Lollardy sentence example

lollardy
  • A reaction against Lollardy, however, had already begun in the days of Henry IV., and both he and his son felt obliged to discountenance opinions which were believed to be politically and theologically dangerous.
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  • There was some heresy in England during the opening decades of the 6th century, survivals of the Lollardy which now and then brought a victim to the stake.
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  • An interval of peace occurred, among a series of border battles, and the heresy of Lollardy was attacked by the clergy; Resby, who had been a priest in England, was burned in 1407 at Perth.
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  • The embers of Lollardy, not extinguished by the new central fountain of learning, the university of St Andrews, smouldered in the west till the Reformation.
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  • It was not till the next reign, when the bishops succeeded in calling in the crown to their aid, and passed the statute De heretico comburendo, that Lollardy ceased to flourish.
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  • The sect spread in a few years to London, Oxford and other centres of intellectual life, but for many years its followers were not numerous; like the old Lollardy, Protestantism took root only in certain places and among certain classesnotably the lesser clergy and the merchants of the great towns.
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  • (4 you.); and again from 1413 the same is true (Gairdners Lollardy and the Reformation being the most elaborate monograph) until we come to Brewers Reign of henry VIII.
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  • Lollardy was most flourishing and most dangerous to the ecclesiastical organization of England during the ten years after Wycliffe's death.
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  • With these were associated more or less intimately, in the first age of Lollardy, John Parker, the strange ascetic William Smith, the restless fanatic Swynderly, Richard Waytstract and Crompe.
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  • The king, who had hitherto seemed anxious to repress the action of the clergy against the Lollards, spoke strongly against the petition and its promoters, and Lollardy never again had the power in England which it wielded up to this year.
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  • In the earlier stages of Lollardy, when the court and the clergy managed to bring Lollards before ecclesiastical tribunals backed by the civil power, the accused generally recanted and showed no disposition to endure martyrdom for their opinions.
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  • The archbishop, having the power of the throne behind him, attacked that stronghold of Lollardy the university of Oxford.
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  • Notwithstanding the repression, Lollardy fastened in new parts.
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  • From this time Lollardy appears.
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  • There was no more wayside preaching, but instead there were conventicula occulta in houses, in peasants' huts, in sawpits and in field ditches, where the Bible was read and exhortations were given, and so Lollardy continued..
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  • From England Lollardy passed into Scotland.
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  • When these points are compared with the Lollard Conclusions of 1395, it is plain that Lollardy had not greatly altered its opinions after fifty-five years of persecution.
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  • Lollardy, which continued down to the Reformation, did much to shape the movement in England.
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  • 30 the church may be gathered from the ballads preserved in the Political Poems and Songs relating to English History, published in 1859 by Thomas Wright for the Master of the Rolls series, and in the Piers Ploughman poems. Piers Ploughman's Creed (see Langland) was probably written about 1394, when Lollardy was at its greatest strength; the ploughman of the Creed is a man gifted with sense enough to see through the tricks of the friars, and with such religious knowledge as can be got from the creed, and from Wycliffe's version of the Gospels.
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