Loamy sentence example

loamy
  • The cedar flourishes best on sandy, loamy soils.
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  • They require a rich loamy soil, not too dry, and should be divided and transplanted into fresh soil annually or every second year, in the early autumn season.
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  • They are excellent for the rock garden and the margins of a loamy border.
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  • South of this belt the soils are generally sandy and are not very fertile except at altitudes of less than 50 ft., where they are loamy and of alluvial origin.
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  • The soil slightly varies, but in general it is found to be a dark loamy mold, with a stiff clayey subsoil.
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  • The grey and white poplars are usually multiplied by long cuttings; the growth is so rapid in a moist loamy soil that, according to Loudon, cuttings 9 ft.
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  • The eyes being selected from well-ripened shoots of the previous year are planted about the end of January, singly, in small pots of light loamy compost, and after standing in a warm place for a few days should be plunged in a propagating bed, having a bottom heat of 75°, which should be increased to 85° when they have produced several leaves, the atmosphere being kept at about the same temperature or higher by sun heat during the day, and at about 75° at night.
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  • When this amount of pressure is necessary, especially in the case of loamy composts, the soil itself should be rather inclined to dryness, and should in no case be sufficiently moist to knead together into a pasty mass.
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  • Pentstemons and phloxes, amongst others, succeed well in soil of this character, but the surface must be well drained; the former are rather apt to perish in winter in loamy soil, if at all close and heavy.
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  • Aralias prefer moist, loamy clay soil and semi shade condition.
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  • The bulbs should be planted from September to January, about 4 inches deep and 2 to 4 inches apart, in light loamy soil thoroughly drained, with a due south aspect.
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  • If small plants are procured, grow them on freely for a year or two in the greenhouse, and then plant out in April, spreading the roots a little and giving them a deep loamy soil.
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  • Both are suitable for warm spots in the rock garden in loamy soils, but C. sibirica, also a dwarf species with pink flowers, requires a damp peaty soil.
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  • Given suitable climatic conditions, they are not difficult to cultivate, for they thrive in well-drained, loamy soil, to which a little peat or leaf-mould has been added.
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  • All the kinds are of the easiest culture in moist, loamy soils, the best kinds being hardy (at least, at the root), and growing again if cut down by frost.
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  • These early-flowering kinds are of simple culture, and succeed best in well-drained raised beds of good loamy soil, in a sunny position.
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  • Evodia Hupehensis - Until quite recent years, Evodia was not represented in the outdoor garden, but there are now several kinds suitable for planting in sunny positions in well-drained loamy soil.
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  • Distinct and graceful; is of value for the garden, growing in free loamy soil, and may be given a place in the shrubbery or in the wild garden.
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  • A rich loamy soil and an open situation are best for it.
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  • This is a hardy, moisture-loving plant, and should be grown in rich and moderately stiff loamy soil, and beside a lake or pond where it will never lack moisture.
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  • A native of Buenos Ayres, it is somewhat tender, only succeeding in light warm soils in sheltered situations, and is best close to the foot of a south wall in warm loamy soil.
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  • For culture outdoors, choose a light loamy soil, thoroughly drained, and with a due south aspect; if backed by a wall or a greenhouse, so much the better.
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  • The border should be well drained and a bed of light, rich, loamy soil, about 1 foot in depth, placed upon the drainage.
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  • All of these thrive in borders of peaty soil, but they grow slowly on certain loamy soils, living perhaps, but never showing the freedom and grace which they do on peaty soils.
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  • All the L. elegans group are perfectly hardy; they grow vigorously in almost any soil, but prefer a deep loamy one with an admixture of peat.
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  • All the plants of the fulgens group show their great beauty only on peaty or deep leafy and moist soils; often on loamy soils the growth is short and weak, the flowers poor, and under such conditions they may not be worth growing.
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  • A rather deep, fairly moist soil of a loamy nature seems to suit it best, but it is not very particular as to soil: fine trees may be seen in old gardens.
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  • In good loamy soil there does not appear to be any reason to doubt that it will grow in almost any part of the country, for there is no question as to its hardiness.
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  • Light loamy soils in warm well-drained situations.
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  • Other kinds are-O. montana, foetida, strobilacea, campestris, and its several varieties; all of these are dwarf, and thrive in sandy loamy soil in open spots in the rock garden.
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  • It is one of the best plants for partial shade, and should have deep loamy soil.
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  • S. oppositifolia and its varieties succeed in deep, open, rich, loamy soil, and are finest in a fissure or on a ledge of the rock garden, where the roots can ramble backwards or down to any depth.
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  • They like a good loamy soil, well drained, but still moist, and are some of the most easily propagated of shrubs.
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  • A deep loamy soil, not too heavy, is the most suitable, but very satisfactory results may even be obtained by deep digging and liberal manuring in poor soils.
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  • Light loamy soil and a sunny sheltered spot are the best conditions.
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  • Japanese Anemones prefer an alkaline loamy soil, but they can be grown successfully even in clay.
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  • They prefer well-drained, loamy soil that is slightly alkaline, with a pH near 6.7.
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  • Hydrangeas do prefer a rich, loamy soil, so work in some good well rotted manure of compost into the soil before planting.
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  • Soil: Vegetables need a rich, loamy soil with a neutral to slightly alkaline pH.
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  • Stags' Leap Winery's grapes grow loamy clay with volcanic soil yielding powerful wines with sturdy tannins.
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  • The silver fir flourishes in a deep loamy soil, and will grow even upon stiff clay, when well drained - a situation in which few conifers will succeed.
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  • The eyes being selected from well-ripened shoots of the previous year are planted about the end of January, singly, in small pots of light loamy compost, and after standing in a warm place for a few days should be plunged in a propagating bed, having a bottom heat of 75°, which should be increased to 85° when they have produced several leaves, the atmosphere being kept at about the same temperature or higher by sun heat during the day, and at about 75° at night.
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  • For the successful raising of the finer sorts of willows good, well-drained, loamy upland soil is desirable, which before planting should be deeply trenched and cleared of weeds.
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  • The pyrethrum grows best in soil of a loamy texture; this should be well manured and deeply trenched up before planting, and should be mulched in the spring by a surface dressing of half-decayed manure.
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  • From a careful series of experiments made in the Horticultural Society's Garden at Chiswick, it was found that where the soil is loamy, or light and slightly enriched with decayed vegetable matter, the apple succeeds best on the doucin stock, and the pear on the quince; and where it is chalky it is preferable to graft the apple on the crab, and the pear on the wild pear.
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  • For the plum on loamy soils the plum, and on chalky and light soils the almond, are the most desirable stocks, and for the cherry on loamy or light rich soils the wild cherry, and on chalk the " mahaleb " stock.
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  • Loamy soils contain a considerable quantity (30-45%) of clay, and smaller quantities of lime, humus and sand.
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  • Manly soils are those which contain a considerable percentage (10-20) of lime, and are called clay marls, loamy marls and sandy marls, according as these several ingredients preponderate.
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  • The clay marls are, like clay soils, too stiff for garden purposes until well worked and heavily manured; but loamy marls are fertile and well suited to fruit trees, and sandy marls are adapted for producing early crops.
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  • It should be laid up in ridges of good loamy soil in alternate layers to form a compost, which becomes a valuable stimulant for any very choice subjects if cautiously used.
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  • In the second case all roots that have struck downwards into a cold uncongenial subsoil must be pruned off if they cannot be turned in a lateral direction, and all the lateral ones that have become coarse and fibreless must also be shortened back by means of a clean cut with a sharp knife, while a compost of rich loamy soil with a little bone-meal, and leaf-mould or old manure, should be filled into the trenches from which the old sterile soil has been taken.
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  • As a rule, all the fibrous-rooted herbaceous plants flourish in good soil which has been fairly enriched with manure, that of a loamy character being the most suitable.
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  • Beautiful tufted erect-stemmed plants preferring a strong rich loamy soil.
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  • They should be grown near water as they like much moisture, and a good loamy soil.
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  • Charming little tufted plants requiring good loamy soil, and sometimes included with Anemone.
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  • Bold-habited composite plants, well suited for shrubbery borders, and thriving in light loamy soil.
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  • Any good well-drained loamy soil is suitable for plums, that of medium quality as to lightness being decidedly preferable.
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  • The adjacent part of the maritime plain is composed of a rich, light brown loamy soil.
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  • Owing to the loamy nature of the soil, few minerals of any kind are found.
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  • It is a very rich loamy earth, possessing great fertility and an unusual power of retaining moisture, which makes artificial irrigation little needed.
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  • These young bulbs should be potted singly in February or March, in mellow loamy soil with a moderate quantity of sand, about two-thirds of the bulb being kept above the level of the soil,.
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