Longfellow sentence example

longfellow
  • The name is often in popular literature written Cambalu, and is by Longfellow accented in verse Cambeilic. But this spelling originates in an accidental error in Ramusio's Italian version, which was the chief channel through which Marco Polo's book was popularly known.

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  • Longfellow wrote "A Psalm of Life" (1839), which was an intimate confession of the religious aspirations of the author.

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  • The city's park system includes the Western Promenade, on Bramhall Hill; the Eastern Promenade, on Munjoy Hill; Fort Allen Park, at the south extremity of the latter promenade; Fort Sumner, another small park farther west, on the same hill; Lincoln Park, containing 2 acres of beautiful grounds near the centre of the city; Deering's Oaks (made famous by Longfellow), the principal park (50 acres) on the peninsula, with many fine old trees, pleasant drives, and an artificial pond used for boating; and Monument Square and Boothby Square.

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  • Longfellow by the same sculptor; and where Congress Street crosses the Eastern Promenade, a monument to the first settlers, George Cleeve and Richard Tucker.

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  • Longfellow - which was built in1785-1786by General Peleg Wadsworth (1748-1829), a soldier of the War of Independence, a representative in Congress from 1793 to 1807, and the grandfather of the poet; was given by Longfellow's sister, Mrs Anne Longfellow Pierce (1810-1901) to the Maine Historical Society; and contains interesting relics of the Wadsworth and Longfellow families, and especially of the poet himself.

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  • Schoolcraft in his Adgic Researches (1839), upon which Longfellow founded his "Hiawatha."

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  • Of the Eliot oaks, made famous by Longfellow's sonnet, one was cut down in 1842, the other still stands.

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  • This first formal appearance as a critic and historian of literature at once gave him a new standing in the community, and was the occasion of his election to the Smith Professorship of Modern Languages in Harvard College, then vacant by the retirement of Longfellow.

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  • She is the subject of a beautiful poem by Longfellow, "Santa Filomena," and the popular estimate of her character and mission was summed up in a particularly felicitous anagram, Flit on, cheering angel.

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  • His ancestor, William Longfellow, had immigrated to Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1676, from Yorkshire, England.

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  • His father was Stephen Longfellow, a lawyer and United States congressman, and his mother, Zilpha Wadsworth, a descendant of John Alden and of "Priscilla, the Puritan maiden."

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  • Longfellow's external life presents little that is of stirring interest.

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  • The effect of Longfellow's visit was twofold.

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  • In 1835 Longfellow was chosen to succeed George Ticknor as professor of modern languages and belles-lettres in Harvard.

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  • On his return to America in December 1836, Longfellow took up his residence in Cambridge, and began to lecture at Harvard and to write.

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  • Nevertheless it has a certain historical importance, for two reasons - (1) because it marks that period in Longfellow's career when, though he had left nature, he had not yet found art, and (2) because it opened the sluices through which the flood of German sentimental poetry flowed into the United States.

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  • In 1842 Longfellow published a small volume of Ballads and other Poems, containing some of his most popular pieces, e.g.

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  • Indeed, as a professor, Longfellow was eminently successful.

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  • In 1849 Longfellow published a novel of no great merit, Kavanagh, and also a volume of poems entitled The Seaside and the Fireside, a title which has reference to his two homes, the seaside one on the charming peninsula of Nahant, the fireside one in Cambridge.

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  • His brother, the Rev. Samuel Longfellow, was a minister of the Unitarian Church.

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  • Longfellow's genius, in its choice of subjects, always oscillated between America and Europe, between the colonial period of American history and the Middle and Romantic Ages of European feeling.

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  • Longfellow was made an LL.D.

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  • In person, Longfellow was rather below middle height, broad shouldered and well built.

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  • Charles Kingsley said of Longfellow's face that it was the most beautiful human face he had ever seen.

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  • In Longfellow, the poet was the flower and fruit of the man.

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  • The subjects of Longfellow's poetry are, for the most part, aspects of nature as influencing human feeling, either directly or through historical association, the tender or pathetic sides and incidents of life, or heroic deeds preserved in legend or history.

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  • This is not the highest praise that can be given to works of art; but it implies less dispraise in Longfellow's case than in almost any other, by reason of his noble subjectivity.

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  • If we look in Longfellow's poetry for originality of thought, profound psychological analysis or new insights into nature, we shall be disappointed.

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  • No man ever lived more completely in the light than Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

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  • Perhaps the most remarkable traits in Longfellow's character were his accessibility and his charity.

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  • Longfellow could never be brought to find fault with anybody or anything."

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  • Howells, My Literary Friends and Acquaintance (New York, 1900) which contains a valuable account of Longfellow's later life.

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  • In extended composition, as when he followed Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn with his own Tent on the Beach, he often failed to rival his graceful brother poet.

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  • His idyllic masterpiece is the sustained transcript of winter scenery and home-life, Snow-Bound, which has had no equal except Longfellow's " Evangeline " in American favour, but, in fact," nothing of its class since " The Cottar's Saturday Night " can justly be compared with it.

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  • Among the parks are Loring, near the centre of the city, in which is a statue of Ole Bull; Lyndale, in the south-west part of the city; Interlachen, just north-west of Lyndale; Glenwood, in the west of the city; Van Cleve, Logan, Windom and Columbia in the part of the city east of the Mississippi river; Riverside, on the south-west bank of the Mississippi; and Minnehaha Park, in which are the Minnehaha Falls, a beautiful cascade of the Minnehaha Creek (the outlet of Lake Minnetonka), near the Mississippi, with a fall of 50 ft., well known from Longfellow's poem " Hiawatha."

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  • His midnight ride from Charlestown to Lexington on the 18th-19th of April 1775, to give warning of the approach of British troops from Boston, is Revere's most famous exploit; it is commemorated by Longfellow, who, however, has "paid little attention to exactness of fact" (Justin Winsor).

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  • You know that poem of Longfellow's, sir, that sounds exactly like the first declension.

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  • The birthplace of Longfellow is now a tenement house at the corner of Fore and Hancock streets, near the Grand.

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  • Portland was the birthplace of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Thomas Brackett Reed, Edward Preble and his nephew George Henry Preble, Mrs Parton ("Fanny Fern"), Nathaniel Parker Willis, Seargent Smith Prentiss and Neal Dow, and it was the home of William Pitt Fessenden, Theophilus Parsons and Simon Greenleaf.

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  • In poetry, a pioneer of the modern spirit in American verse was Richard Henry Dana; and later came Bryant, Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell and Holmes.

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  • The "tranquil bay" is Casco Bay, one of the most beautiful in the world, studded with bold, green islands, well fitted to be the Hesperides of a poet's boyish dreams. At the age of fifteen Longfellow entered Bowdoin College at Brunswick, a town situated near the romantic falls of the Androscoggin river, about 25 m.

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  • The most prominent figure is that of the scholar and linguist Constantin Konaki (1777-1849), who might be termed the Rumanian Longfellow for the facility and felicity of his translations from Western poetry and for his short poems, easily set to music and very popular.

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  • He said, Henry Longfellow, you have done very well.

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  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.

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  • We missed the Cape Cod train Friday morning, and so we came down to Provincetown in the steamer Longfellow.

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  • The birthplace of Longfellow is now a tenement house.

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  • The "Luck of Eden Hall," which has been celebrated in a ballad by the duke of Wharton, and in a second ballad written by Uhland, the German poet, and translated by Longfellow, is an enamelled goblet, kept in a leathern case dating from the times of Henry IV.

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  • Longfellow (who married Nathan Appleton's daughter) wrote his poem "The Old Clock on the Stairs."

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  • Emerson, the poets Bryant, Longfellow, pre-eminently Whittier and Whitman, have spoken on this theme with no uncertain sound.

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  • There their descendants live to-day, still somewhat primitively, and still in somewhat of the glamour thrown over land and people by the Evangeline of Longfellow.

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