Lombok sentence example

lombok
  • Bali is separated from Lombok by a strait not more than 15 m.
    0
    0
  • Then, of forms which are but weakly represented, we have the otherwise abundant thrushes (Turdidae), and, above all, the woodpeckers (Picidae), of which only very few species, out of 400, just cross the boundary and occur in Lombok, Celebes or the Moluccas, but are unknown elsewhere in the region."
    0
    0
  • In 1882, for administrative purposes, Bali was separated from Java and combined with the island of Lombok to form the Dutch residency of Lombok and Bali.
    0
    0
  • Hinduism, which was once the religion of Java, but has been extinct there for four centuries, is still in vogue in the islands of Bali and Lombok, where the cruel custom of widow-burning (suttee) is still practised, and the Hindu system of the four castes, with a fifth or Pariah caste (called Chandala), adhered to.
    0
    0
  • It is most nearly akin to the Sasak language spoken in Lombok and on the east coast of Bali.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the islands of Bali and Lombok the people still profess a form of Hinduism, and Hindu remains are to be found in many other parts of the archipelago, though their traces do not extend to the peninsula.
    0
    0
  • The northern, as in Bali and Lombok, is of volcanic origin.
    0
    0
  • In the southern chain is found a limestone formation analogous to that in Bali, Lombok and Java.
    0
    0
  • A large expedition was sent to Lombok in 1894, and almost the whole of that island was incorporated in the Dutch dominions.
    0
    0
  • It is separated from Bali by the Strait of Lombok and from Sumbawa by the Strait of Alas.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Rising out of the sea with bold and often precipitous coasts, Lombok is traversed by two mountain chains.
    0
    0
  • The northern chain is of volcanic formation, and contains the peak of Lombok (ii,81o ft.), one of the highest volcanoes in the Malay Archipelago.
    0
    0
  • Forest-clad mountains and stretches of thorny jungle alternating with rich alluvial plains, cultivated like gardens under an ancient and elaborate system of irrigation, make the scenery of Lombok exceedingly attractive.
    0
    0
  • To the naturalist Lombok is of particular interest as the frontier island of the Australian region, with its cockatoos and megapods or moundbuilders, its peculiar bee-eaters and ground thrushes.
    0
    0
  • Thus ended the Balinese domination of Lombok, and the island was placed under direct Dutch-Indian control, an assistant resident being appointed at Ampanam.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lombok is now administered from Bali by the Dutch resident on that island.
    0
    0
  • Disturbances between the Sasaks and the Lombok Balinese frequently occur.
    0
    0
  • Lombok has been divided since 1898 into the West, Middle and East Lombok.
    0
    0
  • The famous "Wallace's Line" runs immediately west of Lombok, which therefore has an important part in the work.
    0
    0
  • Cool, With the Dutch in the East (Amsterdam and London, 1897), in Dutch and English, is a narrative of the events sketched above, and contains many particulars about the folklore and dual religions of Lombok, which, with Bali, forms the last stronghold of Hinduism east of Java.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Celebes, Banka and Billiton, with their adjacent islands - and the Little Sunda Islands, of which the more important are Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores, Sumba and Timor.
    0
    0
  • The Oriental Borneo and Bali are respectively divided from Celebes and Lombok by a narrow belt of sea known as "Wallace's Line," on the opposite sides of which the indigenous mammalia are as widely divergent as in any two parts of the world.
    0
    0
  • A theory, which seems to have some probability in its favour, is that these mines were worked by the Khmer people during the period of power, energy and prosperity which found its most lofty expression in the now ruined and deserted city of Angkor Thom; while another attributes these works to the natives of India whose Hindu remains are found in Java and elsewhere, whose influence was at one time widespread throughout Malayan lands, and of whose religious teaching remnants still linger in the superstitions of the Malays and are preserved in some purity in Lombok and Bali.
    0
    0