Louvain sentence example

louvain
  • At Leiden, Utrecht, Groningen, Franeker, Breda, Nimeguen, Harderwyk, Duisburg and Herborn, and at the Catholic university of Louvain, Cartesianism was warmly expounded and defended in seats of learning, of which many are now left desolate, and by adherents whose writings have for the most part long lost interest for any but the antiquary.

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  • Up to the year 1650, or thereabouts, the Canon was still used as a text-book in the universities of Louvain and Montpellier.

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  • A few weeks later his eldest son, Philip William, count of Buren, a student at the university of Louvain, was kidnapped and carried off to Madrid.

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  • He studied philosophy and medicine at the university of Louvain, where he remained as a lecturer for several years.

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  • His first important post was as procurator for the province of Austria, 1847; next year he became rector of the Jesuit college at Louvain, and, after serving as secretary to the provincials of Belgium and Austria, was elected head of the order in 1853.

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  • On the completion of his studies in law at Padua and in divinity at Louvain, Antoine held a canonry at Besancon, but he was promoted to the bishopric of Arras when barely twenty-three (1J40).

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  • In 1424 he went to the university of Paris, where he became a master of arts in 1429, and afterwards studied law at Louvain and Pavia.

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  • But since he states that he was so young a child in 1430 that he could not recollect the details of events in that year, and since he was " colier" at Louvain in 1430, his birth may probably be placed nearer 1415 than 1405.

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  • During his three years' residence at the Belgian capital he found ample scope for his gifts as a diplomatist in the education controversy then raging, and as mediator between the Jesuits and the Catholic university of Louvain.

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  • After the death of his first wife, Matilda (1080-1118), he took to wife Adelaide, daughter of Godfrey, count of Louvain (1121), in the hope of male issue.

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  • Three anonymous Latin lives were published by Colgan in his Trias Thaumaturga (Louvain, 1645), and there exists an 1 ith-century Irish life in three parts published by Whitley Stokes for the Rolls series (1887).

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  • The attempt of the king to enforce the official use of the Dutch language, and the foundation of the so-called philosophical college at Louvain helped to exacerbate the growing discontent.

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  • They have been edited by Beelen, Louvain, 1856.

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  • Ile obtained his early education in Aberdeenshire, and at ten entered Pembroke Hall, Cambridge; after a short while he went to Paris, and, driven thence by the plague, to Louvain, whence by order of the pope he was transferred with several other Scottish students to the papal seminary at Rome.

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  • Local tradition attributes the establishment of a permanent camp at this spot to Julius Caesar, but Louvain only became important in the nth century as a place of residence for the dukes of Brabant.

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  • In 1356 Louvain was the scene of the famous Joyeuse Entree of Wenceslas which represented the principal charter of Brabant.

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  • The old walls of Louvain were 42 m.

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  • With this civil strife the importance and prosperity of Louvain declined.

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  • Many weavers fled to Holland and England, the duke took up his residence in the strong castle of Vilvorde, and Brussels prospered at the expense of Louvain.

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  • The most remarkable building in Louvain is the Hotel de Ville, one of the richest and most ornate examples of pointed Gothic in the country.

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  • There are four other interesting churches in Louvain, viz.

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  • Some ruins on a hill exist of the old castle of the counts of Louvain whose title was merged in the higher style of the dukes of Brabant.

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  • In 1565, like many other English exiles, he made his headquarters at Louvain, and after a visit to the Imperial Diet at Augsburg in 1566, in attendance upon Commendone, who had been largely instrumental in the reconciliation of England with Rome in Mary's reign, he threw himself into the literary controversy between Bishop Jewel (q.v.) and Harding.

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  • His pupil, Rainer Gemma-Frisius, used it for the observation of the solar eclipse of January 1544 at Louvain, and fully described the methods he adopted for making measurements and drawings of the eclipsed sun, in his De Radio Astronomico et Geometrico (1545).

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  • Soon after his resignation he went to London, and thence in June to Louvain, where he entered the Roman Catholic Church and spent some time in the company of Father William Good, a Jesuit.

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  • The Revue catholique, the organ of the professors of the university of Louvain, began in 1846 a controversy with the Journal historique et litteraire of Kersten (1834) upon the origin of human knowledge, which lasted for many years and excited great attention.

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  • The town hall, which took ten years to build (1525-1535), has after that of Louvain the most elaborately decorated facade in Belgium.

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  • In 1602 he entered the university of Louvain, then in the throes of a violent conflict between the Jesuit, or scholastic, party and the followers of Michael Baius, who swore by St Augustine.

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  • In 1616 he returned to Louvain, to take charge of the college of St Pulcheria, a hostel for Dutch students of theology.

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  • However, he took an active part in the university's resistance to the Jesuits; for these had established a theological school of their own in Louvain, which was proving a formidable rival to the official faculty of divinity.

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  • This became the great object of his lectures, when he was appointed regius professor of scriptural interpretation at Louvain in 1630.

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  • Preparing it had been his chief occupation ever since he went back to Louvain.

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  • He studied at Paris from 1509 to 1512, and in 1519 was appointed professor of humanities at Louvain.

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  • The curious oak pulpit representing Adam and Eve expelled from the Garden of Eden came originally from the Jesuit church at Louvain, and is considered the masterpiece of Verbruggen.

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  • He left the monastery for Louvain University.

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  • From 1502 to 1504 he was at Louvain, still declining to teach publicly; among his friends being the future Pope Adrian VI.

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  • But with these exceptions he remained in proximity to the court, living much at Louvain, where he took great interest in the foundation of Hieronymus Busleiden's Collegium Trilingue.

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  • As a subject of the emperor, and attached to his court by a pension, it would have been convenient to him to have fixed his residence in Louvain.

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  • In October 1511 he was teaching Greek to a little band of students in Cambridge; at Basel in 1516 he produced his edition of the Greek Testament, the first that was actually published; and during the next few years he was helping to organize the college lately founded at Louvain for the study of Greek and Hebrew, as well as Latin.

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  • It lies about half-way between Hasselt and Louvain, and is still one of the five fortified places in Belgium.

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  • He was educated at Louvain, and returning to Ireland became a priest at Wexford, and before 1646 was appointed bishop of Ferns.

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  • The most important of his other pamphlets is the "Narrative of the Earl of Clarendon's Settlement and Sale of Ireland" (Louvain, 1668).

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  • He went first to the university of Louvain, where he resided about two years, and then to the college of Rheims, where he had extraordinary success in his public lectures on Euclid's Elements.

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  • Lucubrationes were partially collected at Basel 1563 and in 1566 (omnia opera) at Louvain; a fuller edition drawn chiefly from these two appeared at Frankfort and Leipzig in 1689.

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  • Having made peace with the Moravians, he gained a great and splendid victory over the Northmen near Louvain in October 891, and in spite of some opposition succeeded in establishing his illegitimate son, Zwentibold, as king of the district afterwards called Lorraine.

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  • Strangely enough, this liberty meant increase of power for the Clericals; for besides putting an end to stringent state interference in the education of future priests, it made possible a free and far-reaching Catholic school system whose crown was the episcopally controlled university of Louvain (1834).

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  • Educated at Louvain University, he studied'philosophy and theology with distinguished success, and was rewarded by a series of academic appointments.

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  • At Louvain, however, he obtained a great name as a leader in the anti-scholastic reaction of the 16th century.

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  • Baius, however, was not disturbed in the tenure of his professorship, and even became chancellor of Louvain in 1575.

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  • In 1630 a professor of Louvain, Erycius Puteanus (van Putte), published a treatise, De Begginarum apud Belgas instituto et nomine suiragium, in which he produced three documents purporting to date from the i ith and 12th centuries, which seemed conclusively to prove that the Beguines existed long before Lambert le Begue.

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  • The first records are of communities at Louvain in 1220 and at Antwerp in 1228.

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  • These, in their order of interest, are Bruges, Antwerp, Louvain, Brussels, Ghent, Ypres, Courtrai, Tournai, Fumes, Oudenarde and Liege.

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  • Those at Ghent and Liege are state universities; the two others at Brussels and Louvain are free.

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  • At Louvain alone is there a faculty of theology.

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  • The number of students inscribed for the academical year 1904-1905 at each university was Ghent 899, Liege 1983, Brussels 1082, and Louvain 2134, or a grand total of 6098.

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  • The chief prisons are at Louvain, Ghent and St Gilles (Brussels), and the last named serves as a house of detention.

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  • The establishment under the auspices of the king in 1825 of the Philosophical College at Louvain, and the requirement that every priest before ordination should spend two years in study there, gave great offence to the clerical party, and some of the bishops were prosecuted for the violence of their denunciations at this intrusion of the secular arm into the religious domain.

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  • On the 2nd of August the whole of the Dutch army had crossed the frontier; Leopold collected his forces, such as they were, near Louvain in order to cover his capital.

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  • Albert Nyssens, Catholic The Nys- deputy and professor of penal procedure and colnmercial law at the university of Louvain, and on the Y In 1889 King Leopold announced that he had by his will bequeathed the Congo state to Belgium, and in 1890 the Belgian government, in return for financial help, acquired the right of annexing the country under certain conditions.

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  • Albert Giraud (born at Louvain in 1860) was faithful to the Parnassian tradition in his Pierrot lunaire (1884), Pierrot narcisse (1891) and Hors du siècle (1886).

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  • The poems of Valere Gille (born at Brussels in 1867), whose Cithare was crowned by the French Academy in 1898, belong to the same group. Emile van Arenberghe (born at Louvain in 1854) is the author of some exquisite sonnets.

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  • The competitive system was developed considerably at Louvain, and in the 15th century the candidates for the mastership of arts were divided into three classes (rigorosi, honour-men; transibiles, pass-men; gratiosi, charity-passes), while a fourth, which was not published, contained the names of those who failed.

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  • Navarre, and studied law at Louvain, Cologne and Heidelberg, returning to Paris in 1573.

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  • Kildare, and studied at Louvain, where he joined the Franciscans and acquired Jansenist sympathies.

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  • He was asked to edit the Univers, and to take a chair in the university of Louvain, but he declined both appointments, and in 1838 set out for Rome, revolving a great scheme for christianizing France by restoring the old order of St Dominic. At Rome he donned the habit of the preaching friar and joined the monastery 'of Minerva.

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  • But the most effective protest against them was a movement which began when Michel de Bay, a professor at the Flemish university of Louvain, put forward certain theories on grace and free-will in the latter part of the 16th century.

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  • The word first occurs in Sir Thomas More's Utopia, which was originally published in Latin under the title De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, deque Nova Insula Utopia (Louvain, 1516).

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  • He induced the universities of Cologne and Louvain to condemn the reformer's writings, but failed to enlist the German princes, and in January 1520 went to Rome to obtain strict regulations against those whom he called "Lutherans."

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  • Baguet's Chrysippus (Louvain, 1822) is unfortunately very incomplete.

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  • At Louvain he pursued philosophy, theology and canon law, becoming a doctor of theology (1491), dean of St Peter's and vice-chancellor of the university.

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  • In 1569 he was sent by the general of his order to Louvain, and in 1570, after being ordained priest, began to lecture on theology at the university.

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  • The main source for the life of Bellarmine is his Latin Autobiography (Rome, 1675; Louvain, 1753), which was reprinted with original text and German translation in the work of Dollinger and Reusch entitled Die Selbstbiographie des Cardinals Bellarmin (Bonn, 1887).

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  • Deschamps (professor de droit des gens at Louvain University) (Paris, 1903), are treatises covering all branches of the state's activity, from the standpoint of admirers of the work of Leopold II., in Africa.

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  • The counts of Guelders and Louvain were among the prisoners that fell into the hands of Floris.

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  • Jean Pierre Minckelers, professor of natural philosophy in the university of Louvain, and later of chemistry and physics at Maestricht, made experiments on distilling gas from coal with the view of obtaining a permanent gas sufficiently light for filling balloons, and in 1785 experimentally lighted his lecture room with gas so obtained as a demonstration to his students, but no commercial application was made of the fact.

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  • John summoned the representatives of the cities of the duchy to Louvain to announce to them the marriage of his daughter and heiress Jeanne of Brabant to Wenceslaus duke of Luxemburg, and he offered them liberal concessions in order to secure their assent to the change of dynasty.

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  • Belonging thus to an old and distinguished Swabian family, he was born on the 10th of November 1547, and after studying at the universities of Ingolstadt, Perugia, Louvain and elsewhere began his ecclesiastical career at Augsburg.

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  • After studying law at Louvain, Bourges and Heidelberg, and travelling in France and Italy, Oldenbarneveldt settled down to practise in the law courts at the Hague.

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  • In Brabant - Antwerp, Louvain, Brussels, Malines(Mechlin)- and in the episcopal territory of Liege - Liege, Huy, Dinant - there was a feebler repetition of the Flemish conditions.

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  • Having given offence by his unorthodox views, he left Louvain, and took refuge in Leiden, where he appears to have been in the utmost distress.

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  • The collected edition of St Columban's writings was published by Patrick Fleming in his Collectanea sacra Hiberni (Louvain, 1667), and reproduced by Migne, p. 4, vol.

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  • In June 1538 he writes from Louvain (enrolled there as a university student on the, 4th of December 1537 as Michael Villanova) to his father (then resident at San Gil), explains his removal from Paris, early in September, in consequence of the death (8th August) of his master (el senor mi maestro), says he is studying theology and Hebrew, and proposes to return to Paris when peace is proclaimed.

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  • But the bigotry of the Flemish clergy, and the monkish atmosphere of the university of Louvain, overrun with Dominicans and Franciscans, united for once in their enmity to the new classical learning, inclined Erasmus to seek a more congenial home in Basel.

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  • Albert Giraud (born at Louvain in 1860) was faithful to the Parnassian tradition in his Pierrot lunaire (1884), Pierrot narcisse (1891) and Hors du siècle (1886).

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  • The council of Trent in its fourth session, 8th April 1546, forbade the sale or possession of any anonymous religious book which had not previously been seen and approved by the ordinary; in the same year the university of Louvain, at the command of Charles V., prepared an "Index" of pernicious and forbidden books, a second edition of which appeared in 1S50.

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  • In 1640 a much more elaborate statement of the same ideas appeared in a posthumous treatise on the theology of St Augustine from the pen of Cornelius Jansen, also a Louvain professor (see JAN- ' 'Senism).

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  • On Mary's accession he went abroad to pursue his theological investigations at Louvain, Antwerp and Paris; and from a letter of his own, dated Louvain, 1554, we get a glimpse of the quiet student rejoicing in an "excellent library belonging to a monastery of Minorites."

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