How to use Lord-of-the-manor in a sentence

lord-of-the-manor
  • The name of Bloomsbury is commonly derived from William Blemund, a lord of the manor in the 15th century.

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  • The lord of the manor with his officials and retainers, the peasantry bound to him by ties of personal dependence and mutual rights and obligations, constituted a little world, in which we can watch the play of motives and passions not so dissimilar as we are sometimes led to believe from those of the great modern world.

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  • In 1607 David Waterhouse, lord of the manor of Halifax, obtained a grant of two markets there every week on Friday and Saturday and two fairs every year, each lasting three days, one beginning on the 24th of June, the other on the 11th of November.

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  • Later these fairs and markets were confirmed with the addition of an extra market on Thursday to Sir William Ayloffe, baronet, who had succeeded David Waterhouse as lord of the manor.

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  • Formerly, when floods resulted from this obstruction, the townsfolk of Helston acquired the right of clearing a passage through it by presenting leathern purses containing three halfpence to the lord of the manor.

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  • Wynne, the lord of the manor at that date, was nominated by each of them alternately.

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  • The castle, founded by the Breton Juhel, lord of the manor after the Conquest, was already dismantled under Henry VIII.; but its ivy-clad keep and upper walls remain.

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  • A Saturday market and an annual fair were granted to the lord of the manor by Henry III.

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  • The control of the harbour, piers, pleasure grounds, &c., was acquired from the lord of the manor by the local board in 1886.

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  • The market rights were held by the lord of the manor until 1819, when Earl Powis sold them to the corporation.

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  • It was governed by a portreeve and bailiff, elected annually at the court leet held by the lord of the manor.

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  • Finally, it was acquired in moieties by the Clinton family, and the present Lord Clinton is joint lord of the manor with Sir Robert Jardine.

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  • After the Dissolu tion the market was granted with the manor to John, earl of Bedford, and still belongs to the lord of the manor.

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  • In 14th-century documents it is described as a town or borough governed by a portreeve, who frequently came into conflict with the parson of St John's church, who had become lord of the manor of Yeovil during the reign of Henry III.

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  • The borough court was held by the lord of the manor.

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  • In 1871 its preservation as an open space was insured after several years' dispute, when the lord of the manor gave up his rights.

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  • It is in part laid out in the formal Dutch style, the work of John Aislabie, lord of the manor in the early part of the 18th century.

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  • The right of the burgesses to his election was, however, lost, and the mayor was always nominated by the lord of the manor.

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  • This arrangement lasted until 1565, when the burgesses put in a claim to their right of election, and it was decided that out of four burgesses nominated by the lord of the manor the jury of the court leet should select the mayor.

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  • Roger de Peppart, lord of the manor early in the 13th century, founded the present Protestant church and a house of Crutched Friars.

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  • Up to 1891 the lord of the manor held a court-leet and court-baron annually in November, but in that year Lord Lilford sold to the local board the market tolls, stallages and pickages, and since this sale the courts have lapsed.

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  • Before this date it was under the superintendence of a constable appointed by the steward of the lord of the manor.

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  • At the close of the 18th century the duke of Devonshire, lord of the manor (whose ancestor Sir Ralph de Gernons was lord of Bakewell in 1251), spent large sums of money on improvements in the town.

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  • The weekly market, now the property of the corporation, was granted to the abbot of St Edmunds as lord of the manor in 1227 together with a yearly fair on the vigil of the feast of St Philip and St James.

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  • It is still held by the lord of the manor.

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  • Newton Bushel was so called from Robert Bussell or Bushel, foster-child and kinsman of Theobald de Englishville, who was made lord of the manor by Henry III.

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  • The market rights were purchased by the town in 1880 from the trustees of Thomas Cradock, late lord of the manor.

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  • After several unsuccessful attempts to re-establish the gild merchant, the government in 1592 was vested in the bailiff of the lord of the manor.

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  • The lord of the manor still holds the ancient court-leet and court-baron halfyearly in May and November, in which cognizance is taken of breaches of agreement among the tenants, especially concerning the repair of roads and cultivation of lands.

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  • Thereafter the lord of the manor retained the advowson of the mother church, Lord Amherst of Hackney being patron in 1987.

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  • The Lord of the Manor also exercised jurisdiction over his tenants by a system of manorial courts.

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  • The lord of the manor holds a court leet half-yearly, in April and October, for the recovery of debts under 40s.

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  • The principal proprietor of the soil is Henry Curwen, Esq., the lord of the manor.

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  • Thus the Corporation became its own Lord of the Manor and the Ramsden connection with Huddersfield, was finally severed.

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  • It is now inhabited by six families of paupers (sic transit). The present lord of the manor is Henry Whorwood, esq.

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  • Jane Eyre was a proto-typical 'Gothic Romance', and the brooding lord of the manor was hiding a crazy wife; a fairly prosaic secret.

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