Lowell of 1848, namely, the second series of Poems, containing among others "Columbus," "An Indian Summer Reverie," "To the Dandelion," "The Changeling"; A Fable for Critics, in which, after the manner of Leigh Hunt's The Feast of the Poets, he characterizes in witty verse and with good-natured satire American contemporary writers, and in which, the publication being anonymous, he included himself; The Vision of Sir Launfal, a romantic story suggested by the Arthurian legends - one of his most popular poems; and finally The Biglow Papers.

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  • The ubiquitous and popular interior designer Christopher Lowell design talents extend to the Christopher Lowell bedding line.

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  • Past host of the Emmy award winning show, The Christopher Lowell Show, Lowell bedding is rich in color and texture.

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  • Christopher Lowell, known for his brand phrase, "You can do it", designed a bedding collection to inspire a legion of old and new fans to do just that.

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  • Lowell's, who developed the Seven Layers of Design concept, has a sumptuous collection.

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  • Lowell took his basic collection of bedding and linens one step further when he partnered with Smith + Noble, America's leading resource for window treatments®.

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  • Lowell actually began marketing his bedding collection in 2007 with a stint in February and March of that year where he introduced his bedding collections.

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  • Going back even further, the Christopher Lowell Collection started to make inroads in 2003 with store such as the Burlington Coat Factory.

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  • Christopher Lowell bedding is a part of the designer's constant growth and evolution to making quality and style within the reach of most people.

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  • You can find Christopher Lowell fabric and window hardware at Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft stores nationwide!

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  • University of Massachusetts Lowell offers a certificate program in security management and homeland security.

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  • You can enroll at one of the five campuses (Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth, Lowell, and Medical), depending on which degree or certificate you wish to seek.

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  • Lowell, M.D., Ph.D., is the attending physician who made this procedure possible.

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  • The end of the season bid a final farewell to series original Dell (Chris Lowell) who died as a result of a car accident.

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  • Dell Parker (Chris Lowell) is the receptionist for the practice.

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